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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

World coal outlook to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The 1983 edition of the World Coal Outlook to the Year 2000 examines the worldwide impact of lower oil prices and lower economic activity on the demand, production, and international trade in coal. The report includes detailed regional forecasts of coal demand by end-use application. Regions include the US, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Other Asia, Latin America, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, Communist Europe, and Communist Asia. In addition, regional coal production forecasts are provided with a detailed analysis of regional coal trade patterns. In all instances, the changes relative to Chase's previous forecasts are shown. Because of the current situation in the oil market, the report includes an analysis of the competitive position of coal relative to oil in the generation of electricity, and in industrial steam applications. The report concludes with an examination of the impact of an oil price collapse on the international markets for coal.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Coal operators prepare for a prosperous new year  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of the Coal Age 2008 annual Forecast Survey of 17 coal mining executives which reinforces that 2008 could be a very good year. Coal operators are planning to invest in new equipment, development and new coal mine start-ups, based on a number of demand- and supply-side fundamentals. 71% of those surveyed thought coal production in 2008 would increase from 2007 levels and US exports are expected to climb due to the weak dollar. If the tax credit on synfuels expires on 31 December 2007 production of coal synfuel will likely cease. Asked about expensive planned purchases, companies answers ranged from $80,000 for an underground scoop to $500 m for a new mine installation. However, most producers admit they will not be able to operate at full capacity. 7 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Coal Reserves Data Base report  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Reserves Data Base (CRDB) Program is a cooperative data base development program sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The objective of the CRDB Program is to involve knowledgeable coal resource authorities from the major coal-bearing regions in EIA's effort to update the Nation's coal reserves data. This report describes one of two prototype studies to update State-level reserve estimates. The CRDB data are intended for use in coal supply analyses and to support analyses of policy and legislative issues. They will be available to both Government and non-Government analysts. The data also will be part of the information used to supply United States energy data for international data bases and for inquiries from private industry and the public. (VC)

Jones, R.W.; Glass, G.B.

1991-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

4

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology December 16, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative project demonstrating DryFining™ technology, a more cost-effective way to control coal-based power plant emissions while improving fuel quality, has been named the 2010 Coal-Fired Project of the Year by the editors of Power Engineering magazine. The project, managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was developed with funding from the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Power Initiative and was originally implemented at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station in Underwood, ND, in 2009. The

5

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Novel Fuel Cells for Coal Based Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data required to assess the feasibility of a Direct Coal power plant based upon an Electrochemical Looping (ECL) of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC). The objective of Phase 1 was to experimentally characterize the interaction between the tin anode, coal fuel and cell component electrolyte, the fate of coal contaminants in a molten tin reactor (via chemistry) and their impact upon the YSZ electrolyte (via electrochemistry). The results of this work will provided the basis for further study in Phase 2. The objective of Phase 2 was to extend the study of coal impurities impact on fuel cell components other than electrolyte, more specifically to the anode current collector which is made of an electrically conducting ceramic jacket and broad based coal tin reduction. This work provided a basic proof-of-concept feasibility demonstration of the direct coal concept.

Thomas Tao

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering database, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical database will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical database to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant...

10

STRUCTURE BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

This report is part on the ongoing effort at Brown University and Ohio State University to develop structure based models of coal combustion. A very fundamental approach is taken to the description of coal chars and their reaction processes, and the results are therefore expected to have broad applicability to the spectrum of carbon materials of interest in energy technologies. This quarter, the project was in a period no-cost extension and discussions were held about the end phase of the project and possible continuations. The technical tasks were essentially dormant this period, but presentations of results were made, and plans were formulated for renewed activity in the fiscal year 2001.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Systems Nine new projects selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the University Coal Research program will seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of our nation's abundant coal resources. The announcement today of the selections marks the 34 th round of the Department's longest-running coal program, which began in 1979. This research continues DOE efforts to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical processes governing coal conversion and utilization, and support the technological development of the advanced coal power systems of the future. These advanced systems include ultra-clean

12

Table 7.6 Coal Stocks by Sector, End of Year 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7.6 Coal Stocks by Sector, End of Year 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year: Producers and Distributors: Consumers: Total: Residential

13

Coal and Power Systems Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL People Search Go to US DOE Publications - Brochures Coal and Power Systems Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program Plan Issued The Office of Fossil Energy Coal and Power...

14

Materials in Clean Power Systems VI: Clean Coal-, Hydrogen Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

clean coal technologies, carbon sequestration, membrane-based gas separations, biofuel production, hydrogen production from various sources, etc. With an ...

15

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect

Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements; Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is described.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, conbustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Sciences, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra-fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

19

Rheological properties of water-coal slurries based on brown coal in the presence of sodium lignosulfonates and alkali  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of the oxidized surface of brown coal on the structural and rheological properties of water-coal slurries was found. The kinetics of structure formation processes in water-coal slurries based on as-received and oxidized brown coal was studied. The effect of lignosulfonate and alkali additives on the samples of brown coal was considered.

D.P. Savitskii; A.S. Makarov; V.A. Zavgorodnii [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine). Dumanskii Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Table 7.9 Coal Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 215 Table 7.9 Coal Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: News Release - DOE Begins 25th Year of University Coal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy's longest running student-teacher research grant program - the Office of Fossil Energy's University Coal Research program - begins its 25th year this week with the...

22

Prediction of Coal /Gas Outbursts Based on Selective Ensemble Learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of achieving accurate and reliable coal /gas outbursts prediction, a coal /gas outbursts prediction algorithm based on selective ensemble learning is presented. The component learners consisted of RS-PNN network, and the redundant component ... Keywords: Coal and gas outburst, selective ensemble learning, RS-PNN classifier, classification

Wang Heng, Shao Liangshan, Liu Shuanhong, Lu Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coal Power Systems strategic multi-year program plans  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), through the Coal and Power Systems (C and PS) program, funds research to advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide new and improved energy technologies; to eliminate any detrimental environmental effects of energy production and use; and to maintain US leadership in promoting the effective use of US power technologies on an international scale. Further, the C and PS program facilitates the effective deployment of these technologies to maximize their benefits to the Nation. The following Strategic Plan describes how the C and PS program intends to meet the challenges of the National Energy Strategy to: (1) enhance American's energy security; (2) improve the environmental acceptability of energy production and use; (3) increase the competitiveness and reliability of US energy systems; and (4) ensure a robust US energy future. It is a plan based on the consensus of experts and managers from FE's program offices and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

None

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coal & Power Systems Strategic Plan & Multi-Year Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produce transportation fuels, chemicals, and feedstocks from coal, natural gas, oil shale, biomass, and other carbonaceous resources. Technologies to produce hydrogen will...

25

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiative (CCPI) - Round 2 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier (Active) Project Brief...

26

Coal-based Direct Reduction of Iron Concentrate Pellets by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Coal-based Direct Reduction of Iron Concentrate Pellets by Microwave Heating. Author(s), Wang Xia, Huang Zhucheng. On-Site Speaker ...

27

Coal Power Systems strategic multi-year program plans  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), through the Coal and Power Systems (C and PS) program, funds research to advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide new and improved energy technologies; to eliminate any detrimental environmental effects of energy production and use; and to maintain US leadership in promoting the effective use of US power technologies on an international scale. Further, the C and PS program facilitates the effective deployment of these technologies to maximize their benefits to the Nation. The following Strategic Plan describes how the C and PS program intends to meet the challenges of the National Energy Strategy to: (1) enhance American's energy security; (2) improve the environmental acceptability of energy production and use; (3) increase the competitiveness and reliability of US energy systems; and (4) ensure a robust US energy future. It is a plan based on the consensus of experts and managers from FE's program offices and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

30

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

31

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Seca Coal-Based Systems Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made during the August 1, 2006 - May 31, 2008 award period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42614 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled 'SECA Coal Based Systems'. The initial overall objective of this program was to design, develop, and demonstrate multi-MW integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power plants with >50% overall efficiency from coal (HHV) to AC power. The focus of the program was to develop low-cost, high performance, modular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology to support coal gas IGFC power systems. After a detailed GE internal review of the SOFC technology, the program was de-scoped at GE's request. The primary objective of this program was then focused on developing a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). There were two initial major objectives in this program. These were: (1) Develop and optimize a design of a >100 MWe integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power plant; (2) Resolve identified barrier issues concerning the long-term economic performance of SOFC. The program focused on designing and cost estimating the IGFC system and resolving technical and economic barrier issues relating to SOFC. In doing so, manufacturing options for SOFC cells were evaluated, options for constructing stacks based upon various cell configurations identified, and key performance characteristics were identified. Key factors affecting SOFC performance degradation for cells in contact with metallic interconnects were be studied and a fundamental understanding of associated mechanisms was developed using a fixed materials set. Experiments and modeling were carried out to identify key processes/steps affecting cell performance degradation under SOFC operating conditions. Interfacial microstructural and elemental changes were characterized, and their relationships to observed degradation identified. Mitigation strategies, including innovative coatings and bond layers, were developed, evaluated and down-selected to improve degradation rates. Focus was on microstructural stabilization and minimization of the ASR contribution from Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale growth and other interactions at electrode/interconnect interfaces evaluated during electrochemical testing and advanced microstructural characterization. Novel long-term and accelerated testing techniques were developed and conducted under standard operating conditions to demonstrate capability to meet targeted degradation rates.

Matthew Alinger

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Coal-based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However there are still some unresolved problems with performance durability of SOFC when operating on coal syngas, which inherently has some undesirable ...

34

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlook’s Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

35

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

36

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Coal Reserves Data Base report. Final report on the Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Reserves Data Base (CRDB) Program is a cooperative data base development program sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The objective of the CRDB Program is to involve knowledgeable coal resource authorities from the major coal-bearing regions in EIA`s effort to update the Nation`s coal reserves data. This report describes one of two prototype studies to update State-level reserve estimates. The CRDB data are intended for use in coal supply analyses and to support analyses of policy and legislative issues. They will be available to both Government and non-Government analysts. The data also will be part of the information used to supply United States energy data for international data bases and for inquiries from private industry and the public. (VC)

Jones, R.W.; Glass, G.B.

1991-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 17, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Completed modeling calculations of coal mineral matter transformations, deposition behavior, and heat transfer impacts of six test fuels; and ran pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, microagglomerate product, and mulled product.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

40

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE-FE: 20th Year of University Coal Research Grants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 5, 1999 May 5, 1999 DOE Funds 20th Year of University Coal Grants Students, Teachers Team to Explore Greenhouse Gas Reduction, Coal Science and Technologies for Pollution Free Power Plant The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that 17 university-proposed projects will share in $2.8 million in federal coal research funds - marking the 20th year of a program that combines science education for students with research that can reveal cleaner and more effective ways to use the nation's plentiful coal reserves. The winning colleges and universities include: Arizona State University Brigham Young University Brown University Carnegie Mellon University Clarkson University Colorado School of Mines Georgia Institute of Technology Kansas State University Ohio University

42

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the second quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: completed drop tube furnace devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; completed writing a summary topical report including all results to date on he nine fuels tested; and presented three technical papers on the project results at the 16th International Conference on Coal & Slurry Technologies.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 18, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Continued with data and sample analysis from the pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, air-dried and mulled microagglomerate products; air-dried Pittsburgh No. 8 as-is and mulled products for upcoming Task 3 combustion testing; and prepared two abstracts for presentation for the March 1 994 Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Hargrove, M.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Economic analysis of coal-fired cogeneration plants for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Appropriations Act of 1986 requires the Department of Defense to use an additional 1,600,000 tons/year of coal at their US facilities by 1995 and also states that the most economical fuel should be used at each facility. In a previous study of Air Force heating plants burning gas or oil, Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that only a small fraction of this target 1,600,000 tons/year could be achieved by converting the plants where coal is economically viable. To identify projects that would use greater amounts of coal, the economic benefits of installing coal-fired cogeneration plants at 7 candidate Air Force bases were examined in this study. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed that included two types of financing (Air Force and private) and three levels of energy escalation for a total of six economic scenarios. Hill, McGuire, and Plattsburgh Air Force Bases were identified as the facilities with the best potential for coal-fired cogeneration, but the actual cost savings will depend strongly on how the projects are financed and to a lesser extent on future energy escalation rates. 10 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

Holcomb, R.S.; Griffin, F.P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The International Coal Statistics Data Base program maintenance guide  

SciTech Connect

The International Coal Statistics Data Base (ICSD) is a microcomputer-based system which contains information related to international coal trade. This includes coal production, consumption, imports and exports information. The ICSD is a secondary data base, meaning that information contained therein is derived entirely from other primary sources. It uses dBase III+ and Lotus 1-2-3 to locate, report and display data. The system is used for analysis in preparing the Annual Prospects for World Coal Trade (DOE/EIA-0363) publication. The ICSD system is menu driven and also permits the user who is familiar with dBase and Lotus operations to leave the menu structure to perform independent queries. Documentation for the ICSD consists of three manuals -- the User's Guide, the Operations Manual, and the Program Maintenance Manual. This Program Maintenance Manual provides the information necessary to maintain and update the ICSD system. Two major types of program maintenance documentation are presented in this manual. The first is the source code for the dBase III+ routines and related non-dBase programs used in operating the ICSD. The second is listings of the major component database field structures. A third important consideration for dBase programming, the structure of index files, is presented in the listing of source code for the index maintenance program. 1 fig.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base Gregory D. Croft1 and Tad W the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production of this highest-rank coal. The pro- duction of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

47

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 8, January--March 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued drop tube devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; and started writing a summary topical report to include all results on the nine fuels tested.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 12, January--March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed editing of the fifth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office; and prepared two technical papers for conferences.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 14, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 10, July--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport fuels; completed editing of the first three quarterly reports and sent them to the publishing office; presented the project results at the Annual Contractors` Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: News Release - Innovative Coal-Based Product Bumps Petroleum Out of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16, 2008 16, 2008 Innovative Coal-Based Product Bumps Petroleum Out of Equation Synthetic Binder Pitch Uses Hydrocarbons from Coal in Place of Petroleum Feedstocks WASHINGTON, DC - Through a cooperative agreement with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a team headed by West Virginia University (WVU) has developed and successfully demonstrated a synthetic binder pitch that uses hydrocarbons from coal to supplement or replace petroleum feedstocks. The new binder pitch, and similar coal-derived products, could potentially reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Binder pitch - a carbon-rich, tar-like material - is an important ingredient in making graphite rods used in electric arc furnaces for the manufacture of steel from scrap. Conventional binder pitch usually blends petroleum pitch with standard coal-tar pitch. The new synthetic pitch could replace at least 19,000 tons of conventional pitch needed each year by graphite electrode manufacturers. WVU claims that the same pitch could be used by the aluminum industry; if so, demand for the new product would be close to one million barrels per year.

52

A Study of Coal-Based Direct Reduction of Composite Binder ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A study of the coal-based direct reduction behaviors of composite ... pellets was carried out in a simulating coal-based grate-rotary kiln process.

53

Coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification has been a technological reality for over a half century, being first used in great detail in Europe as an alternative to petroleum. Several projects in the US in the last decade have led to the commercial demonstration and verification of the coal gasification process. This paper reports that, in an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant, the Electric Power Research Institute embarked in a program to research, evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facility, and release an RFP in mid 1990 as Phase I of that program. Houston Lighting and Power Company responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL and P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel.

Baumann, P.D. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (US)); Epstein, M. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Kern, E.E. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 11, October--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of three Freeport Pittsburgh 8 fuels; conducted pilot-scale combustion and ash deposition tests of a fresh batch of Upper Freeport parent coal in the CE fireside Performance Test Facility; and completed editing of the fourth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam  

SciTech Connect

In Denmark, straw is utilised for the generation of energy and district heating in power plants. Combustion of straw gives rise to high contents of potassium chloride and some sulphur dioxide in the flue gas. These compounds can lead to deposits with high content of potassium chloride and potassium sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes, the corrosion during these experiments was monitored. Various ferritic and austenitic materials were investigated at steam temperatures ranging from 520 to 580{degree}C and flue gas temperatures ranging from 925 to 1100{degree}C. The results obtained in the demonstration program led to the rebuilding of the 350 MW pulverized coal fired boiler, Studstrup unit 4, into a co-firing boiler with straw in 2002. During the rebuilding, test tube sections of X20CrMoV12 1 and TP347H FG were built into the superheater and the reheater loops. The temperature ranges during these exposures was for the steam from 470 to 575{degree}C and for the flue gas from 1025 to 1300{degree}C. All these test tubes have been removed during the last three years at one year intervals for corrosion studies. The corrosion studies performed on all investigated tubes included measurements of the corrosion attack, light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the corrosion products.

Frandsen, R.B.; Montgomery, M.; Larsen, O.H. [Elsam Engineering, Kolding (Denmark)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 16, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the first quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Reported results of drop tube furnace data analyses to determine devolatilization kinetics; reported the results from the re-analyzed pilot-scale ash deposits from the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 15, October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; re-analyzed the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; updated the topical summary report; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 13, April--June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport feed coal; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT MAY 1999 DOE/FE-0400 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 Market-Based Advanced Coal Power Systems 1-1 December 1998 1. INTRODUCTION As deregulation unfolds and privatization of the utility market takes shape, priorities for power plant economics have shifted toward those of a "bottom-line" business and away from a regulated industry. Competition in utility generation and the exposure risks of large capital investments have led to a preference to minimize capital costs and fixed and variable operation and maintenance costs. With global competition from independent power producers (IPPs), non- utility generators, and utilities, the present trend of investments is with conventional pulverized

60

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 5, May 1990--June 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, conbustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Sciences, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra-fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SECA Coal-Based Systems - LGFCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LGFCS is developing an integrated planar (IP) SOFC technology for mega-watt scale power generation including the potential for use in highly efficient, economically competitive central generation power plant facilities fuel by coal synthesis gas. This Department of Energy Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is aimed at achieving further cell and stack technical advancements and assessing the readiness of the LGFCS SOFC stack technology to be scaled to larger-scale demonstrations in subsequent phases. LGFCS is currently in Phase 2 of the program with the Phase 1 test carrying over for completion during Phase 2. Major technical results covering the initial Phase 2 budget period include: Metric Stack Testing: 1. The Phase I metric test is a ~7.6 kW block test (2 strips) in Canton that started in March 2012 and logged 2135 hours of testing prior to an event that required the test to be shutdown. The degradation rate through 2135 hours was 0.4%/1000 hours, well below the Phase I target of 2%/1000 hours and the Phase 2 target of 1.5%/1000 hours. 2. The initial Phase II metric test consisting of 5 strips (~19 kW) was started in May 2012. At the start of the test OCV was low and stack temperatures were out of range. Shutdown and inspection revealed localized structural damage to the strips. The strips were repaired and the test restarted October 11, 2012. 3. Root cause analysis of the Phase 1 and initial Phase 2 start-up failures concluded a localized short circuit across adjacent tubes/bundles caused localized heating and thermal stress fracture of substrates. Pre-reduction of strips rather than in-situ reduction within block test rigs now provides a critical quality check prior to block testing. The strip interconnect design has been modified to avoid short circuits. Stack Design: 1. Dense ceramic strip components were redesigned to achieve common components and a uniform design for all 12 bundles of a strip while meeting a flow uniformity of greater than 95% of the mean flow for all bundles. The prior design required unique bundle components and pressure drops specifications to achieve overall strip fuel flow uniformity. 2. Slow crack growth measurements in simulated fuel environments of the MgO-MgAl2O4 substrate by ORNL reveal favorable tolerance against slow crack growth. Evidence as well of a high stress intensity threshold below which crack growth would be avoided. These findings can have very positive implications on long-term structural reliability. More testing is required, including under actual reformate fuels, to gain a deeper understanding of such time dependent reliability mechanisms. 3. A next generation (Gen2) substrate from the LGFCS supplier has been qualified. The substrate incorporates cost reductions and quality improvements. Cell Developments: 1. Subscale testing of the epsilon technology under system relevant conditions surpassed 16,000 hours with a power degradation rate of <1%/1000 hours. Key degradation mechanisms have been identified: (1) MnOx accumulation near the cathode-electrolyte interface and cathode densification (2) metals migration across the anode-ACC bilayer and general microstructure coarsening at high temperatures and peak fuel utilizations and (3) metal migration into primary interconnect (lesser mechanism) 5 2. Alternate LSM cathodes show slightly lower ASR and lesser free MnOx and chromium contamination. Long-term durability screening of three alternate cathodes is being performed. 3. Single layer anodes show very significant improvement in microstructure stability after 5000 hours testing at aggressive conditions of 925C and bundle outlet, high utilization fuel. 4. New primary interconnect designs are being tested that achieve lower ASR. Modeling performed to further balance ASR and cost through optimized designs.

Goettler, Richard

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Iron Age & Coal-based Coke: A Neglected Case of Fossil-fuel Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Iron Age & Coal-based Coke: A Neglected Case of Fossil-fuel Dependence by Vaclav Smil September share of their primary energies from renewable sources. Steel & Coal-Derived Coke Here is another important: steel's fundamental dependence on coal-derived coke with no practical substitutes on any rational

Smil, Vaclav

63

New Equipment of Distinguishing Rock from Coal Based on Statistical Analysis of Fast Fourier Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new equipment of distinguishing rock from coal based on statistical analysis of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is invented which can be used in the mechanized caving coal locales. First, eight groups of sound signals which had been measured during caving ... Keywords: Threshold of Distinguishing Rock from Coal, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Frequency Energy Variance, Frequency Energy Ratio

Gu Tao; Li Xu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power Generation with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power an impermeable seal to prevent it from escaping the aquifer. The proposed alternative technology processes coal carbon and non-mineral coal combustion products in the process. This stream is denser than the aquifer

Nur, Amos

65

Demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of annual summaries on minable coal in the United States, pursuant to the power plant and industrial fuel use act. The demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1980 by area, rank, and potential method of mining is given. Reserve data are given by state and by type of coal (anthracite, bithiminous, subbituminous, and lignite). An introduction, summary, and a glossary of selected coal classification terms is also included. The appendix provides the demonstrated reserve base adjustments and related notions by state. References are also included. Coal reserves for 1979 are given for comparison. 7 figures, 6 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NETL: News Release - Multi-Pollutant Control System for Small Coal-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Multi-Pollutant Control System for Small Coal-Based Power Plants Meets, Exceeds Goals New Retrofit Technology Achieves 98 Percent Mercury Removal, Reduces Capital Costs by 40 Percent WASHINGTON, D. C. - A U.S. Department of Energy project has successfully demonstrated the cost-effective removal of multiple pollutants from the emissions of an older 100-megawatt coal-fired power plant at AES Greenidge's facilities in Dresden, New York. The successful retrofit means the unit can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations while continuing operations another 20-30 years. MORE INFO Learn more about the Greenidge project In addition, wide commercial acceptance of the new system could contribute to significant reductions in national emissions and help extend the life of

67

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 1, Base program activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process development, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, and development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this objective, novel analytical methods were evaluated for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL teamed with 24 research groups in the program. Well-defined and characterized samples of coal liquefaction process-derived materials were provided to each group. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

THE DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The third phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for US Department of Defense (DOD) facilities was completed. The objectives of the project were to: decrease DOD's dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase III activities were focused on evaluating deeply-cleaned coals as fuels for industrial boilers and investigating emissions control strategies for providing ultra-low emissions when firing coal-based fuels. This was addressed by performing coal beneficiation and preparation studies, and bench- to demonstration-scale emissions reduction studies. In addition, economic studies were conducted focused on determining cost and market penetration, selection of incentives, and regional economic impacts of coal-based technologies.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Sarma V. Pisupati; Chunshan Song; Ronald S. Wasco; Ronald T. Wincek; Xiaochun Xu; Alan W. Scaroni; Richard Hogg; Subhash Chander; M. Thaddeus Ityokumbul; Mark S. Klima; Peter T. Luckie; Adam Rose; Richard L. Gordon; Jeffrey Lazo; A. Michael Schaal

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Application of Unascertained Measure Model in Bofang Coal Mine Evaluation Based on Information Entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, coal mine safety is an urgent problem needs to be solved in China. The article takes into account the impact of the safety evaluation factors of traditional coal mines (taking the Bofang mine as an example), using information entropy ... Keywords: information entropy, safety evaluation index, unascertained measure model, Bofang mine

Zhanglin Guo; Zhaopeng Liu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By applying the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production can be modeled with a single Hubbert curve that extends to the practical end of commercial production of this highest-rank coal. The production of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80% complete and can be carried out at the current rate for the next 20 years. The production of subbituminous coal from existing mines can be carried out at the current rate for 40-45 years. Significant new investment to extend the existing mines and build new ones would have to commence in 2009 to sustain the current rate of coal production, 1 billion tons per year, in 2029. In view of the existing data, we conclude that there is no spare coal production capacity of the size required for massive coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Our analysis is independent of other factors that will prevent large-scale coal liquefaction projects: the inefficiency of the process and either emissions of greenhouse gases or energy cost of sequestration.

Croft, Gregory D. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Patzek, Tad W. [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@mail.utexas.edu

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

This report is part on the ongoing effort at Brown University and Ohio State University to develop structure based models of coal combustion. A very fundamental approach is taken to the description of coal chars and their reaction processes, and the results are therefore expected to have broad applicability to the spectrum of carbon materials of interest in energy technologies. This quarter, our work on structure development in carbons continued. A combination of hot stage in situ and ex situ polarized light microscopy was used to identify the preferred orientational of graphene layers at gas interfaces in pitches used as carbon material precursors. The experiments show that edge-on orientation is the equilibrium state of the gas/pitch interface, implying that basal-rich surfaces have higher free energies than edge-rich surfaces in pitch. This result is in agreement with previous molecular modeling studies and TEM observations in the early stages of carbonization. The results may have important implications for the design of tailored carbons with edge-rich or basal-rich surfaces. In the computational chemistry task, we have continued our investigations into the reactivity of large aromatic rings. The role of H-atom abstraction as well as radical addition to monocyclic aromatic rings has been examined, and a manuscript is currently being revised after peer review. We have also shown that OH radical is more effective than H atom in the radical addition process with monocyclic rings. We have extended this analysis to H-atom and OH-radical addition to phenanthrene. Work on combustion kinetics focused on the theoretical analysis of the data previously gathered using thermogravametric analysis.

Robert H. Hurt; Eric M. Suuberg

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 3, November 1989--January 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Coal Mine Safety Investment Prediction Based on Support Vector Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presently, coal mine safety situation in China is still severe. One of the most important reasons is safety investment insufficient. Safety investment prediction can provide decision basis for efficient controlling and guiding safety investment. The ... Keywords: coal mine safety investment, SVM, index system, prediction

Chen Xiang; Cai Weihua; Chen Na

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Coal Mine Safety on Environmental Sustainability Based on Behavior Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety is one of the key problems people concern about most not only at present but also in the future. Currently there are many hidden troubles threatening safety. Particularly, the safety problems in coal mines are very serious and in great need of ... Keywords: coal mine safety, environmental sustainability, Behavior Science, positive behavior, negative behavior, incentive system

Xinjuan Li

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. [12] Parks K. GIS-based infrastructure modeling, 2010–information systems (GIS). Washington, DC: National Hydrogenwww.elsevier.com/locate/he A GIS-based assessment of coal-

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Final Report Environmental Footprints and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, over 50 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from coal. Given that coal reserves in the U.S. are estimated to meet our energy needs over the next 250 years, coal is expected to continue to play a major role in the generation of electricity in this country. With dwindling supplies and high prices of natural gas and oil, a large proportion of the new power generation facilities built in the U.S. can be expected to use coal as the main fuel. The environmental impact of these facilities can only be minimized by innovations in technology that allow for efficient burning of coal, along with an increased capture of the air pollutants that are an inherent part of coal combustion. EPA considers integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as one of the most promising technologies in reducing environmental consequences of generating electricity from coal. EPA has undertaken several initiatives to facilitate and incentivize development and deployment of this technology. This report is the result of one of these initiatives and it represents the combined efforts of a joint EPA/DOE team formed to advance the IGCC technology. The various offices within DOE that participated in the development/review of this report were the Office of Fossil Energy, including the Clean Coal Office and the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Pulverized Coal; Technologies Foreword

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China  

SciTech Connect

More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Center for Energy Economics Research (CCEER)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

NETL: News Release - Coal-Based Fuel Cells: A Giant Leap for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 11, 2005 Coal-Based Fuel Cells: A Giant Leap for Fuel Cell Technology New Program to Develop Multi-Megawatt Fuel Cell Systems WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today...

80

CORROSION OF IRON-BASE ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR AT 871 AND 982 C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Chapter 1. A. B. C. D. E. Coal Processingand Coal Char iThe Energy Crisis Coal Processing . Corrosion .

Gordon, Bruce Abbott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Structure Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion  

SciTech Connect

This unique collaborative project has taken a very fundamental look at the origin of structure, and combustion reactivity of coal chars. It was a combined experimental and theoretical effort involving three universities and collaborators from universities outside the U.S. and from U.S. National Laboratories and contract research companies. The project goal was to improve our understanding of char structure and behavior by examining the fundamental chemistry of its polyaromatic building blocks. The project team investigated the elementary oxidative attack on polyaromatic systems, and coupled with a study of the assembly processes that convert these polyaromatic clusters to mature carbon materials (or chars). We believe that the work done in this project has defined a powerful new science-based approach to the understanding of char behavior. The work on aromatic oxidation pathways made extensive use of computational chemistry, and was led by Professor Christopher Hadad in the Department of Chemistry at Ohio State University. Laboratory experiments on char structure, properties, and combustion reactivity were carried out at both OSU and Brown, led by Principle Investigators Joseph Calo, Robert Essenhigh, and Robert Hurt. Modeling activities were divided into two parts: first unique models of crystal structure development were formulated by the team at Brown (PI'S Hurt and Calo) with input from Boston University and significant collaboration with Dr. Alan Kerstein at Sandia and with Dr. Zhong-Ying chen at SAIC. Secondly, new combustion models were developed and tested, led by Professor Essenhigh at OSU, Dieter Foertsch (a collaborator at the University of Stuttgart), and Professor Hurt at Brown. One product of this work is the CBK8 model of carbon burnout, which has already found practical use in CFD codes and in other numerical models of pulverized fuel combustion processes, such as EPRI's NOxLOI Predictor. The remainder of the report consists of detailed technical discussion organized into chapters whose organization is dictated by the nature of the research performed. Chapter 2 is entitled 'Experimental Work on Char Structure, Properties, and Reactivity', and focuses on fundamental structural studies at Brown using both phenollformaldehyde resin chars as model carbons and real coal chars. This work includes the first known in site high resolution TEM studies of carbonization processes, and some intriguing work on 'memory loss', a form of interaction between annealing and oxidation phenomena in chars. Chapter 3 entitled 'Computational Chemistry of Aromatic Oxidation Pathways' presents in detail the OSU work targeted at understanding the elementary molecular pathways of aromatic oxidation. Chapter 4 describes the 'Mesoscale Structural Models', using a combination of thermodynamic (equilibrium) approaches based on liquid crystal theory and kinetic simulations accounting for the effects of limited layer mobility in many fossil fuel derived carbons containing cross-linking agents. Chapter 5 entitled 'Combustion Modeling' presents work on extinction in the late stages of combustion and the development and features of the CBK8 model.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

2000-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels. Quarterly report, August 1, 1989--October 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

Under the Department of Energy`s Combustor Technology Program, combustor contractors are developing combustor systems for use in residential, commercial, light industrial and industrial retrofit markets. Well-characterized coal based fuels possessing appropriate specifications are required by the contractors for their developmental test programs. Fuels may be dry pulverized or micronized coal or coal-water fuels. In support of these equipment development efforts, Energy International is providing such fuels. A complete list of all of the delivered fuels,the quantities and users are provided in the Appendix. Their fuel needs ranged from small sample quantities (e.g. 5 to 500 lbs.) up to 15 tons per delivery; by now most no longer need fuel. During the twelfth quarter of this contract (August 1, 1989 through October 31, 1989) the primary activities were involved with: (1) Continuation of the procurement, preparation and delivery of coal-based fuels for the combustor contractors. (2) Continuation of the interaction with combustor contractors in order to update their fuel specifications, fuel requirements and delivery schedules. (3) Continuation of the quality control activities to insure that fuel specifications are being met and to determine the cause of any problem which might occur. (4) Issuance of a request-for-bid (Procurement {number_sign}MN-01-2003) for deep cleaning of Upper Elkhorn {number_sign}3 coal to below 2% ash level, and subsequent award of purchase orders to five bidders. (5) Delivery to two separate PETC contractors coal-water slurry and dry, ground coal fuels. (5) Delivery of feed coals to three EI subcontractors who will deep-clean coal (Procurement Package {number_sign}MN-01-2003).

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Repowering flexibility of coal-based advanced power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) helps enhance the economic competitiveness, environmental quality, and national well-being of the U.S. by developing advanced power-generation systems. The potential market for advanced power-generation systems is large. In the U.S., electric demand is estimated to grow at about 1 percent per year through the year 2010. The total power generation market also includes new-capacity as well as replacement of existing power plants as they age. Thus, the market for power systems over the next 15 years is estimated to be about 279,000 megawatts (MW), but could range from as much as 484,000 MW to as little as 153,000 MW. These predictions are summarized. Over the next 15 years, the replacement market is potentially much larger than the expansion market because of the large base of aging power plants in the U.S.

Bajura, R.A.; Bechtel, T.F.; Schmidt, D.K.; Wimer, J.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Structure-Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress was made this period on a number of separate experimental and modelling activities. At Brown, the models of carbon nanostructure evolution were expanded to consider high-rank materials with initial anisotropy. The report presents detailed results of Monte Carlo simulations with non-zero initial layer length and with statistically oriented initial states. The expanded simulations are now capable of describing the development of nanostructure during carbonization of most coals. Work next quarter will address the remaining challenge of isotropic coke-forming coals. Experiments at Brown yielded important data on the "memory loss" phenomenon in carbon annealing, and on the effect of mineral matter on high-temperature reactivity. The experimental aspects of the Brown work will be discussed in detail in the next report.

Christopher Hadad; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Robert Hurt

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

Back Issues of the Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal > Quarterly Coal Report > Quarterly Coal Report Back Issues Quarterly Coal Report Back Issues of the Quarterly Coal Report Year 4thquarter 3rdquarter 2ndquarter 1stquarter QCR...

87

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past quarter of this project, significant progress continued was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made at OSU on advancing the application of computational chemistry to oxidative attack on model polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and graphitic structures. This work is directed at the application of quantitative ab initio molecular orbital theory to address the decomposition products and mechanisms of coal char reactivity. Previously, it was shown that the ?hybrid? B3LYP method can be used to provide quantitative information concerning the stability of the corresponding radicals that arise by hydrogen atom abstraction from monocyclic aromatic rings. In the most recent quarter, these approaches have been extended to larger carbocyclic ring systems, such as coronene, in order to compare the properties of a large carbonaceous PAH to that of the smaller, monocyclic aromatic systems. It was concluded that, at least for bond dissociation energy considerations, the properties of the large PAHs can be modeled reasonably well by smaller systems. In addition to the preceding work, investigations were initiated on the interaction of selected radicals in the ?radical pool? with the different types of aromatic structures. In particular, the different pathways for addition vs. abstraction to benzene and furan by H and OH radicals were examined. Thus far, the addition channel appears to be significantly favored over abstraction on both kinetic and thermochemical grounds. Experimental work at Brown University in support of the development of predictive structural models of coal char combustion was focused on elucidating the role of coal mineral matter impurities on reactivity. An ?inverse? approach was used where a carbon material was doped with coal mineral matter. The carbon material was derived from a high carbon content fly ash (Fly Ash 23 from the Salem Basin Power Plant. The ash was obtained from Pittsburgh #8 coal (PSOC 1451). Doped samples were then burned in a high temperature flame reactor fitted with rapid quench extractive sampling. It was found that the specific reaction rate decreased with increasing ash content by about an order of magnitude over the ash content range investigated. In this case, it was concluded that at least one of the primary reasons for the resultant observation was that an increasing amount of carbon becomes inaccessible to oxygen by being covered with a fused, ?protective,? ash layer. Progress continued on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at OSU.

CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Market-Based Valuation of New Coal-Fired Generation: Case Studies of Investment Risk and Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas turbine technology has dominated new generation capacity additions in the United States, yet several years of unexpectedly high natural gas prices are driving interest in alternatives. This report uses case studies of new coal-fired generation to address the question of whether coal can be a good choice for the private investor. The studies give great detail on possible coal plants in Texas and some guidance on possible projects in Virginia, Ohio, and Indiana. The studies provide a comprehens...

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Technical progress report, September 1995 - March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. During this reporting period, the Phase I final report was completed. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included completing a study to identify appropriate SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies for coal-fired industrial boilers. In addition, work continued on the design of a ceramic filtering device for installation on the demonstration boiler. The ceramic filtering device will be used to demonstrate a smaller and more efficient filtering device for retrofit applications. Work related to coal preparation and utilization, and the economic analysis was primarily focused on preparing the final report. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies and economic analyses of coal use. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, surface-based separation processes, and dry processing. The economic study focused on community sensitivity to coal usage, regional economic impacts of new coal utilization technologies, and constructing a national energy portfolio.

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.  

SciTech Connect

During the third quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made in the chemistry department at OSU on the calculation of thermodynamic properties for a number of model organic compounds. Modelling work was carried out at Brown to adapt a thermodynamic model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally applied to pitch carbonization, to the prediction of coke texture in coal combustion. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. This modelling approach shows promise for the mechanistic prediction of the rank dependence of char structure and will therefore be pursued further. Crystalline ordering phenomena were also observed in a model char prepared from phenol-formaldehyde carbonized at 900{degrees}C and 1300{degrees}C using high-resolution TEM fringe imaging. Dramatic changes occur in the structure between 900 and 1300{degrees}C, making this char a suitable candidate for upcoming in situ work on the hot stage TEM. Work also proceeded on molecular dynamics simulations at Boston University and on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at Ohio State.

Hurt, R.; Colo, J [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stanley, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

NETL: News Release - Tax Credit Programs Promote Coal-Based Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14, 2006 14, 2006 Tax Credit Programs Promote Coal-Based Power Generation Technologies Energy Department Assists Internal Revenue Service in Project Selection WASHINGTON, DC - Legislation designed to advance cleaner coal-based power generation and gasification technologies has received a strong response from the coal community, according to the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy. The expected result: increased energy security and improved environmental performance from our Nation's most abundant energy resource. The response flows from the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the first overhaul of America's energy policy since 1992. Passed on July 29, 2005, by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, the Act focuses on clean energy, efficient energy use, energy conservation, and advanced technologies.

92

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year' in 1981 and won the 'energy conservation award' for 1983. The decision to install and operate a coal gasification plant was based on severe natural gas curtailments at York with continuing supply interruptions. This paper will present a detailed description of the equipment used in the coal gasification system and the process itself. It also includes operating and gas production information along with an economic analysis. The characteristics of producer gas and its use in the various plant applications will be reviewed and compared with natural gas. In summary, this paper deals with caterpillar's experience with coal gasification to date. Caterpillar concludes that the coal gas system has the potential to favorably affect the corporation's commitment to stimulate coal utilization. The three years' operating experience at the York plant has demonstrated the practical use of coal gas as well as the economics associated with producing gas from coal.

Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

EIA Energy Kids - Coal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Basics Coal takes millions of years to create. Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock composed mostly of carbon and hydrocarbons.

100

Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems ‘97 Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference Sponsor: Federal Energy Technology Center- Morgantown and PittsburghDisclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. UPGRADING LOW RANK COAL USING THE KOPPELMAN SERIES C PROCESS

N. W. Merriam

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

102

INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production coal-derived hydrocarbons. Coal is more easily recovered and more widely available than oil shale and

Seth, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Review of Alternatives for Co-firing Biomass in Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update presents information gathered during visits to three European coal-based plants co-fired with biomass. In addition to process details of the plants visited, the report draws together the insight gained of the political and technical approaches that Member States of the European Union (EU) are following to reduce fossil-derived carbon dioxide emissions from their power plants.

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate. The appendices to the report provide a detailed description of the entire DRB process for each state.

Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress continued to be made during the past reporting quarter on both major technical tasks. During the reporting period at OSU, computational investigations were conducted of addition vs. abstraction reactions of H, O(3 P), and OH with monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The potential energy surface for more than 80 unique reactions of H, O ( 3 P), and OH with aromatic hydrocarbons were determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The calculated transition state barriers and reaction free energies indicate that the addition channel is preferred at 298K, but that the abstraction channel becomes dominant at high temperatures. The thermodynamic preference for reactivity with aromatic hydrocarbons increases in the order O(3 P) < H < OH. Abstraction from six-membered aromatic rings is more facile than abstraction from five-membered aromatic rings. However, addition to five-membered rings is thermodynamically more favorable than addition to six-membered rings. The free energies for the abstraction and addition reactions of H, O, and OH with aromatic hydrocarbons and the characteristics of the respective transition states can be used to calculate the reaction rate constants for these important combustion reactions. Experimental work at Brown University on the effect of reaction on the structural evolution of different chars (i.e., phenolic resin char and chars produced from three different coals) have been investigated in a TGA/TPD-MS system. It has been found that samples of different age of these chars appeared to lose their "memory" concerning their initial structures at high burn-offs. During the reporting period, thermal desorption experiments of selected samples were conducted. These spectra show that the population of low temperature oxygen surface complexes, which are primarily responsible for reactivity, are more similar for the high burn-off than for the low burn-off samples of different ages; i.e., the population of active sites are more similar for the ?younger? and ?older? chars at high burn-offs. Progress continued on experimental work at OSU. Another furnace run was conducted with a Pittsburgh seam coal. Temperature profiles were obtained, as well as char samples from three sampling ports. Nonisothermal TGA reactivities were also obtained for these samples. Work is continuing on final ?fine-tuning? of the gas analysis section.

CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the second quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Three parallel efforts were initiated on the modeling of carbon structural evolution. Structural ordering during carbonization was studied by a numerical simulation scheme proposed by Alan Kerstein involving molecular weight growth and rotational mobility. Work was also initiated to adapt a model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally developed under parallel NSF funding, to the prediction of coke texture. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. Boston University has initiated molecular dynamics simulations of carbonization processes and Ohio State has begun theoretical treatment of surface reactions. Experimental work has also begun on model compound studies at Brown and on pilot-scale combustion systems with widely varying flame types at OSE. The work on mobility / growth models shows great promise and is discussed in detail in the body of the report.

Hurt, R.; Calo, J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stanley, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress was made this period on a number of tasks. A significant advance was made in the incorporation of macrostructural ideas into high temperature combustion models. Work at OSU by R. Essenhigh in collaboration with the University of Stuttgart has led to a theory that the zone I / II transition in char combustion lies within the range of conditions of interest for pulverized char combustion. The group has presented evidence that some combustion data, previously interpreted with zone II models, in fact takes place in the transition from zone II to zone 1. This idea was used at Brown to make modifications to the CBK model (a char kinetics package specially designed for carbon burnout prediction, currently used by a number of research and furnace modeling groups in academia and industry). The resulting new model version, CBK8, shows improved ability to predict extinction behavior in the late stages of combustion, especially for particles with low ash content. The full development and release of CBK8, along with detailed descriptions of the role of the zone 1/2 transition will be reported on in subsequent reports. ABB-CE is currently implementing CBK7 into a special version of the CFD code Fluent for use in the modeling and design of their boilers. They have been appraised of the development, and have expressed interest in incorporating the new feature, realizing full CBK8 capabilities into their combustion codes. The computational chemistry task at OSU continued to study oxidative pathways for PAH, with emphasis this period on heteroatom containing ring compounds. Preliminary XPS studies were also carried out. Combustion experiments were also carried out at OSU this period, leading to the acquisition of samples at various residence times and the measurement of their oxidation reactivity by nonisothermal TGA techniques. Several members of the project team attended the Carbon Conference this period and made contacts with representatives from the new FETC Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal. Possibilities for interactions with this new center will be explored. Also this period, an invited review paper was prepared for the 27th International Symposium on Combustion, to be held in Boulder, Colorado in August. The paper is entitled; "Structure, Properties, and Reactivity of Solid Fuels," and reports on a number of advances made in this collaborative project.

CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I.D I.D XBL 7111- 11389 g. s urn coal iurn REfERENCES 1. W.H. Wiser, Coal Catalysis, Proceedings of the EPRIC. Howard. Chern; (John Wil of Coal Utilization H. H. lowry.

Seth, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

EPRI 2002 Workshop on Combustion-Based NOx Controls for Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Workshop on Combustion-Based NOx Controls for Coal-Fired Boilers, formerly the Workshop on NOx Controls for Utility Boilers, was the sixth in a series sponsored by EPRI and offered attendees a comprehensive picture of recent developments and full-scale applications of control technologies for nitrogen oxides (NOx). The workshop took place on October 24-25, 2002, in Atlanta, Georgia.

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and missions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects test; and full-scale combustion tests.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coal Mining Tax Credit (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Mining Tax Credit provides an income or insurance premium tax credit of $2.00 per ton of coal mined, produced or extracted on each ton of coal mined in Arkansas in a tax year. An...

115

Estimating Gas Concentration of Coal Mines Based on ISGNN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online detecting failure of gas sensors in mine wells is an important problem. A key step for solution of the problem is estimating sample values of detected gas sensor, according to sample values of other gas sensors. We propose a scheme based on ISGNN ... Keywords: Estimating gas concentration, Gas concentration modeling, Generating Neural Networks, ISGNN

Aiguo Li; Lina Song

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Czech setting, where coal is still com- monly used inwe found exposure to coal home heating and ETS increasewell studied, residential coal combustion in economically

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and CO 2 from coal with commercially readyHong B, Slatick E. Carbon dioxide emission factors for coal.EIA Quarterly Coal Report January–April 1994:1–8. 1994. DOE/

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Environment Impact Evaluation of Coal Development Based on BP Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the Environment impact of coal development, this paper selected evaluation indicators of the Environment impact of coal development according to certain principles and constructed Environment impact model of the coal development ... Keywords: Environment Impact, Coal Development, BP neural network

Kai Guo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

120

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

122

Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Nearly 60 Years of Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. – The Savannah River Site (SRS) has shut down the massive, coal-powered D-Area powerhouse as the site turns to new, clean and highly efficient power generation technology.

123

Experiments on chemical looping combustion of coal with a NiO based oxygen carrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chemical looping combustion process for coal using interconnected fluidized beds with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} is proposed in this paper. The configuration comprises a high velocity fluidized bed as an air reactor, a cyclone, and a spout-fluid bed as a fuel reactor. The high velocity fluidized bed is directly connected to the spout-fluid bed through the cyclone. Gas composition of both fuel reactor and air reactor, carbon content of fly ash in the fuel reactor, carbon conversion efficiency and CO{sub 2} capture efficiency were investigated experimentally. The results showed that coal gasification was the main factor which controlled the contents of CO and CH{sub 4} concentrations in the flue gas of the fuel reactor, carbon conversion efficiency in the process of chemical looping combustion of coal with NiO-based oxygen carrier in the interconnected fluidized beds. Carbon conversion efficiency reached only 92.8% even when the fuel reactor temperature was high up to 970 C. There was an inherent carbon loss in the process of chemical looping combustion of coal in the interconnected fluidized beds. The inherent carbon loss was due to an easy elutriation of fine char particles from the freeboard of the spout-fluid bed, which was inevitable in this kind of fluidized bed reactor. Further improvement of carbon conversion efficiency could be achieved by means of a circulation of fine particles elutriation into the spout-fluid bed or the high velocity fluidized bed. CO{sub 2} capture efficiency reached to its equilibrium of 80% at the fuel reactor temperature of 960 C. The inherent loss of CO{sub 2} capture efficiency was due to bypassing of gases from the fuel reactor to the air reactor, and the product of residual char burnt with air in the air reactor. Further experiments should be performed for a relatively long-time period to investigate the effects of ash and sulfur in coal on the reactivity of nickel-based oxygen carrier in the continuous CLC reactor. (author)

Shen, Laihong; Wu, Jiahua; Xiao, Jun [Thermoenergy Engineering Research Institute, Southeast University, 2 Sipailou, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Coal price (2005$) $1.29/MMBTU 93.8 kg CO 2 /MMBTU coal COsales $0.05/kWh price (2005$) Coal type Illinois no.coal-to- electricity ef?ciency is 37%, carbon capture is 91%, and the electricity price

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

STEO November 2012 - coal supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach record high in 2012. While U.S. coal production is down 7 percent this year due in part to utilities switching to low-priced natural gas to generate electricity, American coal is still finding plenty of buyers in overseas markets. U.S. coal exports are expected to hit a record 125 million tons in 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says in its new monthly short-term energy outlook. Coal exports are expected to decline in 2013, primarily because of continuing economic weakness in Europe, lower international coal prices, and higher coal production in Asia. However, U.S. coal exports next year are still expected to top 100 million tons for the third year in a row

127

Market-Based Valuation of Coal Generation and Coal R&D in the U.S. Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The payoff from accelerated research and development (R&D) in coal generation technology could be enormous, over $300-$1,300 billion. The prime beneficiary is the power-consuming public. This conclusion is supported by a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the U.S. electric sector. Cosponsored by LCG Consulting, this study provides a large-scale financial, technical, and operational analysis of the electric sector, applying techniques of modern business analysis at an unprecedented scale.

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Circular Economy Assessment for Coal-fired Power Plants Based on Supper-Efficiency DEA Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants are the main pollution source in most areas of China. The implementation of circular economy in coal-fired power plants is necessary for environmental protection and also an effective way of energy saving and emission reduction. ... Keywords: circular economy assessment, circular economy improvement, coal-fired power plant, super-efficiency data envelopment analysis

Shao-lun Zeng; Hong Hu; Wei Wang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Research of Coal Mine Safety Assessment Based on Multi-agent about Evidence Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of coal mine is a very large, complex and dangerous system .In this paper, we analyzed the influence factors of safety in coal mine production. According to the shortage of traditional coal mine safety assessment methods, we took each ... Keywords: evidence theory, multi-agent, safety assessment, working face

Xiaohu Zhao; Qingqing Wang; Keke Zhao

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Watershed Transformation Based Identification of the Combustion Region in an Oxy-coal Flame Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the increasingly stringent standards on pollutant emissions, oxy-coal combustion technologies are being proposed for both existing and new coal-fired power plants. However, there is lack of research to characterize this new type of combustion ... Keywords: edge detection, image enhancement, wavelet transformation, oxy-coal flame, watershed transformation, image segmentation

Tian Qiu; Yong Yan; Gang Lu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Performance Analysis of Existing 600MW Coal-Fired Power Plant with Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the techno-economic performance of 600 MW coal-fired power plant with and without ammonia-based CO2 capture process, based on the operating data of an existing power plant. The simulation and analysis, with fully consideration of ... Keywords: CO2 capture, aqueous ammonia, existing power plant, techno-economic performance

Gang Xu; Liqiang Duan; Mingde Zhao; Yongping Yang; Ji Li; Le Li; Haizhan Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

133

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume III. Coal resource depletion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While US coal resources are known to be vast, their rate of depletion in a future based predominantly on coal has not been examined analytically heretofore. The Coal Depletion Model inventories the coal resource on a regional basis and calculates the cost of coal extraction by three technologies - strip and underground mining and in-situ combustion. A plausible coal demand scenario extending from 1975 to the year 2050 is used as a basis in applying the model. In the year 2050, plants in operation include 285 syncrude plants, each producing 100,000 B/D; 312 SNG plants, each producing 250 million SCF/D and 722 coal-fired electric power plants, each of 1000 MW capacity. In addition, there is 890 million tons per year of industrial coal consumption. Such a high level of coal use would deplete US coal resources much more rapidly than most people appreciate. Of course, the actual amount of US coal is unknown, and if the coal in the hypothetical reliability category is included, depletion is delayed. Coal in this category, however, has not been mapped; it is only presumed to exist on the basis of geological theory. The coal resource depletion model shows that unilateral imposition of a severance tax by a state tends to shift production to other coal producing regions. Boom and bust cycles are both delayed and reduced in their magnitude. When several states simultaneously impose severance taxes, the effect of each is weakened.Key policy issues that emerge from this analysis concern the need to reduce the uncertainty of the magnitude and geographic distribution of the US coal resource and the need to stimulate interaction among the parties at interest to work out equitable and acceptable coal conversion plant location strategies capable of coping with the challenges of a high-coal future.

Dickson, E.M.; Yabroff, I.W.; Kroll, C.A.; White, R.K.; Walton, B.L.; Ivory, M.E.; Fullen, R.E.; Weisbecker, L.W.; Hays, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 2. The Hanna I field test  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Based on the recommendations of A.D. Little, Inc. in a 1971 report prepared for the US Bureau of Mines, the Hanna I test represented the first field test in reestablishing a field program by the US Bureau of Mines. The test was directed toward comparing results from a thick subbitiminous coal seam with those obtained during the field test series conducted at Gorgas, AL, in the 1940's and 1950's. Hanna I was conducted from March 1973 through February 1974. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facility description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

MS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL America has more coal than any other fossil fuel resource. Th e United States also has more coal reserves than any other single country in the world. In fact, 1/4 of all the known coal in the world is in the United States. Th e United States has more energy in coal that can be mined than the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. Currently, coal is mined in 25 of the 50 states. Coal is used primarily in the United States to generate electricity. In fact, it is burned in power plants to produce nearly half of the electricity we use. A stove uses about half a ton of coal a year. A water heater uses about two tons of coal a year. And a refrigerator, that's another half-ton a year. Even though you

137

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of combustion emissions from wood (Honicky andfuel combustion sources, such as gas-, wood-, or coal-indoor combustion of cigarettes and of coal, wood, natural

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain P.F. Peterson, W.E. Kastenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes; coal ash; deep-well injected hazardous liquid waste; and solid wastes such as lead, mercury in a 100- year flood plain, or if they do, be designed to resist washout by a 100-year flood (15). Coal for base-load electricity production--nuclear and coal. U.S. utility executives uniformly maintain that YM

139

Overview of coal conversion  

SciTech Connect

The structure of coal and the processes of coal gasification and coal liquefaction are reviewed. While coal conversion technology is not likely to provide a significant amount of synthetic fuel within the next several years, there is a clear interest both in government and private sectors in the development of this technology to hedge against ever-diminishing petroleum supplies, especially from foreign sources. It is evident from this rather cursory survey that there is some old technology that is highly reliable; new technology is being developed but is not ready for commercialization at the present state of development. The area of coal conversion is ripe for exploration both on the applied and basic research levels. A great deal more must be understood about the reactions of coal, the reactions of coal products, and the physics and chemistry involved in the various stages of coal conversion processes in order to make this technology economically viable.

Clark, B.R.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

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141

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

State coal profiles, January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-1248E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

144

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Phadke, Amol, Charles A....

145

Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Final report, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. All primary source documents used to prepare the 1979 DRB were reviewed. Using the methodologies and documentation found in the 1979 DRB published report as a guide, each of the state-level published reserve estimates were re-derived. In those cases where the estimates could not be reproduced, EIA personnel from the Eastern and Western Energy Data Offices were consulted and the differences, for the most part, were resolved. Throughout this report an attempt was made to describe the information flow that was an integral part of the DRB development. Particular attention and emphasis was given to those instances where deviations from standard, published EIA procedures were used to derive the DRB estimates. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate.

Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization  

SciTech Connect

Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

Design and Development of New Ni-Fe-base Superalloys for Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The development of advanced ultra-supercritical coal-fired power plants with operating temperature beyond 700°C requires the partial ...

148

Model-based estimation of adiabatic flame temperature during coal gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal gasification temperature distribution in the gasifier is one of the importantissues. High temperature may increase the risk of corrosion of the gasifier wall or… (more)

Sarigul, Ihsan Mert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been conducting research on gasification for six decades. One of the objectives of this gasification research has been to maximize carbon conversion and the water–gas shift process for optimal hydrogen production and syngas quality. This research focus and experience were a perfect fit for the National Center for Hydrogen Technology ® (NCHT®) Program at the EERC for improving all aspects of coal gasification, which ultimately aids in the production and purification of hydrogen. A consortia project was developed under the NCHT Program to develop an improved predictive model for ash formation and deposition under the project entitled “Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III: Development of the CABRE III Model.” The computer-based program is now applicable to the modeling of coal and ash behavior in both entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasification systems to aid in overall gasification efficiency. This model represents a significant improvement over the CABRE II model and runs on a Microsoft Windows PC platform. The major achievements of the CABRE III model are partitioning of inorganic transformations between various phases for specific gas cleanup equipment; slag property predictions, including standard temperature–viscosity curves and slag flow and thickness; deposition rates in gasification cleanup equipment; provision for composition analysis for all input and output streams across all process equipment, including major elements and trace elements of interest; composition analysis of deposit streams for various deposit zones, including direct condensation on equipment surfaces (Zone A), homogeneous particulate deposition (Zone B), and entrained fly ash deposition (Zone C); and physical removal of ash in cyclones based on D50 cut points. Another new feature of the CABRE III model is a user-friendly interface and detailed reports that are easily exportable into Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or as pdf files. The user interface provides stepwise guides with built-in checks for efficient entry of required input data on fuels of interest to allow a successful execution of the model. The model was developed with data from several fuels selected by the sponsors, including bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, and petroleum coke (petcoke). The data from these fuels were obtained using small pilot-scale entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasifiers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The CABRE III model is expected to further advance the knowledge base for the NCHT® Program and, more importantly, allow for prediction of the slagging and fouling characteristics of fuels in reducing environments. The information obtained from this program will potentially also assist in maintaining prolonged gasifier operation free from failure or facilitate troubleshooting to minimize downtime in the event of a problem.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Azenkeng, Alexander; McCollor, Donald; Galbreath, Kevin; Jensen, Robert; Lahr, Brent

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Volume 1, Technical report. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1994--March 27, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium for Coal Water Mixture Technology and the U.S. Department of Energy. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. Phase I is nearly completed. During this reporting period, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, engineering designs and economics for retrofitting the Crane, Indiana boiler to fire coal-based fuels, and a 1,000-hour demonstration of dry, micronized coal were completed. In addition, a demonstration-scale micronized-coal water mixture (MCWM) preparation circuit was constructed and a 1,000-hour demonstration firing MCWM began. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations involved literature surveys of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, trace metals, volatile organic compounds, and fine particulate matter capture. In addition, vendors and engineering firms were contacted to identify the appropriate emissions technologies for the installation of commercial NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removal systems on the demonstration boiler. Information from the literature surveys and engineering firms will be used to identify, design, and install a control system(s). Work continued on the refinement and optimization of coal grinding and MCWM preparation procedures, and on the development of advanced processes for beneficiating high ash, high sulfur coals. Work also continued on determining the basic cost estimation of boiler retrofits, and evaluating environmental, regulatory, and regional economic impacts. In addition, the feasibility of technology adoption, and the public`s perception of the benefits and costs of coal usage was studied. A coal market analysis was completed. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies, emissions reductions and economic analyses of coal use.

Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Hatcher, P. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 â?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal production capacities and coal prices. Coal Productionalso be affected by higher coal prices. II "Current Factors$/year Change in Clean Coal Price, $/ton (FOB Plant) Cost of

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5922_1646830,001500250000000... 1 of 2 3/10/2006 7:45 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http 1 Front » Story Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit HT Correspondent Kanpur, March that coal based thermal power plants are the main source for air pollution. The fact came to the fore during

Singh, Ramesh P.

157

Study of the Optimum Extraction of Coal Resources Based on the Rate of Comprehensive Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low efficiency and waste are the main problems in the process of coal resources extraction in China. Taking the utilization and recovery rate into account, the article has analyzed the factors influencing the utilization and recovery rate and given some ... Keywords: Coal Resources, Utilization Rate, Recovery Rate, Resource Taxes, Dynamic Optimization

Sun Dachao; Wei Xiaoping; Lu Nan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Case-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biogas or DME, so we assumed the same values for biogas as for coke oven gas (i.e., town gas coal, washed coal and coke, 75 % for petroleum products and town gas, and 90 % for heat. We also synthesis gas and elec- tricity, high-value-added chemicals, high-value-added fu- els for vehicles

159

Potential Prediction of Favorable Regions about Coal Resources Based on MapGIS in Taiqian Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MapGIS has been widely applied to many fields in geological discipline as a maturely GIS. Its powerful graphic editing and comprehensive snalysis of spatial data functions make it possible to applied to potential prediction of coal. This paper mainly ... Keywords: MapGIS, Taiqian Region, coal resources, potential prediction

Chen Kuikui; Zhang Chong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Based on Two Swarm Optimized Algorithm of Neural Network to Prediction the Switch's Traffic of Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal accurately predict multi-channel network traffic monitoring network for transmission to enhance and improve the QoS is very important, the characteristics of coalmine monitoring network, the first neural network model was constructed, followed by ... Keywords: Coal, network traffic, ant colony algorithm, Particle swarm optimization

Xiao-qiang Shao

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Flow Allocation Model and Algorithm Based on Multi-target Coal Transportation Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal transportation network consists of multiple logistics nodes and transportation paths. As the node capacity and cost factors is limited, its flow distribution is a multi-target and multi-constraint problem. Through the use of multi-target planning ... Keywords: flow allocation, model, algorithm, multi-target, coal transportation network

Tingting Zhu; Tianjun Hu; Xifu Wang; Yalong Zhao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Numerical Simulations of Temperature Field of Coal-Bed Methane with Heat Injection Based on ANSYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional temperature field of the coal-bed methane with heat injection was numerically calculated by ANSYS. The calculated results revealed that the temperature, the thermal gradients and the thermal flux vector sum of the coal-bed near ... Keywords: heat injection, numerical simulation, temperature

Bing Xiong Lu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of Coal Bed Methane Resource Based on Mapgis in Hancheng Mining Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial database of coal bed methane (CBM)is established on the analysis of data about CBM in Hancheng mining area. the relationship between the content of methane and main structure line, the radius of buffer area for structure control of gas is ... Keywords: geological information system, spatial database, spatial analysis, coal bed gad, Hancheng mining area

Chen Lingxia; Chen Lianwu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Research on Resource Value Flow Accounting Based on Circular Economy for Coal-fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology of resource value flow accounting developed for a study which combined material flow analysis?MFA? for the coal-fired power generation plant, in order to shed light on concepts such as resource productivity ... Keywords: Circular economy, Coal-fired power plant, Material flow analysis, Resource value flow accounting

Xie Zhiming; Yi Xuan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, March 28, 1995--September 27, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through the Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Mixture Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. During this reporting period, preparation of the Phase I final report continued. Work on Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included initiating a study to identify appropriate SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies for coal-fired industrial boilers. In addition, work started on the design of a ceramic filtering device for installation on the demonstration boiler. The ceramic filter device will be used to demonstrate a more compact and efficient filtering device for retrofit applications. Coal preparation and utilization activities, and the economic analysis were completed and work focused on preparing the final report. Work on Phase III focused on coal preparation studies and economic analyses of coal use. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, surface-based separation processes, and dry processing. The economic study focused on selecting incentives for commercialization of coal using technologies, community sensitivity to coal usage, regional economic impacts of new coal utilization technologies, and constructing a national energy portfolio.

Miller, B.G.; Hatcher, P.; Knicker, H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Coal production: 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal production and related data are reported for the year 1980, with similar data for 1979 given for comparison. The data here collected on Form EIA-7A, coal production report, from 3969 US mines that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1980. Among the items covered are production, prices, employment, productivity, stocks, and recoverable reserves. Data are reported by state, county, coal producing district, type of mining, and by type of coal (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite). Also included are a glossary of coal terms used, a map of the coal producing disricts, and form EIA-7A with instructions. 14 figures, 63 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal: the new black  

SciTech Connect

Long eclipsed by oil and natural gas as a raw material for high-volume chemicals, coal is making a comeback, with oil priced at more than $100 per barrel. It is relatively cheap feedstock for chemicals such as methanol and China is building plants to convert coal to polyolefins on a large scale and interest is spreading worldwide. Over the years several companies in the US and China have made fertilizers via the gasification of coal. Eastman in Tennessee gasifies coal to make methanol which is then converted to acetic acid, acetic anhydride and acetate fiber. The future vision is to convert methanol to olefins. UOP and Lurgi are the major vendors of this technology. These companies are the respective chemical engineering arms of Honeywell and Air Liquide. The article reports developments in China, USA and India on coal-to-chemicals via coal gasification or coal liquefaction. 2 figs., 2 photo.

Tullo, A.H.; Tremblay, J.-F.

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

170

The world price of coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant increase in the seaborne trade for coal over the past twenty years has unified formerly separate coal markets into a world market in which prices move in tandem. Due to its large domestic market, the United ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

172

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Design and Application of Coal Blending Control System Based on HOLLiAS-LK Large-Scale PLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To make full use of coal combustion heat energy, and for the purposes of energy savings and pollutant reductions, more than two different coal needs to optimize the preparation of coal. This article describes design and application of coal blending control ... Keywords: coal blending system, PLC, cascade control, kingview

Hong Zhu; Haitao Li; Sheng Fu; Yinhua Pang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Bayesian Learning Model in the Agent-based Bilateral Negotiation between the Coal Producers and Electric Power Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reform of China’s coal sector has changed the traditional relationship of the coal producers and electric power generators, and now most of the coal the coal producers sell to the generators is transacted through electric coal bilateral contracts, ... Keywords: Electric price, Agent, Bayesian Learning

Mingwen Zhang; Zhongfu Tan; Jianbao Zhao; Li Li

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1992--March 27, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first phase of the program is underway. Phase I activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (MC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase II research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and pre-combustion (i.e., slagging combustion and/or gasification) strategies for the utilization of high ash and high sulfur coals. Phase III activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phase I are described below. The objective in Phase I is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil- designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or MC. This will be achieved through a program consisting of the following five tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package.

Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; Hogg, R. [and others

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

176

CORROSION OF IRON-BASE ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR AT 871 AND 982 C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22 I1J/m ) synthetic natural gas (SNG). The gasifiers are I.produce a sufficient amount of SNG. Research in the U.S. hasoverall commercial Synthane SNG process. The i I I I coal is

Gordon, Bruce Abbott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

CORROSION OF IRON-BASE ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR AT 871 AND 982 C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fe-Cr-Al Alloys in Coal Gasifier Environments," LBJ>7320,accelerated corrosion of gasifier components by oxygen andof the alloys composing the gasifier components. The role of

Gordon, Bruce Abbott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fe and Ni Enriched and Concentrated from Laterite by Coal Base ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the reduction temperature of 1100?, reduction time of 80min, coal/ore ratio of 2:1, and with followed separation magnetic density of 1.8KG, the grade of ...

179

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2006 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2006 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2006. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2007 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2007 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2007. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Carbon now real factor in denying permits to coal-based generation  

SciTech Connect

Concerns about global climate change and uncertainties about the potential cost of carbon regulation have increased the odds that applications to build coal-fired plants will be denied. In Kansas the coal industry was stunned by the denial of an air-quality permit for a project because of concerns about global warming. It was the first time any official anywhere had invoked greenhouse gases as the reason for denying an operating permit for a proposed fossil-fueled plant.

NONE

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

183

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

184

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

185

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

186

Coal sector profile  

SciTech Connect

Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANTS REQUIRED FOR DEVELOPMENT OF COAL PORT/TERMINAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PIDC intends to develop complete infrastructure facilities (Coal Port/Terminal) for the handling & transportation of imported coal at a greenfield site in the coastal area of Pakistan to facilitate setting up coal based industries in an adjoining industrial zone and supply to other users. International consultants, having experience and expertise of developing coal handling facilities of international standard for off-loading, storage and transportation of imported coal in bulk volume are invited to apply preferably in association with reputed local consultants for preparation of Feasibility Study of the project covering all relevant aspects including: 1. Market study to ascertain potential local demand for imported coal by power, cement and steel plants and other major users for the next 15 years. 2. Develop master plan and design of the infrastructure facilities (Coal Port/Terminal) for handling imported coal in bulk quantity at the location to be identified in the study. 3. Development of industrial zone for coal based industry. 4. Financial and technical aspects / viability of the project. 5. Implementation plan and strategy to develop and operate the project. Interested parties may collect the TOR for the feasibility study from the under mentioned office during working hours or download it from Ministry of Industries, Production & Special Initiatives, Government of Pakistan’s web site www.moip.gov.pk. Detailed proposal for carrying out the feasibility study alongwith financial bid and the background information of the consultants, should be submitted latest by May 17, 2007 at the address given below. PIDC

For Imported; Coal In Pakistan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Environmental externalities: An ASEAN application to coal-based power generation. Extract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant benefits to human health that result from emissions control programs may justify the costs of pollution control policies. Many scientists, economists, risk analysts, and policymakers believe that comparisons of the benefits with the costs of pollution control demonstrate that the US stationary source, air emissions control program is justified. This justification is based upon pronounced benefits to human health, especially from controlling suspended particulates and sulfur compounds. Market decisions are usually made on the basis of a consideration of traditional costs such as capital, operating and maintenance, fuel costs, and fixed charges. Social costs, which could be significant, are not incorporated explicitly into such decisions. These social costs could result in a net reduction in the welfare of individuals, and of society as a whole. Because these social costs and their effects are not represented in the price of energy, individual have no way to explicitly value them; hence, they remain unaccounted for in market decisions. By accounting for external costs, the selection of energy sources and production of energy products can lead to and equilibrium, where the total cost of energy and energy products, together with resulting social costs, can be brought to an economic minimum. The concept of an air emissions control program is of interest to the ASEAN countries (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand) and their governments, especially if such a program could be justified in cost-benefit terms and shown to be directly applicable to ASEAN conditions. It is the intent of the effort described herein to demonstrate that technical options are available to control emissions from coal-based, electric power plants and that that costs of these options may be justified in cost-benefit terms.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard series of two staged gas generators (GG) has been developed in the United States for producing gas with a combustion heat from 4,700 to 7,600 kilojoules per cubic meter from coal (U). The diameter of the gas generators is from 1.4 to 3.65 meters and the thermal capacity based on purified cold gas is from 12.5 to 89 million kilojoules per hour. Certain standard sized gas generators have undergone experimental industrial tests which showed that it is most expedient to feed the coal into the gas generators pneumatically. This reduces the dimensions of the charging device, makes it possible to use more common grades of structural steels and reduces the cost of the gas. A double valve reliably prevents ejections of the gasification product and promotes the best distribution of the coal in the gas generator. The gas generators may successfully operate on high moisture (up to 36 percent) brown coal. Blasting with oxygen enriched to 38 percent made it possible to produce a gas with a combustion heat of 9,350 kilojoules per cubic meter. This supports a combustion temperature of 1,700C.

Rainey, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

191

Pressurized chemical-looping combustion of coal with an iron ore-based oxygen carrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a new combustion technology with inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. Most of the previous investigations on CLC of solid fuels were conducted under atmospheric pressure. A pressurized CLC combined cycle (PCLC-CC) system is proposed as a promising coal combustion technology with potential higher system efficiency, higher fuel conversion, and lower cost for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In this study pressurized CLC of coal with Companhia Valedo Rio Doce (CVRD) iron ore was investigated in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. CVRD iron ore particles were exposed alternately to reduction by 0.4 g of Chinese Xuzhou bituminous coal gasified with 87.2% steam/N{sub 2} mixture and oxidation with 5% O{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at 970 C. The operating pressure was varied between 0.1 MPa and 0.6 MPa. First, control experiments of steam coal gasification over quartz sand were performed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are the major components of the gasification products, and the operating pressure influences the gas composition. Higher concentrations of CO{sub 2} and lower fractions of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} during the reduction process with CVRD iron ore was achieved under higher pressures. The effects of pressure on the coal gasification rate in the presence of the oxygen carrier were different for pyrolysis and char gasification. The pressurized condition suppresses the initial coal pyrolysis process while it also enhances coal char gasification and reduction with iron ore in steam, and thus improves the overall reaction rate of CLC. The oxidation rates and variation of oxygen carrier conversion are higher at elevated pressures reflecting higher reduction level in the previous reduction period. Scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses show that particles become porous after experiments but maintain structure and size after several cycles. Agglomeration was not observed in this study. An EDX analysis demonstrates that there is very little coal ash deposited on the oxygen carrier particles but no appreciable crystalline phases change as verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Overall, the limited pressurized CLC experiments carried out in the present work suggest that PCLC of coal is promising and further investigations are necessary. (author)

Xiao, Rui; Song, Min; Zhang, Shuai; Shen, Laihong [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); Song, Qilei [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Lu, Zuoji [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); GCL Engineering Limited, Zhujiang No. 1, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

2009 Coal Age Buyers Guide  

SciTech Connect

The buyers guide lists more than 1200 companies mainly based in the USA, that provide equipment and services to US coal mines and coal preparation plants. The guide is subdivided by product categories.

NONE

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

2008 Coal Age buyers guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The buyers guide lists more than 1200 companies mainly based in the USA, that provide equipment and services to US coal mines and coal preparation plants. The guide is subdivided by product categories.

NONE

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Central neurocytoma: Management recommendations based on a 35-year experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with histologically confirmed central neurocytomas. Methods and Materials: The data from 45 patients with central neurocytomas diagnosed between 1971 and 2003 were retrospectively evaluated. Various combinations of surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy had been used for treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 10.0 years. The 10-year overall survival and local control rate was 83% and 60%, respectively. Patients whose tumor had a mitotic index of =}3. The 10-year survival and local control rate was 90% and 74% for patients with typical tumors compared with 63% (p = 0.055) and 46% (p = 0.41) for those with atypical tumors. A comparison of gross total resection with subtotal resection showed no significant difference in survival or local control. Postoperative RT improved local control at 10 years (75% with RT vs. 51% without RT, p = 0.045); however, this did not translate into a survival benefit. No 1p19q deletions were found in the 19 tumors tested. Conclusion: Although the overall prognosis is quite favorable, one-third of patients experienced tumor recurrence or progression at 10 years, regardless of the extent of the initial resection. Postoperative RT significantly improved local control but not survival, most likely because of the effectiveness of salvage RT. For incompletely resected atypical tumors and/or those with a high mitotic index, consideration should be given to adjuvant RT because of the more aggressive nature.

Leenstra, James L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Rodriguez, Fausto J. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Frechette, Christina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Giannini, Caterina [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Scheithauer, Bernd W. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Jenkins, Robert B. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Buckner, Jan C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

Horvath, M.L. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States)

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

196

Internet Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at America's Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, rising populations and regional droughts have caused coal-fired power plants to temporarily curtail or cease production due to a lack of available water for cooling. In addition, concerns about the availability of adequate supplies of cooling water have resulted in cancellation of plans to build much-needed new power plants. These issues, coupled with concern over the possible impacts of global climate change, have caused industry and community planners to seek alternate sources of water to supplement or replace existing supplies. The Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching ways to reduce the water demands of coal-fired power plants. As part of the NETL Program, ALL Consulting developed an internet-based Catalog of potential alternative sources of cooling water. The Catalog identifies alternative sources of water, such as mine discharge water, oil and gas produced water, saline aquifers, and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), which could be used to supplement or replace existing surface water sources. This report provides an overview of the Catalog, and examines the benefits and challenges of using these alternative water sources for cooling water.

J. Daniel Arthur

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Fifth Quarterly Report documents progress in pellet testing via thermogravimetric analysis of pellet formulation FORM4-A of a manganese ore/alumina combination. This formulation, described more fully in the Quarterly Technical Progress Report of October 15, 1993, consists of manganese carbonate combined with alundum. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration; however, a minor problem has arisen during the regeneration cycle in that sulfur tends to form and plug the exit tube during the early stage of regeneration. This problem is about to be overcome by increasing the flow rate of air during the regeneration cycle resulting in more oxidizing conditions and hence less tendency for sulfide sulfur (S{sup =}) to oxidize to the intermediate elemental form (S{sup o}) rather than to 4-valent (S{sup +4}).

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

current Coal Distribution Report current Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: November 7, 2012 | Next Release Date: November 2013 | full report Archive Domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, method of transportation; foreign coal distribution by major coal-exporting state and method of transportation; and domestic and foreign coal distribution by origin state. Year Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin Foreign distribution of U.S. coal by major coal-exporting States and destination Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by origin State, consumer, destination and method of transportation1 Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by destination State, consumer, destination and method of transportation1

199

U.S. Program on Materials Technology for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of coal for electrical generation is essential for maintaining adequate energy supplies in the United States in the 21st Century, but traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO2 at high levels relative to other generation options. To address these problems, a government/industry consortium is undertaking a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, termed "Ultrasuperc...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Study on the Principle and Technology of Coal and Methane Simultaneous Extraction Based on the Mining Fissure Elliptic Parabolic Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal and coal-bed methane are all valuable energy resource, if they can be extracted simultaneously and safely, the triple purposes of mine safety production, new energy resource supply and environment protection can be fulfilled. The coal-bed methane ... Keywords: Mining induced fissure, Elliptic Parabolic Zone, Relieved methane, Coal, methane simultaneous extraction

Lin Haifei; Li Shugang; Cheng Lianhua; Pan Hongyu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE COAL WASHABILITY ANALYZER  

SciTech Connect

Washability analysis is the basis for nearly all coal preparation plant separations. Unfortunately, there are no on-line techniques for determining this most fundamental of all coal cleaning information. In light of recent successes at the University of Utah, it now appears possible to determine coal washability on-line through the use of x-ray computed tomography (CT) analysis. The successful development of such a device is critical to the establishment of process control and automated coal blending systems. In this regard, Virginia Tech, Terra Tek Inc., and several eastern coal companies have joined with the University of Utah and agreed to undertake the development of a x-ray CT-based on-line coal washability analyzer with financial assistance from DOE. The three-year project will cost $594,571, of which 33% ($194,575) will be cost-shared by the participants. The project involves development of appropriate software and extensive testing/evaluation of well-characterized coal samples from operating coal preparation plants. Each project participant brings special expertise to the project which is expected to create a new dimension in coal cleaning technology. Finally, it should be noted that the analyzer may prove to be a universal analyzer capable of providing not only washability analysis, but also particle size distribution analysis, ash analysis and perhaps pyritic sulfur analysis.

C.L. LIN; G.H. LUTTRELL; G.T. ADEL; JAN D. MILLER

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

205

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4Q 2009 4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by transportation mode. The data sources beginning with the 2008 Coal Distribution Report

206

Clean Coal Demonstration Projects -- Operation Experience and Risk Assessment Through September 1997, Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean coal technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion can meet stringent emission standards and achieve high plant efficiencies. Commercial and near-commercial sized plants using these technologies have accumulated several years of operational experience and are serious candidates for new coal-based power plants.

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects -- Operating Experience and Risk Assessment Through September 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean coal technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) can meet stringent emission standards and achieve high efficiencies. Commercial and near-commercial sized plants using these technologies have accumulated several years of operational experience and are serious candidates for new coal-based power plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants: ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005343  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seyed Dastgheib seyed Dastgheib Principal Investigator Illinois State Geological Survey 615 E. Peabody Drive Champaign, Illinois 61820-6235 217-265-6274 dastgheib@isgs.uius.edu Reuse of PRoduced WateR fRom co 2 enhanced oil RecoveRy, coal-Bed methane, and mine Pool WateR By coal-Based PoWeR Plants: PRomis /PRoject no. : de-nt0005343 Background Coal-fired power plants are the second largest users of freshwater in the United States. In Illinois, the thermoelectric power sector accounts for approximately 84 percent of the estimated 14 billion gallons per day of freshwater withdrawals and one-third of the state's 1 billion gallons per day of freshwater consumption. Illinois electric power generation capacity is projected to expand 30 percent by 2030, increasing water consumption by

213

COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As of September 28, 2001, all the major project tasks have been completed. A presentation was given to the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) and the North Dakota Division of Community Services (DCS). In general, the feasibility study has resulted in the following conclusions: (1) Municipal wood resources are sufficient to support cofiring at the NDSP. (2) Steps have been taken to address all potential fuel-handling issues with the feed system design, and the design is cost-effective. (3) Fireside issues of cofiring municipal wood with coal are not of significant concern. In general, the addition of wood will improve the baseline performance of lignite coal. (4) The energy production strategy must include cogeneration using steam turbines. (5) Environmental permitting issues are small and do not affect economics. (6) The base-case economic scenario provides for a 15-year payback of a 20-year municipal bond and does not include the broader community benefits that can be realized.

Darren D. Schmidt

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

AVESTAR® - Oxy-Coal Carbon Capture (OCCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Coal Carbon Capture (OCCC) Dynamic Simulator Oxy-Coal Carbon Capture (OCCC) Dynamic Simulator FutureGen 2.0 is a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant using oxy-combustion technology to capture the plant's carbon emissions. To help meet the Nation's ever growing demand for clean energy, the FutureGen Industrial Alliance (Alliance) was formed to test and commercialize advanced coal-based systems fully integrated with carbon capture and geologic storage technologies. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Alliance and its project partners AirLiquide and Babcock & Wilcox, will upgrade an existing power plant in Meredosia, Illinois with oxy-coal carbon capture (OCCC) technology to capture and permanantly store approximately 1.0 million tonnes of CO2 each year.

215

Blackout: coal, climate and the last energy crisis  

SciTech Connect

Coal fuels more than 30 per cent of UK electricity production, and about 50 per cent in the US, providing a significant portion of total energy output. China and India's recent ferocious economic growth has been based almost entirely on coal-generated electricity. Coal currently looks like a solution to many of our fast-growing energy problems. However, while coal advocates are urging us full steam ahead, the increasing reliance on this dirtiest of all fossil fuels has crucial implications for energy policy, pollution levels, the global climate, world economy and geopolitics. Drawbacks to a coal-based energy strategy include: Scarcity - new studies suggest that the peak of world coal production may actually be less than two decades away; Cost - the quality of produced coal is declining, while the expense of transportation is rising, leading to spiralling costs and increasing shortages; and, Climate impacts - our ability to deal with the historic challenge of climate change may hinge on reducing coal consumption in future years.

Heinberg, R. [Post Carbon Institute in California, CA (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Coal Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Recommendations and Strategies Produced for the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Gasification Technologies Council (GTC) September 2004 Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Strategies and Recommendations Final Report Study Performed by:

217

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is being conducted by a team consisting of AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems & Equipment (ASE) (formerly AiResearch Los Angeles Division) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental externalities: Applying the concept to Asian coal-based power generation  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the concept of environmental externality. It discusses various factors -- the atmospheric transformations, relationship of point-source emissions to ambient air quality, dose-response relationships, applicable cause-and-effect principles, and risk and valuation research -- that are considered by a number of state utilities when they apply the environmental externality concept to energy resource planning. It describes a methodology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for general use in resource planning, in combination with traditional methods that consider the cost of electricity production. Finally, it shows how the methodology can be applied in Indonesia, Thailand, and Taiwan to potential coal-fired power plant projects that will make use of clean coal technologies.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1993--March 27, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first two phases of the program are underway. To achieve the objectives of the program, a team of researchers was assembled. Phase I activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water slurry fuels (MCWSFS) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase II research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and precombustion (i.e., slagging combustion and/or gasification) strategies for the utilization of high ash, high sulfur coals. Phase III activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phases I and II are described below. The objective in Phase I is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWSF or DMC. This will be achieved through a program consisting of the following five tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; and (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package.

Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Sharifi, R.; Shepard, J.F.; Scaroni, A.W.; Hogg, R.; Chander, S.; Cho, H.; Ityokumbul, M.T.; Klima, M.S. [and others

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Program on Technology Innovation: Laser-Based Sensors for Monitoring Coal Gasifiers, Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stanford University's High-Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory has undertaken a two-phase project to investigate the feasibility of real-time, in situ sensing of gas temperature and composition during coal gasification using tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption. In Phase I (April 2007June 2008), it was demonstrated through high-pressure TDL absorption sensing of carbon dioxide that TDL sensors can give quantitative measurements at pressures equivalent to 50 atm for 1500K (2250°F)conditions typical of...

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 7, October 1990--December 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the fourth quarter of 1990, the following technical progress was made: (1) Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of microbubble flotation beneficiated products; (2) continued drop tube combustion tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; (3) analyzed the data from three (MIT) pilot-scale combustion tests of the Upper Freeport feed coal; and (4) continued analyses of the data from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels.

Hargrove, M.J.; Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

METC research on coal-fired diesels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The METC in-house Coal-Fueled Diesel Research project is part of the overall DOE effort to develop a technology base for diesel engines capable of operating on coal, shale oil or low-cost coal-derived fuels. The in-house effort started in 1985 as a test-bed for coal-derived liquid fuels and will end this fiscal year with the successful completion of METC`s diesel R&D program. Currently METC in-house research and development efforts focus on pilot chamber combustion in METC`s coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. A novel pilot chamber for a direct-injected, coal-fueled diesel engine has been designed and is being tested in METC`s single cylinder research diesel engine. The pilot chamber configuration allows for operation at extended load and speed conditions using 100 percent CWS and no other pilot fuel. The concept involves the use of a small volume chamber exterior to the main cylinder in which approximately 5 percent of the total fuel energy at full load conditions is injected. Lower NO{sub X} levels may be obtained due to leaner burning as well as broader stable performance using only CWS fuel.

McMillian, M.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Robey, E.H.; Addis, R.E. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Adapting Fuels Management to a Changing Coal Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coal and coal transportation markets have changed significantly over the past several years. A trend that is most likely to require strategic changes in coal procurement organizations is greater commoditization, meaning that these markets will tend to become more standardized, more liquid, more volatile, and more financially driven. This report analyzes how these and other developments are likely to change the coal and coal transportation markets over the next one to three years and how coal-fired ge...

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

227

EIA - AEO2010 - Coal projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Projections Coal Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Coal Projections Figure 88. Coal production by region, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 89. U.S. coal production in six cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 90. Average annual minemouth coal prices by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 91. Average annual delivered coal prices in four cases, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 92. Change in U.S. coal consumption by end use in two cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Coal production increases at a slower rate than in the past In the AEO2010 Reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation, along with the startup of several CTL plants, leads to growth in coal production averaging 0.2 percent per year from 2008 to 2035. This is significantly less than the 0.9-percent average growth rate for U.S. coal production from 1980 to 2008.

228

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficient for wood as a heating source was elevated,distant heating) Natural gas Electricity Coal Wood Unknown/distant heating and use of natural gas, electricity, or wood

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

NETL: News Release - DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2, 2005 August 2, 2005 DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal Technology Project Eight Year Demonstration Project Results in One of World's Cleanest Coal-Based Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy and JEA, the public utility of Florida, have achieved a significant milestone in the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program by completing a project in which JEA's Northside Generating Station was converted into one of the cleanest burning coal-fired power plants in the world. MORE INFO Read the final project report [PDF-438KB] As part of the 8-year, $320 million cost-shared project, JEA installed state-of-the-art technology known as circulating fluidized bed combustion in a 300?megawatt combustor-triple the size of any previous

230

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal 101 Lesson 1: Cleaning Up Coal Clean Coal COAL is our most abundant fossil fuel. The United States has more coal than the rest of the world has oil. There is still...

231

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination State, Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

233

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin State, Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

234

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is expected to continue. Although 1999 world consumption, at 4.7 billion short tons,9 was 15 percent higher than coal use in 1980, it was lower than in any year since 1984 (Figure 51). The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 1999 and 2020, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, but with considerable variation among regions.

235

Definition: Coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Coal A combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock composed mostly of carbon and hydrocarbons. It is formed from plant remains that have been compacted, hardened, chemically altered, and metamorphosed by heat and pressure over geologic time (typically millions of years). It is the most abundant fossil fuel produced in the United States.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century) is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later

236

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Vietnam National Coal Mineral Industries Group Vinacomin | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Mineral Industries Group Vinacomin Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam National Coal-Mineral Industries Group (Vinacomin) Place Vietnam Product Vietnam-based project...

239

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier (Active)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC: Texas Clean Energy Project Greenfield Site, Penwell, Texas PROJECT FACT SHEET Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC: Texas Clean Energy Project: Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration [PDF-1.10MB] (Sept 2013) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Interim Reports Techline: Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration (Dec 2009) Techline: DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage (Mar 2010) Techline: DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward (Jun 2011) Techline: Innovative Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Issues Record of Decision (Sep 2011)

240

Impact of Advanced Turbine Systems on coal-based power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advanced power-generation products currently under development in our program show great promise for ultimate commercial use. Four of these products are referred to in this paper: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC), and Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC). Three of these products, IGCC, PFBC, and EFCC, rely on advanced gas turbines as a key enabling technology and the foundation for efficiencies in the range of 52 to 55 percent. DOE is funding the development of advanced gas turbines in the newly instituted Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, one of DOE`s highest priority natural gas initiatives. The turbines, which will have natural gas efficiencies of 60 percent, are being evaluated for coal gas compatibility as part of that program.

Bechtel, T.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

National Coal Quality Inventory (NACQI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the National Coal Quality Inventory (NaCQI) between 1999 and 2005 to address a need for quality information on coals that will be mined during the next 20-30 years. Collaboration between the USGS, State geological surveys, universities, coal burning utilities, and the coal mining industry plus funding support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) permitted collection and submittal of coal samples for analysis. The chemical data (proximate and ultimate analyses; major, minor and trace element concentrations) for 729 samples of raw or prepared coal, coal associated shale, and coal combustion products (fly ash, hopper ash, bottom ash and gypsum) from nine coal producing States are included. In addition, the project identified a new coal reference analytical standard, to be designated CWE-1 (West Elk Mine, Gunnison County, Colorado) that is a high-volatile-B or high-volatile-A bituminous coal with low contents of ash yield and sulfur, and very low, but detectable contents of chlorine, mercury and other trace elements.

Robert Finkelman

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

EIA - Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal...

243

Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

U.S. coal outlook in Asia  

SciTech Connect

Coal exports from the US to Asia are declining over time as a result of (1) increased competition from coal suppliers within the Asia-Pacific region, (2) changing steel making technologies, (3) decreased emphasis on security of coal supplies, and (4) deregulation of the energy industry--particularly electric utilities. There are no major changes on the horizon that are likely to alter the role of the US as a modest coal supplier to the Asia-Pacific region. The downward trend in US coal exports to Asia is expected to continue over the 1997--2010 period. But economic and policy changes underway in Asia are likely to result in periodic coal shortages, lasting a few months to a year, and short term increased export opportunities for US coal. US coal exports to Asia are projected to fluctuate within the following ranges over the 2000--2010 period: 10--17 million tons in total exports, 6--12 million tons in thermal coal exports, and 4--9 million tons in coking coal exports. The most important role for US coal, from the perspective of Asian coal importing countries, is to ensure a major alternative source of coal supplies that can be turned to in the event of unforeseen disruptions in coal supplies from the Asia-Pacific region or South Africa. However, the willingness of consumers to pay a premium to ensure US export capacity is declining, with increased emphasis on obtaining the lowest cost coal supplies.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Coal - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Coal Short, timely articles with graphs about recent coal issues and trends Coal News & Markets Summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAP), Northern Appalachia (NAP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Power River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. Weekly Coal Production Estimates of U.S. coal production by State based on railroad car loadings data. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Coal Production - Archive Weekly NYMEX Coal Futures

246

What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Refractory Materials based on Magnesia-Alumina Spinel for Improved Performance in Coal Gasification Environments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a larger project to develop novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels, a team composed of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., and academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed new refractory materials and coating systems specifically for application in coal gasification environments. Materials were developed under this U.S. DOE funded project to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Work was conducted to develop and deploy these new materials and to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the serviced environment. Additionally, a light-weight back-up refractory system was developed to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the efforts involved in the development of these materials, along with the laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials leading to relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

SPINEL-BASED REFRACTORIES FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE IN COAL GASIFICATION ENVIRONMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in collaboration with refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology and refractory end users have developed novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels. The objective of this U.S. DOE funded project was to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al 2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Materials have been developed specifically for coal gasification environments and work has been performed to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the service environment and to develop a light-weight back-up refractory system to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the systematic development of these materials, laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials, and relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

250

FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program DOE has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. January 4, 2011 DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration A novel technology that could help release some of the currently unusable energy in an estimated 2 billion tons of U.S. coal waste has been successfully demonstrated by a Department of Energy supported project. December 16, 2010 Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology

251

Results of Year-Round Remotely Sensed Integrated Water Vapor by Ground-Based Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years of measurements with a time resolution of 1 min, some climatological findings on precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid water (CLW) in central Europe are given. A weak diurnal cycle is apparent. The mean overall ...

J. Güldner; D. Spänkuch

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Interim Solar Radiation Data Manual: 30-Year Statistics from the National Solar Radiation Data Base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30-year (1961-1990) statistics contained in this document have been derived from the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). They outline solar radiation sources, as well as 30-year monthly and annual means of 5 solar radiation elements (three surface and two extraterrestrial) and 12 meteorological elements for 239 locations.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

254

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanest Coal Technology Clean Coal 101 Lesson 5: The Cleanest Coal Technology-A Real Gas Don't think of coal as a solid black rock. Think of it as a mass of atoms. Most of the...

256

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

257

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

258

Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide: WHAT IS COAL? Coal looks like a shiny black rock. Coal has lots of energy in it. When it is burned, coal makes heat and light energy. Th e cave men used coal for...

259

Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect

An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

El-Bassioni, A.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

American coal imports 2015  

SciTech Connect

As 2007 ends, the US coal industry passes two major milestones - the ending of the Synfuel tax break, affecting over 100M st annually, and the imposition of tighter and much more expensive safety measures, particularly in deep mines. Both of these issues, arriving at a time of wretched steam coal price levels, promise to result in a major shake up in the Central Appalachian mining sector. The report utilizes a microeconomic regional approach to determine whether either of these two schools of thought have any validity. Transport, infrastructure, competing fuels and regional issues are examined in detail and this forecasts estimates coal demand and imports on a region by region basis for the years 2010 and 2015. Some of the major highlights of the forecast are: Import growth will be driven by steam coal demand in the eastern and southern US; Transport will continue to be the key driver - we believe that inland rail rates will deter imports from being railed far inland and that the great majority of imports will be delivered directly by vessel, barge or truck to end users; Colombian coal will be the overwhelmingly dominant supply source and possesses a costs structure to enable it to compete with US-produced coal in any market conditions; Most of the growth will come from existing power plants - increasing capacity utilization at existing import facilities and other plants making investments to add imports to the supply portfolio - the growth is not dependent upon a lot of new coal fired capacity being built. Contents of the report are: Key US market dynamics; International supply dynamics; Structure of the US coal import market; and Geographic analysis.

Frank Kolojeski [TransGlobal Ventures Corp. (United States)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS COAL & POWER SYSTEMS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY GREENER, SOONER... THROUGH TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION .......... i-1 STRATEGIC PLAN ........ 1-1 PROGRAM PLANS Vision 21 .......................... 2-1 Central Power Systems ...... 3-1 Distributed Generation ..... 4-1 Fuels ................................ 5-1 Carbon Sequestration ....... 6-1 Advanced Research ........... 7-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS STRENGTH THROUGH SCIENCE... A "GREENER, SOONER" PHILOSOPHY Coal, natural gas, and oil fuel about 70 percent of the electricity generated in the United States. As promising as renewable and other alternative fuels are, it will be several decades before they can make significant energy contributions to the Nation's

262

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative "Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy...

263

Interdiffusion and Atomic Mobility in f.c.c Co-Al Based Ternary Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The developed mobility descriptions, validated against measured diffusion data, are being used in the design and processing development of the new Co-based

264

Coal-tire co-liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-liquefaction of ground coal and tire rubber was studied at 400{degrees}C both with and without catalyst. Two different tire samples were used. In the non-catalytic runs, the conversion of coal increased with the addition of tire and the increase was dependent on tire/coal ratio and hydrogen pressure. Using a ferric sulfide-based catalyst, the coal conversion increased with an increase in the catalyst loading. However, the increase was more pronounced at loadings of around 0.5 wt%. The addition of tire to coal in the catalytic runs was not particularly beneficial, especially, when the tire/coal ratio was above 1.

Sharma, R.K.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Liu, Zhenyu; Stiller, A.H. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

US Department of Energy`s high-temperature and high-pressure particulate cleanup for advanced coal-based power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of reliable, low-cost electricity is a cornerstone for the United States` ability to compete in the world market. The Department of Energy (DOE) projects the total consumption of electricity in the US to rise from 2.7 trillion kilowatt-hours in 1990 to 3.5 trillion in 2010. Although energy sources are diversifying, fossil fuel still produces 90 percent of the nation`s energy. Coal is our most abundant fossil fuel resource and the source of 56 percent of our electricity. It has been the fuel of choice because of its availability and low cost. A new generation of high-efficiency power systems has made it possible to continue the use of coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems greatly reduce the pollutants associated with cola-fired plants built before the 1970s. To realize this high efficiency and superior environmental performance, advanced coal-based power systems will require gas stream cleanup under high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) process conditions. Presented in this paper are the HTHP particulate capture requirements for the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) power systems, the HTHP particulate cleanup systems being implemented in the PFBC and IGCC Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Projects, and the currently available particulate capture performance results.

Dennis, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Coal-Based IGFC Project Phase I FC26-08NT0003894  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Square Hotel Pittsburgh, PA 2 SECA OBJECTIVES * Reduce SOFC-based electrical power generation system cost to 700kWe (2007 dollars) for a >100MW Integrated...

267

Impact of Alternative Fuels and Blends: Simple Tool for Ranking Coal and Blends Based on Slagging Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of ongoing work to identify, develop, and validate advanced tools to assess the impact of fuel quality on boiler performance.BackgroundThe deposition of ash particles during the combustion of coal—or blends of coals—is one of the major issues associated with power companies’ lost generation. The ash deposition process, driven by accumulation of molten/sticky, sintered, or loosely condensed deposits on ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Correlation of stability/rheology relationship with coal: Properties and chemical additives  

SciTech Connect

Coal-water slurries have the potential of a near term replacement for fuel oil. In order to gain the fundamental understanding of the preparation and handling of coal-water slurries, experiments were performed to identify the relationship between the coal content of a given coal-water slurry and its physical and chemical properties. The objectives of this program were: Investigate the relationship between the chemical and physical properties of coal and the rheology of coal-water slurry Define procedures for evaluating and preparing coal water slurries for a particular coal candidate, based on the characteristic coal properties Develop improved methods of screening surfactants used in coal-water slurry preparation Perform experiments designed to investigate the effect of characteristic coal properties on slurry quality, by examining the effect of the individual coal properties on slurry quality Develop a statistical formulation to predict the coal content of a given coal water slurry content based on the coal characteristic properties.

Ohene, F.

1992-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: October 01, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 3, 2014 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. Quarterly data for all years are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the second quarter 2013: Total domestic coal distribution was an estimated 205.8 million short tons (mmst) in the second quarter 2013. This value is 0.7 mmst (i.e. 0.3 percent) higher than the previous quarter and 6.3 mmst (i.e. 3.1 percent) higher than the second quarter of 2012 estimates.

271

Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report Annual Coal Report Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report Previous Annual Coal / Coal Industry Annual Reports historical data (PDF): 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 before 2001 Industry Annual 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2012 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2012: U.S. coal production decreased 7.2 percent from 2011, driven by lower electric power sector demand, to roughly 1.02 billion short tons. Productive capacity of U.S. coal mines decreased 3.5 percent to 1.28

272

Coal Age buyers guide 2007  

SciTech Connect

The buyers guide provides a comprehensive list of more than 1,200 suppliers that provide equipment and services to US coal mine and coal preparation plants, mainly based in the USA. Telephone numbers of companies are provided for each product category.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year: Production 1: Waste Coal Supplied 2: Trade: Stock Change 4,5: Losses and

274

Development of a coal reserve GIS model and estimation of the recoverability and extraction costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The United States has the world largest coal resource and coal will serve as the major and dependable energy source in the coming 200 years… (more)

Apala, Chandrakanth, Reddy.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

High-sulfur coals in the eastern Kentucky coal field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eastern Kentucky coal field is notable for relatively low-sulfur, [open quotes]compliance[close quotes] coals. Virtually all of the major coals in this area do have regions in which higher sulfur lithotypes are common, if not dominant, within the lithologic profile. Three Middle Pennsylvanian coals, each representing a major resource, exemplify this. The Clintwood coal bed is the stratigraphically lowest coal bed mined throughout the coal field. In Whitley County, the sulfur content increase from 0.6% at the base to nearly 12% in the top lithotype. Pyrite in the high-sulfur lithotype is a complex mixture of sub- to few-micron syngenetic forms and massive epigenetic growths. The stratigraphically higher Pond Creek coal bed is extensively mined in portions of the coal field. Although generally low in sulfur, in northern Pike and southern Martin counties the top one-third can have up to 6% sulfur. Uniformly low-sulfur profiles can occur within a few hundred meters of high-sulfur coal. Pyrite occurs as 10-50 [mu]m euhedra and coarser massive forms. In this case, sulfur distribution may have been controlled by sandstone channels in the overlying sediments. High-sulfur zones in the lower bench of the Fire Clay coal bed, the stratigraphically highest coal bed considered here, are more problematical. The lower bench, which is of highly variable thickness and quality, generally is overlain by a kaolinitic flint clay, the consequence of a volcanic ash fall into the peat swamp. In southern Perry and Letcher counties, a black, illite-chlorite clay directly overlies the lower bench. General lack of lateral continuity of lithotypes in the lower bench suggests that the precursor swamp consisted of discontinuous peat-forming environments that were spatially variable and regularly inundated by sediments. Some of the peat-forming areas may have been marshlike in character.

Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M. (Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)); Eble, C.F. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Flotation and flocculation chemistry of coal and oxidized coals  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to understand the fundamentals involved in the flotation and flocculation of coal and oxidized coals and elucidate mechanisms by which surface interactions between coal and various reagents enhance coal beneficiation. An understanding of the nature of the heterogeneity of coal surfaces arising from the intrinsic distribution of chemical moieties is fundamental to the elucidation of mechanism of coal surface modification and its role in interfacial processes such as flotation, flocculation and agglomeration. A new approach for determining the distribution in surface properties of coal particles was developed in this study and various techniques capable of providing such information were identified. Distributions in surface energy, contact angle and wettability were obtained using novel techniques such as centrifugal immersion and film flotation. Changes in these distributions upon oxidation and surface modifications were monitored and discussed. An approach to the modelling of coal surface site distributions based on thermodynamic information obtained from gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry is proposed. Polyacrylamide and dodecane was used to alter the coal surface. Methanol adsorption was also studied. 62 figs.

Somasundaran, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

278

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 4, February--April 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and missions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects test; and full-scale combustion tests.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Clean Coal Power Initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the fifth quarterly Technical Progress Report submitted by NeuCo, Incorporated, under Award Identification Number, DE-FC26-04NT41768. This award is part of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (''CCPI''), the ten-year, $2B initiative to demonstrate new clean coal technologies in the field. This report is one of the required reports listed in Attachment B Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist, part of the Cooperative Agreement. The report covers the award period January 1, 2006 - March 31, 2006 and NeuCo's efforts within design, development, and deployment of on-line optimization systems during that period.

Doug Bartlett; Rob James; John McDermott; Neel Parikh; Sanjay Patnaik; Camilla Podowski

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modeling risk and simulation-based optimization of channel depths at Cam Pha Coal Port  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation-based method and a risk model of ship grounding for a long-term optimization of channel depths. The long-term optimization of channel depths should be considered a two-stage process: Firstly, establishing a ship entrance ... Keywords: entrance channel, risk modeling, ship grounding, simulation

N. M. Quy; J. K. Vrijling; P. H. A. J. M Gelder; R. Groenveld

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Estimation Methodology for Total and Elemental Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a tool for estimating total and speciated mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The mercury emissions methodology is based on EPRI's analyses of the results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Mercury Information Collection Request (ICR). The Mercury ICR required owner/operators of coal-fired electric utility steam generating units to report for calendar year 1999 the quantity of fuel consumed and the mercury content of that fuel. In addition, 84 power plant...

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental externalities: An ASEAN application to coal-based power generation. [Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant benefits to human health that result from emissions control programs may justify the costs of pollution control policies. Many scientists, economists, risk analysts, and policymakers believe that comparisons of the benefits with the costs of pollution control demonstrate that the US stationary source, air emissions control program is justified. This justification is based upon pronounced benefits to human health, especially from controlling suspended particulates and sulfur compounds. Market decisions are usually made on the basis of a consideration of traditional costs such as capital, operating and maintenance, fuel costs, and fixed charges. Social costs, which could be significant, are not incorporated explicitly into such decisions. These social costs could result in a net reduction in the welfare of individuals, and of society as a whole. Because these social costs and their effects are not represented in the price of energy, individual have no way to explicitly value them; hence, they remain unaccounted for in market decisions. By accounting for external costs, the selection of energy sources and production of energy products can lead to and equilibrium, where the total cost of energy and energy products, together with resulting social costs, can be brought to an economic minimum. The concept of an air emissions control program is of interest to the ASEAN countries (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand) and their governments, especially if such a program could be justified in cost-benefit terms and shown to be directly applicable to ASEAN conditions. It is the intent of the effort described herein to demonstrate that technical options are available to control emissions from coal-based, electric power plants and that that costs of these options may be justified in cost-benefit terms.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Stabilization of spent sorbents from coal-based power generation processes. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30,1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this study is to determine the effect of implementation of the new and more stringent EPA Protocol Test Method involving sulfide containing waste, on the suitability of the oxidized spent sorbents from gasification of of high sulfur coals for disposal in landfills, and to determine the optimum operating conditions in a ``final`` hydrolysis stage for conversion of the residual calcium sulfide in these wastes to materials that are suitable for disposal in landfills. An additional objective is to study the effect of ash on the regeneration and ash-sorbent separation steps in the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP). To achieve these objectives, a large set of oxidized samples of sulfided calcium-based sorbents (produced in earlier ICCI-funded programs) as well as oxidized samples of gasifier discharge (containing ash and spent sorbent) are tested according to the new EPA test protocol. Samples of the oxidized spent sorbents that do not pass the EPA procedure are reacted with water and carbon dioxide to convert the residual calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate. During this quarter, samples of oxidized sulfided calcium-based sorbents, including untreated calcium sulfide-containing feed materials, were analyzed using both weak acid and more stringent strong acid tests. Preliminary analysis of the H{sub 2}S leachability test results indicate that all samples (including those that were not oxidized) pass the EPA requirement of 500 mg H{sub 2}S per kg of solid waste. However, under the strong acid test procedure, samples containing more than 2.5% calcium sulfide fail the EPA requirement.

Abbassian, J.; Hill, A.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

NETL: News Release - From Coal to Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 13, 2003 May 13, 2003 From Coal to Chemicals... Successful Clean Coal-to-Methanol Project Boosts Prospects For "Multi-Product" Coal Plant - The Liquid Phase Methanol Plant at the Eastman Chemicals-from-Coal Complex - The Kingsport, Tenn., clean coal project operated virtually flawlessly throughout its demonstration period and continues its steady operations today. - KINGSPORT, TN - It was 35 years ago that a single word in the smash hit, coming-of-age movie The Graduate made cinema history: "plastics." As a baby-faced Dustin Hoffman learned, the future was "plastics." Now, largely because of one of the Department of Energy's most successful Clean Coal Technology projects, in the next 35 years, the future may well be "plastics?from coal."

285

EIA Energy Kids - Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sometimes, coal-fired electric power plants are built near coal mines to lower ... industries and businesses with their own power plants use coal to generate ...

286

Coal industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

reports reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

288

coal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal coal Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

289

Canada Week: Canada is a declining market for U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exports of U.S. coal to Canada have declined in recent years as Canada has reduced its coal-fired electric generation. U.S. coal exports to Canada totaled 3.2 million ...

290

DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple Clean Coal Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Affirms Commitment to Clean Coal Technology Investments; Requests $648 Million for Coal Research, Development and Deployment for FY09 Budget - Largest Coal Budget Request in more than 25 years...

291

Powder River Basin Coal Supply and Suitability: EPRI Report Series on Low-Sulfur Coal Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility use of subbituminous coals from the Powder River Basin is expected to increase 100 million tons by the year 2000, with much of the growth coming from units designed for high-sulfur bituminous coal. This report addresses whether Powder River Basin coal suppliers will be able to command a premium for their product and documents the recent and rapid improvements utilities have made in using subbituminous coals.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Coal flows | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal flows Coal flows Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 142, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons. The data is broken down into steam coal exports to Europe, Asia and America. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal flows countries EIA exporting importing Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: World Steam Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries- Reference Case (xls, 103.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

293

coal supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal supply coal supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 15, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal coal supply disposition. prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices- Reference Case (xls, 91.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

294

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts and Sequestration by a Biomimetic Route Based on Enzymatic Catalysts-Current Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts, and from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts, and Sequestration by a Biomimetic Route Based on Enzymatic Catalysis - Current Status Gillian M. Bond (gbond@nmt.edu; 505-835-5653) Margaret-Gail Medina (magail@nmt.edu; 505-835-5229) New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Socorro, NM 87801 John Stringer (jstringe@epri.com; 650-855-2472) Electric Power Research Institute 3412 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 F. Arzum Simsek-Ege (fatma.a.simsek-egel@intel.com; 505-893-8694) Intel Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction A range of carbon management strategies will have to be implemented if meaningful reductions in CO 2 emissions are to be achieved in response to concerns about global climate change. It is becoming increasingly clear that some form or forms of carbon

297

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter From Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kevin crist Kevin crist Principal Investigator Ohio University Research and Technology Center Athens, OH 45701 740-593-4751 cristk@ohiou.edu Environmental and Water Resources Evaluation of thE Emission, transport, and dEposition of mErcury, arsEnic, and finE particulatE mattEr from coal-BasEd powEr plants in thE ohio rivEr vallEy rEgion Background The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established an aggressive research initiative to address the technical and scientific issues surrounding the impact of coal-based power systems on ambient levels of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), mercury/air toxics, and acid gases. Regulatory drivers such as the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the 1997 revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and the 2005 Clean Air

298

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Multivariate statistical evaluation of equilibrium methane adsorption isotherms of coal  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of methane by coals varies over a broad range of values and appears to depend on a complex function related to coal rank. In order to evaluate these variations in methane adsorption 100 coal samples were analyzed. The paper presents some preliminary results of this study based on multivariate statistical evaluation of equilibrium methane adsorption isotherm data, coal petrology, and vitrinite reflectance.

Schwarzer, R.S.; Bayliss, G.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

STUDY OF CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBMICRON COAL PARTICLES DISPERSED IN AIR AND CAPTURE OF COAL PARTICLES BY WATER DROPS IN A SCRUBBING COLUMN.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Present day water spray based dust removal technologies do not effectively remove respirable submicron coal and silica dust particles in the underground coal mines causing… (more)

Chakravorty, Utshab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described earlier in an e-mail, in an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described billion gallons of toxic coal sludge located directly above Marsh Fork Elementary School. (No word yet on their campus a couple of years ago. Underground Appalachian coal mining is being replaced in recent years

Hansen, James E.

303

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knocking the NOx Out of Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 3: Knocking the NOx Out of Coal How NOx Forms NOx Formation Air is mostly nitrogen molecules (green in the above diagram) and...

304

Coal and bituminous reserves  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 5 of this book contains sections entitled: other coal processes; underground processing of coal; and other important energy sources.

NONE

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Combustion-Turbine Design Guidelines Based on Deposition-Corrosion Considerations, Volume 2: Coal-Derived Liquid Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Middle-distillate coal liquids test out as acceptable gas turbine fuels in terms of deposition and corrosion. Solid-liquid slurries would also be acceptable if turbine cleaning techniques were fully used.This series of tests provided design and operating guidelines that would minimize ash deposition and turbine corrosion.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Improved VIKOR Algorithm Based on AHP and Shannon Entropy in the Selection of Thermal Power Enterprise's Coal Suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to select the thermal power enterprise’s coal suppliers properly, certain attributes of the suppliers should be carefully analysis. Supplier selection is a multi criteria problem which multi attributions of the suppliers should be considered. ... Keywords: thermal power, VIKOR, Shannon Entropy, AHP

Ma Lihong; Zhang Yanping; Zhao Zhiwei

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Report Quarterly Coal Report Release Date: October 02, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | full report Previous Quarterly Coal Data historical data (PDF): 1st quarter 2013 4th quarter 2012 3rd quarter 2012 2nd quarter 2012 1st quarter 2012 4th quarter 2011 3rd quarter 2011 2nd quarter 2011 1st quarter 2011 prior to 2011 Go The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, quality, stocks, and refined coal. Data on U.S. coke production, consumption, stocks, imports, and exports are also provided. All data for 2011 and prior years are final. All data for 2012 and 2013 are preliminary. Highlights for second quarter 2013: U.S. coal production during second quarter 2013 totaled 243.1

309

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Index (click to jump links) Coal Production and Prices Coal Mining Labor Productivity Coal Consumption Coal Production and Prices Emissions Caps Lead to More Use of Low-Sulfur Coal From Western Mines Continued improvements in mine productivity (which have averaged 5.9 percent per year since 1980) are projected to cause falling real minemouth prices throughout the forecast relative to historical levels. Higher electricity demand and lower prices, in turn, are projected to yield increasing coal demand, but the demand is subject to the overall sulfur emissions cap in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which encourages progressively greater reliance on the lowest sulfur coals (from Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Utah). Figure 106. Coal production by region, 1970-2025 (million short tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

310

NETL: News Release - 23rd University Coal Grant Solicitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an objective of the Vision 21 program; Conversion of Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas to Fischer-Tropsch Liquids - converting coal-based gas to liquids using iron-based catalysts....

311

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

stocks by sector, by census division and State, 2011, 2010 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 27. Year-end coal stocks...

312

Coal: Energy for the future  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Market Share of Western Coal Continues To Increase U.S. coal production has remained near 1,100 million tons annually since 1996. In the AEO2006 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 1.1 percent per year from 2004 to 2015, when total production is 1,272 million tons. The growth in coal production is even stronger thereafter, averaging 2.0 percent per year from 2015 to 2030, as substantial amounts of new coal-fired generating capacity are added, and several CTL plants are brought on line. Figure 97. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

315

Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is inextricably entwined with China's economy in its current mode of growth. Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on its current growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Broadening awareness of the environmental costs of coal mining, transport, and combustion is raising the pressure on Chinese policy makers to find alternative energy sources. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China is short of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport. Transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transport oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 mt by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets. The looming coal gap threatens to derail China's growth path, possibly undermining political, economic, and social stability. High coal prices and domestic shortages will have regional and global effects. Regarding China's role as a global manufacturing center, a domestic coal gap will increase prices and constrain growth. Within the Asia-Pacific region, China's coal gap is likely to bring about increased competition with other coal-importing countries including Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and India. As with petroleum, China may respond with a government-supported 'going-out' strategy of resource acquisition and vertical integration. Given its population and growing resource constraints, China may favor energy security, competitiveness, and local environmental protection over global climate change mitigation. The possibility of a large coal gap suggests that Chinese and international policy makers should maximize institutional and financial support

Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hydrogen Production and Purification from Coal and Other Heavy Feedstocks Year 6 - Activity 1.4 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., is developing the sour pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology which can be used to reject acid gas components (hydrogen sulfide [H{sub 2}S] and carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}]) from sour syngas streams such as coal gasification syngas. In the current work, tests were conducted to investigate the impact of continuous exposure of real sour syngas and dilute levels of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on the preferred adsorbent of that process. The results show a modest (~10%–15%) decrease in CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity after sour syngas exposure, as well as deposition of metals from carbonyl decomposition. Continuous exposure to HCl and NH{sub 3} yield a higher degree of CO{sub 2} capacity degradation (up to 25%). These tests represent worst-case approaches since the exposure is continuous and the HCl and NH{sub 3} levels are relatively high compare to an industrial sour syngas stream. Long-term PSA tests are needed to unequivocally evaluate the impact of cyclic exposure to these types of streams.

Dunham, Grant

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Decommissioning Handbook for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook lays out the steps necessary to fully decommission a coal-fired power plant. The handbook includes ways to handle permitting, environmental cleanup, site dismantlement, and site remediation, and discusses overall decommissioning costs. It is based on three actual case studies of coal plants recently decommissioned: the Arkwright coal-fired plant of Georgia Power, the Watts Bar coal-fired plant of TVA, and the Port Washington coal-fired plant of Wisconsin Electric Power.

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

318

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Crosscutting Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal...

319

O A L Section 2. Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 2. Coal Coal prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports.

320

Chemicals from coal. Utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides an overview for possible utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are abundant in coal-derived liquids. Coal-derived phenolic compounds include phenol, cresol, catechol, methylcatechol, naphthol, and their derivatives. Liquids from coal liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, and carbonization are potential sources of phenolic chemicals, although certain processing and separation are needed. There are opportunities for coal-based phenolic chemicals, because there are existing industrial applications and potential new applications. Currently the petrochemical industry produces phenol in multi-step processes, and new research and development has resulted in a one-step process. Selective methylation of phenol can produce a precursor for aromatic engineering plastics. Catalytic oxidation of phenol has been commercialized recently for catechol production. There are potential new uses of phenol that could replace large-volume multi-step chemical processes that are based on benzene as the starting material. New chemical research on coal and coal-derived liquids can pave the way for their non-fuel uses for making chemicals and materials.

Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Update on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant is the US's first commercial synthetic fuels project based on coal conversion. The ANG Coal Gasification Company is the administer of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project for the United States Department of Energy. The Project is designed to convert 14 M TPD of North Dakota of lignite into 137.5 MM SCFD of pipeline quality synthetic natural gas (SNG). Located in Mercer County, North Dakota, the gasification plant, and an SNG pipeline. Some 12 years passed from the time the project was conceived unit it became a reality by producing SNG into the Northern Border pipeline in 1984 for use by millions of residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. In this paper, the basic processes utilized in the plant are presented. This is followed by a discussion of the start-up activities and schedule. Finally, some of the more interesting start-up problems are described.

Imler, D.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

How large are U.S. coal reserves? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How large are U.S. coal reserves? There are three separate components for U.S. coal reserves. Recoverable reserves; Demonstrated reserve base; ...

324

Development of coker feeds from aromatic oil and bituminous coal digests.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kingwood coal has been digested with two coal derived (anthracene oil and carbon black base) and two petroleum derived (slurry oil and Maraflex oil) aromatic… (more)

Clendenin, L. Mitchell.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coal: America's energy future. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

NONE

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Quarterly technical status report, January--March 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Mechanism of instantaneous coal outbursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of mine workers die every year from mining accidents, and instantaneous coal outbursts in underground coal mines are one of the major killers. Various models for these outbursts have been proposed, but the precise mechanism is still unknown. We hypothesize that the mechanism of coal outbursts is similar to magma fragmentation during explosive volcanic eruptions; i.e., it is caused by high gas pressure inside coal but low ambient pressure on it, breaking coal into pieces and releasing the high-pressure gas in a shock wave. Hence, coal outbursts may be regarded as another type of gas-driven eruption, in addition to explosive volcanic, lake, and possible ocean eruptions. We verify the hypothesis by experiments using a shock-tube apparatus. Knowing the mechanism of coal outbursts is the first step in developing prediction and mitigation measures. The new concept of gas-driven solid eruption is also important to a better understanding of salt-gas outbursts, rock-gas outbursts, and mud volcano eruptions.

Guan, P.; Wang, H.Y.; Zhang, Y.X. [Peking University, Beijing (China). School of Earth & Space Science

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

A coal export simulation model  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty of future energy supplies has forced industrial nations to diversify both their energy mix and their energy sources of supply. As a result, U.S. coal exports have grown substantially during the past several years. Projected long-term worldwide economic growth suggests that a well-established trend has been set for increased foreign demand for U.S. coal. As export volumes increase the need for careful planning to prevent bottlenecks and to provide for the uninterrupted flow of coal increases. It also will place increased emphasis on identifying the most economic transportation alternatives. These planning and evaluation functions are greatly facilitated if a systematic method is available for modeling the complex interactions of a coal export system. One such model, developed by the Anaconda Minerals Company, is the Coal Export model. This model simulates the movement of coal by transportation equipment (trains, ships, barges, etc.) from an originating mine site to a destination port via an intermediate port facility. Stockpile sizing and the selection of transportation equipment can be optimized with the aid of this model. Also, the impact of various operating policies for ship and train scheduling and for administering stockpiles can be predicted. Evaluating these issues can help to determine the most economic way to move a desired amount of coal from the originating mine site to the destination port.

Bydlon, T.J.; Tyber, H.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

THE EFFECT OF COAL CHAR ON THE CORROSION OF 304 SS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Iron-Base Alloys by Coal Char at 87l D e and 982° e" (of Structural Materials in Coal Gasifier Atmospheres".of Structural Haterials in Coal Gasifier Atmospheres". UCLA,

Foerster, Thomas Friedrich Wilhelm

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Solubilization of coal by chemical process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves exposing coal to an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, or ozone. It is preferable to maximize the surface area of the coal to accelerate oxidation; therefore, coal is broken and crushed into small pieces. The coal is then placed in an oxidizing solution for a sufficient period of time to render it susceptible to solubilization. Exposure to oxidizing agent at 30/sup 0/C for about two days gives good results, although these parameters are not critical. After oxidation, the treated coal is placed in a base solution. Since the original studies were aimed at determining if certain microorganisms could solubilize coal after oxidation pretreatment, the base solutions used for study were organic buffer solutions ordinarily used in biological studies. Although most tests were done with such bases, it was found that a simple sodium hydroxide solution was also very effective, and therefore, it is believed that the critical factor is pH and not the identity of the base; thus, any base would be suitable for use in this solubilization process. The coal can be washed prior to exposure to the base to remove oxidizing agent that might tend to lower the pH of the solubilizing solution. Shaking the coal and base solution can enhance the solubilization process, although it isn't necessary. After two days exposure under ambient conditions, coal is significantly solubilized and can be separated from the solute by centrifugation and filtration.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004  

SciTech Connect

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Moving baseline for evaluation of advanced coal-extraction systems  

SciTech Connect

This document reports results from the initial effort to establish baseline economic performance comparators for a program whose intent is to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced systems suitable for coal resource extraction beyond the year 2000. Systems used in this study were selected from contemporary coal mining technology and from conservative conjectures of year 2000 technology. The analysis was also based on a seam thickness of 6 ft. Therefore, the results are specific to the study systems and the selected seam thickness. To be more beneficial to the program, the effort should be extended to other seam thicknesses. This document is one of a series which describe systems level requirements for advanced underground coal mining equipment. Five areas of performance are discussed: production cost, miner safety, miner health, environmental impact, and recovery efficiency. The projections for cost and production capability comprise a so-called moving baseline which will be used to assess compliance with the systems requirement for production cost. Separate projections were prepared for room and pillar, longwall, and shortwall technology all operating under comparable sets of mining conditions. This work is part of an effort to define and develop innovative coal extraction systems suitable for the significant resources remaining in the year 2000.

Bickerton, C.R.; Westerfield, M.D.

1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Coal Retirements: Defining the Need and the Efficiency Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For decades, major areas of the United States have relied heavily on coal for electricity generation. Abundant and relatively cheap, coal has powered large swaths of the Southeast, Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and western United States. Aging equipment and increased environmental compliance needs are changing the economic paradigm for many coal-fired plants. Faced with rising fuel prices and requirements for major investments in pollution control equipment, some utilities expect to retire significant coal generation in the next few years. This paper will target eleven states that appear to be losing coal generation in the near future. It will discuss the likely amount of generation retirement in each state, based on several publicly available estimates. It will then discuss the role that energy efficiency and combined heat and power (CHP) might play in supplying reliable energy resources in areas that will be facing high amounts of generation retirement. Finally, this paper will discuss the types of policies and regulatory changes that could help encourage the alternative energy efficiency and CHP scheme discussed herein.

Chittum, A.; Farley, K.; Elliot, R. N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling the resolution of inexpensive, novel non-seismic geophysical monitoring tools to monitor CO2 injection into coal beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasynski, S. , 2008, Advancing Coal-Based Power Generationto monitor CO 2 injection into Coal Beds as a part of theanalysis for CO 2 movement in coal beds was based on the

Gasperikova, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Kinetics of coal pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Coal Industry in China (and secondarily India)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coal Industry in China (and secondarily India) Richard K. Lester and Edward S. Steinfeld MIT of Technology. #12;1 THE COAL INDUSTRY IN CHINA (AND SECONDARILY INDIA)1 Richard K. Lester and Edward Steinfeld is expected to account for more than half of global growth in coal supply and demand over the next 25 years

345

Capitalizing on coal  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts that the equivalent of 44 baseload coal fired power plants will be needed to keep pace with US electricity demand by 2025. Potential builders are looking for greater certainty on a number of energy, environmental and regulatory issues before they invest. The work of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) in advocating solutions to create this certainty is reported in this article. It is asking Congress to put transmission assets on a par with other major assets and reduce their depreciable lives from 20 to 15 years, and calling for repeal legislation that limits investment in the regulated energy industry. EEI is advocating federal environmental legislation similar to the Clean Skies Act that would lower emissions faster, with greater certainty, and with greater cost savings. EEI is encouraging FERC to work with states to increase certainty of builders recovering their investment in coal plants. 2 photos.

McMahon, F. [Edison Electric Institute (United States). Alliance of Energy Suppliers

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal News Clean Coal News FE Clean Coal News RSS February 9, 2009 DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery A $13 million cooperative effort with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past seven years has resulted in the successful demonstration of a novel technology that addresses a problem plaguing coal operators and environmentalists alike: separating fine coal particles from water and their ultimate use as a significant energy resource. February 5, 2009 SECA Fuel Cell Program Moves Two Key Projects Into Next Phase The U.S. Department of Energy has selected two projects for continuation within the Department's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program research portfolio. February 3, 2009

347

Coal distribution, January--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal Distribution report provides information on coal production, distribution, and stocks in the United States to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data in this report are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275, Sections 5 and 13, as amended). This issue presents information for January through June 1991. Coal distribution data are shown (in Tables 1--34) by coal-producing Sate of origin, consumer use, method of transportation, and State of destination. All data in this report were collected by the EIA on Form EIA-6, Coal Distribution Report.'' A copy of the form and the instructions for filing appear in Appendix B. All data in this report for 1991 are preliminary. Data for previous years are final. 6 figs., 34 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

NABERS: Lessons from 12 Years of Performance Based Ratings in Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) has been operating for 12 years as a performance based rating system for the energy/greenhouse efficiency of office buildings in Australia. During this period, the scheme has been expanded to include performance based energy and water ratings for offices, hotels and shopping centres, plus performance based rating tools for office indoor environment and waste. NABERS has achieved significant success in transforming the energy efficiency of the office building stock, particularly with respect to the landlord operated services in the higher-quality end of the market. NABERS ratings have become established as a core valuation in the market for sale or lease of these buildings. The declaration of NABERS ratings has recently become mandatory for commercial sale and lease transactions over 2000m2. In this paper, the history of the NABERS scheme is outlined, with particular emphasis on the key lessons learnt and the underlying factors that have contributed to successes and failures along the way. Directions for future development are also discussed.

Bannister, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

NETL: News Release - Department of Energy Funds 26th Year of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 27, 2004 Department of Energy Funds 26th Year of University Coal Grants Students, Teachers to Explore Greenhouse Gas Reductions, Coal Science, and Technologies to Support...

350

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mulled Coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate. Technical progress report No. 6, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the Department of Energy and private industry, considerable progress has been made in: preparation of coal-water fuels; combustion of low-ash coal-based fuel forms; and in processes to provide deeply-cleaned coal. Since the inception of the project, we have: developed formulations for stabilizing wet filter cake into a granular free flowing material (Mulled Coal); applied the formulation to wet cake from a variety of coal sources ranging from anthracite to subbituminous coal; evaluated effects of moisture loss on mull properties; and developed design concepts for equipment for preparing the Mulled Coal and converting it into Coal Water Fuel.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Application of a diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for in situ measurements of atomic mercury in coal-combustion exhaust  

SciTech Connect

A diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor was successfully demonstrated for both in situ and extractive sampling atomic mercury measurements in a laboratory-scale 29.3 kWt (100 000 BTU/h) coal combustor and in situ measurements in a flow reactor at Texas A&M University. Laser sensor measurements were compared to measurements from a commercial mercury analyzer (CMA). A 375 nm single-mode laser and a 784 nm distributed feedback (DFB) laser are sum-frequency-mixed in a nonlinear {beta}-barium borate crystal to generate a 254 nm beam. By tuning the frequency of the DFB laser, the ultraviolet beam frequency was tuned across the transition frequency of mercury at 253.7 nm. The tuning range was large enough that an off-resonant baseline was clearly visible on both sides of the Hg transition. No pretreatment is required for elemental mercury measurements, and the effects of broadband absorption can be effectively eliminated during data analysis. Extractive sampling was demonstrated to improve the detection limit of the sensor and demonstrate the feasibility of total mercury concentration measurements in the future through extractive sampling. Significant variation in the atomic mercury concentration of coal-combustion exhaust was observed over short time periods during our in situ measurements. The sensor detection limits for in situ and extractive sampling are 0.3 and 0.1 parts per billion over a 1 m path length, respectively. 34 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Jesse K. Magnuson; Thomas N. Anderson; Robert P. Lucht; Udayasarathy A. Vijayasarathy; Hyukjin Oh; Kalyan Annamalai; Jerald A. Caton [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energyâ??s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process â?? High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

Howard Meyer

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA-M060(2004) (Washington, DC, 2004). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

356

Partition behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between aged coal tar and water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal tar aged in a large-scale, artificial aquifer experiment for five years was subsequently investigated for leaching behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After five years, the initially liquid coal tar had solidified and formed segregated particles with a grain size similar to that of the sandy aquifer material. The composition of the aged coal tar (ACT) with regard to PAHs was remarkably different from that of the original bulk coal tar (BCT), because most of the low-molecular-weight compounds had been depleted. Equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of 17 PAHs leaching from the aquifer material containing the ACT were measured from consecutive equilibration steps at increasing temperatures of between 25 and 100 {sup o}C using accelerated solvent extraction. The results showed 2-to 5,000-fold lower concentrations than those from BCT, indicating dramatic changes of dissolution behavior of PAHs from coal tar after the five-year aging period. Predictions based on Raoult's law with the subcooled liquid solubilities substantially overestimated the equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of the PAHs from ACT, whereas the estimations were reasonable if the solid solubilities were employed instead. The enthalpies of phase transfer from ACT to water were determined based on the van't Hoff equation. The resulting values agreed with the dissolution enthalpies of pure solid rather than subcooled liquid PAHs.

Liu, L.H.; Endo, S.; Eberhardt, C.; Grathwohl, P.; Schmidt, T.C. [University of Tubingen, Tubingen (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

358

2014 Coal Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has begun the process of re-clearing the coal survey ...

359

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

360

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices (updated December 27, 2006) This report summarizes spot coal prices for the business weeks ended December 1, 8, and 15.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Coal Report 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0584 (2001) Annual Coal Report 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy

362

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Metallurgical coal markets became volatile when the thriving Chinese steel industry in late 2003 and 2004 made outsized demands for coking coal and met coke, ...

363

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

364

New Price Structures for Coal Transportation: Evidence and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates how both rates and costs for representative movements of coal on each of the four major coal-hauling railroads in the U. S. have changed over the past six years, and looks ahead to the next five years. Adding to the sea change in fuel prices is the pervasive and very recent surge in rail rates for coal transportation service. This report evaluates how both rates and costs for representative movements of coal on each of the four major coal-hauling railroads in the United States have ...

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

365

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

366

American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum Dallas, Texas May 17-19, 2004 Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Presentation Outline * Background * Power plant-water issues * DOE/NETL R&D program * Conclusion/future plans ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Global Water Availability Ocean 97% Fresh Water 2.5% 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ice Groundwater Lakes and Rivers ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Freshwater Withdrawals and Consumption Mgal / Day Irrigation 81,300 Irrigation 81,300 Thermoelectric 3,310 Consumption Sources: "Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1995," USGS Circular 1200, 1998

367

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Biomass to Liquids Hydrogen-from-Coal RD&D ENERGY ANALYSIS About Us Search Products Contacts SMART GRID ANALYSIS BASELINE STUDIES QUALITY GUIDELINES NETL-RUA About NETL-RUA...

368

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal 101 Lesson 2: The Clean Coal Technology Program The Clean Coal Technology Program began in 1985 when the United States and Canada decided that something had to be done about the "acid rain" that was believed to be damaging rivers, lakes, forests, and buildings in both countries. Since many of the pollutants that formed "acid rain" were coming from big coal-burning power plants in the United States, the U.S. Government took the lead in finding a solution. One of the steps taken by the U.S. Department of Energy was to create a partnership program between the Government, several States, and private companies to test new methods developed by scientists to make coal burning much cleaner. This became the "Clean Coal Technology Program."

369

Status of Proof-Of-Concept testing at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-concept (POC) testing, and collection and evaluation of data continued at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility during the past year. Following four preliminary tests firing Rosebud coal in 1991 to establish base conditions for the Rosebud coal POC tests, three POC tests were run in 1992, and a fourth test early in 1993. Major equipment additions or modifications included installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which replaced a badly deteriorated venturi. This component also provides improved capability to meet Tennessee pollution regulations while operating the dry ESP and/or baghouse off design, or if one of these two control devices does not function properly. Improvements were also made to the dry ESP prior to the 1993 test, which appear to have improved the performance of this equipment. This paper will present an overview of the major results obtained during the Rosebud coal POC tests, including the performance of the dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Differences between the Rosebud and Illinois coals will be described, but it is emphasized that these observations are based on incomplete results for the Rosebud coal.

Attig, R.C.; Chapman, J.N.; Johanson, N.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Improvements in Measuring Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability in Coal  

SciTech Connect

Total worldwide CBM in-place reserves estimates are between 3500 Tcf and 9500 Tcf. Unminable coal beds have been recommended as good CO2 sequestration sites as the world prepares to sequester large amounts of greenhouse gases. In the U.S., these coal seams have the capacity to adsorb and sequester roughly 50 years of CO2 emissions from all the U.S. coal-fired power plants at today’s output rates. The amount and type of gas ad-sorbed in coal has a strong impact on the permeability of the coal seam. An improved mixed gas adsorption iso-therm model based on the extended-Langmuir theory is discussed and is applied to mixed gas sorption-induced strain based on pure gas strain data and a parameter accounting for gas-gas interactions that is independent of the coal substrate. Advantages and disadvantages of using freestanding versus constrained samples for sorption-induced strain measurements are also discussed. A permeability equation used to model laboratory was found to be very accurate when sorption-induced strain was small, but less accurate with higher strain gases.

Eric P. Robertson

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian of years produced the bituminous coals currently found in southwestern Indiana. Bituminous coals in Indiana currently ranks as the seventh-largest coal-producing state in the nation and has an estimated 17.57 billion

Polly, David

372

A Sensor System Based on Semi-Conductor Metal Oxide Technology for In Situ Detection of Coal Fired Combustion Gases  

SciTech Connect

Sensor Research and Development Corporation (SRD) proposed a two-phase program to develop a robust, autonomous prototype analyzer for in situ, real-time detection, identification, and measurement of coal-fired combustion gases and perform field-testing at an approved power generation facility. SRD developed and selected sensor materials showing selective responses to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. Sensor support electronics were also developed to enable prototype to function in elevated temperatures without any issues. Field-testing at DOE approved facility showed the ability of the prototype to detect and estimate the concentration of combustion by-products accurately with relatively low false-alarm rates at very fast sampling intervals.

Brent Marquis

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

374

Clean Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal to Liquids Major Demonstrations Crosscutting Research Carbon Capture and...

375

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trial 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993. Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test orI C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, researchers have conducted hundreds of life cycle assessments of...

377

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies The USGS published a USGS Professional Paper in 2010 entitled 

378

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies Dataset Summary...

379

Coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fairlawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coal Bed Methane Primer  

SciTech Connect

During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected eleven projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005.

Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting period (i.e., 10/01/05-09/30/06), is attached. At the annual funding meeting held in November 2004, eleven projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005. Of these fourteen 2005 projects, eleven have been completed and the final reports are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2005 and the council selected five projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2006, except for one that started October 1, 2006.

Miller, Bruce G

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Accelerating the deployment of cleaner coal plants  

SciTech Connect

The dearth of commercial operating experience for advanced coal-fired facilities is forcing their early adopters and builders to use long development cycles and pay high costs for unique engineering design studies. A broad-based industry collaborative effort fostered by EPRI to address this issue (CoalFleet for Tomorrow) is beginning to show results. 3 figs.

Parkes, J.; Holt, N.; Phillips, J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coal Tar and Bedrock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of bedrock groundwater and coal tar impacts is one of the most complicated tasks associated with managing manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This report provides an overview of the fate and transport of coal tar in bedrock and the methods available to investigate coal tar at particular sites and discusses how to develop a decision-making framework for coal tar investigations.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

386

Subbituminous and bituminous coal dominate U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While almost all coal consumed in the United States is used to generate electricity (90% in 2010), coal is not entirely homogeneous. Coal is ...

387

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Alternate Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Alternate Hydrogen Production In the Alternate Production technology pathway, clean syngas from coal is converted to high-hydrogen-content liquid...

388

The Effect of Circulating Coal Slurry Water Hardness on Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the effect of gypsum on flotation and coal slurry settling during coal slurry recirculation, the water hardness and proton conductivity of coal ...

389

Using GA-ANN algorithm to predicate coal bump energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A GA-ANN network was constructed for preidcating coal bump energy, based on the 300 training samples form simulated results with PFC2D software for different coal particle stiffness. It was tested that the average relative error of fitted-output value ... Keywords: artificial neural network, coal bump, energy, genetic algorithm, predication

Yunliang Tan; Tongbin Zhao; Zhigang Zhao

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, March 28, 1994--September 27, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first two phases of the program are underway. Activities this reporting period included performing coal beneficiation/preparation studies, conducting combustion performance evaluations, preparing retrofit engineering designs, determining retrofit economics, and installing a micronized coal-water mixture (MCWM) circuit.

Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Morrison, J.L. [and others

1995-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Program on Technology Innovation: Liquid CO2 Coal Slurry for Feeding Coal to Gasifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid CO2 (CO2(l)) has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal-gasification-based power plants. Liquid CO2 has a heat of vaporization that is less than one-quarter of that of water, and it has lower viscosity. Since future coal-based power plants may have to control CO2 emissions by use of a CO2 capture and storage system, it may make economic sense to recycle some of the captured CO2 back to the coal feeding system where it could be used as the...

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Greater Risk in Coal Supply and Price -- Need to Revisit Coal Procurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although spot coal prices have declined significantly from the peaks reached during 2001, they remain above pre-spike levels. This report provides analysis and perspective on the implications and likely long-term effects of the spike in spot coal prices that occurred in late 2000 and 2001. The report analyzes factors that will continue to exert upward pressure on coal prices over the next several years, key uncertainties relating to the future balance between coal supply and demand, and strategies for ma...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Major Projects with Quick Starts & Jobs Creation Office of Clean Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects with Quick Starts & Jobs Creation Projects with Quick Starts & Jobs Creation Office of Clean Coal Summary of Projects and Job Creation The following table outlines the near-term possibilities for projects that capture and sequester carbon from coal-based systems. The potential jobs associated with these activities are listed along with likely construction and operation dates. Since the funding is primarily for construction and associated activities, a rough estimate of 30 job years per $1 million dollars expended was used. COAL/CCS PROJECTS & JOBS CREATION GOV'T INDUSTRY TOTAL TOTAL FUNDING FUNDING FUNDING AWARD JOB PROGRAM/PROJECT ($Million) ($Million) ($Million) DATE CONSTRUCT OPERATE YEARS Current CCPI 440 660 1,100 2010 late 2011 2014 33,000 CCPI Plus $1000M for Additional Projects 1000 1000 2,000 2010 late 2011 2014 60,000

394

Performance and risks of advanced pulverized-coal plants  

SciTech Connect

This article is based on an in-depth report of the same title published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre, CCC/135 (see Coal Abstracts entry Sep 2008 00535). It discusses the commercial, developmental and future status of pulverized fuel power plants including subcritical supercritical and ultra supercritical systems of pulverized coal combustion, the most widely used technology in coal-fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Nalbandian, H. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A "Bed" for Burning Coal A "Bed" for Burning Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 4: A "Bed" for Burning Coal? It was a wet, chilly day in Washington DC in 1979 when a few scientists and engineers joined with government and college officials on the campus of Georgetown University to celebrate the completion of one of the world's most advanced coal combustors. It was a small coal burner by today's standards, but large enough to provide heat and steam for much of the university campus. But the new boiler built beside the campus tennis courts was unlike most other boilers in the world. A Fluidized Bed Boiler A Fluidized Bed Boiler In a fluidized bed boiler, upward blowing jets of air suspend burning coal, allowing it to mix with limestone that absorbs sulfur pollutants.

396

Surface coal mining technology: engineering and environmental aspects  

SciTech Connect

This survey of recommended methods, techniques and alternatives for selecting and designing surface coal mining systems is based on a review and evaluation of methods reported in the literature and applied in the field. The book is based on research conducted or sponsored by The Pennsylvania State University, the US Bureau of Mines, the US EPA, and the Polish Central Research and Design Institute for Openpit Mining. While the high price of petroleum has resulted in conservation efforts, total energy demand will still increase substantially in the years ahead. This increase will try out abilities to discover, extract and beneficiate fuels in the necessary volumes. Coal will eventually replace large amounts of petroleum fuels. A summary of the analyses required to lay out a surface mine, taking into consideration the limitations imposed by geology, equipment, reclamation, economics, and environmental control requirements, is provided.

Fung, R. (ed.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Prebaked Anode from Coal Extract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We previously reported that the coal extract prepared from non-hydrogenative extraction of thermal coals using two-ring-aromatic solvent (Hyper-coal) is suitable ...

398

Coal desulfurization with sodium hypochlorite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wet desulfurization of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Illinois No. 6 coal were conducted with sodium hypochlorite in the laboratory. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was… (more)

Li, Wei, M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Coal data: A reference  

SciTech Connect

This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Updated Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) Emissions Estimates and Inhalation Human Health Risk Assessment for U.S. Coal-Fired Electric Generating Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the mid-1990s, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emissions from U.S. coal-fired electric power plants and the risks associated with those emissions. With the exception of mercury, none of the HAPs-classified chemicals has been fundamentally reassessed for more than 15 years. The set of EPRI studies reported on here provides a fundamental reevaluation of potential HAPs emissions from coal-fired power plants based on current data concerning coals burned, co...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base year coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This project added a new airflow enhancement technology to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal power plant. Airflow parameters and efficiency improvement for the main plant cooling process using the applied technology were determined and compared with the capabilities of existing systems. The project required significant planning and pre-test execution in order to reach the required Air Cooled Condenser system configuration for evaluation. A host Power Plant ACC system had to be identified, agreement finalized, and addition of the SPX ACC Wind Guide Technology completed on that site. Design of the modification, along with procurement, fabrication, instrumentation, and installation of the new airflow enhancement technology were executed. Baseline and post-modification cooling system data was collected and evaluated. The improvement of ACC thermal performance after SPX wind guide installation was clear. Testing of the improvement indicates there is a 5% improvement in heat transfer coefficient in high wind conditions and 1% improvement at low wind speed. The benefit increased with increasing wind speed. This project was completed on schedule and within budget.

Ken Mortensen

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Composition-explicit distillation curves of aviation fuel JP-8 and a coal-based jet fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have recently introduced several important improvements in the measurement of distillation curves for complex fluids. The modifications to the classical measurement provide for (1) a composition explicit data channel for each distillate fraction (for both qualitative and quantitative analysis); (2) temperature measurements that are true thermodynamic state points; (3) temperature, volume, and pressure measurements of low uncertainty suitable for an equation of state development; (4) consistency with a century of historical data; (5) an assessment of the energy content of each distillate fraction; (6) a trace chemical analysis of each distillate fraction; and (7) a corrosivity assessment of each distillate fraction. The most significant modification is achieved with a new sampling approach that allows precise qualitative as well as quantitative analyses of each fraction, on the fly. We have applied the new method to the measurement of rocket propellant, gasoline, and jet fuels. In this paper, we present the application of the technique to representative batches of the military aviation fuel JP-8, and also to a coal-derived fuel developed as a potential substitute. We present not only the distillation curves but also a chemical characterization of each fraction and discuss the contrasts between the two fluids. 26 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Beverly L. Smith; Thomas J. Bruno [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Division

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Applying environmental externalities to US Clean Coal Technologies for Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

During the period 1971 to 1980, electricity consumption in Taiwan increased remarkably at an average rate of 12.2% per year. Despite experiencing a record low in 1982 and 1983, electricity demand returned to double digit growth, reaching 11.6% and 10.2% in 1987 and 1988, respectively, due to a strong economic recovery. In 1988, 71.6 TWh of electricity was produced, 21.1 TWh of which was from coal-fired units (29%). The electricity demand for Taiwan is expected to continue to grow at a very rapid rate during the 1990--2006 time frame. The average load is expected to grow at an annual rate of 5.6% while the peak load is projected to increase at an annual rate of 6.0%. All new coal-fired power plants are expected to comply with government regulations on S0{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulate emissions. Taper reports that all of its proposed coal-fired units will be equipped with modern flue gas emission reduction devices, such as electrostatic precipitators or baghouse filters, flue gas desulfurization and deco{sub x} devices, to reduce the pollutants to their minimum practical levels. New coal-based generation requirements in the sizes needed in Taiwan create an opportunity for several of the Cats currently under demonstration in the United States. Options to be considered are described.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Applying environmental externalities to US Clean Coal Technologies for Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

During the period 1971 to 1980, electricity consumption in Taiwan increased remarkably at an average rate of 12.2% per year. Despite experiencing a record low in 1982 and 1983, electricity demand returned to double digit growth, reaching 11.6% and 10.2% in 1987 and 1988, respectively, due to a strong economic recovery. In 1988, 71.6 TWh of electricity was produced, 21.1 TWh of which was from coal-fired units (29%). The electricity demand for Taiwan is expected to continue to grow at a very rapid rate during the 1990--2006 time frame. The average load is expected to grow at an annual rate of 5.6% while the peak load is projected to increase at an annual rate of 6.0%. All new coal-fired power plants are expected to comply with government regulations on S0{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulate emissions. Taper reports that all of its proposed coal-fired units will be equipped with modern flue gas emission reduction devices, such as electrostatic precipitators or baghouse filters, flue gas desulfurization and deco{sub x} devices, to reduce the pollutants to their minimum practical levels. New coal-based generation requirements in the sizes needed in Taiwan create an opportunity for several of the Cats currently under demonstration in the United States. Options to be considered are described.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

NETL: Coal & Power Systems - Brief History of Coal Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Coal Coal & Power Systems Brief History of Coal Use Steam Locomotive In the 1800s, one of the primary uses of coal was to fuel steam engines used to power locomotives....

407

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Closely Aligned Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > C&CBTL > Closely Aligned Programs Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Closely Aligned Programs The Department of Energy's (DOE) Coal & CoalBiomass to Liquids...

408

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Present coal potential of Turkey and coal usage in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Total coal reserve (hard coal + lignite) in the world is 984 billion tons. While hard coal constitutes 52% of the total reserve, lignite constitutes 48% of it. Turkey has only 0.1% of world hard coal reserve and 1.5% of world lignite reserves. Turkey has 9th order in lignite reserve, 8th order in lignite production, and 12th order in total coal (hard coal and lignite) consumption. While hard coal production meets only 13% of its consumption, lignite production meets lignite consumption in Turkey. Sixty-five percent of produced hard coal and 78% of produced lignite are used for electricity generation. Lignites are generally used for electricity generation due to their low quality. As of 2003, total installed capacity of Turkey was 35,587 MW, 19% (6,774 MW) of which is produced from coal-based thermal power plants. Recently, use of natural gas in electricity generation has increased. While the share of coal in electricity generation was about 50% for 1986, it is replaced by natural gas today.

Yilmaz, A.O. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Relationship between Coal Reservoir Permeability and Fractal Dimension and Its Significance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability of coal reservoir is one of important parameters for coal bed methane (CBM) development. Because of strong heterogeneity of coal reservoir, ascertaining permeability distribution is critical to productivity prediction of CBM. Based on Darcy's ... Keywords: coalbed methane, coal reservoir, permeability, fractal dimension, correlation degree

Hongyu Guo; Xianbo Su; Daping Xia

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

413

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

414

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial (point sources) Coal Oil Other Area sourcesSource Stationary fuel combugtion Electric utilities Coal Oil

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Coal transportation risks for fuel switching decisions  

SciTech Connect

Coal switching costs are generally expected to be the single largest cost factor associated with switching coals to low-sulfur sources. This report analyzes the principal issues and risks involved in moving Powder River Basin coal to eastern destinations and in moving increased amounts of Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal along the Ohio River. The railroad infrastructure for Powder River Basin coal is essentially optimized for current levels of traffic, yet estimated shipments will expand by 100 million tons over the next ten years. A critical issue is the magnitude and timing of investments in the railroad system required to maintain quality of service. Costs for rail and barge transport are comparable at present, yet they have different abilities to handle increased traffic. Negotiated rates will not be uniform and will change with the dynamics of investments and the clarification of utility compliance plans. Coal traffic patterns on inland waterways will change in order to handle barge movements for both Powder River Basin and Central Appalachian low-sulfur coals. Docks serving Central Appalachian coal fields have ample capacity, but originations will take place increasingly far from the rivers. Potential bottlenecks at specific locks and dams along the Ohio River have been identified. With the barge industry coming out of a slump, future barge rates will depend critically on the Corps of Engineers' schedule to upgrade key facilities. 30 figs., 14 tabs.

Toth, S. (Fieldston Co., Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reactivity of coals under coprocessing conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the recent years greater interest has developed for processes involving coal and petroleum fractions to produce distillate fuels. Coprocessing is especially attractive as a direct liquefaction process because it involves the use of heavy petroleum fractions, so both coal and heavy petroleum resids are upgraded simultaneously. The main distinction of coprocessing from other direct liquefaction processes is that coprocessing is more complex from a chemical standpoint than direct liquefaction processes which use traditional solvents, due to the greater variety of hydrocarbons (aromatic from the coal and aliphatics from the petroleum) present in the system. Therefore, need arises for better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions during coprocessing. The aim of the present study is to examine the influence of reaction conditions, coal and petroleum resid properties as well as the compatibility of the coal/petroleum resid pairs in terms of structural components on total coal conversion. Special focus will be given to the reactivity of coals and interaction of the coal and resid which lead to anisotropic coke.

Tomic, J.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reactivity of coals under coprocessing conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the recent years greater interest has developed for processes involving coal and petroleum fractions to produce distillate fuels. Coprocessing is especially attractive as a direct liquefaction process because it involves the use of heavy petroleum fractions, so both coal and heavy petroleum resids are upgraded simultaneously. The main distinction of coprocessing from other direct liquefaction processes is that coprocessing is more complex from a chemical standpoint than direct liquefaction processes which use traditional solvents, due to the greater variety of hydrocarbons (aromatic from the coal and aliphatics from the petroleum) present in the system. Therefore, need arises for better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions during coprocessing. The aim of the present study is to examine the influence of reaction conditions, coal and petroleum resid properties as well as the compatibility of the coal/petroleum resid pairs in terms of structural components on total coal conversion. Special focus will be given to the reactivity of coals and interaction of the coal and resid which lead to anisotropic coke.

Tomic, J.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Coal Severance Tax (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Severance Tax is imposed on all coal severed for sale or industrial purposes, except coal used for heating buildings in the state, coal used by the state or any political subdivision of...

419

Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

Baxter, L.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

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421

NETL: Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids - Systems and Industry Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C&CBTL > Systems Analyses C&CBTL > Systems Analyses Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Reference Shelf – Systems and Industry Analyses Studies DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Advanced Jet Propulsion Fuels: Fischer-Tropsch Based SPK-1 Case Study - Presentation

422

Coal feed lock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal feed lock is provided for dispensing coal to a high pressure gas producer with nominal loss of high pressure gas. The coal feed lock comprises a rotor member with a diametral bore therethrough. A hydraulically activated piston is slidably mounted in the bore. With the feed lock in a charging position, coal is delivered to the bore and then the rotor member is rotated to a discharging position so as to communicate with the gas producer. The piston pushes the coal into the gas producer. The rotor member is then rotated to the charging position to receive the next load of coal.

Pinkel, I. Irving (Fairview Park, OH)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Low Rank Coal Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Rank Coal Optimization Low Rank Coal Optimization NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 4 Project Description NETL's in-house research team is using an integrated approach to combine theory, computational modeling, experiment, and industrial input to develop physics-based methods, models, and tools to support the development and deployment of advanced gasification based devices and systems. The activities in this effort include developing and applying computational and modeling tools to simulate complex flows in applications such as transport or entrained flow gasifiers. TRIG Model Development - The primary objective of this work is to develop a hierarchy of models for numerical simulations of TRIG co-feed conditions that span fast running reduced order models (ROM's) to high fidelity multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Each model will have uncertainty quantification associated with its predictions to allow a user to choose a model based on the trade-offs between computational speed and uncertainty in the predictions.

424

SustainableCoal_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is a vital energy resource, is a vital energy resource, not only for the United States, but also for many developed and developing economies around the world. Finding ways to use coal cleanly and more efficiently at lower costs is a major research and development (R&D) challenge, and an ongoing focus of activities by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). According to a Congressional Research Service analysis, coal represents 93 percent of total U.S. - and over half of world - fossil fuel reserves (expressed in barrels of oil equivalent). Based on recent rates of domestic consumption (averaging 1 billion tons annually, 2000-2010), estimated U.S. recoverable coal reserves of nearly 261 billion short tons are sufficient to last more than 2½ centuries.

425

Pelletization of fine coals  

SciTech Connect

The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

Sastry, K.V.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

International perspectives on coal preparation  

SciTech Connect

The report consists of the vugraphs from the presentations which covered the following topics: Summaries of the US Department of Energy`s coal preparation research programs; Preparation trends in Russia; South African coal preparation developments; Trends in hard coal preparation in Germany; Application of coal preparation technology to oil sands extraction; Developments in coal preparation in China; and Coal preparation in Australia.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 10, 2012 September 10, 2012 New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis A new, free online tool developed by a Department of Energy laboratory allows users to customize and analyze the environmental impact of various fuels before they are used to create power. September 4, 2012 International Experts on Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technologies to Meet at Pittsburgh Coal Conference The role of fossil fuels in the global energy portfolio, reducing the environmental impacts of coal-based energy systems, and recent advances in clean coal technology are just some of the subjects that will be discussed at the 2012 International Pittsburgh Coal Conference to be held October 15-18 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh, Pa. August 22, 2012