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1

Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms. Battelle ...

2

Fermentation method producing ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Dalal, Rajen (Chicago, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Process for producing ethanol from syngas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Carriera, Laura H. (Athens, GA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis...

7

Greenhouse gas emissions related to ethanol produced from corn  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report confers the details of a panel meeting discussion on greenhouse gases. The topic of this discussion was ethanol. Members discussed all aspects of growing corn and producing ethanol. Then the question was raised as to whether or not this is a suitable substitute to fossil fuel usage in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Marland, G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

11

Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc (MEPI) Place O'Neill, Nebraska Zip 68763 Product Focused on ethanol production. Coordinates 34.82186°, -97.513329° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.82186,"lon":-97.513329,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

13

Grain & Wood Based Technologies for Production of Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Outline Sources of Ethanol Grain Based Dry Mill Process Cellulosic Based Processes Costs Conclusions The Production of Ethanol Bioethanol ...

14

Ethanol producers respond to market conditions - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Corn oil recovery is one of several strategies that the ethanol industry is developing to improve ... such as wood waste or corn stover (e.g., leaves, stalks, ...

15

Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Northstar Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northstar Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Northstar Ethanol Place Lake Crystal, Minnesota Zip 56055 Product Corn-base bioethanol producer in Minnesotta References...

17

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus paecilomyces sp.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process in cludes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces, which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate.

Wu, Jung Fu (Lakewood, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus Paecilomyces sp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Wu, J.F.

1985-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Determining the Cost of Producing Ethanol from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mature corn-to-ethanol industry has many similarities to the emerging lignocellulose-to-ethanol industry. It is certainly possible that some of the early practitioners of this new technology will be the current corn ethanol producers. In order to begin to explore synergies between the two industries, a joint project between two agencies responsible for aiding these technologies in the Federal government was established. This joint project of the USDA-ARS and DOE/NREL looked at the two processes on a similar process design and engineering basis, and will eventually explore ways to combine them. This report describes the comparison of the processes, each producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol. This paper attempts to compare the two processes as mature technologies, which requires assuming that the technology improvements needed to make the lignocellulosic process commercializable are achieved, and enough plants have been built to make the design well-understood. Ass umptions about yield and design improvements possible from continued research were made for the emerging lignocellulose process. In order to compare the lignocellulose-to-ethanol process costs with the commercial corn-to-ethanol costs, it was assumed that the lignocellulose plant was an Nth generation plant, built after the industry had been sufficiently established to eliminate first-of-a-kind costs. This places the lignocellulose plant costs on a similar level with the current, established corn ethanol industry, whose costs are well known. The resulting costs of producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol from each process were determined. The figure below shows the production cost breakdown for each process. The largest cost contributor in the corn starch process is the feedstock; for the lignocellulosic process it is the capital cost, which is represented by depreciation cost on an annual basis.

McAloon, A.; Taylor, F.; Yee, W.; Ibsen, K.; Wooley, R.

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each source of biofuel · Potential for environmental impacts · Comparative results · Conclusions #12;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

22

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose The use of corn based ethanol as a supplement or replacement of motor fuel gasoline has many champions as well as detractors. In this presentation I attempt to separate hype from facts and wishful thinking from realistic forecasts. The production of corn based ethanol has physical limits based on land required to grow its primary input. It also has economic limits based on the cost of inputs relative to the cost of the fuel it replaces and the value of the environmental and other benefits its use may provide. By exploring these limits and the likely consequences of

23

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

24

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ethanol production using a soy hydrolysate-based medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method for the production of ethanol that utilizes a soy hydrolysate-based nutrient medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium nutrient medium in conjunction with ethanologenic bacteria and a fermentable sugar for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. The invention offers several advantages over presently available media for use in ethanol production, including consistent quality, lack of toxins and wide availability.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Southridge Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Southridge Ethanol Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75219 Sector Renewable Energy Product Southridge Ethanol is a renewable energy company interested in becoming one of the biggest producers of ethanol in the Southeast. References Southridge Ethanol[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Southridge Ethanol is a company located in Dallas, Texas . References ↑ "Southridge Ethanol" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Southridge_Ethanol&oldid=351577" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

27

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive The Ethanol Production Incentive provides qualified ethanol producers with quarterly payments based on production volume during times when ethanol

28

Badger State Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Badger State Ethanol LLC Place Monroe, Wisconsin Zip 53566 Product Dry-mill bioethanol producer References Badger State Ethanol LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

29

Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

Nguyen, Quang A

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

31

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report was peer reviewed by these contributors and their comments have been incorporated. Among key findings is that, for all cases examined on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol utilized as both E85 and E10 outperforms that of conventional (current) and of reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and greenhouse gas production. In many cases, the superiority of the energy and GHG result is quite pronounced (i.e., well outside the range of model "noise")

Michael Wang Christopher; Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Place Hastings, Nebraska Product Ethanol producer and supplier References Chief Ethanol Fuels...

33

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place Hudson, South Dakota Zip 57034 Product Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Montana-based ethanol producers are eligible for a tax incentive of $0.20 per gallon of ethanol produced solely from Montana agricultural products or

35

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM standard D4806. The total credit amount available for all corn and cellulosic ethanol producers is $5 million for each taxable year. Unused ethanol credits from one ethanol-based cap, such as corn, may be applied to another ethanol-based cap, such as cellulosic, in the same taxable year. Unused credits may not be carried forward. Kentucky statute information regarding alternative fuel producer tax credits can be found within KRS Chapters 141.422-141.430

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Tax Ethanol Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1.00 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM

37

Research Article Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2012 Cline Huynh-Delerme et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 035 mg/L) in nondrinker

Cline Huynh-delerme; Catherine Artigou; Laurent Bodin; Robert Tardif; Ginette Charest-tardif; Ccile Verdier; Nessryne Sater; Mostafa Ould-elhkim; Catherine Desmares

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Direct Conversion of Bio-ethanol to Isobutene on Nanosized ZnxZryOz Mixed Oxides with Balanced AcidBase Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-mass conversion has attracted increasing research interests to produce bio-fuels with bio-ethanol being a major product. Development of advanced processes to further upgrade bio-ethanol to other value added fuels or chemicals are pivotal to improving the economics of biomass conversion and deversifying the utilization of biomass resources. In this paper, for the first time, we report the direct conversion of bio-ethanol to isobutene with high yield (~83%) on a multifunctional ZnxZryOz mixed oxide with a dedicated balance of surface acid-base properties. This work illustrates the significance of rational design of a multifunctional mixed oxide catalyst for one step bio-ethanol conversion to a value-added intermediate, isobutene, for chemical and fuel production. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Sun, Junming; Zhu, Kake; Gao, Feng; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing U.S. dependence on imported oil; the contribution of fossil fuels to the greenhouse gas emissions and the climate change issue; the current level of energy prices and other environmental concerns have increased world interest in renewable energy sources. Biomass is a large, diverse, readily exploitable resource. This dissertation examines the biomass potential in Eastern Texas by examining a 44 county region. This examination considers the potential establishment of a 100-megawatt (MW) power plant and a 20 million gallon per year (MMGY) ethanol plant using lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass sources considered are switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, and logging residues. In the case of electricity generation, co-firing scenarios are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass to individually sustain either a 100% biomass fired power plant or the cellulosic ethanol plant. Such plants would only be feasible at the regional level. Co-firing biomass with coal, however, does provide a most attractive alternative for the study region. The results indicate further that basing the decision solely on economics of feedstock availability and costs would suggest that bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is not a viable energy alternative. Accounting for some environmental and social benefits accruing to the region from bioenergy production together with the feedstock economics, however, suggests that government subsidies, up to the amount of accruing benefits, could make the bioenergies an attractive business opportunity for local farmers and investors.

Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vehicle Technologies Office: DOE Brochure Highlights Ethanol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ethanol production beginning with fertilizer manufacture, GREET determined that producing ethanol from corn requires 0.74 million Btu fossil energy input per million Btu of ethanol...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Central Indiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Place Marion, Indiana Zip 46952 Product Ethanol producer developina a 151 mlpa plant in...

42

Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

Pienkos, P. T.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts Hua Song Lingzhi Zhang Umit S. Ozkan* November 6 th , 2007 Heterogeneous Catalysis Research Group Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 *Ozkan.1@osu.edu Biomass to Hydrogen (Environmentally Friendly) Plant cultivation Plant cultivation Saccharification Saccharification / / Fermentation Fermentation Anaerobic digestion Anaerobic digestion Residues of Residues of agroindustries agroindustries and cultivations and cultivations Municipal Solid Waste Municipal Solid Waste (organic fraction) (organic fraction) Distillation Distillation Reformation of ethanol

44

Ethanol production in non-recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-recombinant bacteria that produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product, associated nucleic acids and polypeptides, methods for producing ethanol using the bacteria, and kits are disclosed.

Kim, Youngnyun; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sunnyside Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sunnyside Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunnyside Ethanol Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip PA 15237 Product Pennsylvania based company created for the specific purpose...

46

Ethanol India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Ethanol India Place Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India Sector Biofuels Product Maharashtra-based biofuels consultancy firm. References Ethanol India1...

47

Agri Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC Jump to: navigation, search Name Agri-Ethanol Products LLC (AEPNC) Place Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27615 Product Ethanol producer and project...

48

Ace Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Ace Ethanol Place Stanley, Wisconsin Zip 54768 Product Producer of corn-based ethanol in Wisconsin. Coordinates 44.958844°, -90.937009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.958844,"lon":-90.937009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbialtechnologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of workstrategy for producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently

Fortman, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Production of ethanol from cellulose (sawdust).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of ethanol from food such as corn, cassava etc. is the most predominate way of producing ethanol. This has led to a shortage (more)

Otulugbu, Kingsley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol Place Central City, Nebraska Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol1 LinkedIn...

52

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Microcogeneration System Based on a Stirling Engine and Fuelled by Diesel and Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the performance of a residential microcogeneration system based on a Stirling engine and fuelled by diesel and ethanol. An extensive number of (more)

Farra, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

MBI International

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Energy Basics: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Biofuel Conversion Processes Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Ethanol Photo of several beakers of gold and...

55

Optimal Design of Storage Facility in BioOptimal Design of Storage Facility in Bio--ethanol Supply Chain under Uncertaintyethanol Supply Chain under Uncertainty Yongxi (Eric) Huang, Prof. Yueyue Fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Design of Storage Facility in BioOptimal Design of Storage Facility in Bio--ethanol Supply facility. A case study based on the California is included, in which the bio-ethanol is produced via

California at Davis, University of

56

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

57

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Policy Category Financial Incentive Policy Type Corporate Tax Incentive Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/biofuels/Pages/biofuelsIncentives.aspx Summary Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM standard D4806. The total credit amount available for all corn and cellulosic ethanol producers is $5 million for each taxable year. Unused ethanol credits from

59

Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Greater Ohio Ethanol, LLC (GO Ethanol) Place Lima, Ohio Zip OH 45804 Product GO Ethanol is a pure play ethanol producer located in Ohio. Coordinates -12.0436°, -77.021217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-12.0436,"lon":-77.021217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mascoma Mascoma Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Vonore, Tennessee Description: The partnership aims to establish an approximately 85 tonnes per day cellulosic ethanol facility in the Niles Ferry Industrial Park, in Monroe County, Tennessee. The facility will produce 2 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol annually and generate process heat through the combustion of byproduct lignin. CEO or Equivalent: Bruce A. Jamerson, CEO Participants: University of Tennessee, Genera Energy LLC Production: * Capacity of 2 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol Technology and Feedstocks: * Mascoma proprietary biochemical conversion process * Switchgrass, hardwood chips State of Readiness: * Estimated to be operational in 2009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for a production incentive payable from the Kansas Qualified Agricultural Ethyl Alcohol Producer Fund. An

62

Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms ...  

Researchers at PNNL have developed a process concept for the use of microorganisms in the production of fuels, chemicals and other products.

63

Evaluation of the Potential for the Production of Lignocellulosic Based Ethanol at Existing Corn Ethanol Facilities: Final Subcontract Report, 2 March 2000 - 30 March 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report on opportunities to explore the business potential provided by converting biomass to products such as ethanol. The goals of this study were: (1) To provide the opportunity to explore the business potential provided by converting biomass to products such as ethanol. (2) To take advantage of the grain-processing infrastructure by investigating the co-location of additional biomass conversion facilities at an existing plant site.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Definition: Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol A colorless, flammable liquid produced by fermentation of sugars. While it is also the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, it can be denatured for fuel use. Fuel ethanol is used principally for blending in low concentrations with motor gasoline as an oxygenate or octane enhancer. In high concentrations, it is used to fuel alternative-fuel vehicles specially designed for its use.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ethanol fuel is ethanol (ethyl alcohol), the same type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. It is most often used as a motor fuel, mainly as a biofuel additive for gasoline. World ethanol production for transport fuel tripled between 2000 and 2007 from 17 billion to more than 52 billion liters. From 2007 to 2008, the share of ethanol in global gasoline type

65

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Ethanol producers may qualify for an income tax credit equal to 30% of production facility nameplate capacity between 500,000 and 15 million

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive The Missouri Department of Agriculture manages the Missouri Ethanol Producer Incentive Fund (Fund), which provides monthly grants to qualified

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blend Mandate Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Mandate Within one year after the Montana Department of Transportation has certified that ethanol producers in the state have produced a total of 40 million gallons of denatured ethanol and have maintained that level of

68

Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Benefits and Considerations Ethanol is a renewable, domestically produced transportation fuel. Whether

70

Iowa Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Ethanol LLC Place Hanlontown, Iowa Zip 50451 Product Corn-base bioethanol producer in Iowa Coordinates 43.28456°, -93.378954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.28456,"lon":-93.378954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Tax Ethanol Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol producer located in Indiana is entitled to a credit of $0.125 per gallon of ethanol produced, including cellulosic ethanol. The Indiana

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production to Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Production and Distribution Ethanol is a domestically produced alternative fuel that's most commonly made from corn. It can also be made from cellulosic feedstocks, such as

73

Energy Basics: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of several beakers of gold and orange liquid ethanol. Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol...

74

Brazil Ethanol Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil Ethanol Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10021 Product A New York City-based firm that had raised USD 10.4m as of 1 May 2007 and appears to be planning to build ethanol...

75

Final report (September, 1999--February, 2002) [Public outreach and information dissemination - cellulosic and corn-based ethanol outreach project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EESI's ''Ethanol, Climate Protection, Oil Reduction'' (ECO) electr[on]ic newsletter reaches out to the environmental and agricultural communities, state/local government officials and other interested parties, and provides a forum for dialogue about ''the potential benefits of ethanol--and particularly the expanded opportunities provided by cellulosic ethanol--with a special focus on climate protection.'' Each issue features expert commentary, excerpts from recent studies about ethanol, a summary of current government activity on ethanol, and ''notable quotables.'' The newsletter is distributed primarily via email and is also posted on EESI's web site. EESI also conducts outreach on the benefits of ethanol and other biofuels by attending and speaking at conferences, meetings and workshops around the country. The 16 issues of the newsletter published through December 2001 are included as attachments.

Ames, Jeremy; Werner, Carol

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Final report (September, 1999--February, 2002) [Public outreach and information dissemination - cellulosic and corn-based ethanol outreach project  

SciTech Connect

EESI's ''Ethanol, Climate Protection, Oil Reduction'' (ECO) electr[on]ic newsletter reaches out to the environmental and agricultural communities, state/local government officials and other interested parties, and provides a forum for dialogue about ''the potential benefits of ethanol--and particularly the expanded opportunities provided by cellulosic ethanol--with a special focus on climate protection.'' Each issue features expert commentary, excerpts from recent studies about ethanol, a summary of current government activity on ethanol, and ''notable quotables.'' The newsletter is distributed primarily via email and is also posted on EESI's web site. EESI also conducts outreach on the benefits of ethanol and other biofuels by attending and speaking at conferences, meetings and workshops around the country. The 16 issues of the newsletter published through December 2001 are included as attachments.

Ames, Jeremy; Werner, Carol

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Issues and Methods for Estimating the Percentage Share of Ethanol ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Together, these vehicles are estimated to account for ... Many interested parties, including auto manufacturers, ethanol producers, petroleum refiners, and

78

Ethanol Facts : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol Facts Ethanol Facts In 2005, the U.S. produced about 4 billion gallons of ethanol from corn grain, equaling approximately 2% of the 140 billion gallons of gasoline consumed. Ethanol is widely used as a fuel additive. The oxygen contained in ethanol improves gasoline combustibility. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 has established a renewable fuels standard which requires using 7.5 billion gallons of ethanol by 2012. E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline blend) can be used as a substitute for gasoline in vehicles that have been modified to use E85. Energy content of E85 is 70% that of gasoline, so about 1.4 gallons of E85 are needed to displace one gallon of gasoline. Starch in corn grain is readily degraded into glucose sugar molecules that are fermented to ethanol. The complex structural

79

Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cellulosic ethanol Cellulosic ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Cellethanol.jpg Cellulosic ethanol is identical to first generation bio ethanol except that it can be derived from agricultural residues, other lignocellulosic raw materials or energy crops. These lignocellulosic raw materials are more widely available than the standard material used for ethanol. They are also considered to be more sustainable, however they need to be broken down (hydrolysed) into simple sugars prior to distillation, a much more complex process than the first generation bioethanol. It first must go through pretreatment,hydrolysis then a conversion. Research since the 1970s and large investments are being made in the US and Europe to speed up development of this route to bioethanol. Biomass refineries like Inbicon in Denmark are producing

80

Engineering economic analysis of the quick-germ / quick-fiber modified dry grind ethanol fractionation process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It has been widely debated whether producing ethanol from corn is sustainable in the long term. Environmentally, the major concern is that producing ethanol from (more)

Lin, Tao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Blue Flint Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Ethanol Flint Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Flint Ethanol Place Underwood, North Dakota Zip ND 58576 Product Joint Venture bentween Great River Energy and Headwaters Incorporated, was established to build and operate a 50 million gallon per year dry mill ethanol plant in Underwood, North Dakota. References Blue Flint Ethanol[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Flint Ethanol is a company located in Underwood, North Dakota . References ↑ "Blue Flint Ethanol" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Blue_Flint_Ethanol&oldid=342914" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

82

Solid-state production of ethanol from sorghum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this research is to study the solid-state fermentation of sorghum-sudangrass, Grazex II (F{sub 1} hybrid of Sorghum vulgare X Sorghum sudanese), to ethanol. Our research focuses on using a modified method of ensiling to produce ethanol directly in the silo. Thirty-eight liters of ethanol/metric ton (L/MT) on a wet-weight basis were produced from sorghum receiving cellulose compared to 23.4 L/MT for sorghum not receiving cellulose additives. Based on total free sugar content, 101 and 84% of theoretical yield are achieved for cellulase-amended and nonamended sorghum, respectively. 47 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Henk, L.L.; Linden, J.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Clark, David P. (Carbondale, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Electric current-producing device having sulfone-based electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytic solvents and applications of such solvents including electric current-producing devices. For example, a solvent can include a sulfone compound of R1--SO2--R2, with R1 being an alkyl group and R2 a partially oxygenated alkyl group, to exhibit high chemical and thermal stability and high oxidation resistance. For another example, a battery can include, between an anode and a cathode, an electrolyte which includes ionic electrolyte salts and a non-aqueous electrolyte solvent which includes a non-symmetrical, non-cyclic sulfone. The sulfone has a formula of R1--SO2--R2, wherein R1 is a linear or branched alkyl or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms, and R2 is a linear or branched or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched oxygen containing alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms. The electrolyte can include an electrolyte co-solvent and an electrolyte additive for protective layer formation.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Sun, Xiao-Guang (Tempe, AZ)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Whats the Issue? Changing Frames of Ethanol Policy in Congress and the Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is generally a low corn- and ethanol-producing area, Texasand South, where corn and ethanol are relatively important,but not unexpected; corn and ethanol are much more important

Weiner, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc...

88

The Role of Cellulosic Ethanol in Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum provides essentially all of the energy used today in the transportation sector. To reduce this dependence on fossil energy, other fuels are beginning to be used, notably ethanol and biodiesel. Almost all fuel ethanol is produced by the conversion of corn grain to starch with subsequent fermentation to ethanol. In 2006, almost 5 billion gallons of fuel ethanol were produced, which used 17% of domestic corn production. The DOE has a goal to displace 30% of motor gasoline demand or 60 billion gallons per year by 2030. To achieve this goal, production of ethanol from lignocellulosic sources (e.g., agricultural residues, forest residues, and dedicated energy crops) is needed. This paper will describe the production of cellulosic ethanol as well as the issues and benefits associated with its production.

Robert M. Neilson, Jr.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip 50058 Product Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a 40m gallon (151.4m litre) bioethanol plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. References Tall Corn Ethanol LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC is a company located in Coon Rapids, Iowa . References ↑ "Tall Corn Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tall_Corn_Ethanol_LLC&oldid=352015" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

90

Bushmills Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bushmills Ethanol Bushmills Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Bushmills Ethanol Place Atwater, Minnesota Zip 56209 Product A group of local agricultural producers and investors working to build a 40m gallon per year ethanol facility in Minnesota. Coordinates 41.032997°, -81.168008° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.032997,"lon":-81.168008,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Ethanol and Classic Cars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have ethanol in them; the typical one is E10 which is 10% ethanol. But there's also E85 which is 85% ethanol. The basic rule is E10 is ok for everything, but E85 can only be...

92

PEMFC Power System on EthanolPEMFC Power System on Ethanol Caterpillar Inc.Caterpillar Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents a carbon cycle, where plants absorb carbon dioxide during growth, "recycling" the carbon released #12;Program ObjectivesProgram Objectives Integrated PEM Fuel Cell System Ethanol based Power Plant 10PEMFC Power System on EthanolPEMFC Power System on Ethanol Caterpillar Inc.Caterpillar Inc. Thomas

93

US Ethanol Production and Use Under Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline as a motor fuel, use of ethanol-blended gasoline results in lower carbon monoxide emission encourages ethanol production. Two prominent policy instruments are currently employed: a federal excise tax are currently employed: a federal excise tax credit on each gallon produced and a "renewable fuel standard" (RFS

94

Ethanol production using corn, switchgrass, and wood; Biodiesel production using soybean and sunflower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy outputs from ethanol produced using corn, switchgrass, and wood biomass were each less than the respective fossil energy inputs. The same was true for producing biodiesel using soybeans and sunflower, however, the energy cost for producing soybean biodiesel was only slightly negative compared with ethanol production. Findings in terms of energy outputs compared with the energy inputs were: Ethanol production using corn grain required 29% more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. Ethanol production using switchgrass required 50 % more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. Ethanol production using wood biomass required 57 % more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. Biodiesel production using soybean required 27 % more fossil energy than the biodiesel fuel produced (Note, the energy yield from soy oil per hectare is far lower than the ethanol yield from corn). Biodiesel production using sunflower required 118 % more fossil energy than the biodiesel fuel produced.

David Pimentel; Tad W. Patzek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Food for fuel: The price of ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: December 11, 7: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production Twelve billion gallons of ethanol were produced worldwide in 2005. The U.S.

98

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Regional Differences in Corn Ethanol Production: Profitability and Potential Water Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the use of a stochastic simulation model this project analyzes both the impacts of the expanding biofuels sector on water demand in selected regions of the United States and variations in the profitability of ethanol production due to location differences. Changes in consumptive water use in the Texas High Plains, Southern Minnesota, and the Central Valley of California, as impacted by current and proposed grain-based ethanol plants were addressed. In addition, this research assesses the potential impacts of technologies to reduce consumptive water use in the production of ethanol in terms of water usage and the economic viability of each ethanol facility. This research quantifies the role of corn ethanol production on water resource availability and identifies the alternative water pricing schemes at which ethanol production is no longer profitable. The results of this research show that the expansion of regional ethanol production and the resulting changes in the regional agricultural landscapes do relatively little to change consumptive water usage in each location. The California Central Valley has the highest potential for increased water usage with annual water usage in 2017 at levels 15% higher than historical estimates, whereas Southern Minnesota and the Texas High Plains are predicted to have increases of less than 5% during the same time period. Although water use by ethanol plants is extremely minor relative to consumptive regional agricultural water usage, technological adaptations by ethanol facilities have the potential to slightly reduce water usage and prove to be economically beneficial adaptations to make. The sensitivity of net present value (NPV) with respect to changes in water price is shown to be extremely inelastic, indicating that ethanol producers have the ability to pay significantly more for their fresh water with little impact on their 10 year economic performance.

Higgins, Lindsey M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC Jump to: navigation, search Name National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC) Place Jefferson City, Missouri Zip 65109 Product The National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition is a non-profit membership organisation serving as a primary advocacy group promoting the use of 85% ethanol in the US as a form of alternative transportation fuel. References National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC) is a company located in Jefferson City, Missouri . References ↑ "National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=National_Ethanol_Vehicle_Coalition_NEVC&oldid=349065

102

Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Feasibility of Producing and Using Biomass-Based Diesel and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility of Producing and Using Biomass-Based Diesel and Jet Fuel in the United States A. Milbrandt, C. Kinchin, and R. McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical...

104

Ethanol-blended Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol-Blended Ethanol-Blended Fuels A Study Guide and Overview of: * Ethanol's History in the U.S. and Worldwide * Ethanol Science and Technology * Engine Performance * Environmental Effects * Economics and Energy Security The Curriculum This curriculum on ethanol and its use as a fuel was developed by the Clean Fuels Development Coalition in cooperation with the Nebraska Ethanol Board. This material was developed in response to the need for instructional materials on ethanol and its effects on vehicle performance, the environment, and the economy. As a renewable alternative energy source made from grain and other biomass resources, ethanol study serves as an excellent learning opportunity for students to use in issue clarification and problem-solving activities. Ethanol illustrates that science and technology can provide us with new

105

Ethanol production by recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

Fowler, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Horton, Philip G. (Gainesville, FL); Ben-Bassat, Arie (Gainesville, FL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ethanol production by recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Beall, David S. (Gainesville, FL); Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H. (Gainesville, FL); Guimaraes, Walter V. (Vicosa, BR); Ohta, Kazuyoshi (Miyazaki, JP); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL); Shanmugam, Keelnatham T. (Gainesville, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ethanol production method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Impact of ethanol expansion on the cattle feeding industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The U.S. has a history of producing surplus corn, but the current and projected growth in ethanol production combined with strong feed and export demand (more)

Daley, Erin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn (more)

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy footprint of Locally Produced Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this study was to conduct a lifecycle wide analysis of the direct and indirect energy inputs and outputs flowing through a bioethanol (more)

Chiatula, Ebelechukwu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Definition: Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Cellulosic ethanol An advanced type of biofuel that is produced by breaking down and using the cellulose compound found in trees and grasses.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, or the inedible parts of plants. It is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Miscanthus grass species, wood chips and the byproducts of lawn and tree maintenance are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Production of ethanol from lignocellulose has the advantage of abundant and

113

Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

I I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our petroleum supply, the price and supply of ethanol is not subject to the whims of potentially unstable foreign governments. And domestic production translates into domestic jobs. In addition, ethanol has the potential to reduce harmful emissions, such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen

114

Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

Information Center

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ethanol | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the...

116

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

SciTech Connect

Engineered microorganisms are currently used for the production of food products, pharmaceuticals, ethanol fuel and more. Even so, the enormous potential of this technology has yet to be fully exploited. The need for sustainable sources of transportation fuels has generated a tremendous interest in technologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of work have produced a considerable knowledge-base for the physiology and pathway engineering of microbes, making microbial engineering an ideal strategy for producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently dominates the biofuel market, some of its inherent physical properties make it a less than ideal product. To highlight additional options, we review advances in microbial engineering for the production of other potential fuel molecules, using a variety of biosynthetic pathways.

Fortman, J.L.; Chhabra, Swapnil; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Chou, Howard; Lee, Taek Soon; Steen, Eric; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

SciTech Connect

Engineered microorganisms are currently used for the production of food products, pharmaceuticals, ethanol fuel and more. Even so, the enormous potential of this technology has yet to be fully exploited. The need for sustainable sources of transportation fuels has gener-ated a tremendous interest in technologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of work have produced a considerable knowledge-base for the physiology and pathway engineering of microbes, making microbial engineering an ideal strategy for producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently dominates the biofuel mar-ket, some of its inherent physical properties make it a less than ideal product. To highlight additional options, we review advances in microbial engineering for the production of other potential fuel molecules, using a variety of biosynthetic pathways.

Fortman, J. L.; Chhabra, Swapnil; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Chou, Howard; Lee, Taek Soon; Steen, Eric; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

A First-Law Thermodynamic Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes energy efficiency of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle. In particular, it critically evaluates earlier publications by DOE, USDA, and UC Berkeley Energy Resources Group. It is demonstrated that most of the current First Law net-energy models of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle are based on nonphysical assumptions and should be viewed with caution. In particular, these models do not (i) define the system boundaries, (ii) conserve mass, and (iii) conserve energy. The energy cost of producing and refining carbon fuels in real time, for example, corn and ethanol, is high relative to that of fossil fuels deposited and concentrated over geological time. Proper mass and energy balances of corn fields and ethanol refineries that account for the photosynthetic energy, part of the environment restoration work, and the coproduct energy have been formulated. These balances show that energetically production of ethanol from corn is 2-4 times less favorable than production of gasoline from petroleum. From thermodynamics it also follows that ecological damage wrought by industrial biofuel production must be severe. With the DDGS coproduct energy credit, 3.9 gallons of ethanol displace on average the energy in 1 gallon of gasoline. Without the DDGS energy credit, this average number is 6.2 gallons of ethanol. Equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions from corn ethanol are some 50% higher than those from gasoline, and become 100% higher if methane emissions from cows fed with DDGS are accounted for. From the mass balance of soil it follows that ethanol coproducts should be returned to the fields.

Patzek, Tad W. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@patzek.berkeley.edu

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

Lynd, L.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-291  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help provide a portion of the feedstocks required to produce renewable domestic transportation fuels.

Wolfrum, E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL Technology New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL Technology April 22, 2011 - 10:17am Addthis Photo courtesy of General Electric Photo courtesy of General Electric Minh Le Minh Le Program Manager, Solar Program Earlier this month, General Electric announced plans to enter the global marketplace for solar photovoltaic (PV) panels in a big way - and to do it, they will be using technology pioneered at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). The record-breaking Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) thin film photovoltaic technology GE has chosen for its solar panels was originally developed more than a decade ago by a team of scientists led by NREL's Xuanzhi Wu, and

122

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

SciTech Connect

Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Liao, James C [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) Place Oshkosh, Wisconsin Product Utica Energy, founded by 5 investing farmers built an ethanol plant west of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. References Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) is a company located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utica_Energy_LLC_formerly_Algoma_Ethanol&oldid=352687" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

124

NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wastepaper as a feedstock for ethanol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The possibility of using wastepaper as a cheap feedstock for production of ethanol is discussed. As the single largest material category in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream, wastepaper is the main target of efforts to reduce the volume of MSW. And in the process for producing ethanol from lignocellulosics, the feedstock represents the highest cost. If wastepaper could be obtained cheaply in large enough quantities and if conversion process cost and efficiency prove to be similar to those for wood, the cost of ethanol could be significantly reduced. At the same time, the volume of wastepaper that must be disposed of in landfills could be lessened. 13 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Bergeron, P.W.; Riley, C.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of additives on the ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow them to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. 49 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Chuang, S.S.C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Building a foundation for structure-based cellulosome design for cellulosic ethanol: Insight into cohesin-dockerin complexation from computer simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foundation for Structure-Based Cellulosome Design for Foundation for Structure-Based Cellulosome Design for Cellulosic Ethanol: Insight into Cohesin-Dockerin Complexation from Computer Simulation Jiancong Xu, 1,3 Michael Crowley, 2,3 and Jeremy C. Smith 1,3 1 Center for Molecular Biophysics, Building 6011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830, USA. 2 Chemical and Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, CO, 80401-3393, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center Corresponding author. Jiancong Xu, Building 6011, MS6309, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA; E-mail: xuj1@ornl.gov; Phone: 865-241-9111; Fax: 865-576-7651. Running title. Computer simulation of cohesin-dockerin complexes. Manuscript pages: 29 Supplementary material pages: 4

129

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Prices Find ethanol fuel prices and trends. Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. The use of ethanol is widespread-almost all gasoline in the U.S. contains

130

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

Szybist, J.; Confer, K. (Delphi Automotive Systems)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc EETI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extraction Technologies Inc EETI Extraction Technologies Inc EETI Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc (EETI) Place New York, New York Zip 10036-2601 Product New York-based bio-technology and ethanol production company with a patent for the exclusive use of the proprietary process of continuously removing and isolating ethanol during its fermentation process. References Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc (EETI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc (EETI) is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc (EETI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ethanol_Extraction_Technologies_Inc_EETI&oldid=345167

133

US Ethanol Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investment bank and advisory firm, Geneva Capital, created in 2006 to develop 6 bioethanol plants in the US. References US Ethanol Holdings1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

134

A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rh and Co-based catalyst performance was compared for steam reforming of ethanol under conditions suitable for industrial hydrogen production. The reaction conditions were varied to elucidate the differences in reaction pathways on both catalysts. On Co/ZnO, CH4 is a secondary product formed through the methanation reaction, while it is produced directly by ethanol decomposition on Rh. The difference in the reaction mechanism is shown to favor Co-based catalysts for selective hydrogen production under elevated system pressures (up to 15 bar) of industrial importance. The carbon deposition rate was also studied, and we show that Co is more prone to coking and catalyst failure. However, the Co/ZnO catalyst can be regenerated, by mild oxidation, despite the high carbon deposition rate. We conclude that Co/ZnO is a more suitable catalyst system for steam reforming of ethanol due to the low methane selectivity, low cost and possibility of regeneration with mild oxidation.

Karim, Ayman M.; Su, Yu; Sun, Junming; Yang, Cheng; Strohm, James J.; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

OpenEI - ethanol  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Tue, 14 Dec 2010...

136

Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description and move this content to a more...

137

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enzyme complexes to convert a potentially wide range of lignocellulosic feedstocks to ethanol and other vendible products. CEO or Equivalent: Dr. Pearse Lyons, Alltech Inc Founder...

138

Price sensitivity of bioethanol produced in New Zealand from Pinus radiata wood  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis conducted of designs for industry-scale ethanol production facilities that use both hexoses and pentoses to produce 97 to 107 tonnes of anhydrous ethanol per day from 960 tonnes of Pinus radiata wood of 50% moisture content (480 oven-dried tonnes). Various process options and available technologies were considered for cost comparisons. The base case plant design was used to assess the probable importance of not fermenting thee wood pentose fraction. When pentose sugars were not fermented, the ethanol price increased from $0.71/L to $0.75/L. The influence of various economic factors on selling price is assessed.

Manderson, G.J.; Spencer, K.; Paterson, A.H.J. (Massey Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). Dept. of Biotechnology); Qureshi, N. (Dept. of Food Sciences, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana, Urbana, IL (US)); Jansen, D.E. (Biochemical Processing Centre, Biotechnology Div., DSIR, Palmerston North (NZ))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

BlueFire Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BlueFire Ethanol BlueFire Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name BlueFire Ethanol Place Irvine, California Zip 92618 Sector Hydro Product US biofuel producer that utilises a patented concentrated acid hydrolysis technology to process various cellulosic waste materials into ethanol. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Farmers Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Farmers' Ethanol LLC Place Adamsville, Ohio Zip OH 43802 Product An association of farmers registered on July 12,2002 with a goal of producing ethanol in the Ohio Appalachian Mountains. Coordinates 35.235864°, -88.390158° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.235864,"lon":-88.390158,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary  

SciTech Connect

At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant ...  

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant Use in N0x Catalytic Reduction Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

143

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol and plant-based biodiesel ( Box 1). Although bio-acid pathway Currently, biodiesel production uses plant oilsbeen developed for use as biodiesel. However, if biodiesel

Fortman, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium, ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

1981-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by-product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

1980-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC)...

149

Ethanol annual report FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Feasibility of converting a sugar beet plant to fuel ethanol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was performed to assess the feasibility of producing fuel ethanol from sugar beets. Sugar beets are a major agricultural crop in the area and the beet sugar industry is a major employer. There have been some indications that increasing competition from imported sugar and fructose sugar produced from corn may lead to lower average sugar prices than have prevailed in the past. Fuel ethanol might provide an attractive alternative market for beets and ethanol production would continue to provide an industrial base for labor. Ethanol production from beets would utilize much of the same field and plant equipment as is now used for sugar. It is logical to examine the modification of an existing sugar plant from producing sugar to ethanol. The decision was made to use Great Western Sugar Company's plant at Mitchell as the example plant. This plant was selected primarily on the basis of its independence from other plants and the availability of relatively nearby beet acreage. The potential feedstocks assessed included sugar beets, corn, hybrid beets, and potatoes. Markets were assessed for ethanol and fermentation by-products saleability. Investment and operating costs were determined for each prospective plant. Plants were evaluated using a discounted cash flow technique to obtain data on full production costs. Environmental, health, safety, and socio-economic aspects of potential facilities were examined. Three consulting engineering firms and 3 engineering-construction firms are considered capable of providing the desired turn-key engineering design and construction services. It was concluded that the project is technically feasible. (DMC)

Hammaker, G.S.; Pfost, H.B.; David, M.L.; Marino, M.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Ethanol | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable biofuel-whether it is produced from starch- and sugar-based feedstocks such as corn grain (as it primarily is in the United States) and sugar cane (as it primarily is in...

152

THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used on farms, such as gasoline, diesel, LP gas (LPG), natural gas, and electricity, for the production of corn ethanol utilizing the latest survey of U.S. corn producers and the 2001 U.S. survey of ethanol in manufacturing and marketing nitrogen fertilizer, (3) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

153

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Final Report for "Investigation of reaction networks and active sites in bio-ethanol steam reforming over Co-based catalysts" with all publications attached.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This was a university-based research project in support of distributed reforming production technologies for hydrogen. Our objective was to examine the steam reforming of bio-ethanol and other related bio-derived liquids over non-precious metal catalyst systems to enable small-scale distributed hydrogen production technologies from renewable sources. The study targeted development of a catalytic system that does not rely on precious metals and that can be active in the 350-550 C temperature range, with high selectivity and high stability. To this end, we adopted a multi-prong research strategy, that included catalyst formulation and synthesis, detailed catalyst characterization, reaction kinetics and reaction engineering, molecular modeling and economic analysis studies. Our approach was an iterative one, where the knowledge gained in one aspect of the study was utilized to modify and fine-tune catalyst development. The research addressed many fundamental and inter-related phenomena involved in the catalytic steam reforming of ethanol that may not be readily studied in an industrial development setting. The outcome of the project was a catalytic system that was able to meet the DOE targets in hydrogen production, with high H{sub 2} yield, high selectivity and stability that could perform efficiently in the 350-550 C temperature range. In addition, we were able to answer many fundamental questions about the catalytic systems that could easily be translated to other catalytic systems. The study resulted in 14 refereed journal articles, with one more in preparation. The results were also shared broadly at many different national and international forums such as conferences of the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, North American Catalysis Society, International Congress on Catalysis and International Conference on Catalysis for Renewable Sources. There were 30 presentations given at various national and international meetings. The P.I. was also invited to give 11 lectures on the findings from this study at many universities and research centers in the USA and other countries. The knowledge base acquired through this study is expected to bring industry closer to designing catalytic systems that can be tailored for the specific hydrogen production applications, especially for distributed hydrogen production strategies.

Umit S. Ozkan

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Western Ethanol Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Company LLC Ethanol Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Ethanol Company LLC Place Placentia, California Zip 92871 Product California-based fuel ethanol distribution and marketing company. Coordinates 33.871124°, -117.861401° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.871124,"lon":-117.861401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

156

Heartland Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Heartland Ethanol LLC Place Knoxville, Tennessee Zip 37929 Product Knoxville, TN based ethanol developer. Coordinates 35.960495°, -83.920914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.960495,"lon":-83.920914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

157

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

ethanol | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ethanol ethanol Dataset Summary Description These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics representative exposed to gasoline containing various levels of ethanol. These materials are representative of those used in gasoline fuel storage and dispensing hardware. All values are compared to the original untreated condition. The data sets include results from specimens exposed directly to the fuel liquid and also a set of specimens exposed only to the fuel vapors. Source Mike Kass, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords compatibility elastomers ethanol gasoline plastics polymers Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon plastics_dma_results_san.xlsx (xlsx, 4.9 MiB)

159

Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

Ingram, Lonnie O' Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

Ingram, Lonnie O' Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Self-Scheduling of a Hydro Producer in a Pool-Based Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the self-scheduling of a hydro generating company in a pool-based electricity market. This company comprises several cascaded plants along a river basin. The objective is to maximize the profit of the company from selling energy in the day-ahead market. This paper proposes a 0/1 mixed-integer linear programming model to account, in every plant, for the nonlinear and nonconcave three-dimensional (3-D) relationship between the power produced, the water discharged, and the head of the associated reservoir. Additionally, start-up costs due mainly to the wear and tear are considered. Finally, different realistic case studies are analyzed in detail.

Antonio J. Conejo; Senior Member; Jos Manuel Arroyo; Javier Contreras; Francisco Apolinar Villamor

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report Ethanol buses were demonstrated within BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST). This report describes the problems at the sites and how they were solved. The aim of the report is to guide other local transport authorities on how to deal with the questions raised when a bus demonstration begins. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

166

Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies, outlines, and documents a set of plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017. These scenarios can provide guidance for setting government policy and targeting government investment to the areas with greatest potential impact.

Sandor, D.; Wallace, R.; Peterson, S.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Continuous production of ethanol by use of flocculent zymomonas mobilis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is produced by means of a floc-forming strain of Zymomonas mobilis bacteria. Gas is vented along the length of a column containing the flocculent bacteria to preclude disruption of liquid flow.

Arcuri, Edward J. (Del Mar, CA); Donaldson, Terrence L. (Lenoir City, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn stover, and switchgrass. A life-cycle assessment approach ...

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Investigation of the Photocatalytic Degradation of Ethanol and Acetone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the photocatalytic oxidation of acetone, ethanol and the interaction between acetone and ethanol. Compared with the degradation of acetone alone, it cannot be described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation in presence of ethanol. The presence of ethanol reduces the initial degradation rate of acetone and the inhibition increases with increasing of ethanol in the system. Acetone also inhibits the degradation of ethanol but it still can be described by the L-H equation. Acetaldehyde in the system comes from the degradation of ethanol, the behavior of production and consumption of which is affected by the amount of ethanol and acetone in the mixture. Temperature significantly affects the degradation of organic compounds in the mixture. Increasing the temperature accelerates the degradation of ethanol and acetone as well as the degradation of acetaldehyde, an intermediate produced in the system. The flux of the reaction system has little effect on the photocatalytic process of organic matter.

Liu, Y.; Ding, B.; Dong, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Market penetration of biodiesel and ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the influence that economic and technological factors have on the penetration of biodiesel and ethanol into the transportation fuels market. This dissertation focuses on four aspects. The first involves the influence of fossil fuel prices, because biofuels are substitutes and have to compete in price. The second involves biofuel manufacturing technology, principally the feedstock-to-biofuel conversion rates, and the biofuel manufacturing costs. The third involves prices for greenhouse gas offsets. The fourth involves the agricultural commodity markets for feedstocks, and biofuel byproducts. This dissertation uses the Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model-Greenhouse Gas (FASOM-GHG) to quantitatively examine these issues and calculates equilibrium prices and quantities, given market interactions, fossil fuel prices, carbon dioxide equivalent prices, government biofuel subsidies, technological improvement, and crop yield gains. The results indicate that for the ranges studied, gasoline prices have a major impact on aggregate ethanol production but only at low prices. At higher prices, one runs into a capacity constraint that limits expansion on the capacity of ethanol production. Aggregate biodiesel production is highly responsive to gasoline prices and increases over time. (Diesel fuel price is proportional to the gasoline price). Carbon dioxide equivalent prices expand the biodiesel industry, but have no impact on ethanol aggregate production when gasoline prices are high again because of refinery capacity expansion. Improvement of crop yields shows a similar pattern, expanding ethanol production when the gasoline price is low and expanding biodiesel. Technological improvement, where biorefinery production costs decrease over time, had minimal impact on aggregate ethanol and biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government subsidies have a large expansionary impact on aggregate biodiesel production, but only expand the ethanol industry at low gasoline prices. All of these factors increase agricultural welfare with most expanding producer surplus and mixed effects on consumers.

Szulczyk, Kenneth Ray

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A comparison of ethanol and butanol as oxygenates using a direct-injection, spark-ignition (DISI) engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate a 'what if' scenario in terms of using butanol as an oxygenate in place of ethanol in an engine calibrated for gasoline operation. No changes to the stock engine calibration were performed for this study. Combustion analysis, efficiency, and emissions of pure gasoline, 10% ethanol, and 10% butanol blends in a modern direct-injection four-cylinder spark-ignition engine were analyzed. Data were taken at engine speeds of 1000 rpm up to 4000 rpm with load varying from 0 N m (idle) to 150 N m. Relatively minor differences existed between the three fuels for the combustion characteristics such as heat release rate, 50% mass fraction burned, and coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure at low and medium engine loads. However at high engine loads the reduced knock resistance of the butanol blend forced the engine control unit to retard the ignition timing substantially, compared with the gasoline baseline and, even more pronounced, compared with the ethanol blend. Brake specific volumetric fuel consumption, which represented a normalized volumetric fuel flow rate, was lowest for the gasoline baseline fuel due to the higher energy density. The 10% butanol blend had a lower volumetric fuel consumption compared with the ethanol blend, as expected, based on energy density differences. The results showed little difference in regulated emissions between 10% ethanol and 10% butanol. The ethanol blend produced the highest peak specific NO{sub x} due to the high octane rating of ethanol and effective antiknock characteristics. Overall, the ability of butanol to perform equally as well as ethanol from an emissions and combustion standpoint, with a decrease in fuel consumption, initially appears promising. Further experiments are planned to explore the full operating range of the engine and the potential benefits of higher blend ratios of butanol.

Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A.; McConnell, S. (Energy Systems)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,039,864 1,032,160 1,033,297 1,032,517 1,037,294 1,037,338 1,038,940 1,036,193 1,037,422 1,035,931 1,035,050 1,043,103 1995 1,051,669 1,054,584 1,051,120 1,051,697 1,052,949 1,062,613 1,058,260 1,054,218 1,054,870 1,051,687 1,056,704 1,060,588 1996 1,067,220 1,062,343 1,027,692 1,040,511 1,055,164 1,056,516 1,052,009 1,051,395 1,052,015 1,048,151 1,052,057 1,053,173 1997 1,064,968 1,054,977 1,059,316 1,059,050 1,059,706 1,064,515 1,063,554 1,063,029 1,066,254 1,064,123 1,065,557 1,065,151 1998 1,064,741 1,058,297 1,057,927 1,057,506 1,060,241 1,055,941 1,055,660 1,055,056 1,056,417 1,057,591 1,057,539 1,038,925

173

Ethanol Myths and Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Myths and Facts Ethanol Myths and Facts Ethanol Myths and Facts More Documents & Publications Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse...

174

Chief Ethanol Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chief Ethanol Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Chief Ethanol Fuels Place Hastings, NE Website http:www.chiefethanolfuels.c References Chief Ethanol Fuels1 Information...

175

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) EA-1888: Final...

176

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) Pacific...

177

Kaapa Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaapa Ethanol LLC Kaapa Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Kaapa Ethanol LLC Place Minden, Nebraska Zip 68959 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates 37.97574°, -81.119434° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.97574,"lon":-81.119434,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fermentation pH has been observed to be the key parameter affecting the ratio of ethanol to acetate produced by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The effects of controlled pH on cell growth and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were measured. It was found that cell concentration and acetate concentration increased with pH, while the ethanol concentration was highest at the lower pH. The molar product ratio of ethanol to acetate was 0.74 at pH 4.0, 0.39 at pH 4.5 and 0.12 at pH 5.0. Future experiments will concentrate on studying other important parameters such as agitation rate and nutrients concentrations with controlled pH as a preclude to continuous reactor studies.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Enriching and characterizing an aerotolerant mixed microbial community capable of cellulose hydrolysis and ethanol production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cellulosic ethanol produced via consolidated bioprocessing may one day be a viable alternative to fossil fuels However, efforts must focus on streamlining and simplifying its (more)

Ronan, Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

QUANTITY AND CAPACITY EXPANSION DECISIONS FOR ETHANOL IN NEBRASKA AND A MEDIUM SIZED PLANT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn-based ethanol is the leader of sustainable sources of energy in the United States due to the abundance of corn and the popularity of ethanol-gasoline (more)

Khoshnoud, Mahsa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Methods for increasing the production of ethanol from microbial fermentation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stable continuous method for producing ethanol from the anaerobic bacterial fermentation of a gaseous substrate containing at least one reducing gas involves culturing a fermentation bioreactor anaerobic, acetogenic bacteria in a liquid nutrient medium; supplying the gaseous substrate to the bioreactor; and manipulating the bacteria in the bioreactor by reducing the redox potential, or increasing the NAD(P)H TO NAD(P) ratio, in the fermentation broth after the bacteria achieves a steady state and stable cell concentration in the bioreactor. The free acetic acid concentration in the bioreactor is maintained at less than 5 g/L free acid. This method allows ethanol to be produced in the fermentation broth in the bioreactor at a productivity greater than 10 g/L per day. Both ethanol and acetate are produced in a ratio of ethanol to acetate ranging from 1:1 to 20:1.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Arora, Dinesh K. (Fayetteville, AR); Ko, Ching-Whan (Fayetteville, AR); Phillips, John Randall (Fayetteville, AR); Basu, Rahul (Bethlehem, PA); Wikstrom, Carl V. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verenium Biofuels Corporation Verenium Biofuels Corporation Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Jennings, Louisiana Description: Operation and maintenance of a demonstration-scale facility in Jennings, Louisiana with some capital additions. CEO or Equivalent: Carlos A. Riva, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director Participants: Only Verenium Biofuels Corporation Production: * Capacity of 1.5 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol biofuel Technology and Feedstocks: * Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosics and fermentation of sugars into ethanol * sugarcane bagasse, dedicated energy crops, agricultural waste, and wood product residues State of Readiness: * The demonstration facility has been completed and is in the

185

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) Corporate HQ: Old Town, Maine Proposed Facility Location: Old Town, Maine Description: Develop, design, and install a biorefinery facility in an existing pulp mill to demonstrate the production of cellulosic ethanol from lignocellulosic (wood) extract. CEO or Equivalent: Edward Paslawski, Chairman and CEO of Red Shield Environmental, LLC Participants: University of Maine, American Process Inc. Production: * Capacity of 2.2 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol Technology and Feedstocks: * University of Maine proprietary process for pre-extracting hemicelluloses during the pulping process * 80 dry tons/day hemicellulose extract from woody biomass

186

Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

SEROTONERGIC ANTI-DEPRESSANTS AND ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Aim: To review laboratory findings on the effects of anti-depressant agents that interact with the serotonergic system on signs of ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats. Method: Adult Wistar rats received a modified liquid diet to produce ethanol dependence. Signs of ethanol withdrawal, locomotor hyperactivity, stereotyped behaviour, tremor, wet dog shakes, agitation, and audiogenic seizures, were evaluated for the first 6 h of ethanol withdrawal. The effects of the anti-depressants fluoxetine, venlafaxine, escitalopram, tianeptine, and extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. Johns wort) (HPE) were examined. Results: Some beneficial effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, HPE, escitalopram and venlafaxine on ethanol withdrawal signs were observed, ranked as follows: fluoxetine = tianeptine> HPE> escitalopram> venlafaxine. Conclusions: Tianeptine and fluoxetine seem to be potent pharmacologically active agents on ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats. Thus, these anti-depressants may be useful in treatment of ethanol withdrawal syndrome in patients with alcoholism. In addition to serotonergic effects, interactions with nitrergic, glutamatergic, and adenosinergic systems may also provide a significant contribution to the beneficial effects of these drugs on ethanol withdrawal syndrome.

I. Tayfun Uzbay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35[degrees]C to about 40[degrees]C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35{degrees}C to about 40{degrees}C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Ethanol Corp Place Houston, Texas Zip 77055 Sector Biomass Product Focused on developing biomass preprocessing technology to efficiently produce cellulosic feedstocks for ethanol producers. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

193

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

194

Xylose fermentation to ethanol  

SciTech Connect

The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

McMillan, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ethanol fuel modification for highway vehicle use. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of problems that might occur if ethanol were used as a blending stock or replacement for gasoline in present cars are identified and characterized as to the probability of occurrence. The severity of their consequences is contrasted to those found with methanol in a previous contract study. Possibilities for correcting several problems are reported. Some problems are responsive to fuel modifications but others require or are better dealt with by modification of vehicles and the bulk fuel distribution system. In general, problems with ethanol in blends with gasoline were found to be less severe than those with methanol. Phase separation on exposure to water appears to be the major problem with ethanol/gasoline blends. Another potentially serious problem with blends is the illict recovery of ethanol for beverage usage, or bootlegging, which might be discouraged by the use of select denaturants. Ethanol blends have somewhat greater tendency to vapor lock than base gasoline but less than methanol blends. Gasoline engines would require modification to operate on fuels consisting mostly of ethanol. If such modifications were made, cold starting would still be a major problem, more difficult with ethanol than methanol. Startability can be provided by adding gasoline or light hydrocarbons. Addition of gasoline also reduces the explosibility of ethanol vapor and furthermore acts as denaturant.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method to produce nanocrystalline powders of oxide-based phosphors for lighting applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Some embodiments of the present invention are directed toward nanocrystalline oxide-based phosphor materials, and methods for making same. Typically, such methods comprise a steric entrapment route for converting precursors into such phosphor material. In some embodiments, the nanocrystalline oxide-based phosphor materials are quantum splitting phosphors. In some or other embodiments, such nanocrystalline oxide based phosphor materials provide reduced scattering, leading to greater efficiency, when used in lighting applications.

Loureiro, Sergio Paulo Martins (Saratoga Springs, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Williams, Darryl Stephen (Clifton Park, NY); Manoharan, Mohan (Niskayuna, NY); Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ethanol Tolerant Yeast for Improved Production of Ethanol from ...  

Inventors: Audrey Gasch, Jeffrey Lewis Ethanol production from cellulosic biomass can make a significant contribution toward decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels.

198

Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

grow from 1.5M in 2006 to 30M in 2017 Fuel Market * Oil price based on "AEO 2006 High Oil Price Projection" * ORNL refinery model analysis used to predict ethanol blending...

199

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

200

Fermentation of soybean hulls to ethanol while retaining protein value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybean hulls were evaluated as a resource for production of ethanol by the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process, and no pretreatment of the hulls was found to be needed to realize high ethanol yields with S. cerevisiae D5A. The impact of cellulase, -glucosidase and pectinase dosages were determined at a 15% biomass loading, and ethanol concentrations of 25-30 g/L were routinely obtained, while under these conditions corn stover, wheat straw, and switchgrass produced 3-4 times lower ethanol yields. Removal of carbohydrates also concentrated the hull protein to over 25% w/w from the original roughly 10%. Analysis of the soybean hulls before and after fermentation showed similar amino acid profiles including an increase in the essential amino acids lysine and threonine in the residues. Thus, eliminating pretreatment should assure that the protein in the hulls is preserved, and conversion of the carbohydrates to ethanol with high yields produces a more concentrated and valuable co-product in addition to ethanol. The resulting upgraded feed product from soybean hulls would likely to be acceptable to monogastric as well as bovine livestock.

Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Wyman, Professor Charles E [University of California, Riverside; John, Bardsley [Dartmouth College

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The feasibility of ethanol production in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural interests across Texas are looking at the possibility of an ethanol industry in Texas. Continued conflict in the Middle East, the ban of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in California, and low commodity prices have all lead to increased interest in ethanol throughout the state of Texas. There have been several ethanol feasibility studies conducted. Most studies have been focused in other states, and only one incorporated risk on input and output prices. Very little research has been done in Texas. Previous studies are typically for a generic location and only looked at ethanol production from corn. This study looks at four different plant sizes in three different regions using corn and grain sorghum. This study incorporates risk on input prices (corn, grain sorghum, natural gas, and electricity) and the output prices of ethanol and dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS). The regions that were analyzed in the study are the Texas Panhandle, the Central Texas region, and the Southeast Texas region. The results indicate that the only plants expected to generate a positive net present value (NPV) were the larger grain sorghum based plants in the Texas Panhandle. The smaller sorghum based plants in the Panhandle did not have a positive NPV. The only other plants that were close to having a positive net present value were the grain sorghum plants in the Central Texas Region. Sorghum in the Southeast Texas Region was not feasible. Using corn as the feedstock was not as feasible in any region. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that a small increase in the net income in the form of increased revenue or reduced costs would make all the plants profitable.

Herbst, Brian Keith

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Small scale ethanol production: design manual. [10 to 15 gallons per hour  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to design, fabricate, and evaluate a small scale continuous ethanol plant. The scope of the study was to satisfy four specific objectives. The first objective was to design a small scale continuous distillation unit capable of producing 10 to 15 gallons per hour of 170 to 190 proof ethanol. A second objective was to economically fabricate the distillation unit. A third objective was to thoroughly evaluate the unit with emphasis on production potential, operation considerations, and energy balance. The fourth objective was to work with the Farm Bureau in identifying an organization that would place the unit in a production environment. The results of the study indicate that the distillation unit is capable of producing and average of 9 to 14 gallons per hour (based on alcohol percent in beer) of 174 proof ethanol. The energy ratio for distillation is a positive 3:1. Once the unit has reached steady state very little operator attention is required with the exception of periodically refluxing. Material cost of the plate column is approximately $5000. The unit could be built by an individual provided he is trained in welding and has the necessary shop equipment. 39 figures, 12 tables.

Adcock, L.E. II; Eley, M.H.; Schroer, B.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement All gasoline containing 1% or more ethanol by volume offered for sale must be conspicuously identified as "with ethanol" or "containing ethanol."

206

Tharaldson Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Place Casselton, North Dakota Zip 58012 Product Owner of a USD 200m 120m-gallon ethanol plant in...

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Mandate Ethanol Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Mandate All gasoline offered for sale at retail stations within the state must contain 10% ethanol (E10). This requirement is waived only if a distributor is unable to purchase ethanol or ethanol-blended gasoline at the same or

208

Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 27,197 26,722 26,923 26,320 25,564 27,995 1981-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 628 784 836 842 527 636 2004-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 25,209 24,689 24,786 24,186 23,810 26,040 2004-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 523 404 487 460 431 473 2004-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 450 432 430 432 415 429 2004-2013 West Coast (PADD 5)

209

Highwater Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Highwater Ethanol Highwater Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Highwater Ethanol Place Lamberton, Minnesota Zip MN 56152 Product Highwater Ethanol LLC is the SPV behind the 195mLpa ethanol plant being constructed in Lamberton, Minnesota, US. Coordinates 44.233433°, -95.262294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.233433,"lon":-95.262294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Feedstocks to Feedstocks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Feedstocks Map of the United States BioFuels Atlas Use this interactive map to compare biomass feedstocks and biofuels by

211

Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intermediate Ethanol Intermediate Ethanol Blends to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

212

Cardinal Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cardinal Ethanol is in the process of building an ethanol plant in East Central Indiana, near Union City. Coordinates 39.184005, -78.164049 Loading map......

213

Ethanol Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethanol Capital Management Place Tucson, Arizona...

214

Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89145 Sector Biofuels Product Holds proprietary...

215

Ethanol Myths and Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Myths and Facts Ethanol Myths and Facts More Documents & Publications Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths...

216

US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Coalition Jump to: navigation, search Name US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition Place Jefferson City, Missouri Zip 65109 Product The National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition is the...

217

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Ethanol Vehicle Emissions When blended with gasoline for use as a vehicle fuel, ethanol can offer some emissions benefits over gasoline, depending on vehicle type, engine

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Funding The Ethanol Infrastructure Incentive Program provides funding to offset the cost of installing ethanol blender pumps at retail fueling stations

219

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: 1) Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline 2) Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas 3) Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode 4) Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Comphrensive resource balance for ethanol produced from corn and sugarcane.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to the increase in price of fossil fuels and climate change caused by Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, many countries around the world are trying (more)

Ben-Khaled, Monia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ethanol producers respond to market conditions - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For instance, Aemetis in Keyes, California, is changing its feedstock from corn to sorghum and replacing its natural gas consumption with biomass.

223

Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}< 250 C). However, when methane is included in the equilibrium analysis, no ethanol is formed at any conditions even approximating those that would be industrially practical. This means that undesired products (primarily methane and/or CO{sub 2}) must be kinetically limited. This is the job of a catalyst. The mechanism of CO hydrogenation leading to ethanol is complex. The key step is the formation of the initial C-C bond. Catalysts that are selective for EtOH can be divided into four classes: (a) Rh-based catalysts, (b) promoted Cu catalysts, (c) modified Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Tax Exemption Ethanol Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Tax Exemption Sales and use taxes apply to 80% of the proceeds from the sale of fuels containing 10% ethanol (E10) made between July 1, 2003, and December 31, 2018. If at any time these taxes are imposed at a rate of 1.25%, the tax on

226

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement Any motor vehicle fuel sold at retail containing more than 1% ethanol or methanol must be labeled according to Connecticut Department of Consumer

227

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol License to Ethanol License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol License Anyone who imports, exports, or supplies ethanol in the state of Wyoming must obtain an annual license from the Wyoming Department of Transportation. The fee for each license is $25. (Reference Wyoming

228

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement Motor fuel containing more than 1% ethanol or methanol may not be sold or offered for sale from a motor fuel dispenser unless the individual selling

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Colorado Corn Blender Pump Pilot Program provides funding assistance for each qualified station dispensing mid-level ethanol blends. Projects

230

Ethanol Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis biomass in beekers Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol contains the same chemical compound (C2H5OH) found in alcoholic beverages. Studies have estimated that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the fuel and reduce air pollution. Ethanol is also increasingly available in E85, an alternative fuel that can be used in flexible fuel vehicles. Several steps are required to make ethanol available as a vehicle fuel. Biomass feedstocks are grown and transported to ethanol production

231

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blends to Blends to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends E15 E85 Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Blends Ethanol is blended with gasoline in various amounts for use in vehicles. E10 E10 is a low-level blend composed of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline. It is

232

Diversified Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Diversified Ethanol Place Northbrook, Illinois Zip 60062 Product A division of OTCBB-traded ONYI that is building an ethanol plant in Iowa. Coordinates 42.12972°, -87.831564° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.12972,"lon":-87.831564,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

1991-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

Huckabee, Marvin L. (Marlboro, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA); Neil, Jeffrey T. (Acton, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ethanol Production and Gasoline Prices: A Spurious Correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethanol made from corn comprises 10 % of US gasoline, up from 3 % in 2003. This dramatic increase was spurred by recent policy initiatives such as the Renewable Fuel Standard and state-level blend mandates, and supported by direct subsidies such as the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit. Some proponents of ethanol have argued that ethanol production greatly lowers gasoline prices, with one industry group claiming it reduced gasoline prices by 89 cents in 2010 and $1.09 in 2011. The estimates have been cited in numerous speeches by Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack. These estimates are based on a series of papers by Xiaodong Du and Dermot Hayes. We show that these results are driven by implausible economic assumptions and spurious statistical correlations. To support this last point, we use the same statistical models and find that ethanol production decreases natural gas prices, but increases unemployment in both the US and Europe. We even show that ethanol production increases the ages of our children.

Christopher R. Knittel; Aaron Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels; Phase 3: Effects of Winter Gasoline Volatility and Ethanol Content on Blend Flammability; Flammability Limits of Denatured Ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assessed differences in headspace flammability for summertime gasolines and new high-ethanol content fuel blends. The results apply to vehicle fuel tanks and underground storage tanks. Ambient temperature and fuel formulation effects on headspace vapor flammability of ethanol/gasoline blends were evaluated. Depending on the degree of tank filling, fuel type, and ambient temperature, fuel vapors in a tank can be flammable or non-flammable. Pure gasoline vapors in tanks generally are too rich to be flammable unless ambient temperatures are extremely low. High percentages of ethanol blended with gasoline can be less volatile than pure gasoline and can produce flammable headspace vapors at common ambient temperatures. The study supports refinements of fuel ethanol volatility specifications and shows potential consequences of using noncompliant fuels. E85 is flammable at low temperatures; denatured ethanol is flammable at warmer temperatures. If both are stored at the same location, one or both of the tanks' headspace vapors will be flammable over a wide range of ambient temperatures. This is relevant to allowing consumers to splash -blend ethanol and gasoline at fueling stations. Fuels compliant with ASTM volatility specifications are relatively safe, but the E85 samples tested indicate that some ethanol fuels may produce flammable vapors.

Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; Clark, W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Dry-grind Highly Digestible Grain Sorghum Lines for Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential of high digestible grain sorghum (HDGS) with a modified starch protein endosperm matrix to replace corn in ethanol production was investigated using dry grind simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Preliminary experiments showed that HDGS yielded higher amounts of glucose and ethanol than normal digestible grain sorghum (NDGS) and corn particularly in the first 48 hrs of fermentation. It was hypothesized that fast conversion of starch to glucose and ethanol during hydrolysis and fermentation are results of improved protein digestibility of HDGS. The invagination of protein structures in HDGS produced a flourier endosperm texture, softer kernels and lower starch content than the normal digestible protein (ND) lines. Highly digestible protein (HD) lines have better pasting properties (significantly lower pasting temperature, faster rate of gelatinization and higher peak viscosity) than ND lines based on the RVA profile. Increasing protein digestibility of the HDGS improved starch digestibility (increased rate of glucose conversion and total glucose yield during saccharification), which is supported by highly significant correlation of turbidity with rate of glucose conversion and efficiency of enzymatic conversion. The efficiency of ethanol conversion is significantly correlated with starch digestibility, pasting properties, and protein digestibility. Results also showed that HD sorghum lines had significantly faster rate of conversion and shorter reaction time needed to achieve completion than ND sorghum lines and corn. Increasing the dry solid concentration from 22% to 30% (w/v) increased the ethanol yield from 8% v/v to 13%v/v. This will allow considerable saving of water, reduced distillation cost and increased ethanol production for a given plant capacity and labor cost. Fineness of grind influences the amount of sugar formed due to variation in surface area of the flour. The hypothesis that finer particles has faster and higher glucose yield, defined as g of glucose converted per g of theoretical glucose, is supported by highly significant correlation of mass fraction of 3 to 60 mu m size range and mass median diameter (MMD) of 60 to 1000 mu m size range with glucose conversion efficiency and glucose conversion rate during saccharification and fermentation.

Hernandez, Joan R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Kentucky Corn Growers' Association (KyCGA) offers grants of $5,000 per pump to retailers installing new E85 dispensers in Kentucky. For more

239

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blending Ethanol Blending Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blending Regulation Gasoline suppliers who provide fuel to distributors in the state must offer gasoline that is suitable for blending with fuel alcohol. Suppliers may not

240

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Credit County governments are eligible to receive waste reduction credits for using yard clippings, clean wood waste, or paper waste as feedstock for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively

242

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Requirement Suppliers that import gasoline for sale in North Carolina must offer fuel that is not pre-blended with fuel alcohol but that is suitable for future

243

Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Place Tampa, Florida Sector Biomass Product Consortium researching ethanol from...

244

Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel. A technology, market, and economic assessment for Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Vehicles and E85 Stations Needed to Achieve Ethanol Goals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the numbers of stations and vehicles necessary to achieve future goals for sales of ethanol fuel (E85). The paper does not analyze issues related to the supply of ethanol which may turn out to be of even greater concern. A model of consumers decisions to purchase E85 versus gasoline based on prices, availability, and refueling frequency is derived and preliminary results for 2010, 2017 and 2030 consistent with the President s 2007 biofuels program goals are presented (1). A limited sensitivity analysis is carried out to indicate key uncertainties in the trade-off between the number of stations and fuels. The analysis indicates that to meet a 2017 goal of 26 billion gallons of E85 sold, on the order of 30% to 80% of all stations may need to offer E85, and that 125 to 200 million flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) may need to be on the road, even if oil prices remain high. These conclusions are tentative for three reasons: (1) there is considerable uncertainty about key parameter values, such as the price elasticity of choice between E85 and gasoline, (2) the future prices of E85 and gasoline are uncertain; and (3) the method of analysis used is highly aggregated; it does not consider the potential benefits of regional strategies nor the possible existence of market segments predisposed to purchase E85. Nonetheless, the preliminary results indicate that the 2017 biofuels program goals are ambitious and will require a massive effort to produce FFVs and insure widespread availability of E85.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pacific Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Ethanol Pacific Ethanol Address 400 Capitol Mall, Suite 2060 Place Sacramento, California Zip 95814 Sector Biofuels Product Ethanol production Website http://www.pacificethanol.net/ Coordinates 38.578811°, -121.502314° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.578811,"lon":-121.502314,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blend Blend Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Definition An ethanol blend is defined as a blended motor fuel containing ethyl alcohol that is at least 99% pure, derived from agricultural products, and

251

Northern Lights Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Northern Lights Ethanol LLC is a company located in Big Stone City, South Dakota . References "Northern Lights Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from...

252

Autothermal Partial Oxidation of Ethanol and Alcohols  

Autothermal Reforming of Ethanol and Alcohols into Syngas Ethanol and alcohols can be converted into syngas using a robust autothermal reforming process. Syngas is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used to synthesize other ...

253

Continuous production of ethanol by use of flocculent Zymomonas mobilis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved means and process for producing ethanol by fermentation are provided. Another object of the invention is to produce ethanol in a continuous-flow process by means of a biological catalyst that can be retained in a continuous-flow reactor vessel without being bonded to or held within a support material. An additional object of the invention is to provide a fermentation reactor vessel wherein disturbance of the desirable plug flow of sugar solution is minimized. These objects are attained by the preferred apparatus and process of the invention which utilize a newly-discovered flocculent strain of Zymomonas mobilis for converting sugar to ethanol in a continuous flow-type reactor vessel. The flow rate of a sugar-containing solution through a column containing the floc-forming strain of Z. mobilis is adjusted so that a sufficient conversion of sugar to ethanol is achieved in the column and the flocculent Z. mobilis is not washed away in effluent from the column. Carbon dioxide gas generated by the fermentation process is vented from a plurality of points spaced along an inclined column in which the process is conducted, thus minimizing disturbance of the plug flow of liquid by this gas.

Arcuri, E.J.; Donaldson, T.L.

1982-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Economic feasibility of ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental and political concerns centered on energy use from gasoline have led to a great deal of research on ethanol production. The goal of this thesis is to determine if it is profitable to produce ethanol in Texas using sweet sorghum juice. Four different areas, Moore, Hill, Willacy, and Wharton Counties, using two feedstock alternatives, sweet sorghum only and sweet sorghum and corn, will be analyzed using Monte Carlo simulation to determine the probability of economic success. Economic returns to the farmers in the form of a contract price for the average sweet sorghum yield per acre in each study area and to the ethanol plant buying sweet sorghum at the contract price will be simulated and ranked. The calculated sweet sorghum contract prices offered to farmers are $9.94, $11.44, $29.98, and $36.21 per ton in Wharton, Willacy, Moore, and Hill Counties, respectively. The contract prices are equal to the next most profitable crop returns or ten percent more than the total cost to produce sweet sorghum in the study area. The wide variation in the price is due to competing crop returns and the sweet sorghum growing season. Ethanol production using sweet sorghum and corn is the most profitable alternative analyzed for an ethanol plant. A Moore County ethanol plant has the highest average net present value of $492.39 million and is most preferred overall when using sweet sorghum and corn to produce ethanol. Sweet sorghum ethanol production is most profitable in Willacy County but is not economically successful with an average net present value of $-11.06 million. Ethanol production in Hill County is least preferred with an average net present value of $-712.00 and $48.40 million when using sweet sorghum only and sweet sorghum and corn, respectively. Producing unsubsidized ethanol from sweet sorghum juice alone is not profitable in Texas. Sweet sorghum ethanol supplemented by grain is more economical but would not be as profitable as producing ethanol from only grain in the Texas Panhandle. Farmers profit on average from contract prices for sweet sorghum when prices cover total production costs for the crop.

Morris, Brittany Danielle

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

90% of new cars have engines specially designed to run on hydrous ethanol. This avoids the expense of remov-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production processes. Most bioethanol is produced from sugar cane (Brazil), molasses and corn (USA production Plants for conversion of bioethanol to other industrial chemical raw materials or end use products sugars. All the ethanol used for fuel and alcoholic drinks, and most industrial ethanol, is made

256

A Bayesian Learning Model in the Agent-based Bilateral Negotiation between the Coal Producers and Electric Power Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reform of Chinas coal sector has changed the traditional relationship of the coal producers and electric power generators, and now most of the coal the coal producers sell to the generators is transacted through electric coal bilateral contracts, ... Keywords: Electric price, Agent, Bayesian Learning

Mingwen Zhang; Zhongfu Tan; Jianbao Zhao; Li Li

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

Cuzens, J.E.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

Qteros formerly SunEthanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Qteros formerly SunEthanol Qteros formerly SunEthanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Qteros (formerly SunEthanol) Place Amherst, Massachusetts Zip 1002 Product Massachusetts based next generation biofuel technology developer. Coordinates 44.450509°, -89.281675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.450509,"lon":-89.281675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

A stochastic feasibility study of Texas ethanol production: analysis of Texas Legislature ethanol subsidy proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent resurgence of interest in ethanol production has prompted the Texas State Legislature to investigate the feasibility of ethanol production in Texas. The reasons for the increased interest in ethanol production could possibly relate to depressed commodity prices, gasoline price volatility, environmental regulations and a renewed push towards increased fuel sufficiently given national and world events following September 11, 2001. Past feasibility studies have failed to incorporate the risk of input and output prices in their analyses. Furthermore, it is evident from the literature, that unrealistic values were used in many of the studies, to perhaps, entice prospective investors in providing capital for the construction and operation of the ethanol facilities. This study provides an unbiased, stochastic simulation feasibility study incorporating the risks of ethanol, corn, dry distillers grains (DDGS), soybean meal, electricity, and natural gas prices on three size facilities in Texas. In addition, four different scenarios were included incorporating four levels of the proposed Texas State Producer Grant into the feasibility study. Those levels were the $0.00, $0.10, $0.20, and $0.30/gal on the first 30 million gallons per year (MMGPY) of production for each registered plant. Rather than assuming point values for input variables and providing a deterministic analysis, the advantage of this study is that it provides a feasibility study that includes risks of input and output prices in its results. For each of the three size facilities analyzed (15, 30, and 80 MMGPY) the results of probability of negative cash flows and simple statistics, probability of dividend payments and simple statistics, present value of ending owners equity in 2022, net present value, certainty equivalents and absolute certainty equivalents risk premiums of net present value are described in the study. The study found that neither the 15, 30, or the 80 MMGPY facilities would be feasible in Texas. The facilities have little chance of economic success under the best scenario ($0.30/gal) and all have a zero percent chance of maintaining beginning equity.

Gill, Robert Chope

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

List of Ethanol Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Incentives Ethanol Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 67 Ethanol Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 67) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Steam-system upgrades Water Heaters Windows Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Ethanol Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Solar Water Heat Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Natural Gas Yes Alcohol Fuel Credit (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Commercial Industrial Ethanol

262

Ethanol Myths and Facts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to advancing technological solutions to promote and increase the use of clean, abundant, affordable, and domestically- and sustainably-produced biofuels to diversify our nation's energy sources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and reduce our dependence on oil. U.S. Energy consumption is expected to grow over 18 percent by 2030. Biofuels must continue to play a significant role as we work aggressively to diversify our nation's energy sources and provide a balanced portfolio of energy solutions to help meet our growing demand for energy. Since 2007, DOE has announced over $1 billion in multi-year biofuels research and development projects.

263

Ethanol Myths and Facts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to advancing technological solutions to promote and increase the use of clean, abundant, affordable, and domestically- and sustainably-produced biofuels to diversify our nation's energy sources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and reduce our dependence on oil. U.S. Energy consumption is expected to grow over 18 percent by 2030. Biofuels must continue to play a significant role as we work aggressively to diversify our nation's energy sources and provide a balanced portfolio of energy solutions to help meet our growing demand for energy. Since 2007, DOE has announced over $1 billion in multi-year biofuels research and development projects.

264

Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Smolin, Nikolai [ORNL; Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Bhandiwad, Ashwini [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State Universitys Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

Dr. Donal F. Day

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Kinetic Energy Analysis of a microburst-Producing Thunderstorm Based on JAWS Dual-Doppler Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-Doppler data collected from 1646 to 1648 MDT 14 July 1982 in Colorado are used to study the kinetic energy budget of a microburst-producing thunderstorm during its mature stage. Values of each term in the kinetic energy budget equation are ...

Yeong-jer Lin; John A. Coover

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ethanol Demand in United States Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol competes with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to satisfy oxygen, octane, and volume requirements of certain gasolines. However, MTBE has water quality problems that may create significant market opportunities for ethanol. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has used its Refinery Yield Model to estimate ethanol demand in gasolines with restricted use of MTBE. Reduction of the use of MTBE would increase the costs of gasoline production and possibly reduce the gasoline output of U.S. refineries. The potential gasoline supply problems of an MTBE ban could be mitigated by allowing a modest 3 vol percent MTBE in all gasoline. In the U.S. East and Gulf Coast gasoline producing regions, the 3 vol percent MTBE option results in costs that are 40 percent less than an MTBE ban. In the U.S. Midwest gasoline producing region, with already high use of ethanol, an MTBE ban has minimal effect on ethanol demand unless gasoline producers in other regions bid away the local supply of ethanol. The ethanol/MTBE issue gained momentum in March 2000 when the Clinton Administration announced that it would ask Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to provide the authority to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of MTBE; to ensure that air quality gains are not diminished as MTBE use is reduced; and to replace the existing oxygenate requirement in the Clean Air Act with a renewable fuel standard for all gasoline. Premises for the ORNL study are consistent with the Administration announcement, and the ethanol demand curve estimates of this study can be used to evaluate the impact of the Administration principles and related policy initiatives.

Hadder, G.R.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Kinder Morgan Central Florida Pipeline Ethanol Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

KINDER MORGAN CENTRAL FLORIDA PIPELINE ETHANOL PROJECT  In December 2008, Kinder Morgan began transporting commercial batches of denatured ethanol along with gasoline shipments in its 16-inch Central Florida Pipeline (CFPL) from Tampa to Orlando, making CFPL the first transmarket gasoline pipeline in the United States to do so. The 16-inch pipeline previously only transported regular and premium gasoline.  Kinder Morgan invested approximately $10 million to modify the line for ethanol shipments which involved chemically cleaning the pipeline, replacing pipeline equipment that was incompatible with ethanol and expanding storage capacity at its Orlando terminal to handle ethanol shipments.  Kinder Morgan is responding to customer interest in ethanol blending. Our Florida

269

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations

271

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption

272

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Biobutanol Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive

273

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Flexible Fuel Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions Updated July 29, 2011 Rising gasoline prices and concerns about climate change have greatly

274

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fueling Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants The Minnesota Corn Research & Promotion Council and the Minnesota

275

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits

276

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program

277

Investigation of Knock limited Compression Ratio of Ethanol Gasoline Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ethanol offers significant potential for increasing the compression ratio of SI engines resulting from its high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. A study was conducted to determine the knock limited compression ratio of ethanol gasoline blends to identify the potential for improved operating efficiency. To operate an SI engine in a flex fuel vehicle requires operating strategies that allow operation on a broad range of fuels from gasoline to E85. Since gasoline or low ethanol blend operation is inherently limited by knock at high loads, strategies must be identified which allow operation on these fuels with minimal fuel economy or power density tradeoffs. A single cylinder direct injection spark ignited engine with fully variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) is operated at WOT conditions to determine the knock limited compression ratio (CR) of ethanol fuel blends. The geometric compression ratio is varied by changing pistons, producing CR from 9.2 to 13.66. The effective CR is varied using an electro-hydraulic valvetrain that changed the effective trapped displacement using both Early Intake Valve Closing (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closing (LIVC). The EIVC and LIVC strategies result in effective CR being reduced while maintaining the geometric expansion ratio. It was found that at substantially similar engine conditions, increasing the ethanol content of the fuel results in higher engine efficiency and higher engine power. These can be partially attributed to a charge cooling effect and a higher heating valve of a stoichiometric mixture for ethanol blends (per unit mass of air). Additional thermodynamic effects on and a mole multiplier are also explored. It was also found that high CR can increase the efficiency of ethanol fuel blends, and as a result, the fuel economy penalty associated with the lower energy content of E85 can be reduced by about a third. Such operation necessitates that the engine be operated in a de-rated manner for gasoline, which is knock-prone at these high CR, in order to maintain compatibility. By using EIVC and LIVC strategies, good efficiency is maintained with gasoline, but power is reduced by about 34%.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Low-Level Ethanol Fuel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet addresses: (a) why Clean Cities promotes ethanol blends; (b) how these blends affect emissions; (c) fuel performance and availability; and (d) cost, incentives, and regulations.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fueling Infrastructure Polymer Materials Compatibility to Ethanol...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fueling Infrastructure Polymer Materials Compatibility to Ethanol-blended Gasoline These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics...

280

Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

Pitstick, M.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

Pitstick, M.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ethanol: the billion-dollar harvest.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol has dominated headlines as people and governments invest in alternative forms of energy. The biofuel is made from corn kernels and is being touted (more)

Allan, Chantal Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

An Environmental and Policy Evaluation of Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the global demand for energy rises, there are significant efforts to find alternative energy sources. In the United States (US), these efforts are primarily motivated by a desire to increase energy security and reduce the potential impacts on climate change caused by carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Biofuels are considered a potential partial solution, which are being encouraged through public policy. Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel that is required in increasing amounts over time as part of the Renewable Fuel Standards. Thus, researchers are exploring the environmental impacts of using this biofuel on a large scale. This dissertation research performed an environmental evaluation using the Life Cycle Assessment technique on Bioenergy Sorghum, a crop which was specifically produced as an energy crop, used in a conversion process (MixAlco version 1) that can produce cellulosic ethanol. Results indicate that the conversion process is highly optimized with minimal environmental concerns. Analysis of the crop production, however, demonstrate that further investigation is warranted regarding the depletion of natural resources and emissions from the fertilizers and pesticides/herbicides, due to large scale production of energy crops. A new policy is proposed to support the sustainable, environmentally responsible development of cellulosic ethanol in the US.

Hurtado, Lisa Diane

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Evaluation of nanoparticle-immobilized cellulase for improved ethanol yield in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation reactions  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol yields were 2.1 (P = 0.06) to 2.3 (P = 0.01) times higher in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) reactions of microcrystalline cellulose when cellulase was physisorbed on silica nanoparticles compared to enzyme in solution. In SSF reactions, cellulose is hydrolyzed to glucose by cellulase while yeast simultaneously ferments glucose to ethanol. The 35 C temperature and the presence of ethanol in SSF reactions are not optimal conditions for cellulase. Immobilization onto solid supports can stabilize the enzyme and promote activity at non-optimum reaction conditions. Mock SSF reactions that did not contain yeast were used to measure saccharification products and identify the mechanism for the improved ethanol yield using immobilized cellulase. Cellulase adsorbed to 40 nm silica nanoparticles produced 1.6 times (P = 0.01) more glucose than cellulase in solution in 96 h at pH 4.8 and 35 C. There was no significant accumulation (<250 {mu}g) of soluble cellooligomers in either the solution or immobilized enzyme reactions. This suggests that the mechanism for the immobilized enzyme's improved glucose yield compared to solution enzyme is the increased conversion of insoluble cellulose hydrolysis products to soluble cellooligomers at 35 C and in the presence of ethanol. The results show that silica-immobilized cellulase can be used to produce increased ethanol yields in the conversion of lignocellulosic materials by SSF.

Lupoi, Jason; Smith, Emily

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Continuous Ethanol Production Using Immobilized-Cell/Enzyme Biocatalysts in Fluidized-Bed Bioreactor (FBR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Previous studies at ORNL using immobilized Zymomonas mobilis in FBR at both laboratory and demonstration scale (4-in-ID by 20-ft-tall) have shown that the system was more than 50 times as productive as industrial benchmarks (batch and fed-batch free cell fermentations for ethanol production from glucose). Economic analysis showed that a continuous process employing the FBR technology to produce ethanol from corn-derived glucose would offer savings of three to six cents per gallon of ethanol compared to a typical batch process. The application of the FBR technology for ethanol production was extended to investigate more complex feedstocks, which included starch and lignocellulosic-derived mixed sugars. Economic analysis and mathematical modeling of the reactor were included in the investigation. This report summarizes the results of these extensive studies.

Nghiem, NP

2003-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Comparing Scales of Environmental Effects from Gasoline and Ethanol Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the environmental effects of alternative fuel production is critical to characterizing the sustainability of energy resources to inform policy and regulatory decisions. The magnitudes of these environmental effects vary according to the intensity and scale of fuel production along each step of the supply chain. We compare the scales (i.e., spatial extent and temporal duration) of ethanol and gasoline production processes and environmental effects based on a literature review, and then synthesize the scale differences on space-time diagrams. Comprehensive assessment of any fuel-production system is a moving target, and our analysis shows that decisions regarding the selection of spatial and temporal boundaries of analysis have tremendous influences on the comparisons. Effects that strongly differentiate gasoline and ethanol supply chains in terms of scale are associated with when and where energy resources are formed and how they are extracted. Although both gasoline and ethanol production may result in negative environmental effects, this study indicates that ethanol production traced through a supply chain may impact less area and result in more easily reversed effects of a shorter duration than gasoline production.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Timothy L [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M [University of Minnesota

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Research on a novel method diagnosis and maintenance for key produce plant based on MAS and NN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the development of the electrical power market, the maintenance automation has become an intrinsic need to increase the overall economic efficiency of hydropower plants. A Multi-Agent System (MAS) based model for the predictive maintenance system ...

Weijin Jiang; Xiaohong Lin

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed to run on gasoline, E85, or any mixture of the two. FFVs are offered by several vehicle manufacturers. To determine if your vehicle can use E85, consult your owner's...

290

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. A proposal issued by BlueFire Ethanol Inc,describing a project that will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation...

291

Development of critical surface diagnostic based on the ion acoustic decay instability in laser produced high density plasma  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a large angle, UV collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic for high density, hot plasma relevant to laser fusion. The CTS measured the basic parameters of the plasma waves (frequency, wave number), or the spectral density function for selected wave vectors of plasma waves, which were excited by the IADI (ion acoustic parametric decay instability). It is a good diagnostic tool for a local electron temperature measurement. The electron temperature was estimated by measuring either ion acoustic wave or electron plasma wave in the laser intensity window of 1produced high density plasma.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nedak Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nedak Ethanol LLC Nedak Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Nedak Ethanol LLC Place Atkinson, Nebraska Zip 68713 Product NEDAK Ethanol, LLC is a Nebraska limited liability company, which was formed on December 15, 2003 for the purpose of constructing and operating an ethanol plant near Atkinson, Nebraska. Coordinates 34.52909°, -78.168819° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.52909,"lon":-78.168819,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on AddThis.com...

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Underwriters Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on AddThis.com... Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing

295

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 The Department of Energy (Department) has the strategic...

296

NIST Finds That Ethanol-Loving Bacteria Accelerate Cracking ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US production of ethanol for fuel has been rising quickly, topping 13 ... and reliably transport ethanol fuel in repurposed oil and gas pipelines.". ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to...

298

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October...

299

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Cellulosic ethanol: biofuel researchers prepare toBiofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial welltechnologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of work

Fortman, J. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Inc | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly American Ethanol Inc.) Place Cupertino, California Zip CA 95014 Product...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Relationships between circadian rhythms and ethanol intake in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intake/(ethanol + water intake)). This exposure lasted 5intake/(ethanol + water intake). Statistical Analysesand water bottles were weighed to determine g/kg intake as

Trujillo, Jennifer L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the US today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations.

Not Available

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania's Ethanol Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on

304

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Ethanol Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section...

305

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement An ethanol retailer selling a blend of 10% ethanol by volume or higher must

307

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Laws and Incentives

308

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blended Fuel Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition Ethanol blended fuel, such as gasohol, is defined as any gasoline blended with 10% or more of anhydrous ethanol. (Reference Idaho Statutes 63-240

309

Lipidomic changes in rat liver after long-term exposure to ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined the progression of ALD along with lipidomic changes in rats fed ethanol for 2 and 3 months to understand the mechanism, and identify possible biomarkers. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed 5% ethanol or caloric equivalent of maltose-dextrin in a Lieber-DeCarli diet. Animals were killed at the end of 2 and 3 months and plasma and livers were collected. Portions of the liver were fixed for histological and immunohistological studies. Plasma and the liver lipids were extracted and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A time dependent fatty infiltration was observed in the livers of ethanol-fed rats. Mild inflammation and oxidative stress were observed in some ethanol-fed rats at 3 months. The multivariate and principal component analysis of proton and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy data of extracted lipids from the plasma and livers showed segregation of ethanol-fed groups from the pair-fed controls. Significant hepatic lipids that were increased by ethanol exposure included fatty acids and triglycerides, whereas phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased. However, both free fatty acids and PC decreased in the plasma. In liver lipids unsaturation of fatty acyl chains increased, contrary to plasma, where it decreased. Our studies confirm that over-accumulation of lipids in ethanol-induced liver steatosis accompanied by mild inflammation on long duration of ethanol exposure. Identified metabolic profile using NMR lipidomics could be further explored to establish biomarker signatures representing the etiopathogenesis, progression and/or severity of ALD. - Highlights: > Long term exposure to ethanol was studied. > A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based lipidomic approach was used. > We examined the clustering pattern of the NMR data with principal component analysis. > NMR data were compared with histology and immunohistochemistry data. > Biochemical parameters were compared with the observed NMR lipid data.

Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kondraganti, Shakuntala [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Shakeel Ansari, G.A., E-mail: sansari@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Clostridium thermocellum ATCC27405 transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic profiles after ethanol stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a candidate consolidated bioprocessing biocatalyst, which is a microorganism that expresses enzymes for both cellulose hydrolysis and its fermentation to produce fuels such as lignocellulosic ethanol. However, C. thermocellum is relatively sensitive to ethanol compared to ethanologenic microorganisms such as yeast and Zymomonas mobilis that are used in industrial fermentations but do not possess native enzymes for industrial cellulose hydrolysis. In this study, C. thermocellum was grown to mid-exponential phase and then treated with ethanol to a final concentration of 3.9 g/L to investigate its physiological and regulatory responses to ethanol stress. Samples were taken pre-shock and 2, 12, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min post-shock, and from untreated control fermentations for systems biology analyses. Cell growth was arrested by ethanol supplementation with intracellular accumulation of carbon sources such as cellobiose, and sugar phosphates, including fructose-6-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate. The largest response of C. thermocellum to ethanol shock treatment was in genes and proteins related to nitrogen uptake and metabolism, which is likely important for redirecting the cells physiology to overcome inhibition and allow growth to resume. This study suggests possible avenues for metabolic engineering and provides comprehensive, integrated systems biology datasets that will be useful for future metabolic modeling and strain development endeavors.

Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Essays on the Impact of Presidential and Media-Based Usage of Anxiety-Producing Rhetoric on Dynamic Issue Attention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intention of the project is to determine whether political elites have to discuss an issue using a specific emotional tone before the public and other political elites consider that issue a problem. Research has not yet demonstrated under what conditions elite rhetorical cues can heighten issue attention. Past studies have suggested that an increase in the absolute intensity of elite issue discussion can heighten perceptions of an issue as a problem. The problem with this notion is that within that absolute issue discussion, elites might simply be repeatedly saying conditions related to an issue are stable. They might also be presenting basic factual background information about an issue, a type of discussion unlikely to capture the interest of many in the political system. There has to be a specific type of cue that elites can offer to compel others in the political system to reconsider their outlook on issue salience. Derived from dual systems theories of emotion, the dissertation predicts that issue discussion that heightens feelings of anxiety increases the likelihood of an altered outlook on issue salience. To evaluate this prediction, time series statistical techniques are employed. The time series models evaluate whether prior change in the level of anxietybased cues by the president and the media predict changes in the level of attention the public offers to that issue. The same types of models evaluate whether this form of issue discussion by the president predicts issue dynamics of the media, and vice-versa. The several issues studied are crime, health care, poverty, and the environment. Information spanning thirty years is collected from presidential papers, general and ideological media newspaper coverage, and multiple public survey organizations. The findings suggest anxiety-based issue discussion does have the potential to guide issue attention. Prior changes in anxiety-based cues do predict future levels of attention the public provides to issues. A positive shift in anxiety cues by elites appears to have the capacity to increase public attention to issues. This increase though appears to be very small and abbreviated, suggesting limited effects. Elites do not appear to influence each other through anxiety cues.

Olds, Christopher Paul

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulous and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharoyces pombe, cellulase, .beta.-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35.degree. C. to about 40.degree. C. until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, Stanley M. (Longmont, CO); Mohagheghi, Ali (Northglen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Winter Haven, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Potential sources of non-petroleum based alcohols for vehicular fleet testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of alcohol required to supply all of the US Department of Energy's vehicular fleet test fuel needs during the period fiscal year 1980 through 1982 could reach on the order of 1.5 and 1.6 million gallons per year of 200 proof ethanol and fuel-grade methanol, respectively. During the time frame of fiscal year 1982 through 1987, vehicular fleet testing fuel needs could approach 8 and 10 million gallons per year of ethanol and methanol, respectively. In terms of supply, all of the ethanol fleet test fuel requirements can be satisfied by domestic fermentation ethanol from non-petroleum/non-natural gas resources. Initially, the major ethanol fermentation firms are potentially capable of supplying the necessary quantity of ethanol. As the test project progresses and fleet size expands, the outlook for ethanol supply from the major firms as well as from other private sources, both existing and planned, is very promising. This supply outlook could be altered significantly if an expanding Gasohol market demands a major portion of the available ethanol production. It is in the Federal Government's best interest to arrange for ethanol supply agreements as soon as possible so that fleet test volume requirements can be assured. The supply situation for methanol from non-petroleum/non-natural gas resources is not very promising. It appears that methanol produced from coal or biomass will not be available before 1985 at the earliest, assuming that a decision to construct a sizeable plant is made immediately. As such, fuel grade methanol for use in the reliability fleet test project will most likely have to be obtained from the existing petroleum/natural gas-based methanol market. This market is currently operating at a level below maximum capacity and several older mothballed plants can be reactivated if the economic situation warrants.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 3550% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ethanol Production, Distribution, and Use: Discussions on Key Issues (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From production to the environment, presentation discusses issues surrounding ethanol as a transportation fuel.

Harrow, G.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Smoothing HCCI heat release with vaporization-cooling-induced thermal stratification using ethanol.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends are being widely considered as alternative fuels for light-duty automotive applications. At the same time, HCCI combustion has the potential to provide high efficiency and ultra-low exhaust emissions. However, the application of HCCI is typically limited to low and moderate loads because of unacceptably high heat-release rates (HRR) at higher fueling rates. This work investigates the potential of lowering the HCCI HRR at high loads by using partial fuel stratification to increase the in-cylinder thermal stratification. This strategy is based on ethanol's high heat of vaporization combined with its true single-stage ignition characteristics. Using partial fuel stratification, the strong fuel-vaporization cooling produces thermal stratification due to variations in the amount of fuel vaporization in different parts of the combustion chamber. The low sensitivity of the autoignition reactions to variations of the local fuel concentration allows the temperature variations to govern the combustion event. This results in a sequential autoignition event from leaner and hotter zones to richer and colder zones, lowering the overall combustion rate compared to operation with a uniform fuel/air mixture. The amount of partial fuel stratification was varied by adjusting the fraction of fuel injected late to produce stratification, and also by changing the timing of the late injection. The experiments show that a combination of 60-70% premixed charge and injection of 30-40 % of the fuel at 80{sup o}CA before TDC is effective for smoothing the HRR. With CA50 held fixed, this increases the burn duration by 55% and reduces the maximum pressure-rise rate by 40%. Combustion stability remains high but engine-out NO{sub x} has to be monitored carefully. For operation with strong reduction of the peak HRR, ISNO{sub x} rises to around 0.20 g/kWh for an IMEP{sub g} of 440 kPa. The single-cylinder HCCI research engine was operated naturally aspirated without EGR at 1200 rpm, and had low residual level using a CR = 14 piston.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

320

Deletion of N-type calcium channels alters ethanol reward and reduces ethanol consumption in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regulate ethanol consumption. Cell 109:733743.Mice blockers on alcohol consumption in alcohol-drinkingRD (1998) Etha- nol consumption and resistance are inversely

Newton, P M; Orr, C J; Wallace, M J; Kim, C; Shin, H S; Messing, R O

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Retailer Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit The Ethanol Promotion Tax Credit is available to any fuel retailer for up

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate The tax rate on fuel containing ethanol is $0.06 per gallon less than the tax rate on other motor fuels in certain geographic areas. This reduced

323

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard At least 85% of gasoline supplied to a retailer or sold in Hawaii must contain a minimum of 10% ethanol (E10), unless the Director determines that

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Fee to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Facility Fee The cost to submit an air quality permit application for an ethanol production plant is $1,000. An annual renewal fee is also required for the

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Biodiesel Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption Motor fuels sold to an ethanol or biodiesel production facility and motor

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Sales Tax Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption The portion of ethanol (ethyl alcohol) sold and blended with motor fuel is exempt from sales tax. (Reference Oklahoma Statutes 68-500.10-1 and

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Labeling Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements Pumps that dispense ethanol-blended gasoline available for purchase must be

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Ethanol and Ethanol Specifications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications Ethanol-blended gasoline must conform to ASTM D4814, E85 must conform to

329

Show Me Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Show Me Ethanol LLC Show Me Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Show Me Ethanol, LLC Place Carrollton, Missouri Zip 64633 Product Developing an ethanol project in Carrollton, Missouri. Coordinates 36.935443°, -76.531593° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.935443,"lon":-76.531593,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Didion Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Didion Ethanol LLC Didion Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Didion Ethanol LLC Place Cambria, Wisconsin Zip 53923 Product Also Didion Milling LLC, Grand River Distribution LLC. Developing a 50m gallon ethanol facility in Cambria, Wisconsin. Coordinates 43.543205°, -89.108619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.543205,"lon":-89.108619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Michigan Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Michigan Ethanol LLC Place Caro, Michigan Zip 48723-8804 Product Ethanol productor in Caro, Michigan. Coordinates 43.488705°, -83.396764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.488705,"lon":-83.396764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Ethanol LLC Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place Bakersfield, California Product Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Kansas Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas Ethanol LLC Kansas Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Kansas Ethanol LLC Place Lyons, Kansas Zip 67554 Product Constructing a 55m gallon ethanol plant in Rice County, Kansas Coordinates 43.72394°, -96.871179° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.72394,"lon":-96.871179,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Energy Utilization in Fermentation Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel ethanol industry has put into practice several techniques for minimizing energy requirements for ethanol manufacture. Thermal energy usage in fermentation grain ethanol plants has been reduced from the prior practice of 80,900 Btu per gallon ethanol to current demonstrated practice of 49,700 Btu per gallon. Future, state-of-the-art improvements are expected to reduce usage further to 37,000 Btu per gallon or less. The total energy input is projected at 52,000 Btu per gallon after adding in the electrical power. Energy savings have been achieved primarily by flash vapor reuse, pressure cascading of distillation units, and use of more efficient byproduct drying methods. These energy saving techniques should also be useful in other commercial processing applications.

Easley, C. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Opportunities for Utility-Owned CHP at Dry-Mill Fuel Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report quantifies opportunities to co-locate natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) facilities with corn dry-mill fuel ethanol plants in the upper Midwest. It also evaluates the opportunity to generate renewable power by fueling the CHP plants with biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of the byproducts of the corn wet-milling process.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Xylose utilizing Zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium  

SciTech Connect

Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Viitanen, Paul V; Stieglitz, Barry

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Xylose utilizing zymomonas mobilis with improved ethanol production in biomass hydrolysate medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Xylose-utilizing, ethanol producing strains of Zymomonas mobilis with improved performance in medium comprising biomass hydrolysate were isolated using an adaptation process. Independently isolated strains were found to have independent mutations in the same coding region. Mutation in this coding may be engineered to confer the improved phenotype.

Caimi, Perry G; Hitz, William D; Stieglitz, Barry; Viitanen, Paul V

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy optimization for the design of cornbased ethanol plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we address the problem of optimizing corn-based bioethanol plants through the use of heat integration and mathematical programming techniques. The goal is to reduce the operating costs of the plant. Capital cost, energy usage, and yields all contribute to prduction cost. Yield and energy use also influence the viability of cornbased ethanol as a sustainable fuel. We first propose a limited superstructure of alternative designs including the various process units and utility streams involved in ethanol production. Our objective is to determine the connections in the network and the flow in each stream in the network such that we minimize the energy requirement of the overall plant. This is accomplished through the formulation of a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem involving mass and energy balances for all the units in the system, where the model is solved through two nonlinear programming subproblems. We then perform a heat integration study on the resulting flowsheet; the modified flowsheet includes multieffect distillation columns and further reduces energy consumption. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce the current steam consumption required in the transformation of corn into fuel grade ethanol by more than 40 % compared to initial basic design.

Andreas Peschel; Mariano Martn; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Wade Martinson; Luca Zullo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Economic evaluation of the MIT process for manufacture of ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an economic evaluation of the MIT process for the manufacture of ethanol from cellulosic residues. Conceptual process designs were developed for two cases, Case A which is based on the experimental data obtained to date, and Case B which hypothesizes the suppression of acid byproducts. Manufacturing costs, including profit, were estimated at $12.20/million Btu for Case A and $9.40/million Btu for Case B. These are equivalent to about $1.05 and $0.80/gal ethanol respectively. These economic estimates may be slightly on the low side since they do not consider feedstock storage nor working capital requirements. Nevertheless, the manufacturing costs for Case A appear to be comparable to those of the manufacture of ethanol from corn. The plant size used for this analysis was 1500 ton/day corn stover. This is considered to be a realistic size. The conceptual plants make about 27 million gal/yr ethanol in Case A and 41 million gal/yr in Case B. The MIT process appears to be one of the more promising programs being developed under contract for DOE. It is recommended that the process research be continued. Three areas of concern were identified which must be investigated before the process can be commercialized. First, a satisfactory means of storage of corn stover and other agricultural residues must be developed. Second, a method to sterilize corn stover must be developed or it must be demonstrated that the MIT process can run continuously for extended periods with stover that has been sterilized. Third, research must be done to demonstrate the recycle and reuse of process water.

Jenkins, D.M.; Reddy, T.S.

1979-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Annual report and revised research plan, January 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to demonstrate on a laboratory scale the technical feasibility of the direct microbial conversion of pretreated wood to ethanol. During the first year of this contract, we investigated the feasibility of biologically delignifying wood with C. pruinosum and directly fermenting the pretreated wood to ethanol with a mixed culture. Bench-top fermentations of a thermophilic bacillus growing on glucose and of a mixed culture of thermophilic sporocytophaga (US) and a thermophilic bacillus growing on microcrystalline and amorphous cellulose were evaluated for growth and ethanol production. In the mixed culture fermentation of amorphous and microcrystalline cellulose, the specific rate of substrate depletion was calculated to be 0.087 hr/sup -1/ and 0.0346 hr/sup -1/, respectively. However, defining the growth requirements of C. pruinosum and sporocytophaga (US) proved more difficult than originally anticipated. In order to achieve the program objectives within the contract period, a revised research plan was developed based upon chemical pretreatment and the direct fermentation of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. In place of the biological delignification pretreatment step, we have substituted a chemically supplemented steam pretreatment step to partially delignify wood and to enhance its accessibility to microbial utilization. Clostridium thermocellum, which ferments cellulose directly to ethanol and acetic acid, has replaced the mixed culture fermentation stage for ethanol production. Research on the production of ethanol from xylose by the thermophilic bacillus ZB-B2 is retained as one means of utilizing the hemicellulose fraction of hardwood. Work on the genetic improvement of the ethanol yields of both cultures by suppressing acetic acid production is also retained. The rationale, experimental approach, and economic considerations of this revised research plan are also presented.

Brooks, R.E.; Bellamy, W.D.; Su, T.M.

1978-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fuel from farms: A guide to small-scale ethanol production: Second edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide presents the current status of on-farm fermentation ethanol production as well as an overview of some of the technical and economic factors. Tools such as decision and planning worksheets and a sample business plan for use in exploring whether or not to go into ethanol production are given. Specifics in production including information on the raw materials, system components, and operational requirements are also provided. Recommendation of any particular process is deliberately avoided because the choice must be tailored to the needs and resources of each individual producer. The emphasis is on providing the facts necessary to make informed judgments. 98 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Economic impact of ethanol production on U.S. livestock sector: a spatial analysis of corn and distillers grain shipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of corn-based ethanol in the U.S. has increased from 1,630 million gallons in 2000 to 4,855 million gallons in 2006, representing a 198% (more)

N'Guessan, Yapo Genevier

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Pennsylvania laws and incentives

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Oklahoma laws and incentives

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Tax Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol facility is eligible for a credit of $0.075 per gallon of ethanol, before denaturing, for new production for up to 36 consecutive

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Georgia laws and incentives

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Station Locations Find ethanol (E85) fueling stations near an address or ZIP code or along a

348

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Idaho laws and incentives related

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Florida laws and incentives

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Mississippi laws and incentives

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Colorado laws and incentives

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Alaska laws and incentives related

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Wisconsin laws and incentives

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement State government agencies and universities owning or operating motor

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Virginia laws and incentives

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Arkansas laws and incentives

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A qualified investor may receive a tax credit of up to 40% of an

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Oregon laws and incentives related

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Texas laws and incentives related

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all California laws and incentives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A tax credit is available for investments in a qualified small business

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Tennessee laws and incentives

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Minnesota laws and incentives

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Kentucky laws and incentives

365

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Delaware laws and incentives

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Nevada laws and incentives related

367

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%. 5 figs.

Oulman, C.S.; Chriswell, C.D.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

Oulman, Charles S. (Ames, IA); Chriswell, Colin D. (Slater, IA)

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing The Kansas Development Finance Authority may issue revenue bonds to cover

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Illinois laws and incentives

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Michigan laws and incentives

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Nebraska laws and incentives

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Kansas laws and incentives related

375

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Louisiana laws and incentives

376

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Indiana laws and incentives

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Missouri laws and incentives

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Utah Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Utah laws and incentives related

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Iowa Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Iowa laws and incentives related

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement A retail motor fuel dispenser that dispenses fuel containing more than 10%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ohio Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Ohio laws and incentives related

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Connecticut laws and incentives

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vermont Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Vermont laws and incentives

384

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Ethanol Fuel Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants

385

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Maryland Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Maryland laws and incentives

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Washington Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Washington laws and incentives

387

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Hawaii laws and incentives related

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Arizona Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Arizona laws and incentives

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alabama Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Alabama laws and incentives

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Wyoming laws and incentives

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Federal laws and incentives

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Maine Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Maine laws and incentives related

393

Current State of the U.S. Ethanol Industry, November 2010, U...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more expensive petroleum. Ethanol is a substitute for hydrocarbons, and when crude oil prices increase, more ethanol is used to meet demand for gasoline. Since ethanol is...

394

NREL: Continuum Magazine - At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive Issue 5 Print Version Share this resource At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive DOE challenge met-research advances cut costs to produce fuel from non-food plant sources. A photo showing a silhouette of a man wearing glass in a dark room lit only by a band of light consisting or red, blue, and white dots (26186). Enlarge image In NREL's new Energy Systems Integration Facility, the Insight Collaboration Laboratory shows a 3D model of cellulose microfibrils. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL Imagine a near perfect transportation fuel-it's clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable. Now imagine that it's also affordable. Bringing this vision closer to reality was the challenge the U.S.

395

Biological production of ethanol from coal. Task 4 report, Continuous reactor studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of ethanol from synthesis gas by the anaerobic bacterium C. ljungdahlii has been demonstrated in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), CSTRs with cell recycle and trickle bed reactors. Various liquid media were utilized in these studies including basal medium, basal media with 1/2 B-vitamins and no yeast extract and a medium specifically designed for the growth of C. ljungdahlii in the CSTR. Ethanol production was successful in each of the three reactor types, although trickle bed operation with C. ljungdahlii was not as good as with the stirred tank reactors. Operation in the CSTR with cell recycle was particularly promising, producing 47 g/L ethanol with only minor concentrations of the by-product acetate.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (the Act) outlined a national energy strategy that called for reducing the nation's dependency on petroleum imports. The Act directed the Secretary of Energy to establish a program to promote and expand the use of renewable fuels. The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated a wide range of potential fuels and has concluded that cellulosic ethanol is one of the most promising near-term prospects. Ethanol is widely recognized as a clean fuel that helps reduce emissions of toxic air pollutants. Furthermore, cellulosic ethanol produces less greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline or any of the other alternative transportation fuels being considered by DOE.

Hadder, G.R.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Biological production of ethanol from coal. [Quarterly report], March 22, 1990--June 21, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fermentation pH has been observed to be the key parameter affecting the ratio of ethanol to acetate produced by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The effects of controlled pH on cell growth and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were measured. It was found that cell concentration and acetate concentration increased with pH, while the ethanol concentration was highest at the lower pH. The molar product ratio of ethanol to acetate was 0.74 at pH 4.0, 0.39 at pH 4.5 and 0.12 at pH 5.0. Future experiments will concentrate on studying other important parameters such as agitation rate and nutrients concentrations with controlled pH as a preclude to continuous reactor studies.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF DIESEL ENGINE NOX EMISSIONS USING ETHANOL AS A REDUCTANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOx emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine were reduced by more than 90% and 80% utilizing a full-scale ethanol-SCR system for space velocities of 21000/h and 57000/h respectively. These results were achieved for catalyst temperatures between 360 and 400 C and for C1:NOx ratios of 4-6. The SCR process appears to rapidly convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, which subsequently slipped past the catalyst at appreciable levels at a space velocity of 57000/h. Ammonia and N2O were produced during conversion; the concentrations of each were higher for the low space velocity condition. However, the concentration of N2O did not exceed 10 ppm. In contrast to other catalyst technologies, NOx reduction appeared to be enhanced by initial catalyst aging, with the presumed mechanism being sulfate accumulation within the catalyst. A concept for utilizing ethanol (distilled from an E-diesel fuel) as the SCR reductant was demonstrated.

(1)Kass, M; Thomas, J; Lewis, S; Storey, J; Domingo, N; Graves, R (2) Panov, A

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

399

Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

Hsu, D. D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

1 DISTILLERS BY-PRODUCTS AND CORN STOVER AS FUELS FOR ETHANOL PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Dry-grind ethanol plants have the potential to reduce their operating costs and improve their net energy balances by using biomass as the source of process heat and electricity. We utilized ASPEN PLUS software to model various technology bundles of equipment, fuels and operating activities that are capable of supplying energy and satisfying emissions requirements for dry-grind ethanol plants of 50 and 100 million gallons per year capacity using corn stover, distillers dried grains and solubles (DDGS), or a mixture of corn stover and syrup (the solubles portion of DDGS). In addition to their own requirements, plants producing 50 and 100 million gallons of ethanol are capable of supplying 5-7 or 10-14 MegaWatts of electricity to the grid, respectively. Economic analysis showed favorable rates of return for biomass alternatives compared to conventional plants using natural gas and purchased electricity over a range of conditions. The mixture of corn stover and syrup provided the highest rates of return in general. Factors favoring biomass included a higher premium for low carbon footprint ethanol, higher natural gas prices, lower DDGS prices, lower ethanol

Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam; Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of different crop species and mixtures and storage methods on ethanol production. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn, grain sorghum, wheat and barley were tested for ethanol production as pure species and in mixtures. Some compensatory responses were discovered such as foam reduction in barley feedstocks. Cull potatoes were also tested for ethanol production in their pure state and in combination with grain sorghum. Potato producers could derive additional income if cull potatoes could be profitably used in the production of ethanol. A potato and grain mixture may alleviate the necessity of adding additional grinding equipment to process fleshy high moisture material. It is noteworthy to point out that the hammer mill employed at NMSU Agricultural Science Center at Clovis had no problems in processing potatoes in their pure form. Ensiling storage for high moisture corn and sweet sorghum was tested to determine the effect on ethanol production. High moisture corn proved to be an acceptable feedstock for ethanol production. Because of significant deterioration of the ensiled sweet sorghum samples, further investigation into appropriate techniques to simulate silage on a small-scale is needed. 6 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

Houck, W.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Preface : the 2000 ethanol vehicle challenge.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical papers presented in this special publication represent the efforts of students from 16 colleges and universities across North America. Over 600 students have participated in the Ethanol Vehicle Challenge since its inception in 1998. The 2000 Ethanol Vehicle Challenge was the final year of this successful 3-year advanced vehicle competition series. The papers presented are enhanced and expanded versions of those prepared in advance of the competition by the participating student engineers. They describe the design elements, construction details, and performance of the dedicated ethanol vehicles brought to the Challenge by the participating universities. The goal of this competition was to demonstrate the potential of E85 (85% denatured ethanol and 15% hydrocarbon primer) to significantly lower emissions and improve the performance, fuel efficiency and cold starting of vehicles fueled by ethanol. The competition series began with a Request for Proposals in January 1997. A letter announcing and soliciting interest in the competition (Notice of Interest) was sent to all accredited engineering programs and two-year technical schools in the US and Canada. The Notice described the competition and the requirements for the conversion of a 1997 Chevrolet Malibu to dedicated E85 operation. On the basis of the submitted proposals, 14 schools were selected to participate in the first competition in 1998. Those schools were invited to participate again in 1999. Two additional schools collaborated with the existing teams for the 2000 competition; these two teams participated in the competition, but they were not eligible for the competition awards.

LeBlanc, N. M.; Larsen, R. P.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creek Ethanol LLC Creek Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC Place Goldfield, Iowa Zip 50542 Product Prairie Creek Ethanol, LLC had planned to build a 55m gallon (208m litre) per year ethanol plant in Wesley, Iowa, but, as of 23 May 2008, the board of directors voted to recommend to the members of the company to dissolve the company as soon as possible. Coordinates 37.707559°, -117.233459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.707559,"lon":-117.233459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of

405

Frontier Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frontier Ethanol LLC Frontier Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Frontier Ethanol LLC Place Gowrie, Iowa Product Owner and operator of a bioethanol plant near Gowrie, Iowa. Coordinates 42.28227°, -94.290334° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.28227,"lon":-94.290334,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

Prairie Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Ethanol LLC Place Loomis, South Dakota Product Farmer owned bioethanol project development and managment team. Coordinates 48.82192°, -119.636004° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.82192,"lon":-119.636004,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

INTERMITTENT PRESENTATIONS OF ETHANOL SIPPER TUBE INDUCE ETHANOL DRINKING IN RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Aims: Intermittent presentations of the ethanol sipper have been reported to induce more ethanol drinking in rats than when the ethanol sipper was continuously available during the session. This intermittent sipper effect was observed in a social drinking situation, in which subjects experienced intermittent opportunities to interact briefly with a conspecific rat. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the intermittent sipper procedure in situations providing for intermittent presentations of food, and, in addition, in situations that do not provide for intermittent presentations of another rewarding event. Methods: Four groups of male Long-Evans hooded rats, arranged in a 2 2 factorial design with two levels of Sipper Procedure (Intermittent vs Continuous) and two levels of Food procedure (Food vs No Food), were trained in drinking chambers. During each daily session, Intermittent Sipper groups received access to the ethanol sipper during each of 25 trials of 10 s each, while Continuous Sipper groups had access to the ethanol sipper during the entire session ( 30 min). During each session, Food groups received 25 presentations of food pellets while No Food groups received no food pellets. Ethanol concentrations in the sipper [3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 % (vol./vol.)] increased across sessions. Results: More rapid escalation of ethanol intake was observed in the Intermittent Sipper groups than in the Continuous Sipper groups, and this effect was observed in both the Food and No Food conditions (Ps ethanol sipper, yet induced more ethanol drinking than Continuous Sipper procedures. The intermittent sipper effect is not dependent on presentations of food. Implications for scheduleinduced polydipsia and Pavlovian autoshaping are discussed.

Arthur Tomie; William C. Miller; Erik Dranoff; Larissa A. Pohorecky

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two batch and one continuous reactor study involving Clostridium ljungdahlii were carried out. First, the effects of H{sub 2} partial pressure on growth, CO and H{sub 2} uptake and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were investigated in batch culture. Over the concentration range studied, it was observed that CO was preferentially utilized in favor of H{sub 2}. It was also seen that increasing H{sub 2} partial pressures increased the ratio of ethanol to acetate. Finally, a two-stage CSTR system was successfully operated with C. ljungdahlii in which growth occurred in the first stage and ethanol production occurred in the second stage.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about oil dependency and the contributions of fossil fuel use to climatic change, the U.S. Department of Energy has begun a research initiative to make 20% of motor fuels biofuel based in 10 years, and make 30% of fuels bio-based by 2030. Fundamental to this objective is developing an understanding of feedstock dynamics of crops suitable for cellulosic ethanol production. This report focuses on switchgrass, reviewing the existing literature from field trials across the United States, and compiling it for the first time into a single database. Data available from the literature included cultivar and crop management information, and location of the field trial. For each location we determined latitude and longitude, and used this information to add temperature and precipitation records from the nearest weather station. Within this broad database we were able to identify the major sources of variation in biomass yield, and to characterize yield as a function of some of the more influential factors, e.g., stand age, ecotype, precipitation and temperature in the year of harvest, site latitude, and fertilization regime. We then used a modeling approach, based chiefly on climatic factors and ecotype, to predict potential yields for a given temperature and weather pattern (based on 95th percentile response curves), assuming the choice of optimal cultivars and harvest schedules. For upland ecotype varieties, potential yields were as high as 18 to 20 Mg/ha, given ideal growing conditions, whereas yields in lowland ecotype varieties could reach 23 to 27 Mg/ha. The predictive equations were used to produce maps of potential yield across the continental United States, based on precipitation and temperature in the long term climate record, using the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Potential yields calculated via this characterization were subsequently compared to the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County Level data base (ORECCL), which was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Graham et al. 1996) to predict biofuel crop yields at the county level within a limited geographic area. Mapped output using the model was relatively consistent with known switchgrass distribution. It correctly showed higher yields for lowland switchgrass when compared with upland varieties at most locations. Projections for the most northern parts of the range suggest comparable yields for the two ecotypes, but inadequate data for lowland ecotypes grown at high latitudes make it difficult to fully assess this projection. The final model is a predictor of optimal yields for a given climate scenario, but does not attempt to identify or account for other limiting or interacting factors. The statistical model is nevertheless an improvement over historical efforts, in that it is based on quantifiable climatic differences, and it can be used to extrapolate beyond the historic range of switchgrass. Additional refinement of the current statistical model, or the use of different empirical or process-based models, might improve the prediction of switchgrass yields with respect to climate and interactions with cultivar and management practices, assisting growers in choosing high-yielding cultivars within the context of local environmental growing conditions.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Davis, Ethan [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Retailer Fuel Retailer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit Retailers that sell fuel blends of gasoline containing up to 15% ethanol by

411

Thermally efficient PEM fuel cell that runs on ethanol  

onboard conversion of ethanol into hydrogen fuel Liquid ethanol feedstock eliminates problems with storage and transportation of gaseous hydrogen Control of temperature maximizes selectivity of reformation process and prevents membrane fouling ...

412

Market Power in Ethanol Transport Jonathan E. Hughes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2008) · Low sulfur coal, Busse and Keohane (forthcoming) GIS MAP OF U.S. RAILROAD NETWORK MOTIVATION, ethanol is used voluntarily in "economic blending" when the (subsidized) price of ethanol is lower than

California at Davis, University of

413

Thermally efficient PEM fuel cell that runs on ethanol  

PEM fuel cell with onboard conversion of ethanol into hydrogen fuel Liquid ethanol feedstock eliminates problems with storage and transportation of gaseous hydrogen Control of temperature maximizes selectivity of reformation process and prevents ...

414

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Hydrogen Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

416

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants and Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on

418

Final Report on Development of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum for the conversion of lignocellulose to ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project addressed the need for economical technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, specifically the conversion of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. The technology developed is a set of strains of the bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and an associated fermentation process for pretreated hardwood. Tools for genetic engineering and analysis of the organism were developed, including a markerless mutation method, a complete genome sequence and a set of gene expression profiles that show the activity of its genes under a variety of conditions relevant to lignocellulose conversion. Improved strains were generated by selection and genetic engineering to be able to produce higher amounts of ethanol (up to 70 g/L) and to be able to better tolerate inhibitory compounds from pretreated hardwood. Analysis of these strains has generated useful insight into the genetic basis for desired properties of biofuel producing organisms. Fermentation conditions were tested and optimized to achieve ethanol production targets established in the original project proposal. The approach proposed was to add cellulase enzymes to the fermentation, a method called Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). We had reason to think SSF would be an efficient approach because the optimal temperature and pH for the enzymes and bacterium are very close. Unfortunately, we discovered that commercially available cellulases are inactivated in thermophilic SSF by a combination of low redox potential and ethanol. Despite this, progress was made against the fermentation targets using bacterial cellulases. Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum may still prove to be a commercially viable technology should cellulase enzyme issues be addressed. Moreover, the organism was demonstrated to produce ethanol at approximately theoretical yield from oligomeric hemicellulose extracts, an ability that may prove to be uniquely valuable in pretreatment configurations in which cellulose and hemicellulose are separated.

Herring, Christopher D.; Kenealy, William R.; Shaw, A. Joe; Raman, Babu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Davison, Brian H.; Covalla, Sean F.; Sillers, W. Ryan; Xu, Haowen; Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Hogsett, David A.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure highlights NREL's recent advances in cellulosic ethanol production. Research at NREL addresses both biochemical and thermochemical processes.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Corn for Cellulosic Ethanol - National Renewable Energy ...  

edenspace. Edenspace: A Track Record of Success Improved crop feedstocks for cellulosic ethanol Superb development team includes NREL,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. ethanol production and the Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

422

Clean Cities: Ethanol Basics, Fact Sheet, October 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Document answers frequently asked questions about ethanol as a transportation fuel, including those on production, environmental effects, and vehicles.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ethanol Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. ethanol vehicle and infrastructure projects.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Physicochemical factors affecting ethanol adsorption by activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Powder and granular activated charcoal were evaluated for ethanol adsorptivity from aqueous mixtures using an adsorption isotherm. Ethanol adsorption capacity was more pronounced at 25C as compared to 5, 15, and 40C. When pH of the ethanol-buffer mixture (0.09 ionic strength) was changed from acidic (2.3) to neutral and then to alkaline (11.2), ethanol adsorption was decreased. Increasing ionic strength of the ethanol-buffer mixtures from 0.05 to 0.09 enhanced ethanol adsorption but a further increase to 0.14 showed no significant effect. Ethanol adsorption was more efficient from an aqueous ethanol mixture as compared to semidefined and nondefined fermentation worts, respectively. Heating granular charcoal to 400C for 1 hour and 600C for 3 hours in N2 increased ethanol adsorptivity and heating to 1000C (1 hour) in CO2 decreased it when ethanol was removed from dilute solutions by simple pass adsorption in a carbon packed column. Granular charcoal was superior to powdered charcoal and an inverse relationship was noted between the weight of the granular carbon bed in the column and ethanol adsorbed/g carbon. Decreasing the column feed flow rate from 7.5 to 2.0 liter aqueous ethanol/min increased the adsorption rate. 16 references.

Bradley, K.J.; Hamdy, M.K.; Toledo, R.T.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

ITO Thin Films by RF Sputtering for Ethanol Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensor for detection of ethanol vapours using RF sputter deposited ITO thin film on glass and Si substrates is reported. The principle of operation is the change of resistance of ITO film on exposure to ethanol vapours. The films were annealed at ... Keywords: Indium Tin Oxide, RF sputtering, ethanol sensor

Sudhir Chandra; H. J. Pandya; A. L. Vyas

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Solubilty and growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of silver nitrate in ethanol was determined at various temperatures. The growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol were then determined using initial derivaties of temperature and desupersaturation in a mixed-batch crystallizer. For ... Keywords: ethanol, growth kinetics, initial derivatives, silver nitrate, solubility

M. Manteghian; A. Ebrahimi

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for a cellulosic ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida. This EA is on hold.

428

Engine behavior using mixtures of gasoline - ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the greatest contributors to air pollution in large cities is the transportation sector. The emissions from the increased number of vehicles contribute to smog, low visibility and various greenhouse gas emissions. Pollutants contributing to smog ... Keywords: ethanol, gas emissions

Charalampos Arapatsakos

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

U.S. Ethanol Policy: The Unintended  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, the U.S. already has a formidable source of oil that can be quickly pumped from at the pump; 2) while taxpayers would forego tax reve- nue, lower pump prices would more than compensate; 3) the U.S. would build energy security as domestic ethanol replaced oil im- ports from the Middle East

Meagher, Mary

430

Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

NTRM Producer Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NTRM Producer Information. An NTRM (NIST Traceable Reference Material) is a commercially produced reference ...

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Dispensing Equipment Testing with Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline Test Fluid: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Nonpetroleum-Based Fuel Task addresses the hurdles to commercialization of biomass-derived fuels and fuel blends. One such hurdle is the unknown compatibility of new fuels with current infrastructure, such as the equipment used at service stations to dispense fuel into automobiles. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program and the Biomass Program have engaged in a joint project to evaluate the potential for blending ethanol into gasoline at levels higher than nominal 10 volume percent. This project was established to help DOE and NREL better understand any potentially adverse impacts caused by a lack of knowledge about the compatibility of the dispensing equipment with ethanol blends higher than what the equipment was designed to dispense. This report provides data about the impact of introducing a gasoline with a higher volumetric ethanol content into service station dispensing equipment from a safety and a performance perspective.

Boyce, K.; Chapin, J. T.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy conservation in ethanol production from renewable resources and non-petroleum energy sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dry milling process for the conversion of grain to fuel ethanol is reviewed for the application of energy conservation technology, which will reduce the energy consumption to 70,000 Btu per gallon, a reduction of 42% from a distilled spirits process. Specific energy conservation technology applications are outlined and guidelines for the owner/engineer for fuel ethanol plants to consider in the selection on the basis of energy conservation economics of processing steps and equipment are provided. The process was divided into 5 sections and the energy consumed in each step was determined based on 3 sets of conditions; a conventional distilled spirits process; a modern process incorporating commercially proven energy conservation; and a second generation process incorporating advanced conservation technologies which have not yet been proven. Steps discussed are mash preparation and cooking, fermentation, distillation, and distillers dried grains processing. The economics of cogeneration of electricity on fuel ethanol plants is also studied. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report: July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present results from culture isolation and selection studies, bench-scale fermentation experiments, and ethanol recovery experiments. Several promising isolates have been obtained in addition to Clostridium ljungdahlii, strain PETC, and are being used in batch and continuous culture comparison studies. C. ljungdahlii is being utilized in two-stage bench-scale reactor studies, aimed at producing ethanol in high concentrations from a stable culture system. Finally, solvent comparison studies have been performed for the economical recovery of ethanol from the fermentation broth.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

Tyson, K.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Methanol and Methanol Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Methanol Tax Ethyl alcohol and methyl alcohol motor fuels are taxed at a rate of $0.08 per gallon when used as a motor fuel. Ethyl alcohol is defined as a motor

439

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report This report addresses the experience of introducing ethanol buses and fuel stations in Nanyang (China). Though the demonstration met initial obstacles, significant data and information was collected. The responses from drivers and passengers show that the ethanol buses were well accepted, and the function and performance of the ethanol buses was satisfactory. How to Use This Tool

440

Development of a Performance-Based Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that produce a variety of products - including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol -for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "based ethanol producer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass -- A comparison of selected alternative processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to compare the cost of selected alternative processes for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. In turn, this information will be used by the ARS/USDA to guide the management of research and development programs in biomass conversion. The report will identify where the cost leverages are for the selected alternatives and what performance parameters need to be achieved to improve the economics. The process alternatives considered here are not exhaustive, but are selected on the basis of having a reasonable potential in improving the economics of producing ethanol from biomass. When other alternatives come under consideration, they should be evaluated by the same methodology used in this report to give fair comparisons of opportunities. A generic plant design is developed for an annual production of 25 million gallons of anhydrous ethanol using corn stover as the model substrate at $30/dry ton. Standard chemical engineering techniques are used to give first order estimates of the capital and operating costs. Following the format of the corn to ethanol plant, there are nine sections to the plant; feed preparation, pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and dehydration, stillage evaporation, storage and denaturation, utilities, and enzyme production. There are three pretreatment alternatives considered: the AFEX process, the modified AFEX process (which is abbreviated as MAFEX), and the STAKETECH process. These all use enzymatic hydrolysis and so an enzyme production section is included in the plant. The STAKETECH is the only commercially available process among the alternative processes.

Grethlein, H.E.; Dill, T.

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

JV Task 112-Optimal Ethanol Blend-Level Investigation  

SciTech Connect

Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET) and Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) tests were conducted on four 2007 model vehicles; a Chevrolet Impala flex-fuel and three non-flex-fuel vehicles: a Ford Fusion, a Toyota Camry, and a Chevrolet Impala. This investigation utilized a range of undenatured ethanol/Tier II gasoline blend levels from 0% to 85%. HWFET testing on ethanol blend levels of E20 in the flex fuel Chevrolet Impala and E30 in the non-flex-fuel Ford Fusion and Toyota Camry resulted in miles-per-gallon (mpg) fuel economy greater than Tier 2 gasoline, while E40 in the non-flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala resulted in an optimum mpg based on per-gallon fuel Btu content. Exhaust emission values for non-methane organic gases (NMOG), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) obtained from both the FTP-75 and the HWFET driving cycles were at or below EPA Tier II, Light-Duty Vehicles, Bin 5 levels for all vehicles tested with one exception. The flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala exceeded the NMOG standard for the FTP-75 on E-20 and Tier II gasoline.

Richard Shockey; Ted Aulich; Bruce Jones; Gary Mead; Paul Steevens

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Atlantic Ethanol Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlantic Ethanol Capital Atlantic Ethanol Capital Place Washington, Washington, DC Product Biofuel Investor in Caribbean and Central American region. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":