Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO2013 Early Release AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight Variable Fixed Heatrate 6 nth-of-a- kind Online Size Lead time Cost in 2012 Contingency Optimism Cost in 2012 4 O&M 5 O&M in 2012 Heatrate Technology Year 1 (MW) (years) (2011 $/kW) Factor 2 Factor 3 (2011 $/kW) (2011 $/MWh) (2011$/kW) (Btu/kWh) (Btu/kWh) Scrubbed Coal New 7 2016 1300 4 2,694 1.07 1.00 2,883 4.39 30.64 8,800 8,740 Integrated Coal-Gasification Comb Cycle (IGCC) 7 2016 1200 4 3,475 1.07 1.00 3,718 7.09 50.49 8,700 7,450 Pulverized Coal with carbon sequestration 2017 650 4 4,662 1.07 1.03 5,138 4.37 65.31 12,000 9,316

2

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Activity-based Cost Estimates with Feature-Based2004). “Effective Cost Estimate and Construction Processesof new designs. These cost estimates are inflated by the

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Cost-Based Sampling of Individual Instances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many practical domains, misclassification costs can differ greatly and may be represented by class ratios, however, most learning algorithms struggle with skewed class distributions. The difficulty is attributed to designing classifiers to maximize ... Keywords: Class Imbalance, Cost-Based Learning, Sampling

William Klement; Peter Flach; Nathalie Japkowicz; Stan Matwin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Application of activity-based costing in a manufacturing company: a comparison with traditional costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based Costing (ABC) represents an alternative paradigm to traditional cost accounting system and has received extensive attention during the past decade. Rather than distorting the cost information by using traditional overhead allocation methods, ...

Gonca Tuncel; Derya Eren Akyol; Gunhan Mirac Bayhan; Utku Koker

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Optimal Project Feature Weights in Analogy-Based Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Project Feature Weights in Analogy-Based Cost Estimation: Improvement and Limitations, IEEE Abstract--Cost estimation is a vital task in most important software project decisions as measured by standard metrics. Index Terms--Software cost estimation, analogy-based cost estimation, project

7

Analytic framework for TRL-based cost and schedule models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many government agencies have adopted the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale to help improve technology development management under ever increasing cost, schedule, and complexity constraints. Many TRL-based cost and ...

El-Khoury, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Energy Storage Cost Data Base - Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Storage Cost Data Base Version 1.0 is a prototype reference tool built on an Excel spreadsheet that contains cost and performance data sheets for a variety of energy storage systems. The tool enables utility engineers to screen and select specific storage systems from the data base and perform financial analysis such as levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and to prepare a financial ProForma based on the selected storage system. The Data Base was first released in 2010 and updated in ...

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Low Cost Aqueous Electrolyte Based Energy Storage: Materials and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Low Cost Aqueous Electrolyte Based Energy Storage: Materials and ... Deployment of New High Temperature Alloys for Power Generation Systems · Designing ... Materials Metrology for a Hydrogen Distribution Infrastructure.

10

CostStudio: a web-based cost estimation tool for architectural design studios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of computers has had a tremendous impact on every field of study. Their phenomenal computing power and storage capabilities, along with the ability to "network" and share information, afford tremendous possibilities. The Internet has become the single largest source for the dissemination and sharing of information. Academia has proactively seized the opportunity to review existing educational methodology and devise methods that use the power of computers and networking to improve knowledge transfer and create a better learning experience for students. Online accredited degrees offered by virtual universities epitomize the impact of technology on the field of education. The vertical impact of a broader and deeper educational experience in every academic field has been complimented by a horizontal impact on all the fields, as they continue to discover areas of overlap and foster inter-disciplinary learning. Architecture is one of the fields that has benefited tremendously by advances in information technology. Computers have replaced traditional manual drafting techniques, design techniques and storage of information. Not only do these tools provide the means of doing things better and faster, but they also enhance the learning process. The current research focuses on a cost estimation tool that accentuates knowledge of the cost estimation process for architectural students and audits the student's usage of the tool by recording each interaction in an auditing database. Cost estimation, traditionally, has received more focus by construction engineers. However, it holds considerable significance for architects who must evaluate the cost feasibility of their designs. CostStudio, an online web-based cost estimation tool, was developed for architecture students to fulfill these needs. The tool was developed in Java using Java Server Pages and component based Java Beans technology with a pure Java based database at the backend. The research effort focuses on educating architectural students and studying the impact and acceptance of such tools among students.

Shah, Neelu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Designing to Target Cost. ” 12th Annual Conference of thethe Hurdle of First Cost: Action Research in TargetD.T. (1987). “A Future for Cost Modelling: Building Cost

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Russian gas resource base large, overstated, costly to maintain  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas resources of the Former Soviet Union are immense, with an officially estimated initial recoverable endowment of 250.7 trillion cu m (8,852 trillion cu ft). Of this volume, 85% is located in the Russian Federation, which will be the dominant world supplier of gas through 2015. Although Russia possesses an amazing gas resource base, official figures overstate both the recovery factor for gas in place and appear to systematically overestimate volumes of recoverable gas in undiscovered fields. Production and transportation of gas from the Yamal peninsula and the new discoveries in the Kara and Barents seas will cost many times the current average cost of gas production in Russian. The paper discusses resources and reserves and examines the reliability of Soviet-vintage data.

Grace, J.D. (Troika Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States))

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elemental analysis (cost-per-square-foot) are referred to asTraditional’ models (cost per square foot, elementalunit costs per an area unit (i.e. , $/Square Foot) or per a

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Using time-driven activity-based costing to manage digital forensic readiness in large organisations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A digital forensic readiness (DFR) programme consists of a number of activities that should be chosen and managed with respect to cost constraints and risk. Traditional cost systems, however, can not provide the cost of individual activities. This makes ... Keywords: Cost management, Digital forensic readiness, Forensics management, Time-driven activity-based costing

K. Reddy; H. S. Venter; M. S. Olivier

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Developing an activity-based costing approach for system development and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the use of the Activity Based Costing (ABC) approach to software estimation. Like other more traditional approaches to software estimation, ABC provides man-day estimates. In addition, it also provides detailed costing information ... Keywords: IS project planning, activity-based costing, effort estimation, organizational learning, software process measurement, time and cost estimation

Ginny Ooi; Christina Soh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal...

19

Total capital cost data base: 10MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the total capital cost data base of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant. This Solar One cost data base was created using the computer code ''Cost Data Management System (CDMS)''. The cost data base format was developed to be used as a common method of presentation of capital costs for power plants. The basic format is a plant system cost breakdown structure. Major accounts are land; structures and improvements; collector, receiver, thermal transport, thermal storage, and stream generation systems; turbine plant; electrical plant; miscellaneous plant systems and equipment; and plant-level indirect costs. Each major account includes subaccounts to as many as nine level of detail. The data base can be accessed to provide elements-of-work costs at any subaccount level or at the plant level. The elements-of-work include sitework/earthwork; concrete work; metal work; architectural; process equipment; piping; electrical; and miscellaneous work. Each of these elements-of-work can be or are broken into finer detail and costs can be accumulated to identify more specific needs, e.g., pipe insulation or heat exchangers. The cost data base can be accessed and various reports can be generated. These vary from a single page summary to detailed listings of costs and notes. Reported costs can be stated in dollars, dollars per kilowatt or percentage of the total plant cost. Reports or samples of reports for the pilot plant capital cost are included.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Time Cost of Tornado Warnings and the Savings with Storm-Based Warnings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the cost of time spent under tornado warnings issued annually by the National Weather Service (NWS). County-based tornado warnings imposed substantial costs on the nation: an average of 234 million person-hours spent under ...

Daniel Sutter; Somer Erickson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads ITN Energy Systems, Inc. Project Number: SC0010151 Project Description...

22

Feature based cost and carbon emission modelling for wire and arc additive manufacturing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is a CNC and welding deposition based additive manufacturing method. This novel manufacturing technique has potential cost and… (more)

Guo, Jianing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimal weight tuning method for unit selection cost functions in syllable based text-to-speech synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method for tuning the weights of unit selection cost functions in syllable based text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis system. In this work, unit selection cost functions, namely target cost and concatenation cost, are designed appropriate ... Keywords: Concatenation cost, Genetic algorithm, Target cost, Text-to-speech synthesis, Tuning of weights, Unit selection

N. P. Narendra; K. Sreenivasa Rao

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2012: Bulk Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates EPRI reports 1020071, Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2010, and 1021932, Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2011, which presents 2011 updated data on the cost, performance, and capabilities of energy storage systems only for bulk energy storage applications in a Excel workbook database. The distributed options detailed in the index can be found in the 2011 product, 1021932. The goal of this research was to ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Benefits and Costs of ATP Investments in Component-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in incompatible formats and semantic models, which means that ... application integration, comparison shopping, and agent-based process invocation ...

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Facilities and Administration (F&A) cost is another term used for indirect cost. F&A/Indirect cost are calculated based on the direct expenditures of sponsored projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated based on the direct expenditures of sponsored projects. F&A/Indirect cost can not be readily. These costs are "real" though they can not be associated with a specific project. Examples of F and departmental administration. Penn will apply the appropriate F&A rate to the direct cost of the project based

Bushman, Frederic

27

Extending Simulation Modeling to Activity-Based Costing for Clinical Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model was developed to measure costs in an Emergency Department setting for patients presenting with possible cervical-spine injury who needed radiological imaging. Simulation, a tool widely used to account for process variability but typically ... Keywords: activity-based costing, animated simulation modeling

Noah D. Glick; C. Craig Blackmore; William N. Zelman

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cost and performance analysis of biomass-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To make a significant contribution to the power mix in the United States biomass power systems must be competitive on a cost and efficiency basis. We describe the cost and performance of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The economic viability and efficiency performance of the IGCC generation technology appear to be quite attractive.

Craig, K. R.; Mann, M. K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergyOffice of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical...

30

NETL: Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture Process through Heat Integration Project No.: DE-FE0012914 ADA-ES is conducting bench scale testing and computer modeling of...

31

Feature-based investment cost estimation based on modular design of a continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies of continuous manufacturing processes have used equipment-factored cost estimation methods to predict savings in initial plant investment costs. In order to challenge and validate the existing methods of ...

Collins, Donovan (Donovan Scott)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The broad objective of this thesis involves investigation of the role agriculture might play in a society wide greenhouse gas emissions reduction effort. Specifically, the breakeven price for carbon emission offsets is calculated for agriculturally based emission reducing practices. The practices investigated in the Texas High Plains involve reduced tillage use, reduced fallow use, reduced crop fertilization, cropland conversion to grassland, feedlot enteric fermentation management and digester based dairy manure handling. Costs of emission reductions were calculated at the producer level. The calculated offset prices are classified into four cost categories. They are: negative cost, low cost (less than $20 per ton of carbon saved), moderate cost ($20 through $100 per ton of carbon saved), and high cost (over $100 for tons of carbon saved). Negative cost implies that farmers could make money and reduce emissions by moving to alternative practices even without any carbon payments. Alternatives in the positive cost categories need compensation to induce farmers to switch to practices that sequester more carbon. All fallow dryland crop practices, dryland and irrigated cotton zero tillage, dryland and irrigated wheat zero tillage, irrigated corn zero tillage, cotton irrigated nitrogen use reduction under minimum tillage and dryland pasture for all systems, and anaerobic lagoon complete mix and plug flow systems fall in the negative cost category. Dryland and irrigated wheat under minimum tillage are found to be in the low cost category. Cotton dryland under minimum tillage and cotton irrigated with nitrogen use reduction under zero tillage fell into the moderate cost class. Both corn and cotton irrigated minimum tillage are found to be in the high cost category. This study only considers the producer foregone net income less fixed costs as the only cost incurred in switching to an alternative sequestering practice. More costs such as learning and risk should probably be included. This limitation along with other constraints such as use of short run budget data, lack of availability and reliability of local budgets, overlooking any market effects, and lack of treatment of costs incurred in selling carbon offsets to buyers are limitations and portend future work.

Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cost Comparison of Public Elementary School Construction Costs Based on Project Delivery System in the State of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a correlation exists between cost and project delivery system then this is crucial knowledge for any group organizing a new construction project. It has been observed anecdotally that the construction cost per student of public elementary schools has been observed to continue to increase in the state of Texas, even with the recent downturn in the economy. The recent economic depression in the USA has seen construction material costs stagnate and construction costs dropping. This is a direct result of the competitive nature of a market that has a lack of business. The issue of a rising cost at the time of a falling market is of more than a passing research interest to school superintendents and the people of Texas. This study investigated the relationship between cost and project delivery systems. A survey was sent to all school superintendents in Texas requesting recent data on elementary school enrollment, project delivery type and construction costs. One hundred and thirty six responses were received from one thousand and seventy six Texas school districts. A comparative means test was used to determine if a relationship exists between construction cost per student and project delivery system for public elementary schools in Texas. The research shows that Texas school districts are primarily using two types of project delivery systems for their new school construction, Construction Management at Risk and Competitive Sealed Proposals. After comparing the average construction cost per student for these two project delivery systems, the statistical analysis showed that Competitive Sealed Proposals cost approximately four thousand dollar less per student than Construction Management at Risk. The clear question is then as to why are districts using Construction Management at Risk when the comparative benefits of the contract type are not worth this amount of money per student.

Reinisch, Ashley

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Traders' collective portfolio optimization with transaction costs: towards microscopic validation of agent-based models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the availability of very detailed data on financial market, agent-based modeling is hindered by the lack of information about real-trader behavior. This makes it impossible to validate agent-based models, which are thus reverse-engineering attempts. This work is a contribution to the building of a set of stylized facts about the traders themselves. Using the client database of Swissquote Bank SA, we find that the transaction cost structure determines on average to a large extend the relationship between the mean turnover per transaction of an investor and his mean wealth. A simple extension of CAPM that includes variable transaction costs is able to reproduce qualitatively the observed behaviors. We argue that this shows the collective ability of a population to construct a mean-variance portfolio that takes into account transaction costs.

de Lachapelle, David Morton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Design Optimization and Construction of the Thyratron/PFN Based Cost Model Modulator for the NLC  

SciTech Connect

As design studies and various R and D efforts continue on Next Linear Collider (NLC) systems, much R and D work is being done on X-Band klystron development, and development of pulse modulators to drive these X-Band klystrons. A workshop on this subject was held at SLAC in June of 1998, and a follow-up workshop is scheduled at SLAC June 23-25, 1999. At the 1998 workshop, several avenues of R and D were proposed using solid state switching, induction LINAC principles, high voltage hard tubes, and a few more esoteric ideas. An optimized version of the conventional thyratron-PFN-pulse transformer modulator for which there is extensive operating experience is also a strong candidate for use in the NLC. Such a modulator is currently under construction for base line demonstration purposes. The performance of this ''Cost Model'' modulator will be compared to other developing technologies. Important parameters including initial capital cost, operating maintenance cost, reliability, maintainability, power efficiency, in addition to the usual operating parameters of pulse flatness, timing and pulse height jitter, etc. will be considered in the choice of a modulator design for the NLC. This paper updates the progress on this ''Cost Model'' modulator design and construction.

Koontz, Roland F

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Life Cost Based FMEA Manual: A Step by Step Guide to Carrying Out a Cost-based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Failure occurs when one or more of the intended functions of a product are no longer fulfilled to the customer's satisfaction. The most critical product failures are those that escape design reviews and in-house quality inspection and are found by the customer. The product may work for a while until its performance degrades to an unacceptable level or it may have not worked even before customer took possession of the product. The end results of failures which may lead to unsafe conditions or major losses of the main function are rated high in severity. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a tool widely used in the automotive, aerospace, and electronics industries to identify, prioritize, and eliminate known potential failures, problems, and errors from systems under design, before the product is released (Stamatis, 1997). Several industrial FMEA standards such as those published by the Society of Automotive Engineers, US Department of Defense, and the Automotive Industry Action Group employ the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to measure risk and severity of failures. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) is a product of 3 indices: Occurrence (O), Severity (S), and Detection (D). In a traditional FMEA process design engineers typically analyze the 'root cause' and 'end-effects' of potential failures in a sub-system or component and assign penalty points through the O, S, D values to each failure. The analysis is organized around categories called failure modes, which link the causes and effects of failures. A few actions are taken upon completing the FMEA worksheet. The RPN column generally will identify the high-risk areas. The idea of performing FMEA is to eliminate or reduce known and potential failures before they reach the customers. Thus, a plan of action must be in place for the next task. Not all failures can be resolved during the product development cycle, thus prioritization of actions must be made within the design group. One definition of detection difficulty (D) is how well the organization controls the development process. Another definition relates to the detectability of a particular failure in the product when it is in the hands of the customer. The former asks 'What is the chance of catching the problem before we give it to the customer'? The latter asks 'What is the chance of the customer catching the problem before the problem results in a catastrophic failure?' (Palady, 1995) These differing definitions confuse the FMEA users when one tries to determine detection difficulty. Are we trying to measure how easy it is to detect where a failure has occurred or when it has occurred? Or are we trying to measure how easy or difficult it is to prevent failures? Ordinal scale variables are used to rank-order industries such as, hotels, restaurants, and movies (Note that a 4 star hotel is not necessarily twice as good as a 2 star hotel). Ordinal values preserve rank in a group of items, but the distance between the values cannot be measured since a distance function does not exist. Thus, the product or sum of ordinal variables loses its rank since each parameter has different scales. The RPN is a product of 3 independent ordinal variables, it can indicate that some failure types are 'worse' than others, but give no quantitative indication of their relative effects. To resolve the ambiguity of measuring detection difficulty and the irrational logic of multiplying 3 ordinal indices, a new methodology was created to overcome these shortcomings, Life Cost-Based FMEA. Life Cost-Based FMEA measures failure/risk in terms of monetary cost. Cost is a universal parameter that can be easily related to severity by engineers and others. Thus, failure cost can be estimated using the following simplest form: Expected Failure Cost = {sup n}{Sigma}{sub i=1}p{sub i}c{sub i}, p: Probability of a particular failure occurring; c: Monetary cost associated with that particular failure; and n: Total number of failure scenarios. FMEA is most effective when there are inputs into it from

Rhee, Seung; Spencer, Cherrill; /Stanford U. /SLAC

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Life Cost Based FMEA Manual: A Step by Step Guide to Carrying Out a Cost-based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Failure occurs when one or more of the intended functions of a product are no longer fulfilled to the customer's satisfaction. The most critical product failures are those that escape design reviews and in-house quality inspection and are found by the customer. The product may work for a while until its performance degrades to an unacceptable level or it may have not worked even before customer took possession of the product. The end results of failures which may lead to unsafe conditions or major losses of the main function are rated high in severity. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a tool widely used in the automotive, aerospace, and electronics industries to identify, prioritize, and eliminate known potential failures, problems, and errors from systems under design, before the product is released (Stamatis, 1997). Several industrial FMEA standards such as those published by the Society of Automotive Engineers, US Department of Defense, and the Automotive Industry Action Group employ the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to measure risk and severity of failures. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) is a product of 3 indices: Occurrence (O), Severity (S), and Detection (D). In a traditional FMEA process design engineers typically analyze the 'root cause' and 'end-effects' of potential failures in a sub-system or component and assign penalty points through the O, S, D values to each failure. The analysis is organized around categories called failure modes, which link the causes and effects of failures. A few actions are taken upon completing the FMEA worksheet. The RPN column generally will identify the high-risk areas. The idea of performing FMEA is to eliminate or reduce known and potential failures before they reach the customers. Thus, a plan of action must be in place for the next task. Not all failures can be resolved during the product development cycle, thus prioritization of actions must be made within the design group. One definition of detection difficulty (D) is how well the organization controls the development process. Another definition relates to the detectability of a particular failure in the product when it is in the hands of the customer. The former asks 'What is the chance of catching the problem before we give it to the customer'? The latter asks 'What is the chance of the customer catching the problem before the problem results in a catastrophic failure?' (Palady, 1995) These differing definitions confuse the FMEA users when one tries to determine detection difficulty. Are we trying to measure how easy it is to detect where a failure has occurred or when it has occurred? Or are we trying to measure how easy or difficult it is to prevent failures? Ordinal scale variables are used to rank-order industries such as, hotels, restaurants, and movies (Note that a 4 star hotel is not necessarily twice as good as a 2 star hotel). Ordinal values preserve rank in a group of items, but the distance between the values cannot be measured since a distance function does not exist. Thus, the product or sum of ordinal variables loses its rank since each parameter has different scales. The RPN is a product of 3 independent ordinal variables, it can indicate that some failure types are 'worse' than others, but give no quantitative indication of their relative effects. To resolve the ambiguity of measuring detection difficulty and the irrational logic of multiplying 3 ordinal indices, a new methodology was created to overcome these shortcomings, Life Cost-Based FMEA. Life Cost-Based FMEA measures failure/risk in terms of monetary cost. Cost is a universal parameter that can be easily related to severity by engineers and others. Thus, failure cost can be estimated using the following simplest form: Expected Failure Cost = {sup n}{Sigma}{sub i=1}p{sub i}c{sub i}, p: Probability of a particular failure occurring; c: Monetary cost associated with that particular failure; and n: Total number of failure scenarios. FMEA is most effective when there are inputs into it from all concerned disciplines of the product development t

Rhee, Seung; Spencer, Cherrill; /Stanford U. /SLAC

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

International stock market linkages : are overnight returns on the U.S. Market informative?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Based on the theory of international stock market co-movements, this study shows that a profitable trading strategy can be developed. The U.S. market return is… (more)

An, Byeongung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

43

Generalized linear model-based expert system for estimating the cost of transportation projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely effective cost management requires reliable cost estimates at every stage of project development. While underestimation of transportation costs seems to be a global trend, improving early cost prediction accuracy in estimates is difficult. This ... Keywords: Cost management, Expert system, Generalized linear model, Relational database, Transportation projects

Jui-Sheng Chou

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

COST-EFFECTIVE VISIBILITY-BASED DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR GENERAL OFFICE LIGHTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were calculated at the stated cost per Kwh by assuming 30to the work surface. The costs per Kwh essentially span themostly dependent upon the cost per Kwh divided by the area

Clear, Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells decreases (and the cost per kWh increases). If vehiclebetween NiMH battery cost per kWh (and per kilogram (kg))meter, and a variable, per kWh cost. SCE has two different

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lignin-based Active Anode Materials Synthesized from Low-Cost ...  

cost battery material obtained from a renewable resource. This material can be made binder-free, eliminating a major cost in battery materials.

47

Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

Warren, R.N.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cost Maps for Fossil Assets Management: Based on a Case Study With Minnesota Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to effective management of utility assets is determining the benefits and costs of options over various timeframes. This report describes and illustrates a structured approach to asset management decision making using cost maps.

1995-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

OPTIMIZING TRANSMISSION SERVICE COST OF KHUZESTAN REGIONAL GRID BASED ON NSGA?II ALGORITHM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Any plan for modeling the components of transmission service costs should be able to consider congestion as well as loss cost. Assessing the real value of congestion and loss costs in each network has a substantial contribution to analyze the grid’s weaknesses in order to release capacity of power network. As much as the amount of congestion and loss costs in the transmission grid reduces the amount of power passing through transmission lines increases. Therefore

Alireza Tavakoli Shooshtari; Mahmood Joorabian; Armin Ebrahimi Milani; Arash Gholamzadeh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product, an update to EPRI product 1020071, presents 2011 updated data on the cost, performance, and capabilities of energy storage systems for various applications. The data is presented in the form of an Excel workbook database. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of the installed costs and operatin...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reliability and Cost-Benefit-Based Standards for Transmission Network Operation and Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................... 143 Table C.3: Breakdown of transmission costs during t3 when considering all outages to single outages N-2 Deterministic security policy that refers to double outages O Operational cost #12. Probabilistic cost-benefit framework considered to replace historical deterministic N-k criteria. No changes

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

52

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the cost estimates for private parking, in Report #and institutional parking The cost estimates for 1991 area complete social-cost estimate would include, in addition,

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the cost estimates for private parking, in Report #and institutional parking The cost estimates for 1991 area complete social-cost estimate would include, in addition,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Low cost fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics and fiber reinforced composites  

SciTech Connect

A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC`s) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

Singh, M.; Levine, S.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

centimeter or cubic centimeters CNG = compressed natural gascompressed natural gas (CNG) refueling stations providessimilar cylinders for storing CNG. In general, the cost of a

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The equivalence of uniform and Shapley value-based cost allocations in a specific game  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concerns the possible equivalence of the Shapley value and other allocations in specific games. For a group buying game with a linear quantity discount schedule, the uniform allocation results in the same cost allocation as the Shapley value. ... Keywords: Cooperative game, Core, Group buying, Shapley value, Uniform cost allocation

Rachel R. Chen; Shuya Yin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluation of preliminary data analysis framework in software cost estimation based on ISBSG R9 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research has argued that preliminary data analysis is necessary for software cost estimation. In this paper, a framework for such analysis is applied to a substantial corpus of historical project data (ISBSG R9 data), selected without explicit ... Keywords: ISBSG Data R9, Software cost estimation, Software engineering data analysis

Qin Liu; Wen Zhong Qin; Robert Mintram; Margaret Ross

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Anytime induction of low-cost, low-error classifiers: a sampling-based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Machine learning techniques are gaining prevalence in the production of a wide range of classifiers for complex real-world applications with nonuniform testing and misclassification costs. The increasing complexity of these applications poses a real ...

Saher Esmeir; Shaul Markovitch

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A cost-based adaptive handover hysteresis scheme to minimize the handover failure rate in 3GPP LTE system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We deal with a cost-based adaptive handover hysteresis scheme for the horizontal handover decision strategies, as one of the self-optimization techniques that can minimize the handover failure rate (HFR) in the 3rd generation partnership project (3GPP) ...

Doo-Won Lee; Gye-Tae Gil; Dong-Hoi Kim

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Large-Scale cost-based abduction in full-fledged first-order predicate logic with cutting plane inference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abduction is inference to the best explanation. Abduction has long been studied intensively in a wide range of contexts, from artificial intelligence research to cognitive science. While recent advances in large-scale knowledge acquisition warrant applying ... Keywords: abduction, cost-based abduction, cutting plane inference, integer linear programming

Naoya Inoue; Kentaro Inui

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cost-based optimizations of power density and target-blanket modularity for {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U-based ADEP  

SciTech Connect

A cost-based parametric systems model is developed for an Accelerator-Driven Energy Production (ADEP) system based on a {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycle and a molten-salt (LiF/BeF{sub 2}/ThF{sub 3}) fluid-fuel primary system. Simplified neutron-balance, accelerator, reactor-core, chemical-processing, and balance-of-plant models are combined parametrically with a simplified costing model. The main focus of this model is to examine trade offs related to fission power density, reactor-core modularity, {sup 233}U breeding rate, and fission product transmutation capacity.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

SLA-based Optimization of Power and Migration Cost in Cloud Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud computing systems (or hosting datacenters) have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Utility computing, reliable data storage, and infrastructure-independent computing are example applications of such systems. Electrical energy cost of ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Virtual Machine Placement, Service Level Agreement, Energy Efficiency, Data center, Server Consolidation

Hadi Goudarzi; Mohammad Ghasemazar; Massoud Pedram

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A mission taxonomy-based approach to planetary rover cost-reliability tradeoffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our earlier work on robot mission reliability provides tradeoff analysis between input parameters such as mission success rate, robot team size, and robot component reliability, but only for specific tasks. Here we take a more comprehensive approach ... Keywords: failure, mission cost, mission design, mission taxonomy, planetary robot, reliability, robot configuration optimization

David Asikin; John M. Dolan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2005 Authors Striebel, Kathryn A., Joongpyo Shim, Azucena Sierra, Hui Yang, Xiangyun Song, Robert Kostecki, and Kathryn N. McCarthy Journal Journal of Power Sources Volume 146 Pagination 33-38 Keywords libob, lifepo4, lithium-ion, post-test, raman spectroscopy Abstract Pouch type LiFePO4-natural graphite lithium-ion cells were cycled at constant current with periodic pulse-power testing in several different configurations. Components were analyzed after cycling with electrochemical, Raman and TEM techniques to determine capacity fade mechanisms. The cells with carbon-coated current collectors in the cathode and LiBOB-salt electrolyte showed the best performance stability. In many cases, iron species were detected on the anodes removed from cells with both TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The LiFePO4 electrodes showed unchanged capacity suggesting that the iron is migrating in small quantities and is acting as a catalyst to destabilize the anode SEI in these cells.

67

Cost-Effective Integration of Efficient Low-Lift Base Load Cooling Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term goal of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Integration subprogram is to develop cost-effective technologies and building practices that will enable the design and construction of net Zero Energy Buildings — commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis — by 2025. To support this long-term goal, DOE further called for — as part of its FY07 Statement of Needs — the development by 2010 of “five cost-effective design technology option sets using highly efficient component technologies, integrated controls, improved construction practices, streamlined commissioning, maintenance and operating procedures that will make new and existing commercial buildings durable, healthy and safe for occupants.” In response, PNNL proposed and DOE funded a scoping study investigation of one such technology option set, low-lift cooling, that offers potentially exemplary HVAC energy performance relative to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The primary purpose of the scoping study was to estimate the national technical energy savings potential of this TOS.

Jiang, Wei; Winiarski, David W.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Armstrong, Peter R.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

69

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry experts believe that new vehicle designs based on fuel cells, electricElectric Power Research Institute, Pricing for Success: Using Auto Industry Models to Review Electric Vehicle

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Growth-optimal investments and numeraire portfolios under transaction costs: An analysis based on the von Neumann-Gale model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to extend the capital growth theory developed by Kelly, Breiman, Cover and others to asset market models with transaction costs. We define a natural generalization of the notion of a numeraire portfolio proposed by Long and show how such portfolios can be used for constructing growth-optimal investment strategies. The analysis is based on the classical von Neumann-Gale model of economic dynamics, a stochastic version of which we use as a framework for the modelling of financial markets with frictions.

Bahsoun, Wael; Taksar, Michael I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cycling performance of low-cost LiFePO4-based high-power lithium-ion cells was investigated and the components were analyzed after cycling to determine capacity fade mechanisms. Pouch type LiFePO4/natural graphite cells were assembled and evaluated by constant C/2 cycling, pulse-power and impedance measurements. From post-test electrochemical analysis after cycling, active materials, LiFePO4 and natural graphite, showed no degradation structurally or electrochemically. The main reasons for the capacity fade of cell were lithium inventory loss by side reaction and possible lithium deposition on the anode.

Shim, Joongpyo; Sierra, Azucena; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

76

Manufacturing Cost Analysis for YSZ-Based FlexCells at Pilot and Full Scale Production Scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

the significant increases that result if target raw material costs cannot be achieved at this volume.

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Robin Kimbrell; Kellie Chenault

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A model of the Capital Cost of a natural gas-fired fuel cell based Central Utilities Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model defines the methods used to estimate the cost associated with acquisition and installation of capital equipment of the fuel cell systems defined by the central utility plant model. The capital cost model estimates the cost of acquiring and installing the fuel cell unit, and all auxiliary equipment such as a boiler, air conditioning, hot water storage, and pumps. The model provides a means to adjust initial cost estimates to consider learning associated with the projected level of production and installation of fuel cell systems. The capital cost estimate is an input to the cost of ownership analysis where it is combined with operating cost and revenue model estimates.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hydrogen Sensor Based on Pd/GeO{sub 2} Using a Low Cost Electrochemical Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work reports on a synthesis of sub micron germanium dioxide (GeO{sub 2}) on porous silicon (PS) by electrochemical deposition. n-type Si (100) wafer was used to fabricate (PS) using conventional method of electrochemical etching in HF based solution. A GeCl{sub 4} was directly hydrolyzed by hydrogen peroxide to produce pure GeO{sub 2}, and then electrochemically deposited on PS. Followed by palladium (Pd) contact on GeO{sub 2} /PS was achieved by using RF sputtering technique. The grown GeO{sub 2} crystals were characterized using SEM and EDX. I-V characteristics of Pd/ GeO{sub 2} were recorded before and after hydrogen gas exposure as well as with different H{sub 2} concentrations and different applied temperatures. The sensitivity of Pd/ GeO{sub 2} also has been investigated it could be seen to increase significantly with increased hydrogen concentration while it decreased with increase temperature.

Jawad, M. J.; Hashim, M. R. [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800-Penang (Malaysia); Ali, N. K. [Material Innovations and Nanoelectronics Research Group, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Department of electronic engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate, Phase II: 26 September 2007 - 25 September 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global Solar's CIGS manufacturing cost has decreased by increased automation, higher materials utilization, and greater capacity with higher rates in all tools.

Wiedeman, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

K. Stork; R. Poola

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Manufacturing Cost Analysis for YSZ-Based FlexCells at Pilot and Full Scale Production Scales  

SciTech Connect

Significant reductions in cell costs must be achieved in order to realize the full commercial potential of megawatt-scale SOFC power systems. The FlexCell designed by NexTech Materials is a scalable SOFC technology that offers particular advantages over competitive technologies. In this updated topical report, NexTech analyzes its FlexCell design and fabrication process to establish manufacturing costs at both pilot scale (10 MW/year) and full-scale (250 MW/year) production levels and benchmarks this against estimated anode supported cell costs at the 250 MW scale. This analysis will show that even with conservative assumptions for yield, materials usage, and cell power density, a cost of $35 per kilowatt can be achieved at high volume. Through advancements in cell size and membrane thickness, NexTech has identified paths for achieving cell manufacturing costs as low as $27 per kilowatt for its FlexCell technology. Also in this report, NexTech analyzes the impact of raw material costs on cell cost, showing the significant increases that result if target raw material costs cannot be achieved at this volume.

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Robin Kimbrell; Kellie Chenault

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

VillageNet: A low-cost, IEEE 802.11-based mesh network for connecting rural areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VillageNet is a new wireless mesh networking technology that provides low-cost broadband Internet access for wide regions. It targets the rural market around the world, where large populations live but paying capacities are low. VillageNet offers a low-cost, ...

Partha Dutta; Sharad Jaiswal; Rajeev Rastogi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

USING RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (RBCA) TO ASSESS (THEORETICAL) CANCER DEATHS AVERTED COMPARED TO THE (REAL) COST OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, on the basis of existing health studies at the time, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project legislation was proposed that would authorize remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites and vicinity properties. The cost of the program to the Federal Government was expected to be $180 million. With the completion of this project, approximately 1300 theoretical cancer deaths were prevented in the next 100 years at a cost of $1.45 billion, based on the Fiscal Year 1998 Federal UMTRA budget. The individual site costs ranged from $0.2 million up to $18 billion spent per theoretical cancer death averted over the next 100 years. Resources required to sustain remediation activities such as this are subject to reduction over time, and are originally based on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public. This evaluation used a process incorporating risk-based corrective action (RBCA); a three-tiered, decision-making process tailoring corrective action activities according to site-specific conditions and risks. If RBCA had been applied at the start of the UMTRA Project, and using a criterion of >1 excess cancer death prevented as justification to remediate the site, only 50% of the existing sites would have been remediated, yielding a cost savings of $303.6 million to the Federal Government and affected States, which share 10% of the cost. This cost savings equates to 21% of the overall project budget. In addition, only 22% of the vicinity properties had structural contamination contributing to elevated interior gamma exposure and radon levels. Focusing only on these particular properties could have saved an additional $269.3 million, yielding a total savings of $573 million; 40% of the overall project budget. As operational experience is acquired, including greater understanding of the radiological and nonradiological risks, decisions should be based on the RBCA process, rather than relying on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public.

Miller, M. L.; Hylko, J. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Design, fabrication, and characterization of a low-cost flexural bearing based 3D printing tool head  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the design, characterization and optimization of a low-cost additive rapid-prototyping tool head for a technology known as Fused Filament Fabrication for use in an educational curriculum. Building a ...

Ramirez, Aaron Eduardo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Service Provider Competition: Delay Cost Structure, Segmentation, and Cost Advantage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model competition between two providers who serve delay-sensitive customers. We compare a generalized delay cost structure, where a customer's delay cost depends on her service valuation, with the traditional additive delay cost structure, where the ... Keywords: delay cost structure, service competition, value-based market segmentation

Maxim Afanasyev; Haim Mendelson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate: May 24, 2006 -- July 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Global Solar Energy rapidly advances the cost and performance of commercial thin-film CIGS products using roll-to-roll processing on steel foil substrate in compact, low cost deposition equipment, with in-situ sensors for real-time intelligent process control. Substantial increases in power module efficiency, which now exceed 13%, are evident at GSE factories in two countries with a combined capacity greater than 75 MW. During 2009 the average efficiency of cell strings (3780 cm2) was increased from 7% to over 11%, with champion results exceeding 13% Continued testing of module reliability in rigid product has reaffirmed extended life expectancy for standard glass product, and has qualified additional lower-cost methods and materials. Expected lifetime for PV in flexible packages continues to increase as failure mechanisms are elucidated, and resolved by better methods and materials. Cost reduction has been achieved through better materials utilization, enhanced vendor and material qualification and selection. The largest cost gains have come as a result of higher cell conversion efficiency and yields, higher processing rates, greater automation and improved control in all process steps. These improvements are integral to this thin film PV partnership program, and all realized with the 'Gen2' manufacturing plants, processes and equipment.

Wiedeman, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cost and Area Comparison Per Student of the Public Elementary Schools in Texas based on the Project Delivery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown that there exists a correlation between the cost of construction of elementary schools and the project delivery systems. Previous research showed that Competitive Sealed proposal contract method of construction is $4000 cheaper than the Construction Manager at Risk method of construction per student for elementary school construction in Texas. This research investigates the elements causing construction cost variation in elementary schools of Texas by comparing and contrasting the two forms of contract documents, CSP and CMR. Two schools were selected for the study, although the schools are technically in different regions of Texas, the geological record suggests that there is not much difference in the techniques used for foundation construction and hence a reasonable comparison is possible. A comparison was completed of the contract documents for two elementary schools. School A was built using CSP and School B using CMR. The two schools were built for about $13000 per student in line with A. N. Reinisch’s findings for CSP contracts in Texas, but not CMR average costs. The two ISD’s who supplied the documents were clearly concerned at cost control and appear to have managed this process. The earlier findings of a cost difference between CSP and CMR are not overturned by this study. Future studies involving a greater number of schools and the development of a central database are recommended.

Goyal Rakesh, Sheetal

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

91

Do-It-yourself eye tracker: low-cost pupil-based eye tracker for computer graphics applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eye tracking technologies offer sophisticated methods for capturing humans' gaze direction but their popularity in multimedia and computer graphics systems is still low. One of the main reasons for this are the high cost of commercial eye trackers that ... Keywords: computer graphics, eye tracker accuracy, eye tracking, human computer interfaces

Rados?aw Mantiuk; Micha? Kowalik; Adam Nowosielski; Bartosz Bazyluk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

SVM-Based Multiclass Cost-sensitive Classification with Reject Option for Fault Diagnosis of Steam Turbine Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam turbine generator faults not only damage the generator itself, but also cause outages and loss of profits, for this reason, many researchers work on the fault diagnosis. But misdiagnosing may also lead to serious losses. In order to improve ... Keywords: SVM, multiclass, cost-sensitive, fault diagnosis, reject option

Chao Zou; En-hui Zheng; Hong-wei Xu; Le Chen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Table 1. Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" ,"Plant Characteristics",,,"Plant Costs (2012$)" ,"Nominal Capacity (MW)","Heat Rate (Btu/kWh)",,"Overnight Capital Cost ($/kW)","Fixed O&M Cost ($/kW-yr)","Variable O&M Cost ($/MWh)" ,,,,,,,"NEMS Input" " Coal" "Single Unit Advanced PC",650,8800,,3246,37.8,4.47,"N" "Dual Unit Advanced PC",1300,8800,,2934,31.18,4.47,"Y" "Single Unit Advanced PC with CCS",650,12000,,5227,80.53,9.51,"Y" "Dual Unit Advanced PC with CCS",1300,12000,,4724,66.43,9.51,"N" "Single Unit IGCC ",600,8700,,4400,62.25,7.22,"N"

94

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Compressed Air Energy Storage: Proven US CAES Plant Cost Achievements and Potential Engineering, Design & Project Management Based C ost Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a market ready technology that can play a valuable role in enhancing grid flexibility for variable generation integration. Relative to combustion turbines, CAES provides additional benefits and value streams, such as potential classification as a transmission asset, lower emissions, superior regulation service, reduction of wind spillage and in other ways improving wind plant economics. Although high cost estimates for CAES circulate in the industry, the first ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

100

OPPORTUNITY COST OF LAND AND URBAN GROWTH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impact of the opportunity cost of urban land on urban growth. Based on prices, costs and productivity data on agricultural commodities… (more)

Jiang, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters of moving substrate, while ensuring uniform properties; enhance health and safety by reducing selenium waste generation through modifications to the reactor and Se delivery method. - Back Contact Deposition - Reduce back-contact cost and increase operation yield by using improved back-contact materials.

Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S. (Global Solar Energy, L.L.C.)

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

So how much will it cost to build a nuke?  

SciTech Connect

Trying to get a better understanding of the different estimates of the cost of nuclear power, Prof. Francois Leveque of Mines ParisTech and Marcelo Saguan of Microeconomix examined seven studies published since 2000. They examined levelized cost, which captures the cost of electricity generation from nuclear reactors over the entire life cycle, including initial investment costs, operations and maintenance costs, cost of fuel, cost of capital, and decommissioning. The results, in 2007 euro/MWh, vary from 18 to 80. Making matters worse, more recent studies show an upward trend: the average value for studies published in 2003--05 is about 43 euro/MWh, while those published in 2007--09 average 63 euro2007/MWh. One reason for the different results is different assumptions about the main cost drivers and how they may vary over time. With the advent of third-generation nuclear reactors, numbers in the range of $1,000/kW (approx. 750 euro/kW) were being tossed around, suggesting a $1 billion investment for a 1,000 MW plant. A 2003 MIT study assumed an overnight cost of 1,750 euro/kW, with later studies raising the numbers to 3,000 euro/kW (approx. US$ 4,500). In 2008, Progress Energy Florida put the price tag for 2 new reactors it is planning to build on the Gulf Coast of Florida at $14 billion with another $3 billion for transmission and related expenses. Likewise, Florida Power & Light figures it would cost $20 billion for 2 new reactors at its Turkey Point site in Florida. These higher cost estimates and significant uncertainties about the true costs pose serious challenges to the competitiveness of nuclear power.

NONE

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate: Annual Technical Report, 24 May 2006 - 25 September 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global Solar Energy has enhanced module reliability, reduced cost and improved performance of its CIGS deposition process, and reduced cost of materials and processes for contacts.

Weideman, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A New Energy Efficient Routing Algorithm Based on a New Cost Function in Wireless Ad hoc Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless ad hoc networks are power constrained since nodes operate with limited battery energy. Thus, energy consumption is crucial in the design of new ad hoc routing protocols. In order to maximize the lifetime of ad hoc networks, traffic should be sent via a route that can be avoid nodes with low energy. In addition, considering that the nodes of ad hoc networks are mobile, it is possible that a created path is broken because of nodes mobility and establishment of a new path would be done again. This is because of sending additional control packets, accordingly, energy consumption increases. Also, it should avoid nodes which have more buffered packets. Maybe, because of long queue, some of these packets are dropped and transmitted again. This is the reason for wasting of energy. In this paper we propose a new energy efficient algorithm, that uses a new cost function and avoid nodes with characteristics which mentioned above. We show that this algorithm improves the network energy consumption by using this ...

Lotfi, Mehdi; Shahmirzadi, Majid Asadi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Application note: A low-cost microcontroller-based system to monitor crop temperature and water status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype system was developed and constructed for automating the measurement and recording of canopy-, soil-, and air temperature, and soil moisture status in cropped fields. The system consists of a microcontroller-based circuit with solid-state ... Keywords: Air temperature, Datalogging, Infrared thermometer, Microcontrollers, Sensors, Soil moisture, Soil temperature

Daniel K. Fisher; Hirut Kebede

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of I-10 Pomona (07-181304) Long-Life Pavement Rehabilitation Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the expenditures for these projects, costs were divided intofurnished materials. Project Cost Breakdown Original BidIndirect Costs Figure 1. Project cost breakdown based on

Harvey, John T; Santero, Nicholas J; G, Mary Fermo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Comparing large scale CCS deployment potential in the USA and China: a detailed analysis based on country-specific CO2 transport & storage cost curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States and China are the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and their projected continued growth and reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal, make them strong candidates for CCS. Previous work has revealed that both nations have over 1600 large electric utility and other industrial point CO2 sources as well as very large CO2 storage resources on the order of 2,000 billion metric tons (Gt) of onshore storage capacity. In each case, the vast majority of this capacity is found in deep saline formations. In both the USA and China, candidate storage reservoirs are likely to be accessible by most sources with over 80% of these large industrial CO2 sources having a CO2 storage option within just 80 km. This suggests a strong potential for CCS deployment as a meaningful option to efforts to reduce CO2 emissions from these large, vibrant economies. However, while the USA and China possess many similarities with regards to the potential value that CCS might provide, including the range of costs at which CCS may be available to most large CO2 sources in each nation, there are a number of more subtle differences that may help us to understand the ways in which CCS deployment may differ between these two countries in order for the USA and China to work together - and in step with the rest of the world - to most efficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper details the first ever analysis of CCS deployment costs in these two countries based on methodologically comparable CO2 source and sink inventories, economic analysis, geospatial source-sink matching and cost curve modeling. This type of analysis provides a valuable insight into the degree to which early and sustained opportunities for climate change mitigation via commercial-scale CCS are available to the two countries, and could facilitate greater collaboration in areas where those opportunities overlap.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

113

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

06/21/13 2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey Certificate $ 11,574 **NOTE: Total flight costs are based on averages and are subject to change. Also, the ATC

Delene, David J.

115

Explicit and implicit copayments for phototherapy: examining the cost of commuting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table  1.    Patients’  cost  for  office-­?based  2.  Differences  in  cost  based  on  fuel  efficiency  Statistics.    2010  Cost  of  Owning  and  Operating  a  

Yentzer, Brad A; Gustafson, Cheryl J; Feldman, Steven R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Photovoltaic manufacturing cost and throughput improvements for thin-film CIGS-based modules: Phase 1 technical report, July 1998--July 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objectives of the Global Solar Energy (GSE) Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are directed toward reducing cost and expanding the production rate of thin-film CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS)-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. In Phase 1, GSE has successfully attacked many of the highest risk aspects of each task. All-laser, selective scribing processes for CIGS have been developed, and many end-of-contract goals for scribing speed have been exceeded in the first year. High-speed ink-jet deposition of insulating material in the scribes now appears to be a viable technique, again exceeding some end-of-contract goals in the first year. Absorber deposition of CIGS was reduced corresponding to throughput speeds of up to 24-in/min, also exceeding an end-of-contract goal. Alternate back-contact materials have been identified that show potential as candidates for replacement of higher-cost molybdenum, and a novel, real-time monitoring technique (parallel-detector spectroscopic ellipsometry) has shown remarkable sensitivity to relevant properties of the CIGS absorber layer for use as a diagnostic tool. Currently, one of the bilayers has been baselined by GSE for flexible CIGS on polymeric substrates. Resultant back-contacts meet sheet-resistance goals and exhibit much less intrinsic stress than Mo. CIGS has been deposited, and resultant devices are comparable in performance to pure Mo back-contacts. Debris in the chamber has been substantially reduced, allowing longer roll-length between system cleaning.

Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.G.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

119

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

120

Engineering Cost Analysis - Chapter 17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of these is that costs over the life of the project must be estimated based on some forecast, and forecasts have proven to be highly variable and frequently inaccurate. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

124

Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Several additional studies were conducted to explore the sensitivity of sedimentary geothermal system costs to key assumptions in the base case model. 1. Decreased Drilling Costs...

125

Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

distributor, and installer costs are used to calculate the costs of different water heater designs. Consumer operating expenses are calculated based on the modeled energy...

126

Cost analysis of multicast transport architectures in multiservice networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: backbone network topology, cost-based routing algorithms, data flow costs, link sharing, multicast architectures, multicast routing, multisource flow specification

K. Ravindran; Ting-Jian Gong

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

Measuring Cost Variability in Provision of Transit Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. , and S. R. Mundle. Peak-Base Cost Allocation Models. In29–33. Reilly, J. M. Transit Costs During Peak and Off-PeakHow to Allocate Bus Route Costs. Transit, Vol. 5, No. 2,

Taylor, Brian D.; Garrett, Mark; Iseki, Hiroyuki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.1 Fuel Cell System Cost Estimate We define the fuel cellto note that these cost estimates are based on a largeother studies on fuel cell cost estimates Baseline gasoline

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Measuring Cost Variability in Provision of Transit Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pro- vide separate cost estimates for two periods—the peakvehicle-hour unit-cost estimates for the peak and base= vehicle-hour unit-cost estimate for peak, U BVH = vehicle-

Taylor, Brian D.; Garrett, Mark; Iseki, Hiroyuki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Keywords: CO 2 capture Cost estimates Experience curveshand, reliance on cost estimates for current technology hassummarizes the nominal cost estimates for each system based

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid incremental cost estimates were developed based onsizing . Final incremental cost estimates ranged from $1,786Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

135

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

136

Middle East Production Costs - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Persian Gulf Oil Production Capacity and Development Cost Forecast (without additional development to replace production) Based on Low-Case Weighted Average

137

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

138

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

139

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

140

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices in the United States: Current Drivers and Cost-Reduction Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. However, system cost reductions are not necessarily realized or realized in a timely manner by many customers. Many reasons exist for the apparent disconnects between installation costs, component prices, and system prices; most notable is the impact of fair market value considerations on system prices. To guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, it is necessary to develop a granular perspective on the factors that underlie PV system prices and to eliminate subjective pricing parameters. This report's analysis of the overnight capital costs (cash purchase) paid for PV systems attempts to establish an objective methodology that most closely approximates the book value of PV system assets.

Goodrich, A.; James, T.; Woodhouse, M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of crude oil and the cost of the products is notare related to the amount and cost of oil imported from theDivision, The External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Italian Association of Energy EconomistsYardstick Regulation of Electricity Distribution Utilities Based on the Estimation of an Average Cost Function *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we estimate an average-cost function for a panel of 45 Swiss electricity distribution utilities as a basis for yardstick regulation of the distribution-network access prices. Unlike the existing literature, we separate the electricity sales function of utilities from the network operation function. Several exogenous variables measuring the heterogeneity of the service areas were included in the model specification in order to allow the regulator to set differentiated benchmark prices incorporating this heterogeneity. We can identify different exogenous service area characteristics that affect average cost. These are the load factor, the customer density and the output density of different consumer groups. Moreover, the estimation results indicate the existence of significant economies of scale; i.e. most of the Swiss utilities in our sample are too small to reach minimum efficient scale. However, to give the small utilities incentives to merge the size of the utilities must not be included in the yardstick calculation. 1.

Massimo Filippini; Jörg Wild; Massimo Filippini; Jörg Wild

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Decommissioning Experiences and Lessons Learned: Decommissioning Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the United States (US) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued revised decommissioning regulations that provided a dose-based site release limit and detailed supporting regulatory guidance. This report summarizes the decommissioning cost experiences at US nuclear plants, including information about radwaste volumes and the cost of radwaste disposal based on the current regulatory situation in the US.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

151

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

154

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

155

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

156

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

157

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

158

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

160

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Dataset Summary Description The calculator provides information on the assumptions behind foodborne illness cost estimates and gives you a chance to make your own assumptions and calculate your own cost estimates. This interactive web-based tool allows users to estimate the cost of illness due to specific foodborne pathogens. The updated ERS cost estimate for Shiga-toxin producing E. coli O157 (STEC O157) was added to the Calculator in spring, 2008. Calculator users can now review and change the assumptions behind the ERS cost estimates for either STEC O157 or Salmonella. The assumptions that can be modified include the annual number of cases, the distribution of cases by severity, the use or costs of medical care, the amount or value of time lost from work, the costs of premature death, and the disutility costs for nonfatal cases. Users can also update the cost estimate for inflation for any year from 1997 to 2007.

162

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

165

Environmental externalities: Applying the concept to Asian coal-based power generation. [Includes external environmental and societal costs and methods of evaluating them  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the concept of environmental externality. It discusses various factors -- the atmospheric transformations, relationship of point-source emissions to ambient air quality, dose-response relationships, applicable cause-and-effect principles, and risk and valuation research -- that are considered by a number of state utilities when they apply the environmental externality concept to energy resource planning. It describes a methodology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for general use in resource planning, in combination with traditional methods that consider the cost of electricity production. Finally, it shows how the methodology can be applied in Indonesia, Thailand, and Taiwan to potential coal-fired power plant projects that will make use of clean coal technologies.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bytransportation infrastructure and services, then we should set prices on the infrastructure and services equal to marginal social costs.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

GRADUATE STUDENT TUITION ON RESEARCH AWARDS Graduate Student salaries and tuition costs are allowable costs on sponsored projects and are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are allowable costs on sponsored projects and are often a required cost. Policy BACKGROUND In accordance to their research projects must include a line item in the direct cost budget proposal for tuition remission based and budgets for non-competing renewals that include salary costs for a Research Project Assistant must also

Krovi, Venkat

172

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

173

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Congress in its oversight of the federal government, including agencies ’ stewardship of public funds. To use public funds effectively, the government must meet the demands of today’s changing world by employing effective management practices and processes, including the measurement of government program performance. In addition, legislators, government officials, and the public want to know whether government programs are achieving their goals and what their costs are. To make those evaluations, reliable cost information is required and federal standards have been issued for the cost accounting that is needed to prepare that information. 1 We developed the Cost Guide in order to establish a consistent methodology that is based on best practices and that can be used across the federal government for developing, managing, and evaluating capital program cost estimates. For the purposes of this guide, a cost estimate is the summation of individual cost elements, using established methods and valid data, to estimate the future costs of a program, based on what is known today. 2 The management of a cost estimate involves continually updating the estimate with actual data as they become available, revising the estimate to reflect changes, and analyzing differences between estimated and actual costs—for example, using data from a reliable earned value management (EVM) system. 3 The ability to generate reliable cost estimates is a critical function, necessary to support the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) capital programming process. 4 Without this ability, agencies are at risk of experiencing cost overruns, missed deadlines, and performance shortfalls—all recurring problems that our program assessments too often reveal. Furthermore, cost increases often mean that the government

Best Practices For Developing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparing cost prediction models by resampling techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accurate software cost prediction is a research topic that has attracted much of the interest of the software engineering community during the latest decades. A large part of the research efforts involves the development of statistical models based ... Keywords: Accuracy measure, Bootstrap, Confidence interval, Permutation test, Software cost estimation

Nikolaos Mittas; Lefteris Angelis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Price of electricity tracks cost of living  

SciTech Connect

The retail price of electricity and the consumer price index are rising at about the same rate: 241.5 and 242.6, respectively, based on a 1967 index of 100. Increases in fossil fuel costs, wages, and the cost of borrowed funds have contributed to these changes. Details of the annual percentage changes are summarized in five tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy · Evolution of Texture in ...

183

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

184

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

185

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

187

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given company’s cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

189

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

190

Entanglement Cost of Nonlocal Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For certain joint measurements on a pair of spatially separated particles, we ask how much entanglement is needed to carry out the measurement exactly. For a class of orthogonal measurements on two qubits with partially entangled eigenstates, we present upper and lower bounds on the entanglement cost. The upper bound is based on a recent result by D. Berry [Phys. Rev. A 75, 032349 (2007)]. The lower bound, based on the entanglement production capacity of the measurement, implies that for almost all measurements in the class we consider, the entanglement required to perform the measurement is strictly greater than the average entanglement of its eigenstates. On the other hand, we show that for any complete measurement in d x d dimensions that is invariant under all local Pauli operations, the cost of the measurement is exactly equal to the average entanglement of the states associated with the outcomes.

Somshubhro Bandyopadhyay; Gilles Brassard; Shelby Kimmel; William K. Wootters

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Regional-Scale GIS-Based Modeling System for Evaluating the Potential Costs and Supplies of Biomass from Biomass Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A GIS-based modeling system was developed for analyzing the geographic variation in potential bioenergy feedstock supplies and optimal locations for siting bioenergy facilities. The modeling system is designed for analyzing individual US states but could readily be adapted to any geographic region.

Graham, R.L.; English, B.C.; Noon, C.E.; Liu, W.; Daly, M.J.; Jager, H.I.

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Developing a power-efficient and low-cost 3D NoC using smart GALS-based vertical channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shorter global interconnects enable 3D NoC structures to offer higher performance, improved packaging density, and lower interconnect power consumption to CMPs and SoCs compared to their 2D counterparts. However, substantial challenges such as high peak ... Keywords: 3D Networks-on-Chip, Bidirectional Bisynchronous Vertical Channels, Forecasting-based dynamic power management

Amir-Mohammad Rahmani; Pasi Liljeberg; Juha Plosila; Hannu Tenhunen

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders · Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and ...

194

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicleJP, et al. Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis,”Year 2006 UCD—ITS—RR—06—04 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Handbook for cost estimating. A method for developing estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides overall guidance to assist the NRC in preparing the types of cost estimates required by the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines and to assist in the assignment of priorities in resolving generic safety issues. The Handbook presents an overall cost model that allows the cost analyst to develop a chronological series of activities needed to implement a specific regulatory requirement throughout all applicable commercial LWR power plants and to identify the significant cost elements for each activity. References to available cost data are provided along with rules of thumb and cost factors to assist in evaluating each cost element. A suitable code-of-accounts data base is presented to assist in organizing and aggregating costs. Rudimentary cost analysis methods are described to allow the analyst to produce a constant-dollar, lifetime cost for the requirement. A step-by-step example cost estimate is included to demonstrate the overall use of the Handbook.

Ball, J.R.; Cohen, S.; Ziegler, E.Z.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CREST Cost of Renewable Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for Developing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; User Manual Version 4, August 2009 - March 2011 (Updated July...

198

Cost-sharing mechanisms for scheduling under general demand ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a general demand cost-sharing game, there is a set of customers who is ... Based on these bids and the cost of providing service, the service provider.

199

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

200

APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. (Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

205

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

206

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blincoe, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1994,M. Faigin, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1990,Q. Wang, and D. L. Greene, Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, The

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blincoe, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1994,M. Faigin, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1990,Q. Wang, and D. L. Greene, Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, The

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

213

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which needs to be 44% or better along with relatively high wind speeds. Along with low production costs, however, delivery and storage costs will also factor into the final cost...

214

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

215

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

216

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

217

Cost estimation and analysis for government contract pricing in china  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software cost estimation methods and their applications in government contract pricing have been developed and practiced for years. However, in China, the government contract process has been questioned in some aspects. It is largely based on analogy ... Keywords: cost analysis., cost estimation, government contract pricing

Mei He; Ye Yang; Qing Wang; Mingshu Li

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Wind Power Technology Status and Performance and Cost Estimates - 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the status and cost of wind power technology based on the Wind Power Technology Status and Performance and Cost Estimates – 2008 (EPRI report 1015806). It addresses the status of wind turbine and related technology for both onshore and offshore applications and the performance and cost of onshore wind power plants.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evidence of cost growth under cost-plus and fixed-price contracting  

SciTech Connect

As defined by the US Department of Energy (DOE), privatization refers to a shifting of responsibilities for the completion of projects from a cost-plus Management and Operations (M and O) contract, to incentive-based contracts with the private sector. DOE`s new vision is to arrange cleanup work around incentives-based contracts, which are won via competitive bidding. Competition in awarding cleanup contracts can make use of market incentives to lower project costs and reduce slippage time. Fixed-price contracts encourage contractors to minimize schedule delays and cost overruns once the scope of a project has been negotiated. Conversely, cost-plus contracting offers weak incentives for contractors to select cost-minimizing production and management approaches. Because privatization explicitly allocates more risk to the contractor, it forces the government to better define its goals and methods. This study summarizes actual cost experiences with government contracts performed under cost-plus and fixed-price incentive structures at all levels of government. The first section provides some background on the problem of making contractor activity more cost-efficient. Following this are sections on the measurement of performance and the costs of projects, limitations on measurement, and findings of similar studies. The study concludes with appendices discussing the details of the performance measurement methodology and the project data sets used in the study.

Scott, M.J.; Paananaen, O.H.; Redgate, T.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Jaksch, J.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved asin data used for cost estimates. At the other extreme,Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on surveys that

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the United States (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ever power-quality- cost estimate of $26 billion per yearcovers. Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on whatof uncertainty in the cost estimates that have been prepared

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that likely increased project costs (e.g. , brownfieldlevel based on underlying project costs. Conversely, someProgram database where project cost data were not available

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of innovation by forecasting technology evolution profiles based on patent analytics and analysis of R&D efforts around the major EGS (or analogous) cost components. - Explore...

226

A fresh look at cost estimation, process models and risk analysis”, EDSER-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable cost estimation is indispensable for industrial software development. A detailed analysis shows why the existing cost models are unreliable. Cost estimation should integrate software process modelling and risk analysis. A novel approach based on probability theory is proposed. A probabilistic cost model could provide a solid basis for cost-benefit analyses. 1

Frank Padberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Percent of 2010 Luminaire Cost LED Luminaire Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEDs promise to change the world, and few doubt that they will, but a key limiter to more rapid adoption is the cost of the LED themselves. The cost breakdown of LED luminaires vary, but it is safe to put the cost of the LED at around 25% to 40 % of the total luminaire cost. It is projected to remain a significant cost of the total luminaire for many years.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Costs to build Fermilab in 1984 dollars  

SciTech Connect

It is of current interest to examine the costs incurred to date to build Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and to determine what those costs are when stated in FY 1984 constant dollars. The appended tables are in support of this exercise and are based on all costs for Equipment items (reduced by obsolescence) and all Plant Projects which have been appropriated through FY 1984. Also included are non-plant costs which are required to complete the Energy Saver, Tevatron I and II projects (i.e., Equipment and R and D in support of Construction). This study makes the assumption that all funding through FY 1984 will have been costed by the end of FY 1986. Those costs incurred in FY 1985 and FY 1986 have been deflated to FY 1984 dollars. See Appendix A for the DOE inflation factors used in the conversion to FY 1984 dollars. The costs are identified in three categories. The Accelerator Facilities include all accelerator components, the buildings which enclose them and utilities which support them. The Experimental Facilities include all beam lines, enclosures, utilities and experimental equipment which are usable in current experimental programs. The Support Facilities include lab and office space, shops, assembly facilities, roads, grounds and the utilities which do not specifically support the Accelerator or Experimental Facilities, etc.

Jordan, N.G.; Livdahl, P.V.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July (1996). Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of theaddition, some motor-vehicle manufacturers have been finedEPA charges motor-vehicle manufacturers to cover the cost of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin goals.

Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

costs | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Varnish cache server costs Dataset Summary Description This dataset represents a historical repository of all the numerical data from the smartgrid.gov website condensed into spreadsheets to enable analysis of the data. Below are a couple of things worth noting: Source Smartgrid.gov Date Released March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Date Updated March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Keywords AMI costs distribution smart grid transmission Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 4Q12 (xlsx, 112.1 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 3Q12 (xlsx, 107.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 2Q12 (xlsx, 111.9 KiB)

238

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cost Study Manual | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual Update 62912. Memo regarding Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, Newsletter-June 1999 Build...

240

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

UNDP-Energy Costing Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-Energy Costing Tool UNDP-Energy Costing Tool (Redirected from UNDP Energy Costing Tool) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNDP Energy Costing Tool Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme Sector: Energy Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.undp.org/energy/mdg-serv.htm Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-costing-tool Language: English References: UNDP MDG Support Services [1] The Energy Costing Tool is an Excel-based model designed to help countries estimate the costs of increasing access to energy services to support the achievement of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MGD). More information is available on the

243

Filter system cost comparison for IGCC and PFBC power systems  

SciTech Connect

A cost comparison was conducted between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse advanced particulate filter concept, which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second-generation 453 MWe (net) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process-related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost, and the effect on the cost of electricity (COE) for the two filter systems.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M.; Buchanan, T. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACF = B + AF (short-run cost) ACF 91 (1.0) ACF 0 ACF ²ACM ²ACM ACF = AF k (long-run cost) B ²AM AF ²AM AF 0 AF 91 (1.0)is simply: DRAFT FOR REVIEW ACF = AF k ACF ? AF ? where: ACF

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACF = B + AF (short-run cost) ACF 91 (1.0) ACF 0 ACF ²ACM ²ACM ACF = AF k (long-run cost) B ²AM AF ²AM AF 0 AF 91 (1.0)is simply: DRAFT FOR REVIEW ACF = AF k ACF ? AF ? where: ACF

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The cost of geothermal energy in the western US region:a portfolio-based approach a mean-variance portfolio optimization of the regions' generating mix to 2013.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy planning represents an investment-decision problem. Investors commonly evaluate such problems using portfolio theory to manage risk and maximize portfolio performance under a variety of unpredictable economic outcomes. Energy planners need to similarly abandon their reliance on traditional, ''least-cost'' stand-alone technology cost estimates and instead evaluate conventional and renewable energy sources on the basis of their portfolio cost--their cost contribution relative to their risk contribution to a mix of generating assets. This report describes essential portfolio-theory ideas and discusses their application in the Western US region. The memo illustrates how electricity-generating mixes can benefit from additional shares of geothermal and other renewables. Compared to fossil-dominated mixes, efficient portfolios reduce generating cost while including greater renewables shares in the mix. This enhances energy security. Though counter-intuitive, the idea that adding more costly geothermal can actually reduce portfolio-generating cost is consistent with basic finance theory. An important implication is that in dynamic and uncertain environments, the relative value of generating technologies must be determined not by evaluating alternative resources, but by evaluating alternative resource portfolios. The optimal results for the Western US Region indicate that compared to the EIA target mixes, there exist generating mixes with larger geothermal shares at equal-or-lower expected cost and risk.

Beurskens, Luuk (ECN-Energy Research Centre of the Netherland); Jansen, Jaap C. (ECN-Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands); Awerbuch, Shimon Ph.D. (.University of Sussex, Brighton, UK); Drennen, Thomas E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation using cost curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environmental control costs for oil shale processes  

SciTech Connect

The studies reported herein are intended to provide more certainty regarding estimates of the costs of controlling environmental residuals from oil shale technologies being readied for commercial application. The need for this study was evident from earlier work conducted by the Office of Environment for the Department of Energy Oil Shale Commercialization Planning, Environmental Readiness Assessment in mid-1978. At that time there was little reliable information on the costs for controlling residuals and for safe handling of wastes from oil shale processes. The uncertainties in estimating costs of complying with yet-to-be-defined environmental standards and regulations for oil shale facilities are a critical element that will affect the decision on proceeding with shale oil production. Until the regulatory requirements are fully clarified and processes and controls are investigated and tested in units of larger size, it will not be possible to provide definitive answers to the cost question. Thus, the objective of this work was to establish ranges of possible control costs per barrel of shale oil produced, reflecting various regulatory, technical, and financing assumptions. Two separate reports make up the bulk of this document. One report, prepared by the Denver Research Institute, is a relatively rigorous engineering treatment of the subject, based on regulatory assumptions and technical judgements as to best available control technologies and practices. The other report examines the incremental cost effect of more conservative technical and financing alternatives. An overview section is included that synthesizes the products of the separate studies and addresses two variations to the assumptions.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cost effective multimedia courseware development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia technology offers considerable potential for education though the costs of production of courseware are prohibitive especially in a rapidly changing discipline such as computer science. This paper proposes a cost-effective technique which ...

C. J. Pilgrim; Y. K. Leung; D. D. Grant

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Overview and Low Cost Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... The major reason that there is not more widespread use of titanium and its alloys is the high cost. Developments in reducing the cost of titanium ...

253

Cost and Impacts of Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Policies RESULTS 2010-2025 and long-run impacts 2010-2025 GovernmentIndustry Costs Hydrogen production, infrastructure & cost HyTrans merges the early transition...

254

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Low-cost nanosecond electronic coincidence detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple and low-cost implementation of a fast electronic coincidence detector based on PECL logic with a TTL-compatible interface. The detector has negligible dead time and the coincidence window is adjustable with a minimum width of 1 ns. Coincidence measurements of two independent sources of Bose-Einstein distributed photocounts are presented using different coincidence window widths.

Kim, T; Gorelik, P V; Wong, F N C; Kim, Taehyun; Fiorentino, Marco; Gorelik, Pavel V.; Wong, Franco N. C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cost of Offshore Wind Energy Charlene Nalubega  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Offshore Wind Energy water as well as on land based wind farms. The specific offshore wind energy case under consideration kilowatt Hour will be determined. Wind Energy has been around for a very long time. It started as out

Mountziaris, T. J.

258

3800 Green Series Cost Elements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stoller - Legacy ManagementSustainable Acquisition (formerly EPP) Program 3800 Series Cost Elements01/30/2012 (Rev. 4)

259

Empirical Methods of Cost Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

260

Bifacial Efficiency at Monofacial Cost  

solar cells; photovoltaics; PV; bifacial efficiency; Monofacial Cost, Bifacial Cells; bifacial Modules; industry growth forum; gamma solar Created ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS 1 California Institute of Technology Issuing Authority: Office is that portion of the total cost of an externally funded project that is not funded by the sponsor. Depending as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Tai, Yu-Chong

262

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on U.S. dependence on foreign oil: “…protecting againston U.S. dependence on foreign oil, that the cost of the 1991U.S. dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce military

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development of a right-of-way cost estimation and cost estimate management process framework for highway projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escalation of right-of-way (ROW) costs have been shown to be a prime contributor to project cost escalation in the highway industry. Two problems contribute to ROW cost escalation: 1) the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process generally lacks structure and definition as compared to other areas of cost estimation; and 2) there is a lack of integration and communication between those responsible for ROW cost estimating and those responsible for general project cost estimating. The research for this thesis was preceded by a literature review to establish the basis for the study. Data collection was completed through interviews of seven state highway agencies (SHAs) and two local public agencies (LPAs). The findings of the research are presented in a set of ROW flowcharts which document the steps, inputs, and outputs of the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process. Three ROW cost estimates and a cost management process take place throughout project development. An effort was made from the onset of the research to relate the ROW cost estimating and cost estimate management process to the first four project development phases (planning, programming. preliminary design, and final design). There are five flowcharts produced as a result of this research: 1) an agency-level flowchart showing all cost estimates and the interaction of ROW with the project development process; 2) a conceptual ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during planning; 3) a baseline ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during programming; 4) an update ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during preliminary design to include a cost estimate management loop; and 5) a ROW cost management flowchart which depicts the required steps during final design. Although selected SHA contacts provided input following the development of the flowcharts, the flowcharts were only validated to a limited extent due to time and budget constraints. These flowcharts attempt to address the two contributing problems to ROW cost escalation by providing structure to the ROW cost estimation process and by developing the ROW process flowcharts linked to the project development process. Based on the input provided by SHA contacts, the flowcharts appear to have the potential to provide guidance to SHAs in improving the accuracy of ROW cost estimates through addressing these two problems.

Lucas, Matthew Allen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

UNDP-Energy Costing Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-Energy Costing Tool UNDP-Energy Costing Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNDP Energy Costing Tool Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme Sector: Energy Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.undp.org/energy/mdg-serv.htm Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-costing-tool Language: English References: UNDP MDG Support Services [1] The Energy Costing Tool is an Excel-based model designed to help countries estimate the costs of increasing access to energy services to support the achievement of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MGD). More information is available on the Energy

265

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coke gasification costs, economics, and commercial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of petroleum coke remains a problem for modern high conversion refineries. Market uncertainty and the price for coke can prevent the implementation of otherwise attractive projects. The commercially proven Texaco Gasification Process remains an excellent option for clean, cost effective coke disposition as demonstrated by the new coke gasification units coming on-line and under design. Previous papers, have discussed the coke market and general economics of coke gasification. This paper updates the current market situation and economics, and provide more details on cost and performance based on recent studies for commercial plants.

Jahnke, F.C.; Falsetti, J.S.; Wilson, R.F. [Texaco, Inc., White Plains, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

17.2 - Cost Participation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17.2 (June 2004) 17.2 (June 2004) 1 Cost Participation [Reference: FAR 35.003(b), DEAR 917.70] Overview This section discusses DOE treatment of cost participation by organizations performing research, development, and demonstration projects under DOE prime contracts. This section does not cover efforts and projects performed for DOE by other Federal agencies. Background Cost participation is a generic term denoting any situation where the Government does not fully reimburse the contractor for all allowable costs necessary to accomplish the project or effort under the contract. The term includes, but is not limited to: * Cost Sharing * Cost Matching * Cost Limitation, which may be direct or indirect * Participation in-kind

270

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Computerized Energy and Treatment Cost Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computer program has been developed that quickly calculates blowdown heat loss as a function of makeup water, boiler water chemistry, and blowdown recovery equipment. By inputting water analysis, basic system parameters, and type of fuel, the cost of heat loss in the blowdown can be quickly and accurately determined. Present operating systems can quickly be evaluated as to potential cost savings on the addition of a blowdown flash tank and/or a recovery heat exchanger. Proposed systems can be engineered from the start with an eye to decreasing energy loss and saving money. In addition, the proper internal treatment is recommended along with appropriate products. Cost of energy lost in the blowdown is calculated based on different levels of blowdown heat recovery. Accurate calculations are readily available to make more intelligent decisions on the purchase of recovery equipment, rather than depending on very tedious, potentially inaccurate determinations by long hand.

Trace, W. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used in industry. However, smaller previously unfeasible applications can now be cost effective due to the packaged system approach which has become available in recent years. The availability of this equipment in a packaged system form makes it feasible to replace pressure reducing valves with turbine generator sets in applications with flows as low as 4000 pounds of steam per hour. These systems produce electricity for $0.01 to $.02 per kWh (based on current costs of gas and oil); system cost is between $200 and $800 per kW of capacity. Simple system paybacks between one and three years are common.

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Rapid parallel systems deployment: techniques for overnight clustering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated system deployment frameworks and configuration management systems have been in wide use for a number of years. However, due to increasing pressures to maintain high availability, coupled with the price effects of commodity servers, administrators ...

Donna Cumberland; Randy Herban; Rick Irvine; Michael Shuey; Mathieu Luisier

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Today in Energy - High airline jet fuel costs prompt cost ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... and idling time. ... Delta stated that it anticipates cost savings of $300 million per year as a result of this ...

280

On demand responsiveness in additive cost sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We propose two new axioms of demand responsiveness for additive cost sharing with variable demands. Group Monotonicity requires that if a group of agents increase their demands, not all of them pay less. Solidarity says that if agent i demands more, j should not pay more if k pays less. Both axioms are compatible in the partial responsibility theory postulating Strong Ranking, i.e., the ranking of cost shares should never contradict that of demands. The combination of Strong Ranking, Solidarity and Monotonicity characterizes the quasi-proportional methods, under which cost shares are proportional to ‘rescaled ’ demands. The alternative full responsibility theory is based on Separability, ruling out cross-subsidization when costs are additively separable. Neither the Aumann-Shapley nor the Shapley-Shubik method is group monotonic. On the other hand, convex combinations of “nearby ” …xed-path methods are group-monotonic: the subsidy-free serial method is the main example. No separable method meets Solidarity, yet restricting the axiom to submodular (or supermodular) cost functions leads to a characterization of the …xed-‡ow methods, containing the Shapley-Shubik and serial methods. JEL Classi…cation numbers: C 71, D 63.

Hervé Moulin; Yves Sprumont

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â��bottom-upâ� costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA�® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Agent-based and multi-agent simulations: coming of age or in search of an identity?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on a woman’s current time/energy cost for foraging andCost = Cost of Parenting + Cost of Foraging time/energy

Read, Dwight W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

An Explanation of F&A Costs What are F&A Costs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Explanation of F&A Costs What are F&A Costs? Costs involved in conducting sponsored projects costs and F&A costs together are the actual cost of a sponsored project. Direct costs are "those costs, indirect costs cannot be specifically attributed to an individual project. For example, it is difficult

285

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool to compare existing cost estimates from the literature,It compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from aE. Hydrogen supply: cost estimate for hydrogen pathways—

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Technical communique: Minkowski terminal cost functions for MPC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical communique delivers a systematic procedure for obtaining a suitable terminal cost function for model predictive control based on Minkowski cost functions. It is shown that, for any given stabilizing linear state feedback control law and ... Keywords: Lyapunov methods, Minkowski functions, Model predictive control

SašA V. Rakovi?; Mircea Lazar

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Consumers' Search Cost and Emerging Structure of Web Sites Coalitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the impact of the model's assumptions in terms of heterogeneity of the agents, rationality and search process it enters the market and this search cost decreases linearly with its age reaching the value of ci endConsumers' Search Cost and Emerging Structure of Web Sites Coalitions: a Multi-agent Based

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

289

COST SAVING THROUGH APPLICATION OF THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Bendix now makes four component parts for one precision mechanical assembly from investment castings rather than from wrought-stock machined and welded assemblies--a conversion based directly on the cost saving potential. With proper evaluation of metal components for casting suitability and usage, manufacturers may realize cost saving far beyond their expectations.

Cromwell, W. E.; Tiehen, G. L.; Paul, J. P.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use. by Anthony Radich. Introduction. The idea of using vegetable oil for fuel has been around as long as the diesel engine.

291

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Download Data | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a...

293

Preemptive scheduling with position costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizon is divided into time periods. In these models, the whole production is not processed in a single period, and production and holding costs are introduced ...

294

FIRM PRODUCTIVITY AND SUNK COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to explore whether or not sunk costs are systematically related to productivity di¤erences at the …rm level, as suggested by models of industry dynamics (Hopenhayn, 1992).The comparisons of productivity distributions for groups of …rms with di¤erent levels of sunk costs are performed by non-parametric procedures and for a large scale …rm-level panel data set of Spanish manufacturing …rms. We …nd that sunk costs are an important source of heterogeneity across …rm productivity. The evidence we …nd is consistent with models of industry dynamics predicting lower productivity for …rms with a higher level of sunk costs.

Jose C. Fariñas; Sonia Ruano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

296

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

297

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjørn Sødal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

GEOCITY: a computer model for systems analysis of geothermal district heating and cooling costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer-simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating/cooling using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating/cooling based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The basis for our geothermal-energy cost analysis is the unit cost of energy which will recover all the costs of production. The calculation of the unit cost of energy is based on life-cycle costing and discounted-cash-flow analysis. A wide variation can be expected in the range of potential geothermal district heating and cooling costs. The range of costs is determined by the characteristics of the resource, the characteristics of the demand, and the distance separating the resource and the demand. GEOCITY is a useful tool for estimating costs for each of the main parts of the production process and for determining the sensitivity of these costs to several significant parameters under a consistent set of assumptions.

Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Program for Optimizing SRF Linac Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every well-designed machine goes through the process of cost optimization several times during its design, production and operation. The initial optimizations are done during the early proposal stage of the project when none of the systems have been engineered. When a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac is implemented as part of the design, it is often a difficult decision as to the frequency and gradient that will be used. Frequently, such choices are made based on existing designs, which invariably necessitate moderate to substantial modifications so that they can be used in the new accelerator. Thus the fallacy of using existing designs is that they will frequently provide a higher cost machine or a machine with sub-optimal beam physics parameters. This paper describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK [1] several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project. The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs.

Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 11:06am Addthis For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type. When deciding what resource to use for developing energy- and cost-savings estimates, a program should consider items detailed in Table 1. Table 1.Resources for Estimating Energy Savings Resource Items to consider Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Based on representative building models of commercial buildings. Guidance available for a limited number of building types using the most common technologies.

303

Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: financere.nrel.gov/finance/content/CREST-model OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool, CREST Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-renewable-energy-spreadsheet-too Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs Assess projects, design cost-based incentives (e.g., feed-in tariffs), and evaluate impacts of tax incentives and other support structures using this economic cash flow model.

304

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity With the two ongoing studies, one for the physics program, [1] and one for the accelerator and facilities [2] on the "Neutrino Factory Based on a Muon Storage Ring", a number of interesting suggestions and ideas came up. Almost immediately the question of scaling cost with the storage ring energy and with intensity came up. Nevertheless, it was impossible to explore all those questions in great detail, either in the report or in the preliminary cost estimate that is presented in Appendix A. During the study it became more and more clear, that one of the unique features of a neutrino source, namely the possibility to balance the cost of the accelerator with the cost of the detector, would urge the accelerator people to find an answer to this

305

The Influence of Availability Costs on Optimal Heat Exchanger Size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing heat exchangers based on second law rather than first law considerations ensures that the most efficient use of available energy is being made. Techniques for second-law optimizing heat exchangers have been developed recently that are straightforward and simple. The main difficulty lies in determining the proper cost of irrreversibility that is to be used in the optimization process. This paper demonstrates how this issue can be handled by including the irreversibility cost in a dimensionless parameter that represents the ratio of annual ownership costs to annual operating costs that include irreversibility costs. In this way, each heat exchanger designer can estimate the costs of irreversibilities for his particular system, and use the generalized method for determining the optimal heat exchanger size.

Witte, L. C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluation of Uncertainties in Cost Estimations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines uncertainty in several cost estimation methods for large infrastructure projects. In particular the impact and consequences of different unexpected events that have occurred during the construction of various tunnels and aqueducts will be treated. Combined with the cost estimation development, several hypotheses concerning uncertainty prediction and correlation will be verified. First, the basis for researching this topic is described and the methods of estimation and uncertainty prediction are presented. Based upon the results of an extensive investigation into the occurrence of unexpected events, several hypotheses concerning unexpected events and correlations are verified. Other related topics that have been researched are also briefly mentioned. Finally the findings are contemplated in a larger context based upon which the conclusions are presented

Meint Boschloo; Meint Boschloo; Pieter Van Gelder; Han Vrijling; Han Vrijling

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials provided here assume discount rates and energy price projections (TXT 17 KB) determined annually by FEMP and the Energy Information Administration. Building Life Cycle Cost Software FEMP's Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) software can help you calculate life cycle costs, net savings, savings-to-investment ratio, internal rate of return, and payback period for Federal energy and water conservation projects funded by agencies or alternatively financed. BLCC also estimates emissions and emission reductions. An energy escalation rate calculator (EERC) computes an average escalation rate for energy savings performance contracts when payments are based on energy cost savings.

308

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Cost prediction for ray shooting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ray shooting problem arises in many different contexts. For example, solving it efficiently would remove a bottleneck when images are ray-traced in computer graphics. Unfortunately, theoretical solutions to the problem are not very practical, ... Keywords: average performance, cost model, cost prediction, octree, ray shooting, space decomposition

Boris Aronov; Hervé Brönnimann; Allen Y. Chang; Yi-Jen Chiang

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Audit Costs for the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct program costs for detailed audits of 13.5 million square feet of institutional building space in the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program were $0.047/SF. The building area was 63 percent simple (offices, schools, and universities) and 37 percent complex (medical buildings and power plants). Allowing for the influence of one large facility which received less-extensive treatment due to previous work, thorough audits were obtained for an average cost of $0.050/SF. Large medical buildings (greater than about 170,000 square feet) were audited for $0.050/SF or less, and program costs for survey audits of 17.2 million square feet were $0.0028/SF. The effect on audit costs of complexity of recommended modifications, amount of savings determined, amount of implementation costs, building size, and building complexity are discussed. Primary effects on audit costs are size and complexity of buildings. Program guidelines limited consideration of projects with greater than a four year payback.

Heffington, W. M.; Lum, S. K.; Bauer, V. A.; Turner, W. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ARCHITECT AND ENGINEERING COSTS AT LOS ALAMOS AND SANDIA NATIONAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

operations offices to manage to a standard architect and engineering (A-E) cost as a percentage of construction. Based on this initiative, the objective of our audit was to...

313

Bringing Energy Efficiency and Cost of Ownership to Online Shopping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

no easy way to calculate how much it will cost to operate a product based on one's local electricity rate (there are over 3,000 different US utilities) and personalized usage...

314

International Emission Trading and the Cost of Greenhouse Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the knowledge base concerning CC&S technologies. References Adams, D.M., R.J. Alig, B.A. McCarl, J.M. Callaway, and S.M. Winnett, (1999). "Minimum Cost Strategies for...

315

Low-cost electromagnetic tagging : design and implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several implementations of chipless RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tags are presented and discussed as low-cost alternatives to chip-based RFID tags and sensors. An overview of present-day near-field electromagnetic ...

Fletcher, Richard R. (Richard Ribon)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

5-Megawatt solar-thermal test facility: facility construction-cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The appropriation analysis, cash flow analysis, monthly cash flow analysis and construction cost estimate are tabulated for the 1 MW And 5 MW test facilities based upon limited initial appropriations, including work sheets for the construction cost estimates. (LEW)

1975-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measuring cycling kinematics using a low-cost, flashing LED, multi-camera approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis a low cost motion capture approach is presented and applied to measure cyclists' kinematics. The motion capture system consists of low cost hardware and custom developed software. Based on still-frame, ...

Gilbertson, Matthew (Matthew W.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Technology commercialization cost model and component case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells seem poised to emerge as a clean, efficient, and cost competitive source of fossil fuel based electric power and thermal energy. Sponsors of fuel cell technology development need to determine the validity and the attractiveness of a technology to the market in terms of meeting requirements and providing value which exceeds the total cost of ownership. Sponsors of fuel cell development have addressed this issue by requiring the developers to prepare projections of the future production cost of their fuel cells in commercial quantities. These projected costs, together with performance and life projections, provide a preliminary measure of the total value and cost of the product to the customer. Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. and Michael A. Cobb & Company have been retained in several assignments over the years to audit these cost projections. The audits have gone well beyond a simple review of the numbers. They have probed the underlying technical and financial assumptions, the sources of data on material and equipment costs, and explored issues such as the realistic manufacturing yields which can be expected in various processes. Based on the experience gained from these audits, the DOE gave Booz-Allen and Michael A. Cobb & company the task to develop a criteria to be used in the execution of future fuel cell manufacturing cost studies. It was thought that such a criteria would make it easier to execute such studies in the future as well as to cause such studies to be more understandable and comparable.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Technology commercialization cost model and component case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells seem poised to emerge as a clean, efficient, and cost competitive source of fossil fuel based electric power and thermal energy. Sponsors of fuel cell technology development need to determine the validity and the attractiveness of a technology to the market in terms of meeting requirements and providing value which exceeds the total cost of ownership. Sponsors of fuel cell development have addressed this issue by requiring the developers to prepare projections of the future production cost of their fuel cells in commercial quantities. These projected costs, together with performance and life projections, provide a preliminary measure of the total value and cost of the product to the customer. Booz-Allen Hamilton Inc. and Michael A. Cobb Company have been retained in several assignments over the years to audit these cost projections. The audits have gone well beyond a simple review of the numbers. They have probed the underlying technical and financial assumptions, the sources of data on material and equipment costs, and explored issues such as the realistic manufacturing yields which can be expected in various processes. Based on the experience gained from these audits, the DOE gave Booz-Allen and Michael A. Cobb company the task to develop a criteria to be used in the execution of future fuel cell manufacturing cost studies. It was thought that such a criteria would make it easier to execute such studies in the future as well as to cause such studies to be more understandable and comparable.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Preemptive scheduling with position costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imization of the sum of the position costs of all the jobs, which will be denoted by. ??fi in the ?-field of the ..... http://www-poleia.lip6.fr/~sourd/project/position. 5 ...

322

Cost | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

323

Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC HPWH(2) HPWH(3) HPWH Standard 0.62 EF WH unless high natural gas costs (>1.50therm), in which case recommendations consistent with new...

324

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 10004, Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record Program Record Record #: 10004 Date: September 16, 2010 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010 Update to: Record 9012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2010 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2010 technology and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $51/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2010, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2009 cost analyses of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2010 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. Both cost estimates are based on performance at beginning of life.

325

Where did the money go? The cost and performance of the largest commercial sector DSM program  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total resource cost (TRC) of energy savings for 40 of the largest 1992 commercial sector DSM programs. The calculation includes the participating customer`s cost contribution to energy saving measures and all utility costs, including incentives received by customers, program administrative and overhead costs, measurement and evaluation costs, and shareholder incentives paid to the utility. All savings are based on post-program savings evaluations. We find that, on a savings-weighted basis, the programs have saved energy at a cost of 3.2 {cents}/kWh. Taken as a whole, the programs have been highly cost effective when compared to the avoided costs faced by the utilities when the programs were developed. We investigate reasons for differences in program costs and examine uncertainties in current utility practices for reporting costs and evaluating savings.

Eto, J.; Kito, S.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Production Cost Optimization Project 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Production Cost Optimization project assists participating members in implementing or enhancing heat rate optimization programs to reduce production costs through sustainable performance improvements. This Technical Update summarizes the status of the project and presents results for five (5) sites that have completed initial and follow-up assessments. A PCO assessment consists of benchmarking plant thermal performance using historical plant data along with an on-site performance appraisal to id...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

Productization and Manufacturing Scaling of High-Efficiency Solar Cell and Module Products Based on a Disruptive Low-Cost, Mono-Crystalline Technology: Final Technical Progress Report, April 1, 2009 - December 30, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report for PV incubator subcontract with Solexel, Inc. The purpose of this project was to develop Solexel's Unique IP, productize it, and transfer it to manufacturing. Silicon constitutes a significant fraction of the total solar cell cost, resulting in an industry-wide drive to lower silicon usage. Solexel's disruptive Solar cell structure got around these challenges and promised superior light trapping, efficiency and mechanical strength, despite being significantly thinner than commercially available cells. Solexel's successful participation in this incubator project became evident as the company is now moving into commercial production and position itself to be competitive for the next Technology Pathway Partnerships (TPP) funding opportunity.

Fatemi, H.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

Epler, John

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Comparative Analysis of the Cost Models Used for Estimating Renovation Costs of Universities in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility managers use various cost models and techniques to estimate the cost of renovating a building and to secure the required funds needed for building renovation. A literature search indicates that these techniques offer both advantages and disadvantages that need to be studied and analyzed. Descriptive statistical methods and qualitative analysis are employed to identify and compare techniques used by facility managers to calculate the expected renovation costs of a building. The cost models presently used to predict the cost and accumulate the budget required for renovation of a building were determined through interviews with ten Texas-based university facilities managers. The data and information gathered were analyzed and compared. Analysis of results suggests that traditional methods like Floor Area Method (FAM) is the most accurate, less time consuming, easy to use as well as convenient for data collection. Case-Based Reasoning (CBR), though not as widely used as FAM, is known to facilities managers. This is due to the fact that, if a new type of project needs to be renovated, and the data for a similar project is not available with the facilities manager, a completely new database needs to be created. This issue can be resolved by creating a common forum where data for all types of project could be made available for the facilities managers. Methods such as regression analysis and neural networks are known to give more accurate results. However, of the ten interviewees, only one was aware of these new models but did not use them as they would be helpful for very large projects and they would need expertise. Thus such models should be simplified to not only give accurate results in less time but also be easy to use. These results may allow us to discuss changes needed within the various cost models.

Faquih, Yaquta Fakhruddin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is equal simply to the quantity of oil (bbls) in the SPR inSPR ($) QSPR Y = the quantity of oil in the SPR at the startoil in the SPR in base year (1991) (109 $) (base-year quantity

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is equal simply to the quantity of oil (bbls) in the SPR inSPR ($) QSPR Y = the quantity of oil in the SPR at the startoil in the SPR in base year (1991) (109 $) (base-year quantity

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Solar Decathlon House Construction Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety gear on the roof of a house. Above him is a large photovoltaic panel. safety gear on the roof of a house. Above him is a large photovoltaic panel. A member of Team Spain installs a portion of his house's roof during Solar Decathlon 2009. Solar Decathlon 2009 Solar Decathlon House Construction Costs The construction costs of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009 team houses varied widely based on the technologies employed and the target market for which they were designed. In general, however, construction costs ranged from about $200,000 to more than $800,000. But it is important to remember that these houses were one-of-a-kind designs that incorporated bleeding-edge technologies. If they were to be mass-produced, as most residential homes are, their overall costs would likely decrease significantly. Specific construction cost ranges for each house as well as information

334

Comparison of high-speed rail and maglev system costs  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares the two modes of transportation, and notes important similarities and differences in the technologies and in how they can be implemented to their best advantage. Problems with making fair comparisons of the costs and benefits are discussed and cost breakdowns based on data reported in the literature are presented and discussed in detail. Cost data from proposed and actual construction projects around the world are summarized and discussed. Results from the National Maglev Initiative and the recently-published Commercial Feasibility Study are included in the discussion. Finally, estimates will be given of the expected cost differences between HSR and maglev systems implemented under simple and complex terrain conditions. The extent to which the added benefits of maglev technology offset the added costs is examined.

Rote, D.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Research Administration committed cost sharing, and in-kind/matching requirements associated with sponsored projects. Definitions Cost Sharing A portion of total sponsored project costs not funded by the sponsor. Mandatory Cost

336

Sponsored Project Account Cost Transfer Explanation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsored Project Account Cost Transfer Explanation Check-Off List December 2011 The explanations checked below best describe the reasons for why the cost transfers are being made. Costs as to how to allocate the cost, temporarily assigned the cost to an existing account that acted

He, Chuan

337

FACILITY AND ADMINISTRATIVE (INDIRECT) COSTS September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2015. Definitions: Direct Costs: Costs that can be specifically identified with a particular project(s) Cost: A broad category of costs that are common to all research projects. "Facilities" is defined one F&A cost rate. If 50% or more of a project is performed off-campus (exclusive of any subcontract

Albertini, David

338

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

339

Cost objective PLM and CE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during the progression of the project of product development.

Nicolas Perry; Alain Bernard

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

FY 1996 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Cost savings are an integral part of Hanford site operations. Congressional actions towards establishing a balanced budget have resulted in reductions to funding for all federal agencies, including the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission. In September 1994 the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) approved the FY 1995 multi-year baseline that included a cost estimate of $1.9 billion for FY 1996. However, Congress only appropriated $1.3 billion for that year. The shortfall of $600 million resulted in a significant challenge to accomplish the required workscope. Therefore, RL initiated an aggressive cost savings program to eliminate the shortfall by deleting workscope that was unnecessary and performing the remaining workscope more efficiently. RL initiated baseline planning actions (including deletions, deferrals, transfers, and additions) during the FY 1996 multi-year baseline development process to match workscope and anticipated funding and identified $205 million of workscope deletions. CFR (Contract Finance and Review Division) then reviewed over 200 cost baseline change requests during FY 1996 and documented an additional $95 million of FY 1996 cost savings. This included $73 million of workscope deletions and $22 million of efficiencies. Total savings as a result of FY 1996 initiatives, including baseline planning actions and current year initiatives, were $300 million.

Andrews-Smith, K.L.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Detailed cost estimate of reference residential photovoltaic designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents estimated installation costs for four reference residential photovoltaic designs. Installation cost estimates ranged from $1.28 to $2.12/W/sub p/ for arrays installed by union labor (4.1 to 6.07 kW/sub p/-systems), and from $1.22 to $1.83 W/sub p/ for non-union installations. Standoff mounting was found to increase costs from $1.63/W/sub p/ to $2.12/W/sub p/ for a representative case, whereas 25 kWh of battery storage capacity increased installation costs from $1.44/W/sub p/ to $2.08/W/sub p/. Overall system costs (union-based were $6000 to $7000 for a 4.1 kW array in the northeast, to approx. $9000 for a 6.07 kW/sub p/ array in the southwest. This range of installation costs, approx. $1 to $2/W/sub p/ (in 1980 dollars), is representative of current installation costs for residential PV systems. Any future cost reductions are likely to be small and can be accomplished only by optimization of mounting techniques, module efficiencies, and module reliability in toto.

Palmer, R.S.; Penasa, D.A.; Thomas, M.G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent renewable energy policy used globally to date, and there are many benefits to the certainty offered in the marketplace to reduce development risks and associated financing costs and to grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control in renewable energy policy design. In recent years, policy mechanisms for containing FIT costs have become more refined, allowing policymakers to exert greater control on policy outcomes and on the resulting costs to ratepayers. As policymakers and regulators in the United States begin to explore the use of FITs, careful consideration must be given to the ways in which policy design can be used to balance the policies' advantages while bounding its costs. This report explores mechanisms that policymakers have implemented to limit FIT policy costs. If designed clearly and transparently, such mechanisms can align policymaker and market expectations for project deployment. Three different policy tools are evaluated: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report employs case studies to explore the strengths and weaknesses of these three cost containment tools. These tools are then evaluated with a set of criteria including predictability for policymakers and the marketplace and the potential for unintended consequences.

Kreycik, C.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Maintenance cost studies of present aircraft subsystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes two detailed studies of actual maintenance costs for present transport aircraft. The first part describes maintenance costs for jet transport aircraft broken down into subsystem costs according to an ...

Pearlman, Chaim Herman Shalom

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Benefit-cost in a Benevolent Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is a well-de?ned cost function C( y) for publicthe private values bene?t-cost test, but is potentiallythe private values bene?t-cost test, Lemma 4 implies y-

Bergstrom, Ted

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cost of Crime: A Review of the Research Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sed to conduct the research; a House Research Department August 1999 Cost of Crime: A Review of the Research Studies Page 2 summary of the study's main findings; and, where appropriate, additional comments on the research. Additionally, Appendix B (page 27) contains a bibliography of the research studies. Most "cost of crime" research studies focus on Part I (serious) crimes and use similar data bases. The majority of research studies assessing the cost of crime to victims and society limit their scope to crimes classified as serious Part I crimes by the FBI. These crimes include homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Additionally, a handful of studies focuses on the costs of particular crimes, such as driving while intoxicated or child abuse. These studies tend to be based on targeted, customized surveys and data collection efforts rather than on pre-existing, general crime data

Emily Shapiro

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

349

Analysis of costs-benefits tradeoffs of complex security systems  

SciTech Connect

Essential to a systems approach to design of security systems is an analysis of the cost effectiveness of alternative designs. While the concept of analysis of costs and benefits is straightforward, implementation can be at the least tedious and, for complex designs and alternatives, can become nearly intractable without the help of structured analysis tools. PACAIT--Performance and Cost Analysis Integrated Tools--is a prototype tool. The performance side of the analysis collates and reduces data from ASSESS, and existing DOE PC-based security systems performance analysis tool. The costs side of the analysis uses ACE, an existing DOD PC-based costs analysis tool. Costs are reported over the full life-cycle of the system, that is, the costs to procure, operate, maintain and retire the system and all of its components. Results are collected in Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel workbooks and are readily available to analysts and decision makers in both tabular and graphical formats and at both the system and path-element levels.

Hicks, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Security Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Pricing of automotive coiled spring steel...3 kg (20 tons) per car � Total $40.75 (a) 1989 prices...

352

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shown the effects of using oil costs as a measure of avoidedfcity or heat, an oil-based cost city probably overstatescombustion. The external costs of oil use differ coal and

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Entanglement cost in practical scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantify the one-shot entanglement cost of an arbitrary bipartite state, that is the minimum number of singlets needed by two distant parties to create a single copy of the state up to a finite accuracy, using local operations and classical communication only. This analysis, in contrast to the traditional one, pertains to scenarios of practical relevance, in which resources are finite and transformations can only be achieved approximately. Moreover, it unveils a fundamental relation between two well-known entanglement measures, namely, the Schmidt number and the entanglement of formation. Using this relation, we are able to recover the usual expression of the entanglement cost as a special case.

Francesco Buscemi; Nilanjana Datta

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

Disposal Cost Savings Considerations in Curie Reduction Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, the Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, announced a new fee structure for the disposal of radioactive wastes based on waste density, dose rate, and activity (curies). This report provides a detailed discussion of the current Barnwell Disposal Fee Structure along with its cost impact on various types of wastes generated. The report also evaluates various curie reduction options, their practical application, and their cost savings potential to help LLW ...

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Embolization of the Internal Iliac Artery: Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different ... cost -effectiveness of coils versus the Amplatzer Vascular. Plug (AVP) for occlusion ...

357

WEB RESOURCE: COST Action 531 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... This site offers progress reports, meeting information and other resources produced by the COST Action 531, a special initiative of COST, ...

358

Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration 30.1DOE'sOversightofCertainContractorDefinedPensionPlansandItsEffect...

359

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

360

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... We study the lot-sizing problem with piecewise concave production costs ... is to propose a minimum cost production plan to satisfy the demand ...

362

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal Project Summary Full Title: Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production...

363

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

364

Costs Drop for Photovoltaic Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2009 ... The cost reduction over time was largest for smaller PV systems, such as those used to power individual households. Also, installed costs show ...

365

Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

None

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

367

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses Title Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses...

368

Low Cost Nanomaterials for PV Devices  

Impact: Low-cost solution for solar energy (Expand to lighting, batteries, etc) Low-cost Nanomaterials for PV Devices . Title: Slide 1 Author: Donna ...

369

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bytransportation infrastructure and services, then we should set prices on the infrastructure and services equal to marginal social costs.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTING THE SUN SHINE ON SOLAR COSTS: AN EMPIRICALLetting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Regional differences for cost of crude oil to refiners widened in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The cost of crude oil to refiners varies across regions based on the different types of crude oil available to refiners and transportation bottlenecks in that region.

372

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other than distributed generation. The cost reductionsWind Solar Thermal Photovoltaic Distributed Generation-Base Distributed Generation-Peak D Vintage PLANT TYPE C

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Density Functional Theory Study of Copper Oxide as Low-cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density Functional Theory Study of Copper Oxide as Low-cost Photovoltaic Material · Dye-sensitized Solar Cells with Anodized Aluminum Alloy-based Counter- ...

374

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick- stemmed species. Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering- economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or truck.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Butler, J. [Butler (James), Tifton, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

378

Electricity resource planners credit only a fraction of potential ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A conventional natural gas combustion turbine of the required size might require approximately $195 million in overnight capital costs ...

379

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed optimized designs and cost estimates for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC coproduction projects that produced hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and hydrocarbon liquid fuel precursors in addition to power. The as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project was the starting point for this study that was performed by Bechtel, Global Energy and Nexant under Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-99FT40342. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This non-optimized plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW.1 This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal- and coke-fueled IGCC power plants. A side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, shows their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a four-train coal-fueled IGCC power plant, also based on the Subtask 1.3 cases. This plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency to power of 44.5% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,116 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to co-produce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. Subtask 2.1 developed a petroleum coke IGCC power plant with the coproduction of liquid fuel precursors from the Subtask 1.3 Next Plant by eliminating the export steam and hydrogen production and replacing it with a Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis facility that produced 4,125 bpd of liquid fuel precursors. By maximizing liquids production at the expense of power generation, Subtask 2.2 developed an optimized design that produces 10,450 bpd of liquid fuel precursors and 617 MW of export power from 5,417 tpd of dry petroleum coke. With 27 $/MW-hr power and 30 $/bbl liquids, the Subtask 2.2 plant can have a return on investment of 18%. Subtask 2.3 converted the Subtask 1.6 four-train coal fueled IGCC power plant

Sheldon Kramer

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed optimized designs and cost estimates for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC coproduction projects that produced hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and hydrocarbon liquid fuel precursors in addition to power. The as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project was the starting point for this study that was performed by Bechtel, Global Energy and Nexant under Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-99FT40342. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This non-optimized plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW.1 This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal- and coke-fueled IGCC power plants. A side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, shows their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a four-train coal-fueled IGCC power plant, also based on the Subtask 1.3 cases. This plant has a thermal efficiency to power of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency to power of 44.5% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,116 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to co-produce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. Subtask 2.1 developed a petroleum coke IGCC power plant with the coproduction of liquid fuel precursors from the Subtask 1.3 Next Plant by eliminating the export steam and hydrogen production and replacing it with a Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis facility that produced 4,125 bpd of liquid fuel precursors. By maximizing liquids production at the expense of power generation, Subtask 2.2 developed an optimized design that produces 10,450 bpd of liquid fuel precursors and 617 MW of export power from 5,417 tpd of dry petroleum coke. With 27 $/MW-hr power and 30 $/bbl liquids, the Subtask 2.2 plant can have a return on investment of 18%. Subtask 2.3 converted the Subtask 1.6 four-train coal fueled IGCC power plant

Sheldon Kramer

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Full Cost of Intercity Travel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation," National Resources Defense San Francisco, October Emile Quinet, Monograph the Council, "The Social Cost

Levinson, David

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission, nor has the California Energy Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information and cost sensitivity analysis curves. The Energy Commission also uses the fixed cost data of the Model in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

385

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total installed cost #12;6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and downtown data Verified that historical natural gas pipeline cost data

386

Class I Disposal Well Plugging and Abandonment Cost Estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Per your request, Petrotek Engineering Corporation (Petrotek) has prepared a plugging and abandonment cost estimate for the proposed COGEMA DW No. 4 and No. 5 wells. Because the well design and completion for both wells are very similar, one cost is provided that is representative for each of the wells. The procedures included herein are based on COGEMA's permit modification application to Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) UIC Permit 00-340 which applies to both wells, and WDEQ regulations and guidance. A time and materials cost estimate for plugging either of the wells follows. The cost is based on information provided by COGEMA, WDEQ requirements, our field experience, and recent quotes from applicable vendors. The costs are based on the following assumptions:> A falloff test and Radioactive Tracer log (RAT) may be required. Based on historical WDEQ requirements, (1) a falloff test would be required if more than six months has elapsed since the last falloff test, and (2) a Part II mechanical integrity test (e.g., a RAT log) would be required if more than 2 years had elapsed since the last RAT log.> Materials disposal (e.g., tubing, packer, wellhead and other debris) will be

Christensen Ranch; Disposal Wellfield; Donna Wichers

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Handbook for quick cost estimates. A method for developing quick approximate estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a supplement to a ''Handbook for Cost Estimating'' (NUREG/CR-3971) and provides specific guidance for developing ''quick'' approximate estimates of the cost of implementing generic regulatory requirements for nuclear power plants. A method is presented for relating the known construction costs for new nuclear power plants (as contained in the Energy Economic Data Base) to the cost of performing similar work, on a back-fit basis, at existing plants. Cost factors are presented to account for variations in such important cost areas as construction labor productivity, engineering and quality assurance, replacement energy, reworking of existing features, and regional variations in the cost of materials and labor. Other cost categories addressed in this handbook include those for changes in plant operating personnel and plant documents, licensee costs, NRC costs, and costs for other government agencies. Data sheets, worksheets, and appropriate cost algorithms are included to guide the user through preparation of rough estimates. A sample estimate is prepared using the method and the estimating tools provided.

Ball, J.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EFFECT OF REDUCED U-235 PRICE ON FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the effect of changes in natural uranium cost and in separative work charges on fuel cycle costs in nuclear power plants. Reactors considered were a Dresden-type boiling water reactor (BWR) and a Yankee- type pressurized water reactor (PWR), with net power ratings of 100, 300, and 500 Mwe. Fuel cycle costs were calculated for these reactors, using either enriched uranium or U/sup 235/-thorium as the fuel material. The price schedule for uranium was based on a feed material cost of /kg uranium as UF/sub 6/ and separative work costs of /kg uranium (Schedule B) and /kg uranium (Schedule C). The present AEC price schedule for enriched uranium was also used for purposes of a reference case. The results indicate that a reduction in present enriched uranium price to that given by Schedule B would reduce fuel cycle costs for the BWR plants by 0.4 to 0.5 mill/kwh for the enriched-uranium cycle, and 0.4 to 0.7 mill/kwh for the thorium cycle. Reductions in fuel cycle costs for the PWR plants were 0.5 to 0.7 and 0.4 to 0.75 mill/kwh, respectively, for the same situations. (auth)

Bennett, L.L.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Postmortem Cost and Schedule Analysis - Lessons Learned On NCSX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative fusion energy confinement device developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract from the US Department of Energy. The project was technically very challenging, primarily due to the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. As the project matured these challenges manifested themselves in significant cost overruns through all phases of the project (i.e. design, R&D, fabrication and assembly). The project was subsequently cancelled by the DOE in 2008. Although the project was not completed, several major work packages, comprising about 65% of the total estimated cost (excluding management and contingency), were completed, providing a data base of actual costs that can be analyzed to understand cost drivers. Technical factors that drove costs included the complex geometry, tight tolerances, material requirements, and performance requirements. Management factors included imposed annual funding constraints that throttled project cash flow, staff availability, and inadequate R&D. Understanding how requirements and design decisions drove cost through this top-down forensic cost analysis could provide valuable insight into the configuration and design of future state-of-the art machines and other devices.

R. Strykowsky, T. Brown, J. Chrzanowski, M. Cole, P. Heitzenroeder, G.H. Neilson, Donald Rej, and M. Viola

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

392

Analysis of Cost Estimating Processes Used Within a Concurrent Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concurrent engineering environments affect the cost estimating and engineering capability of an organisation. Cost estimating tools become outdated and need changing in order to reflect the new environment. This is essential, since cost estimating is the start of the cost management process and influences the `go', `no go' decisions concerning a new product development. This paper examines both traditional and more recent developments in order to highlight their advantages and limitations. The analysis includes parametric estimating, feature based costing, artificial intelligence, and cost management techniques. This study was deemed necessary because recent investigations carried out by Cranfield University highlighted that many concurrent engineering companies are not making efficient, wide spread use of existing estimating and cost management tools. In order to promote more efficient use of the discussed estimating processes within the twenty first century, this paper highlights the work of a leading European aerospace manufacturer and their efforts to develop a more seamless estimating environment. Furthermore, a matrix is developed that illustrates particular concurrent engineering environments to which each technique is aptly suited.

Environment Throughout Product; Christopher Rush; Dr. Rajkumar Roy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Measuring Imputed Costs in the Semiconductor Equipment Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the order ful¯llment process of a customized capital equipment supplier. Prior to receiving a ¯rm purchase order from the customer, the supplier receives a series of shared forecasts, which are called `soft orders'. Facing a stochastic internal manufacturing lead-time, the supplier must decide at what time to begin the ful¯llment of the order. This decision requires a trade-o ® between starting too early, leading to potential holding or cancellation cost, and the cost of starting too late, leading to potential loss of goodwill. We collect detailed data of shared forecasts, actual purchase orders, production lead-times, and delivery dates for a supplier-buyer dyad in the semiconductor equipment supply chain. Under the assumption that the supplier acts rationally, optimally balancing the cancellation, holding, and delay costs, we are able to estimate the corresponding cost parameters based on the observed data. Our estimation results suggest that the cost of cancellation is four times higher and the holding cost is two times higher than the delay cost. In other words, the supplier is very conservative when commencing the order ful¯llment, which negates the e®ectiveness of the overall forecast sharing mechanism. 1 1

Morris A. Cohen; Teck H. Ho; Justin Z. Ren; Christian Terwiesch

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Detecting leaks to reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how analyzing boilerhouse data in its manufacturing plants and applying algorithmic techniques is helping an automobile manufacturer run its utility operations more efficiently. Ford Motor Co., based in Dearborn, Michigan, is realizing significant energy savings, reducing capital expenditures, and minimizing wastewater disposal costs by diagnosing and quantifying leaks in its compressed air, steam/condensate, and process water systems by applying algorithms developed by Cleveland-based CEC Consultants Inc. These algorithms make use of readily available--and often already installed--instruments, such as vortex shedding meters, chart recorders, and data loggers, to compare how much utility use is needed for assembly and manufacturing equipment with how much is being generated.

Valenti, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

396

Transparent Cost Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transparent Cost Database Transparent Cost Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transparent Cost Database Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Transportation Topics: Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/TCDB/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-transparent-cost-databa Language: English The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

397

External costs of intercity truck freight transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From a societal perspective, it is desirable for all transportation users to pay their full social (private and external) costs. We estimate four general types of external costs for intercity freight trucking and compare them with the private costs incurred by carriers. Estimated external costs include: accidents (fatalities, injuries, and property damage); emissions (air pollution and greenhouse gases); noise; and unrecovered costs associated with the provision, operation, and maintenance of public facilities. The analysis reveals that external costs are equal to 13.2 % of private costs and user fees would need to be increased about

David J. Forkenbrock

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Costs in the Norwegian Payment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate social and private cost for the use and production of payment services in Norway for 2007. The calculations include banks’, merchants ’ and households ’ cost for cash, cards and giro payments. The social cost is calculated to be 0.49 % of GDP, or NOK 11.16 billion. Costs are also calculated on a per-service basis. The results are compared with data from earlier cost surveys by Norges Bank. The unit costs of the most popular services have decreased over the years. Efficiency and productivity of banks ’ payment service operations has improved. We also make comparisons between frameworks, methodologies, and results from cost surveys in five European countries.

Olaf Gresvik; Harald Haare; Norges Bank; Sigbjørn Atle Berg; Gunnvald Grønvik; Asbjørn Enge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. Past Incubator awardee, Innovalight, is creating high-efficiency, low-cost

400

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

402

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

403

Entanglement Cost of Quantum Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entanglement cost of a quantum channel is the minimal rate at which entanglement (between sender and receiver) is needed in order to simulate many copies of a quantum channel in the presence of free classical communication. In this paper we show how to express this quantity as a regularized optimization of the entanglement formation over states that can be generated between sender and receiver. Our formula is the channel analog of a well-known formula for the entanglement cost of quantum states in terms of the entanglement of formation; and shares a similar relation to the recently shattered hope for additivity. The entanglement cost of a quantum channel can be seen as the analog of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem in the case where free classical communication is allowed. The techniques used in the proof of our result are then also inspired by a recent proof of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem and feature the one-shot formalism for quantum information theory, the post-selection technique for quantum channels as well as von Neumann's minimax theorem. We discuss two applications of our result. First, we are able to link the security in the noisy-storage model to a problem of sending quantum rather than classical information through the adversary's storage device. This not only improves the range of parameters where security can be shown, but also allows us to prove security for storage devices for which no results were known before. Second, our result has consequences for the study of the strong converse quantum capacity. Here, we show that any coding scheme that sends quantum information through a quantum channel at a rate larger than the entanglement cost of the channel has an exponentially small fidelity.

Mario Berta; Fernando Brandao; Matthias Christandl; Stephanie Wehner

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Low Cost Emergency VAR Compensator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The barriers to commercialization of the Capacitor Bank Group Shorting (CAPS) concept were investigated in this study. Also, the application of mechanically switched CAPS systems was examined from the technical and cost points of view. In addition, a semiconductor (thyristor) switched or controlled CAPS arrangement was studied. Although only three utilities were surveyed in the market assessment part of the study, it was concluded that if there is a need for additional shunt compensation systems or a nee...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

Transmission Valuation and Cost Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides information on the status of the electric power industry regarding the economic valuation of transmission projects. Such valuations became critical with the introduction of economic transmission projects in the context of competitive electricity markets. Economic valuation is also becoming increasingly important for traditional reliability upgrades, because of the need for consistency in cost allocations between the two types of upgrades. The year 2005 has brought significa...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

407

Argonne CNM Highlight: Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Photovoltaic electricity is a rapidly growing renewable energy source and will ultimately assume a major role in global energy production. The cost of solar-generated electricity is typically compared with electricity produced by traditional sources with a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculation. Generally, LCOE is treated as a definite number, and the assumptions lying beneath that result are rarely reported or even understood. We shed light on some of the key assumptions and offer a new approach to calculating LCOE for photovoltaics based on input parameter distributions feeding a Monte Carlo simulation. In this framework, the influence of assumptions and confidence intervals becomes clear.

408

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

409

Maryland Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs Maryland Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs January 12, 2010 - 9:14am Addthis Joshua DeLung One potential problem with going solar across America is that the up-front costs of installing solar panels are often too high for the average consumer. Though panels can produce mounds of energy savings over a long period of time, the expense of installation is still too high for many. However, stimulus funding awarded to a small, Maryland-based business with six employees - AccuStrata Inc. - by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Recovery Act is helping the company develop technology to eliminate such barriers. AccuStrata was awarded its third Small Business Innovation Research grant of $150,000 in December. These grants will help the company increase the

410

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs August 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to develop clean, domestic energy sources, the Energy Department today announced a $4.5 million investment in two projects-led by Minnesota-based 3M and the Colorado School of Mines-to lower the cost, improve the durability, and increase the efficiency of next-generation fuel cell systems. This investment is a part of the Energy Department's commitment to maintain American leadership in innovative clean energy technologies, give American businesses more options to cut energy costs, and reduce our reliance on imported oil. "Fuel cell technologies have an important role to play in diversifying

411

Maryland Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maryland Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs Maryland Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs Maryland Small Business Helping Lower Solar Costs January 12, 2010 - 9:14am Addthis Joshua DeLung One potential problem with going solar across America is that the up-front costs of installing solar panels are often too high for the average consumer. Though panels can produce mounds of energy savings over a long period of time, the expense of installation is still too high for many. However, stimulus funding awarded to a small, Maryland-based business with six employees - AccuStrata Inc. - by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Recovery Act is helping the company develop technology to eliminate such barriers. AccuStrata was awarded its third Small Business Innovation Research grant of $150,000 in December. These grants will help the company increase the

412

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products The energy and cost calculators below allow Federal agencies to enter their own input values (such as utility rates, hours of use) to estimate energy and cost savings for energy-efficient products. Some are Web-based tools; others are Excel spreadsheets provided by ENERGY STAR® for download. Lighting Compact Fluorescent Lamps Exit Signs Commercial and Industrial Equipment Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Air-Cooled Chillers Commercial Heat Pumps Boilers Food Service Equipment Dishwashers Freezers Fryers Griddles Hot Food Holding Cabinets Ovens Refrigerators Steam Cookers Ice Machines Office Equipment Computers, Monitors, and Imaging Equipment Appliances Dishwashers Clothes Washers Residential Equipment Central Air Conditioners

413

Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Date: March 22, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn This presentation describes the analysis of the costs of increased energy efficiency for residential water heaters. Here, we focus on the cost and efficiency data for electric and gas-fired water heaters. This data formed the basis of the Technical Support Document for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Final Rule on Water Heaters. The engineering analysis uses computer simulation models to investigate the efficiency improvements due to design options and combinations thereof. The analysis covers four polyurethane foam insulation types based on non-ozone-depleting substances as blowing

414

Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 19'9. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1)kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; developmeNt of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Price caps for standard offer service: A hidden stranded cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some utility commissions or legislatures, concerned about mis-estimating the market line when calculating stranded costs, are choosing to require a price-capped standard offer service (SOS) to be offered by utilities in the competitive marketplace. This grants to customers the flexibility to switch from a fixed-price alternative with the utility to (or even to and from) a non-utility power supplier. Given the enormous uncertainty in future power market prices, this flexibility, which is being bestowed free-of-charge to customers, may prove to be of considerable value. Valuation of this SOS flexibility using call option techniques shows that this can be a non-trivial fraction of total stranded costs. The costs of price-capped SOS can be ameliorated through the structure of the price cap. This article describes the option-based techniques for valuing SOS and some approaches to limiting its cost to utilities.

Graves, F.; Liu, P. [Brattle Group, Cambridge, MA (United States)]|[Brattle Group, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Brattle Group, London (United Kingdom)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

417

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative. The most practical method of determining the cost is through the use of a computer program, based on the capability of personal computers to manipulate large amounts of data and perform difficult calculations without error. Development of such a program requires both theoretical and practical knowledge of the dredging process. There are several existing cost estimation and production estimation programs in use in the dredging industry today. Several different algorithms to estimate production have been developed over the years, and there are some non-proprietary production programs. However, the majority of both cost and production estimation programs are proprietary and therefore not available to those apart from the individual company. Therefore, the need exists for a program of this type which can be made available to the general public. This report discusses the development of a new generalized cost and production estimation program. Both slurry transport theory and centrifugal pump theory are incorporated into the production component of the program. This is necessary to obtain an accurate production estimate in the absence of a great deal of data for a specific dredge. Practical knowledge of costs associated with the dredging process is applied in the cost estimation component. The gram is written in the Quattropro(version6.01)spread sheet formatand may be used in conjunction with Microsoft Windows version 3.1 or Windows95. The acronym CSDCEP has been given to the program, which stands for Cutter detailing the operation of the program is available. The cost estimate results produced by CSDCEP were compared with actual data and government cost estimates for twenty one completed projects. The average difference between the estimate and the actual costs was twenty four percent. CSDCEP is a generalized cost estimating program that yields a good approximation of the final dredging cost.

Miertschin, Michael Wayne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis More Documents & Publications Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Policy Flash...

420

User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.  

SciTech Connect

PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to determine the realization rate of energy and cost savings from the Department of Energy's Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) program based on information reported by the energy services companies (ESCOs) that are carrying out ESPC projects at federal sites. Information was extracted from 134 Measurement and Verification (M&V) reports to determine reported, estimated, and guaranteed cost savings and reported and estimated energy savings for the previous contract year. Because the quality of the reports varied, it was not possible to determine all of these parameters for each project. For 133 of the 134 projects, there was sufficient information to compare estimated, reported, and guaranteed cost savings. For this group, the total estimated cost savings for the reporting periods addressed were $95.7 million, total reported cost savings were $96.8 million, and total guaranteed cost savings were $92.1 million. This means that on average: ESPC contractors guaranteed 96% of the estimated cost savings, projects reported achieving 101% of the estimated cost savings, and projects reported achieving 105% of the guaranteed cost savings. For 129 of the projects examined, there was sufficient information to compare estimated and reported energy savings. On the basis of site energy, estimated savings for those projects for the previous year totaled 5.371 million MMBtu, and reported savings were 5.374 million MMBtu, just over 100% of the estimated energy savings. On the basis of source energy, total estimated energy savings for the 129 projects were 10.400 million MMBtu, and reported saving were 10.405 million MMBtu, again, just over 100.0% of the estimated energy savings.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Slattery, Bob S [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Capping the electricity cost of cloud-scale data centers with impacts on power markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel electricity cost capping algorithm that not only minimizes the electricity cost of operating cloud-scale data centers, but also enforces a cost budget on the monthly electricity bill. Our solution first explicitly models the impacts of power demands on electricity prices and the power consumption of cooling and networking in the minimization of electricity cost. In the second step, if the electricity cost exceeds a desired monthly budget due to unexpectedly high workloads, our solution guarantees the quality of service for premium customers and trades off the request throughput of ordinary customers. We formulate electricity cost capping as two related constrained optimization problems and propose an efficient algorithm based on mixed integer programming. Simulation results show that our solution outperforms the state-ofthe-art solutions by having lower electricity costs and achieves desired cost capping with maximized request throughput.

Yanwei Zhang; Yefu Wang; Xiaorui Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors.

VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Assessing initial-cost growth and subsequent long-term cost improvement in coal-to-SNG processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the study was the development of guidance that would enable gas-industry R and D managers to make more-reliable assessments of the potential for both initial-cost growth and subsequent long-run cost improvement in alternative coal-gasification technologies. The first phase of the research assessed the reasonableness of the GRI contingency methodology by comparing the results obtained from applying the GRI method and the RAND Pioneer Plant Study (PPS) method to an identical set of eight coal-to-SNG processes. The second phase of the research, which addressed the issue of cost improvement, found that between process introduction and process maturity, overall cost reductions of between 30% (for moderately innovative technologies) and 60% (for highly innovative technologies) are possible. However, these results were highly dependent on a number of key assumptions including: similarity of site characteristics for successive plants; access to prior plant's experience base; and appropriate management attitudes.

Hess, R.W.; Myers, C.W.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management: Office Overview Scoping and NEPA/MEPAScoping and NEPA/MEPA Scoping and Cost EstimatesScoping and Cost Estimates Project Define a Project so we canOffice Focus: Better Define a Project so we can have a more accurate cost

Minnesota, University of

426

Cost estimating method of industrial product implemented in WinCOST software system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a method for estimating the cost of industrial products and its implementation into a software system named WinCOST. The software is used for calculating the manufacturing time and cost evaluation of industrial products with high level ... Keywords: chip removing process, cold forming processes, cost estimation, cost per hour, software system

Gheorghe Oancea; Lucia Antoneta Chicos; Camil Lancea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

An analysis of the costs of running a station car fleet  

SciTech Connect

Station cars are electric vehicles available at transit stations which may be used for transportation between the transit station and home, work, and/or for errands. This transportation service would be provided by the local transit agency. This report discusses an economic model of the costs of running a station car fleet. While some of these costs are highly uncertain, this analysis is a first look at the required user fees for full cost recovery. The model considers the capital costs of the vehicles and the required infrastructure; the annual fixed vehicle costs for insurance, registration, etc.; the mileage-based costs; and the annual non-vehicle costs for administration, infrastructure maintenance, etc. The model also includes various factors such as the fleet size, the annual mileage, the number of transit stations that would have facilities for station cars, and the number of users. The model specifically examines the cost of using of electric vehicles; however, for comparison, the cost of using a fleet of gasoline-powered vehicles also is calculated. This report examines the sensitivity of the model to the various factors. A principal conclusion from the analysis is that the largest cost contributor is the initial vehicle purchase price. For a given initial purchase price, the factor driving the user fee required for full cost recovery is the number of different daily users of a vehicle. The model also compares the annual cost of transportation using station cars and mass transit to the annual cost of solo commuting. If a station car is used by more than one person a day, and this use replaces the ownership of a conventional vehicle, the annual cost of transportation may be similar. However, for the base case assumptions, the station car user fee required for full cost recovery is higher than the cost of solo commuting.

Zurn, R.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A methodology framework for calculating the cost of e-government services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a structured framework for calculating the cost of e-Government services, based on the complementary application of the IDEF0 modelling tool and the Activity-Based Costing technique. The motivation for this research effort was derived ...

Elias A. Hadzilias

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this independent review will permit NREL and DOE to better understand the credibility of the TIAX cost estimation process and to implement changes in future cost analyses, if necessary. The Team found the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells to be reasonable and, using 2005 cell stack technology and assuming production of 500,000 units per year, to have calculated a credible cost of $108/kW.

Wheeler, D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: PEMFC Manufacturing Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEMFC Manufacturing Cost PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Project Summary Full Title: Manufacturing Cost of Stationary Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems Project ID: 85 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; fuel cells; stationary Performer Principal Investigator: Brian James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-243-3383 Email: brian_james@directedtechnologies.com Period of Performance End: November 1999 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Cross-Cutting Objectives: Estimate the cost of the fuel cell system using the Directed Technologies, Inc. cost database built up over the several years under U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Company contracts.

432

Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specify for maximum energy savings Specify for maximum energy savings Windows must meet local energy code requirements. For even higher energy performance, consider ENERGY STAR windows, which are recommended for low-rise dwellings and are often suitable for mid-rise dwellings as well. For window and storm window options with superior performance in cold climates, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's highly insulating windows purchasing program (see next page). Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost Government or utility incentives and financing may be available for energy efficiency in low-income housing. Check www.dsireusa.org for up-to-date information on incentive

433

Global Direct Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Country-specific direct cost of corrosion for the year 2004...Basque region 1988 Pesetas, 75 100.00 0.75 1.9977 1.5 Czechoslovakia 1998 Koruna, 31.816 (f) 29.8600 1.0655 1.1006 1.17 Netherlands 1969 Guilders, 0.51441 3.6340 0.1416 8.2103 1.16 Sweden 1967 Kroner, 1 5.0000 0.2000 3.0284 0.61 Finland 1965 Markka, 0.175 (g) 3.2110 0.0545 2.0995 0.11 Global...

434

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

FY 1995 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 challenged us to dramatically reduce costs at Hanford. We began the year with an 8 percent reduction in our Environmental Management budget but at the same time were tasked with accomplishing additional workscope. This resulted in a Productivity Challenge whereby we took on more work at the beginning of the year than we had funding to complete. During the year, the Productivity Challenge actually grew to 23 percent because of recissions, Congressional budget reductions, and DOE Headquarters actions. We successfully met our FY 1995 Productivity Challenge through an aggressive cost reduction program that identified and eliminated unnecessary workscope and found ways to be more efficient. We reduced the size of the workforce, cut overhead expenses, eliminated paperwork, cancelled construction of new facilities, and reengineered our processes. We are proving we can get the job done better and for less money at Hanford. DOE`s drive to do it ``better, faster, cheaper`` has led us to look for more and larger partnerships with the private sector. The biggest will be privatization of Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System, which will turn liquid tank waste into glass logs for eventual disposal. We will also save millions of dollars and avoid the cost of replacing aging steam plants by contracting Hanford`s energy needs to a private company. Other privatization successes include the Hanford Mail Service, a spinoff of advanced technical training, low level mixed waste thermal treatment, and transfer of the Hanford Museums of Science and history to a private non-profit organization. Despite the rough roads and uncertainty we faced in FY 1995, less than 3 percent of our work fell behind schedule, while the work that was performed was completed with an 8.6 percent cost under-run. We not only met the FY 1995 productivity challenge, we also met our FY 1995-1998 savings commitments and accelerated some critical cleanup milestones. The challenges continue. Budgets remain on the decline, even while the expectations increase. Yet we are confident in our ability to keep our commitments and goals by identifying new efficiencies in the Hanford cleanup program. We will also pursue new contracting arrangements that will allow us to foster greater competition and use more commercial practices while maintaining our commitment to the safety and health of the public, our workers, and the environment.

Andrews-Smith, K.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

Global Indirect Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Indirect cost of corrosion for the USA (1998 basis)...76.64 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Mining 27.86 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Petroleum refining 32.22 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical 111.04 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Pulp and paper 148.05 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Agricultural 126.28 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Food processing 123.66 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Electronics â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Home appliances 25.25 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Subtotal 671.00 Production loss 2.5â??5.5 26.84...

437

Energy (Cost) Savings by Zero Discharge in Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum reuse of cooling tower blowdown by the incorporation of a sidestream softening system to recycle water can allow for significant savings in energy costs for industry. The system design parameters described in this paper are based upon calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica solubility equations for the resultant high ionic strength of a zero blowdown system. Operational aspects are highlighted in terms of deposition, corrosion, and biofouling potentials as well as currently-practiced, successful treatment procedures. The effects and history of corrosion and scale inhibitors, as well as other treatment chemicals, have been evaluated for numerous plants utilizing zero blowdown, and a summation of this knowledge is presented here. The cost analysis of conventional systems versus recycle systems is based upon a computer model's predictions for makeup waters of various qualities and costs.

Matson, J. V.; Gardiner, W. M.; Harris, T. G.; Puckorius, P. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation November 19, 2013 - 3:49pm Addthis A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine cuts a thin steel plate that will be formed into lighting fixture housing. Wisconsin-based Eaton Corporation is developing a new manufacturing process that streamlines LED fixture designs. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine cuts a thin steel plate that will be formed into lighting fixture housing. Wisconsin-based Eaton Corporation is developing a new manufacturing process that streamlines LED fixture designs. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation A goniometer measures the photometric output distribution of an outdoor LED street light fixture. Researchers at Eaton are developing a new manufacturing process will enable LED chips to sit directly on heat sinks, improving heat transfer. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation

439

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Annual subcontract report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1990--30 April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed under a three-phase subcontract. The objectives of the program include (1) achievement of active-area efficiencies of greater than 14% on small cells; (2) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 13% on 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules; (3) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 12.5% on 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules; and achievement of greater than 20-year module life (based on life testing extrapolations) with no greater than 10% efficiency degradation. The results obtained and described herein include the following: (1) efficiencies of 12.7% were achieved on small-area devices; (2) 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved greater than 8% aperture-area efficiency, but work for further efficiency improvement was redirected toward the 0.37-M{sup 2} (4 if) modules; (3) 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved 26.5-W output, which calculates to 8.0% aperture-area efficiency; (4) consistent prototype production was focused on and substantially achieved within Phase 2; (5) life testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory showed no inherent stability problems with the CdTe technology, and the accuracy of module measurement was satisfactorily resolved; and (6) a ``cradle-to-cradle`` recycling program was begun based upon the philosophy that the establishment of such mechanisms will be required to ensure maximum recapture and recycling of all manufacturing waste materials and/or modules returned from the field.

Albright, S.P.; Johnson, S.X. [Golden Photon, Inc., CO (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base overnight cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

Hand, M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

Environmental protection using social costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions and other residual wastes come from industrial production, commercial and household activities, and transportation. These wastes damage the environment, including human health. As economies grow, so does concern about balancing that growth with the desire for environmental protection. At issue is how much environmental protection we should have. We address this issue using the concept of social costing. The issue is discussed in the context of electric power generation. There is particular concern about the use of fossil fuels such as petroleum, the major fuel used in the Republic of China, and coal which is the most common fuel used in the U. S. Electric power generation is a major source of airborne pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, CO, and CO{sub 2}. It also results in liquid and solid wastes, and other effects such as changes in land use. To generate electric power, fuel (such as petroleum, coal or enriched uranium) or some other resource (e.g., wind or geothermal) is needed. A fuel cycle consists of a sequence of activities and processes involved in generating electric power. These activities include fuel extraction, treatment and processing; fuel conversion into electricity; transmission; waste disposal; and transportation of fuel and wastes between the different stages of the fuel cycle. Each stage results in emissions or other residuals. Several recent-studies have been about the environmental costs of electricity.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Low cost titanium--myth or reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium, and titanium cost has prevented its use in non-aerospace applications including the automotive and heavy vehicle industries.

Turner, Paul C.; Hartman, Alan D.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Updating MIT's cost estimation model for shipbuilding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis project will update the MIT ship cost estimation model by combining the two existing models (the Basic Military Training School (BMTS) Cost Model and the MIT Math Model) in order to develop a program that can ...

Smith, Matthew B., Lieutenant, junior grade

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A. Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Determining the cost of a facility as complex as the neutrino source presented here is a very difficult task within the short time period...

451

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

452

Average-case active learning with costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the expected cost of a greedy active learning algorithm. Our analysis extends previous work to a more general setting in which different queries have different costs. Moreover, queries may have more than two possible responses and the distribution ...

Andrew Guillory; Jeff Bilmes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Price and cost impacts of utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. In particular, should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity Most of the debates about the appropriate economic tests to use in assessing utility programs do not address the magnitude of the impacts. As a result, questions remain about the relationships among utility DSM programs and acquisition of supply resources and the effects of these choices on electricity prices and costs. This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. A dynamic model is used to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios for three utilities: a base that is typical of US utilities; a surplus utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. Model results show that DSM programs generally reduce electricity costs and increase electricity prices. However, the percentage reduction in costs is usually greater than the percentage increase in prices. On the other hand, most of the cost benefits of DSM programs can be obtained without raising electricity prices.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with req'd IDC) Principal Investigator's Justification for Indirect

Eustice, Ryan

458

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 8, Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHOTOVOLTAIC COST TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA Ryan Wiser Lawrencein the United States: California. We find that: (1) solarof PV system costs in California. Through mid-November 2005,

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

User's manual: GCOST: A gas cost-of-service program: Version 1. 0  

SciTech Connect

The process of rate design for a gas distribution utility requires the use of cost-of-service studies. A cost-of-service study finds the various costs of serving all of a utility's customers, and allocates these costs to individual customer classes. Costs include investments in plant and equipment, operating expenses, and taxes. There are two distinct approaches that underlie cost-of-service studies. One approach is based on marginal costs and the other on embedded costs. The marginal-cost allocation can be defined as the incremental cost of adding a single customer to the system. The embedded cost is the customer's share of historical costs. Of the two approaches, the latter is easier to implement and traditionally has been used for rate-making purposes. GCOST is designed to perform cost-of-service studies using the traditional embedded cost approach. It accepts accounting, financial, and operating data as user input. It then allocates the various items of utility plant and operating expenses to each customer class according to user-specified methods. For each cost item or account, the user has the option of specifying an allocation method or formula. This flexibility allows the user to experiment with different combinations of allocati