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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Unaccounted-for gas project. Data bases. Volume 5. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study identifies, explains, and quantifies unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric (PG E) Co.'s gas transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The results demonstrate that the UAF volumes are reasonable for determining the indirectly billed gas requirements component of the gas cost and for operating the PG E gas system. Gas leakage is a small percentage of UAF. Summaries of studies on gas leakage, gas theft, measurement inaccuracies, and accounting methodologies are presented along with recommendations for further work which could reduce or more accurately measure UAF.

Cowgill, R.; Waller, R.L.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas dedicated to oil and gas exploration. Our system combines probe- based volume rendering with data processing Seismic interpretation is an important task in the oil and gas exploration-production (EP) workflow [9, 26

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

3

Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

J. Dimock

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Natural gas annual 1994: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data fro the Nation from 1930 to 1994, and by State from 1967 to 1994.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

Stotts, Robert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

Natural gas annual 1992. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data for the Nation from 1930 to 1992, and by State from 1967 to 1992. The Supplement of this report presents profiles of selected companies.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000 J. E. Hibbard, M. P. Rupen#12;cant processing of atomic gas into other forms if this process is to be viable. Here I present, if the \\processing eÃ?ciency" (i.e., the frac- tion of gas processed into globular clusters or into hot gas through

Mihos, Chris

11

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000 J. E. Hibbard, M. P. Rupen and J. H. van Gorkom, eds. Gas/Star O#11;sets in Tidal Tails J. C. Mihos Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 Abstract. We use numerical simulations to study the development of gas/star o#11;sets

Mihos, Chris

12

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Gas Density and the Volume Schmidt Law for Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thickness of the equilibrium isothermal gaseous layers and their volume densities \\rho_{gas}(R) in the disc midplane are calculated for 7 spiral galaxies (including our Galaxy) in the frame of self-consistent axisymmetric model. Local velocity dispersions of stellar discs were assumed to be close to marginal values necessary for the discs to be in a stable equilibrium state. Under this condition the stellar discs of at least 5 of 7 galaxies reveal a flaring. Their volume densities decrease with R faster than \\rho_{gas}, and, as a result, the gas dominates by the density at the disc periphery. Comparison of the azimuthally averaged star formation rate SFR with the gas density shows that there is no universal Schmidt law SFR \\rho_{gas}^n, common to all galaxies. Nevertheless, SFR in different galaxies reveals better correlation with the volume gas density than with the column one. Parameter n in the Schmidt law SFR \\rho_{gas}^n, formally calculated by the least square method, lies within 0.8-2.4 range and it's mean value is close to 1.5. Values of n calculated for molecular gas only are characterized by large dispersion, but their mean value is close to 1. Hence the smaller \\rho_{gas} the less is a fraction of gas actively taking part in the process of star formation.

O. V. Abramova; A. V. Zasov

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 1. Project summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF), performed by the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) to determine the UAF gas volume in the SoCalGas system, to identify the factors contributing to UAF, and to estimate the gas volume associated with each factor, is described. It was found that measurement-related effects contributed more than 80% of SoCalGas' 1991 UAF volume. Less than 3% is associated with adjustments to SoCalGas' accounting system, and approximately 6% is associated with losses due to theft. Testing showed that the leakage element contributed only 8% of the UAF volume.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Law, E.; Ozenne, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

HERA-B Gas Systems The gas mixture, the gas volume of the corresponding detector and the required gas flow are given. All detectors are operating at nominal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HERA-B Gas Systems The gas mixture, the gas volume of the corresponding detector and the required gas flow are given. All detectors are operating at nominal pressure within a given tolerance p. The pipes connecting the external gas hut with the third floor of the electronics trailer are listed on page

16

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 4. Leakage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume IV of the six-volume set reports on the UAF leakage volumes associated with the transmission and distribution piping systems, each analyzed separately. Unplanned gas releases in SoCalGas distribution and transmission operations contributed approximately 871,900 thousand cubic feet to the 1991 UAF volume. The study indicated that SoCalGas' current leak detection program has been successful in reducing the number of leaks throughout the distribution system, with the sensitive detection equipment finding leaks earlier in their development and reducing the average leakage rate.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Bruni, J.; Crebs, S.; Law, E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thermodynamical Consistency of Excluded Volume Hadron Gas Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new excluded volume hadron gas model by Singh et al. [1-7] is critically discussed. We demonstrate that in this model the results obtained from relations between thermodynamical quantities disagree with the corresponding results obtained by statistical ensemble averaging. Thus, the model does not satisfy the requirements of thermodynamical consistency.

M. I. Gorenstein

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 3. Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company, volume III of the six-volume set contains the results of measurement factors analysis, including both estimates of UAF due to fixed-factor assumptions and meter accuracy. Accurate measurement of gas volume is a function of the meter and the factors used to adjust the meter read. If the meter registers slow or fast, the actual gas volume passing through the meter will not be measured true. The estimated UAF volume from all measurement elements resulted in an overall net under-measurement of the 1991 gas volume in the SoCalGas system of 8,048,800 thousand cubic feet. Appendices include tabular numerical and graphic information on measurement parameters and other supplemental data.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Aquin, D.; Beloat, B.; Epps, B.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 2. Accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF), performed by the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume II of the six-volume set presents the results of the accounting portion, including sections on accounting adjustments and company-use gas. It identifies enhancements to accounting practices that make records more accurately reflect the physical activity occurring in the system. The result is an accounting record of gas volumes received and delivered which have been adjusted for the enhancements, and exclude accounting estimates and prior period adjustments.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Law, E.; Rudshagen, C.; Yevchak, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Unaccounted-for gas project. Leak Task Force. Volume 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Leak Task Force quantified unintentional gas losses (leakage and dig-ins). Results show that 1987 gas leakage accounted for less than 5% of the operating UAF.

Cowgill, R.M.; Robertson, J.L.; Grinstead, J.R.; Luttrell, D.J.; Walden, E.R.

1990-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 6. Databases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), the last volume of the six-volume set contains the supporting data and discussions of the methods used to extract and organize data from SoCalGas billing records to support the analysis of study elements. An overview of the analytical approach is presented, and detailed information on the related computational logic, program design, and input data requirements is provided. An appendix contains input data file descriptions.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Azma, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges Xiaohui. Large-volume APG discharges find numerous applications in processing of material surfaces,1 ozone-purity helium is presented, and the role of trace impurities in such noble gas plasmas is established. Trace

Raja, Laxminarayan L.

25

No-migration variance petition: Draft. Volume 4, Appendices DIF, GAS, GCR (Volume 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by national defense-related activities. Approximately 2.6 million cubic feet of the se waste have been generated and are stored at various facilities across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), was sited and constructed to meet stringent disposal requirements. In order to permanently dispose of TRU waste, the DOE has elected to petition the US EPA for a variance from the Land Disposal Restrictions of RCRA. This document fulfills the reporting requirements for the petition. This report is volume 4 of the petition which presents details about the transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags; gas generation reactions and rates during long-term WIPP operation; and geological characterization of the WIPP site.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Unaccounted-for gas project. Theft Task Force. Volume 3. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Theft Task Force analyzed the percentage of customers involved in gas theft, the average annual volume of gas stolen by a single customer, and the total number of customers and their total gas usage. Results were used in conjunction with documented customer theft to arrive at a calculation that more accurately reflected the theft contribution to UAF for 1987.

Cima, K.M.; Cottengim, T.L.; Wong, R.M.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Unaccounted-for gas project: Summary volume. Energy delivery and control. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Theft Task Force analyzed the percentage of customers involved in gas theft, the average annual volume of gas stolen by a single customer, and the total number of customers and their total gas usage. Results were used in conjunction with documented customer theft to arrive at a calculation that more accurately reflected the theft contribution to UAF for 1987.

Cima, K.M.; Cottengim, T.L.; Wong, R.M.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 011,816Feet) Base Gas)

32

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 5. Theft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume V of the six-volume set examines losses due to theft. Residential and non-residential (commercial and industrial) theft are distinguished. Analysis involves estimating both frequencies of occurrence and the volumes associated with such occurrence. Approaches and techniques of detection and control are discussed. The problem in developing estimates is that theft is difficult to detect. The study finds that theft contributes approximately 644,529 thousand cubic feet to the 1991 UAF. Residential theft is estimated at 324,227 Mcf and non-residential theft at 320,302 Mcf.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Fiero, G.; Harris, G.; Ozenne, D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

NONE

1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Unaccounted-for gas project. Accounting Task Force. Volume 1. Energy delivery and control. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was conducted to determine unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric (PG E) Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Accounting Task Force analyzed purchases and transport received, sales and transport delivered, interdepartmental sales, and gas department use to determine the effect on UAF. Findings show that accounting adjustments and cycle billing have a major impact on the 1987 operating UAF.

Luttrell, D.J.; Nelson, F.A.; Peterson, J.D.; Cowgill, R.M.; Waller, R.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,998 10,643 10,998DecadeFeet) Base Gas) (Million

38

Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Perception-Based Transparency Optimization for Direct Volume Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perception-Based Transparency Optimization for Direct Volume Rendering Ming-Yuen Chan, Student. Perceptual enhancement on transparent layers in direct volume rendered images: a CT head dataset with layered structures (left); layers are enhanced using our proposed rendering optimization method (right). Abstract

Chen, Wei

42

Thermodynamics and fluctuations of conserved charges in Hadron Resonance Gas model in finite volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermodynamics of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collision experiments are usually studied as a system of infinite volume. Here we report on possible effects for considering a finite system size for such matter in the framework of the Hadron Resonance Gas model. The bulk thermodynamic variables as well as the fluctuations of conserved charges are considered. We find that the finite size effects are insignificant once the observables are scaled with the respective volumes. The only substantial effect is found in the fluctuations of electric charge which may therefore be used to extract information about the volume of fireball created in heavy-ion collision experiments.

Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Samanta, Subhasis; Sur, Subrata

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve3.Revenue3 Oil and GasPURPOSES.

44

Digital volume imaging of the PEFC gas diffusion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a key role in the overall performance/durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Of profound importance, especially in the context of water management and flooding phenomena, is the influence of the underlying pore morphology and wetting characteristics Of the GDL microstructure. In this article, we present the digital volumetric imaging (DVI) technique in order to generate the 3-D carbon paper GDL microstructure. The internal pore structure and the local microstructural variations in terms of fiber alignment and fiber/binder distributions are investigated using the several 3-D thin sections of the sample obtained from DVI.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL; Shim, Eunkyoung [NC ST

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Resilience-Based Design of Natural Gas Distribution Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study Resilience-Based Design of Natural Gas Distribution Networks G. P. Cimellaro, Ph.D., A response to natural disasters. In this paper, a new performance index measuring the functionality of a gas; Disaster resilience; Vulnerability; Gas networks; Damage assessment; Lifelines; Serviceability; Natural gas

Bruneau, Michel

46

Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

NONE

1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

48

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

49

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application Arthur VALLERON a,b , Christophe, Engineering Materials Department The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShaleVolumeGas,Net

54

On Issues of Precision for Hardware-based Volume Visualization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses issues with the limited precision of hardware-based volume visualization. We will describe the compositing OVER operator and how fixed-point arithmetic affects it. We propose two techniques to improve the precision of fixed-point compositing and the accuracy of hardware-based volume visualization. The first technique is to perform dithering of color and alpha values. The second technique we call exponent-factoring, and captures significantly more numeric resolution than dithering, but can only produce monochromatic images.

LaMar, E C

2003-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15Thousand CubicYear Jan FebFeet)

57

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan FebFeet) YearYear Jan

58

Description of Hot and Dense Hadron Gas Properties in a New Excluded-Volume model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new equation of state for a hot and dense hadron gas (HG) is obtained where the finite hard-core size of baryons has been incorporated in a thermodynamically consistent formulation of excluded volume correction. Our model differs from other existing approaches on the following points. We assign a hard-core volume only to each baryon and mesons though possess a small volume but they can fuse and interpenetrate into one another. Use of the full quantum statistics is made in obtaining the grand canonical partition function where excluded-volume correction has been incorporated by explicitly integrating over volume. We thus find that the new model works even for the cases of extreme temperatures and/or densities where most of other approaches fail. The model does not violate causality even at extreme densities. The temperature and density dependence of various thermodynamical quantities, e.g. pressure, baryon density, entropy and energy density compare well with the results of other microscopic HG models. After suitable parametrization of the centre-of-mass energy in terms of temperature and baryon chemical potential, we explore some new freeze-out criteria which exhibit full independence of the collision energy and of the structures of the colliding nuclei. We further demonstrate the suitability of our model in explaining various experimental results of the multiplicity-ratios of various particles and their antiparticles. Finally, we use our excluded-volume model to obtain the transport behaviour of the hot and/or dense HG such as shear viscosity to entropy ratio, speed of sound etc. and compare the results with earlier calculations.

S. K. Tiwari; P. K. Srivastava; C. P. Singh

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Volume Fraction of Ionized Intergalactic Gas at Redshift z=6.5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed number density of Lyman-alpha sources implies a minimum volume of the inter-galactic medium that must be ionized, in order to allow the Lyman-alpha photons to escape attenuation. We estimate this volume by assigning to each Lyman-alpha emitter the minimum Stromgren sphere that would allow half its Lyman-alpha photons to escape. This implies a lower limit to ionized gas volume fraction of 20-50% at redshift z=6.5. This is a lower limit in two ways: First, we conservatively assume that the Lyman-alpha sources seen (at a relatively bright flux limit) are the only ones present; and second, we assume the smallest Stromgren sphere volume that will allow the photons to escape. This limit is completely independent of what ionizing photon sources produced the bubbles. Deeper Lyman-alpha surveys are possible with present technology, and can strengthen these limits by detecting a higher density of Lyman-alpha galaxies.

Sangeeta Malhotra; James Rhoads

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketedCoalbedNet WithdrawalsVolume

63

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShaleVolume (MMcf)"

64

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves inDry Natural GasPlant+ LeaseVolume (MMcf)"

65

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 2, Heating season  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US Government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer; Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24.TotalVehicleFeet) Base

69

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Efficient Error Calculation for Multiresolution Texture-Based Volume Visualization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiresolution texture-based volume visualization is an excellent technique to enable interactive rendering of massive data sets. Interactive manipulation of a transfer function is necessary for proper exploration of a data set. However, multiresolution techniques require assessing the accuracy of the resulting images, and re-computing the error after each change in a transfer function is very expensive. They extend their existing multiresolution volume visualization method by introducing a method for accelerating error calculations for multiresolution volume approximations. Computing the error for an approximation requires adding individual error terms. One error value must be computed once for each original voxel and its corresponding approximating voxel. For byte data, i.e., data sets where integer function values between 0 and 255 are given, they observe that the set of error pairs can be quite large, yet the set of unique error pairs is small. instead of evaluating the error function for each original voxel, they construct a table of the unique combinations and the number of their occurrences. To evaluate the error, they add the products of the error function for each unique error pair and the frequency of each error pair. This approach dramatically reduces the amount of computation time involved and allows them to re-compute the error associated with a new transfer function quickly.

LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The effect of high-pressure injection of gas on the reservoir volume factor of a crude oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF HIGH-PRESSURE INJECTION OF GAS ON THE RESERVOIR VOLUME FACTOR OF A CRUDE OIL A Thesis By+ BAXTER DS'kONEYCUTT o Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, i957 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECT OF HIGH-PRESSURE INJECTION OF GAS ON THE RESERVOIR VOLUME FACTOR OF A CRUDE OIL A Thesis By BAXTER D. HONEYCUTT Appro d as to style...

Honeycutt, Baxter Bewitt

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Feature Based Rendering for 2D/3D Partial Volume Segmentation Zigang Wang1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feature Based Rendering for 2D/3D Partial Volume Segmentation Datasets Zigang Wang1 and Zhengrong 11794, USA ABSTRACT In this paper, a new feature based rendering algorithm for partial volume is presented. This algorithm utilizes both surface and volume information for the rendering of the partial

74

Feature based volume decomposition for automatic hexahedral mesh generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much progress has been made through these years to achieve automatic hexahedral mesh generation. While general meshing algorithms that can take on general geometry are not there yet; many well-proven automatic meshing algorithms now work on certain classes of geometry. This paper presents a feature based volume decomposition approach for automatic Hexahedral Mesh generation. In this approach, feature recognition techniques are introduced to determine decomposition features from a CAD model. The features are then decomposed and mapped with appropriate automatic meshing algorithms suitable for the correspondent geometry. Thus a formerly unmeshable CAD model may become meshable. The procedure of feature decomposition is recursive: sub-models are further decomposed until either they are matched with appropriate meshing algorithms or no more decomposition features are detected. The feature recognition methods employed are convexity based and use topology and geometry information, which is generally available in BREP solid models. The operations of volume decomposition are also detailed in the paper. The final section, the capability of the feature decomposer is demonstrated over some complicated manufactured parts.

LU,YONG; GADH,RAJIT; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

75

High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part A. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasbility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part A of Volume 3 contains the introduction and plant area conditions which include the following: (1) description of existing conditions-geology; (2) hydrology; (3) terrestrial and aquatic ecology; (4) meteorology; (5) land use existing conditions; (6) archaeology; (7) aesthetics-existing conditions; (8) acoustics; (9) existing socioeconomic conditions; and (10) resource assessment. 25 figures, 55 tables.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Enahancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit W, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. At each site where the techno!o@es were to be demonstrated, petiormance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NO. and 50 percent for SO2. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 67.2% and S02 emissions by 52.6%. For the cyclone-fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9%.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where the technologies were to be demonstrated, performance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NOX and 50 percent for S02. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 67.2?40 and SOZ emissions by 52.6Y0. For the cyclone-fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9Y0.

None

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1 Hanspeter Pfister2 Charles hardware has proven valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the inter- activity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present

Meyer, Miriah

80

Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles Hansen, Chris Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the interactivity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present a novel, image

Utah, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0YearDecade Year-0Base Gas) (Million

82

Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15IndustrialVehicle FuelBase Gas) (Million

83

Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0DecadeWithdrawalsDecadeBase Gas) (Million

84

Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (non-orifice meter studies). Volume 2A. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was conducted to determine unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Measurement Task Force identified the amount of UAF attributable to measurement inaccuracies. Results show that the major residential measurement-related UAF elements, fixed-factor temperature and elevation/barometric pressure effects, contribute to UAF due to assumptions inherent in the billing calculation for average temperature and elevation which are then applied to all residential customers.

Luttrell, D.J.; Noistering, R.H.; Peterson, J.D.; Cowgill, R.M.; Waller, R.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Manganese-based sorbents for coal gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to perform a preliminary screening on a particular Mn-based sorbent, CST-939 (from Chemetals), for hot gas desulfurization. The purpose of the preliminary screening is to determine which temperature and type of coal gas this sorbent demonstrates the greatest capacity and efficiency for sulfur removal. The following conclusions were made from the data collected on the CST-939 sorbent: The sorbent efficiency and capacity are much greater at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) than at 871{degrees}C (1,600{degrees}F). The sorbent efficiency and capacity are much greater in the presence of the more highly-reducing Shell gas than with the less-reducing KRW gas. The sorbent showed tremendous capacity for sulfur pickup, with actual loadings as high as 21 weight percent. Oxidative regeneration at 871{degrees}C (1,600{degrees}F) appeared to decompose sulfate; however, unusually high SO{sub 2} release during the second sulfidations and/or reductive regenerations indicated incomplete regeneration. The average crush strength of the reacted sorbent did not indicate any loss of strength as compared to the fresh sorbent. Superior sorbent performance was obtained in the presence of simulated Shell gas at 538{degrees}C (1,000{degrees}F).

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Fisher, E.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Goyette, W.J. [Chemetals, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Supporting Information Hybrid Tin Oxide-SWNT Nanostructures Based Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S1 Supporting Information Hybrid Tin Oxide-SWNT Nanostructures Based Gas Sensor Syed Mubeen1 , Min) and (c) showing high magnification SEM images of bare SWNTs and SWNTs coated with tin oxide (-0.4 V vs of bare SWNTs and SWNTs coated with tin oxide (-0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl wire, 5 µC) towards a) H2S, b) acetone

89

Regulatory analysis for review and establishment of natural gas curtailment priorities. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall perspective for policy review is in Volume 1. It contains a concise statement of the problem, a list of policy alternatives, all study findings, and an outline of the evaluations which produced the study findings. Volume 2 is a detailed evaluation of each policy alternative, except for the environmental impact assessment in Volume 3. Both Volumes 2 and 3 are designed to add details for the reader who has already studied Volume 1; background in Volume 1 is not repeated in other volumes. Volume 2 should be used to understand the basic causes for the differences in curtailment alternatives presented in Volume 1. It should also be used to gain understanding of how any additional curtailment alternative must be evaluated before it can be safely implemented. This volume also discusses the following basic policy goals which should guide the selection of any policy change: (1) efficiency as measured by shortage costs and supplier costs, (2) equity as measured by fairness among groups, (3) administrative burden as measured by record keeping and implementation problems, and (4) contribution toward special goals such as oil import reduction.

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS SYSTEMS ANALYSIS MODEL (GSAM) VOLUME I - SUMMARY REPORT VOLUME II - USER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIA - RP PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIB - SRPM PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIC - E&P PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIID - D&I PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work completed on DOE Contract DE-AC21-92MC28138, Development of a Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The products developed under this project directly support the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in carrying out its natural gas R&D mission. The objective of this research effort has been to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas market. GSAM has been developed to explicitly evaluate components of the natural gas system, including the entire in-place gas resource base, exploration and development technologies, extraction technology and performance parameters, transportation and storage factors, and end-use demand issues. The system has been fully tested and calibrated and has been used for multiple natural gas metrics analyses at NETL in which metric associated with NETL natural gas upstream R&D technologies and strategies under the direction of NETL has been evaluated. NETL's Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced natural gas. GSAM provides the capability to assess potential and on-going R&D projects using a full fuel cycle, cost-benefit approach. This method yields realistic, market-based assessments of benefits and costs of alternative or related technology advances. GSAM is capable of estimating both technical and commercial successes, quantifying the potential benefits to the market, as well as to other related research. GSAM, therefore, represents an integration of research activities and a method for planning and prioritizing efforts to maximize benefits and minimize costs. Without an analytical tool like GSAM, NETL natural gas upstream R&D activities cannot be appropriately ranked or focused on the most important aspects of natural gas extraction efforts or utilization considerations.

Unknown

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling twin-screw multiphase pump performance during periods of high gas volume fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pumping adds energy to an unprocessed effluent stream acting as a combined pump and compressor, permitting the recovery of oil and gas on an economical basis. In practice, multiphase production is characterized by wide fluctuations in the gas and liquid...

Singh, Aditya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Noise-Based Volume Rendering for the Visualization of Multivariate Volumetric Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to meteorology and ge- ology require the analysis of such multivariate data and are in need of a comprehensiveNoise-Based Volume Rendering for the Visualization of Multivariate Volumetric Data Rostislav-velocity upstream (cyan). This is impossible with normal direct volume rendering (d). Abstract--Analysis

Tierny, Julien

93

Mid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by rising sea level caused by the melting of alpine glaciers and small ice caps and portionsMid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca palaeotemperatures composition of seawater, and estimate continental ice volume and sea-level variability during the Mid

94

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing

96

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic(Million

97

Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar AprCubicDecadeBase Gas)

98

Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)

99

Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0Year Jan Feb MarYear Jan FebBase

100

Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0ExtensionsYearSep-14YearDecadeBase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15YearThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1Base

102

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 (MillionDecade Year-0 Year-1Base

103

Arkansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS98,,,1999,0,0,1e+15,1469,6,01179,"WAT","HY"Tables andA 6 J (Million CubicDecadeBase Gas) (Million

104

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ultrasonic flowmeter offers new approach to large-volume gas measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to provide a measurement tool for performing transmission-pipeline efficiency studies and aid in gas control and intercompany gas transfer. A single path, contrapropagating ultrasonic flowmeter can be calibrated to accurately measure gas flow rates in large-diameter pipelines over a wide range of flows. The agreement between a multiple-run orifice measurement station and the ultrasonic flowmeter is within + 0.5%. Uncertainty in the meter calibration is a function of the ability to predict the flow profile of the gas stream.

Munk, W.D.

1982-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

High-temperature gas-cooled reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning medium-enriched uranium/thorium once-through fuel cycle; medium-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle fuel; high-enrichment uranium-235/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; high-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; and gas-turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room-Temperature Gas Sensing Based on Electron Transfer between Discrete Tin Oxide Nanocrystals and the response time. Rutile-structured tin oxide (SnO2) is an n-type semiconducting material widely used in gas

Chen, Junhong

108

A physics-based emissions model for aircraft gas turbine combustors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a physics-based model of an aircraft gas turbine combustor is developed for predicting NO. and CO emissions. The objective of the model is to predict the emissions of current and potential future gas turbine ...

Allaire, Douglas L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization With Manganese-Based Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a pellet formulation which is capable of achieving low sulfur partial pressures and a high capacity for sulfur, loaded from a hot fuel gas and which is readily regenerable. Furthermore the pellet must be strong for potential use in a fluidized and regenerable over many cycles of loading and regeneration. Regeneration should be in air or oxygen-depleted air to produce a high-concentration sulfur dioxide. Fixed-bed tests were conducted with several formulations of manganese sesquioxide and titania, and alumina. They were subject to a simplified fuel gas of the oxygen-blown Shell type spiked with a 30,000 ppmv concentration of H{sub 2}S. Pellet crush strengths for 4 and 2 mm diameter pellets was typically 12 lbs per pellet and 4 lbs per pellet, respectively. For the most favorable of the formulations tested and under the criteria of break-through at less than 100 ppmv H{sub 2}S and loading temperatures of 5000 {degrees}C and an empty-bed space velocity of 4, 000 per hour, breakthrough occurred an effective loading of sulfur of 27 to 29% over 5 loading and regeneration cycles. At 90% of this saturation condition, the observed level of H{sub 2}S was below 10 ppmv. For regeneration, a temperature of 9000 {degrees}C is required to dissociate the sulfide into sulfur dioxide using air at atmospheric pressure. The mean sulfur dioxide concentration which is achieved during regeneration is 8% with empty-bed space velocities of 700/hr. TGA tests on individual pellets indicate that bentonite is not desirable as a bonding material and that Mn/Ti ratios higher than 7:1 produce relatively non-porous pellets. Whereas the reactivity is rapid below 12% conversion, the kinetics of conversion decreased significantly above this level. This observation may be the result of plugging of the pellet pores with sulfided product creating inaccessible pore volumes or alternately an increase in diffusional resistance by formation of MnS.

Berns, J.J.; Hepworth, M.T. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Research and development of a high efficiency gas-fired water heater. Volume 2. Task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design and development of a cost-effective high efficiency gas-fired water heater to attain a service efficiency of 70% (including the effect of exfiltration) and a service efficiency of 78% (excluding exfiltration) for a 75 GPD draw at a 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, with a stored water to conditioned air temperature difference of 80/sup 0/F, are described in detail. Based on concept evaluation, a non-powered natural draft water heater was chosen as the most cost-effective design to develop. The projected installed cost is $374 compared to $200 for a conventional unit. When the project water heater is compared to a conventional unit, it has a payback of 3.7 years and life cycle savings of $350 to the consumer. A prototype water heater was designed, constructed, and tested. When operated with sealed combustion, the unit has a service efficiency of 66.4% (including the effect of exfiltration) below a burner input of 32,000 Btu/h. In the open combustion configuration, the unit operated at a measured efficiency of 66.4% Btu/h (excluding exfiltration). This compares with a service efficiency of 51.3% for a conventional water heater and 61% for a conventional high efficiency unit capable of meeting ASHRAE 90-75. Operational tests showed the unit performed well with no evidence of stacking or hot spots. It met or exceeded all capacity or usage tests specified in the program test plan and met all emission goals. Future work will concentrate on designing, building, and testing pre-production units. It is anticipated that both sealed combustion and open draft models will be pursued.

Vasilakis, A.D.; Pearson, J.F.; Gerstmann, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Transactions of NAMRI/SME 79 Volume 31, 2003 FEM BASED PROCESS DESIGN FOR LASER FORMING OF DOUBLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transactions of NAMRI/SME 79 Volume 31, 2003 FEM BASED PROCESS DESIGN FOR LASER FORMING OF DOUBLY form- ing process. #12;Transactions of NAMRI/SME 80 Volume 31, 2003 Edwardson, et al. (2001

Yao, Y. Lawrence

113

Transaction-Based Building Controls Framework, Volume 1: Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document proposes a framework concept to achieve the objectives of raising buildings’ efficiency and energy savings potential benefitting building owners and operators. We call it a transaction-based framework, wherein mutually-beneficial and cost-effective market-based transactions can be enabled between multiple players across different domains. Transaction-based building controls are one part of the transactional energy framework. While these controls realize benefits by enabling automatic, market-based intra-building efficiency optimizations, the transactional energy framework provides similar benefits using the same market -based structure, yet on a larger scale and beyond just buildings, to the society at large.

Somasundaram, Sriram; Pratt, Robert G.; Akyol, Bora A.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Foster, Nikolas AF; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Somani, Abhishek; Steckley, Andrew C.; Taylor, Zachary T.

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Optimum operating parameters for zinc ferrite such as temperatures, gas compositions, and space velocities are discussed. From the test results, salient features of zinc ferrite were derived and discussed in regard to system implications, issues raised, and technical requirements. 47 refs., 53 figs., 41 tabs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and distinguished from other chemical species that may be simultaneously present, is particularly challenging. Aside from the laboratory-based method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), where samples may be collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or cryofocusing, the other major approaches for gas-phase detection employ lasers typically operating in the mid-infrared wavelength region. While mass spectrometry can readily detect noble gases - the helium leak detector is an obvious example - laser-based methods such as infrared (IR) or Raman spectroscopy are completely insensitive to them as their monatomic nature precludes a non-zero dipole moment or changes in polarizability upon excitation. Therefore, noble gases can only be detected by one of two methods: (1) atomic emission spectroscopies which require the generation of plasmas through laser-induced breakdown, electrical arcing, or similar means; (2) non-spectroscopic methods which measure one or more physical properties (e.g., mass, thermal conductivity, density). In this report, we present our progress during Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) in the research and development of a non-spectroscopic method for noble gas detection. During Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), we demonstrated via proof-of-concept experiments that the combination of thermal conductivity detection (TCD) and coating-free damped resonance detection (CFDRD) using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could provide selective sensing of these inert species. Since the MEMS-based TCD technology was directly adapted from a brassboard prototype commissioned by a previous chemical sensing project, FY11 efforts focused on advancing the state of the newer CFDRD method. This work, guided by observations previously reported in the open literature, has not only resulted in a substantially measureable increase in selectivity but has also revealed a potential method for mitigating or eliminating thermal drift that does not require a secondary reference sensor. The design of an apparatus to test this drift compensation scheme will be described. We will conclude this report with a discussion of planned efforts in Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12).

Loui, A; McCall, S K

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Field evaluation of cofiring gas with coal for quantifying operational benefits and emissions trim in a utility boiler. Volume 2. Topical report, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume consists of 14 appendixes to accompany volume 1 of the report, and covers the following test data: analysis of coal, fylash, and bottom ash samples; cleanliness factors; slagging observation record sheets; stack opacity measurements; stack sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides measurements; total coal flow; fuel gas flow; furnace exit gas temperature; percent oxygen at economizer outlet; percent excess air; bulk steam temperatures at secondary superheater and reheater outlets; secondary superheater and reheater tube outlet leg temperatures; unit heat rate; and models used for data interpretation.

Clark, K.J.; Torbov, T.S.; Impey, R.J.; Hara, K.G.; Burnett, T.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa Department of Structural systems. No models are available in literature to measure the performance of natural gas network of natural or manmade hazard which might lead to the disruption of the system. The gas distribution network

Bruneau, Michel

118

Wood Pellets for UBC Boilers Replacing Natural Gas Based on LCA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Pellets for UBC Boilers Replacing Natural Gas Based on LCA Submitted to Dr. Bi By Bernard Chan Pellets for UBC Boilers Replacing Natural Gas" By Bernard Chan, Brian Chan, and Christopher Young Abstract This report studies the feasibility of replacing natural gas with wood pellets for UBC boilers. A gasification

119

Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications Alexander Singh industrial applications such as the smart grid and oil and gas are continuously monitored. The massive to positively impact the bottom line. In the oil and gas industry, modern oil rigs are outfitted with thousands

Slatton, Clint

120

A Multimedia Workflow-Based Collaborative Engineering Environment for Oil & Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Multimedia Workflow-Based Collaborative Engineering Environment for Oil & Gas Industry Ismael H the control and execution of large and complex industrial projects in oil and gas industry. The environment governmental oil & gas company. The necessity of collaboration is especially acute in the field of computer

Barbosa, Alberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-DissolvedSummary" ,"ClickVolume

122

Condition Based Monitoring of Gas Turbine Combustion Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop sensors that allow condition based monitoring of critical combustion parts of gas turbines. Siemens teamed with innovative, small companies that were developing sensor concepts that could monitor wearing and cracking of hot turbine parts. A magnetic crack monitoring sensor concept developed by JENTEK Sensors, Inc. was evaluated in laboratory tests. Designs for engine application were evaluated. The inability to develop a robust lead wire to transmit the signal long distances resulted in a discontinuation of this concept. An optical wear sensor concept proposed by K Sciences GP, LLC was tested in proof-of concept testing. The sensor concept depended, however, on optical fiber tips wearing with the loaded part. The fiber tip wear resulted in too much optical input variability; the sensor could not provide adequate stability for measurement. Siemens developed an alternative optical wear sensor approach that used a commercial PHILTEC, Inc. optical gap sensor with an optical spacer to remove fibers from the wearing surface. The gap sensor measured the length of the wearing spacer to follow loaded part wear. This optical wear sensor was developed to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. It was validated in lab tests and installed on a floating transition seal in an F-Class gas turbine. Laboratory tests indicate that the concept can measure wear on loaded parts at temperatures up to 800{degrees}C with uncertainty of < 0.3 mm. Testing in an F-Class engine installation showed that the optical spacer wore with the wearing part. The electro-optics box located outside the engine enclosure survived the engine enclosure environment. The fiber optic cable and the optical spacer, however, both degraded after about 100 operating hours, impacting the signal analysis.

Ulerich, Nancy; Kidane, Getnet; Spiegelberg, Christine; Tevs, Nikolai

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

BRANCH AND CUT BASED ON THE VOLUME ALGORITHM ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engine should exhibit similar behavior as one based on the VA, since both LP ...... Also, an external magnetic field can be present or not, this is modelled by an

124

National Solar Radiation Data Base (1961-1990). Final technical report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) for the United States was completed in September 1992. This was the final product of four years of work under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. The NSRDB contains 30 years of hourly data for five solar radiation elements and 15 meteorological elements for 239 sites. The user`s manual (NSRDB-Volume 1, 1992) for the NSRDB provides detailed information on the structure of the data base and the products that have been produced from it. Most users of the data base will find all of the information that they need in Volume 1. Volume 2 has been written primarily for researchers who need more information about the methods employed in producing the data base. In addition to research results, we have included information on practical lessons learned from this project. Therefore, Volume 2 should be of value to anyone developing a similar data base for other regions or other countries. Most of the solar radiation data in the NSRDB and the previous SOLMET (SOLar METeorological) data base were generated by computer models. Therefore, a major part of this report is centered around the METeorological/STATistical (METSTAT) model (Section 3.0), its input data (Sections 5.0 and 6.0), its use in producing the NSRDB (Sections 4.0 and 7.0), and comparisons with the models used in producing the SOLMET data base (Section 10.0).

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural Gas Expected

126

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-DissolvedSummary"Gas,PlantNet

127

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (BillionShare ofNet WithdrawalsVolume

128

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePrice (Dollars perNet WithdrawalsVolume

129

,"Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved NaturalPriceLNGNet WithdrawalsVolume

130

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheetDryCrudeVolume

131

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed Methane ProvedShaleCrudeNetVolume

132

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbedShale Proved+Net WithdrawalsVolume

133

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice Sold toResidential ConsumptionNet WithdrawalsVolume

134

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPrice Sold to Electric PowerNet WithdrawalsVolume

135

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice Sold to9"3LNG StorageNetVolume

136

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves in NonproducingU.S. UndergroundVolume (MMcf)"

137

,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNet

138

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,PriceNet

139

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After LeasePriceNet

140

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDry Natural GasCrude Oil +Price

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves inDry Natural GasPlant Liquids, ExpectedNet

142

U.S. Natural Gas Supply to 2030 Larry Hughes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LNG Total Figure 1: U.S. natural gas supply (reference case) It should be noted that this is the reference case; the "side cases", based upon the volume of projected LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports gas supply projections for 2030 (TCF) Production Low LNG Reference High LNG Dry gas 21.99 20.83 19

Hughes, Larry

143

Lagrangian Relaxation Based Decompositon for Well Scheduling in Shale-gas Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian Relaxation Based Decompositon for Well Scheduling in Shale-gas Systems Brage Rugstad of mid and late-life wells in shale-gas systems. This state of the wells can be prevented by performing. In this paper, we present a Lagrangian relaxation based scheme for shut-in scheduling of distributed shale multi

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

144

ISSN:1369 7021 Elsevier Ltd 2007NOVEMBER 2007 | VOLUME 10 | NUMBER 1128 Polymer-based solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

molecular design. Charge carrier mobilities are A significant fraction of the cost of solar panels comesISSN:1369 7021 © Elsevier Ltd 2007NOVEMBER 2007 | VOLUME 10 | NUMBER 1128 Polymer-based solar cells Conjugated polymers are excellent candidates for use in low-cost electronics and photovoltaics (PV)1. Polymer

McGehee, Michael

145

Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

Not Available

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Control method for mixed refrigerant based natural gas liquefier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a natural gas liquefaction system having a refrigerant storage circuit, a refrigerant circulation circuit in fluid communication with the refrigerant storage circuit, and a natural gas liquefaction circuit in thermal communication with the refrigerant circulation circuit, a method for liquefaction of natural gas in which pressure in the refrigerant circulation circuit is adjusted to below about 175 psig by exchange of refrigerant with the refrigerant storage circuit. A variable speed motor is started whereby operation of a compressor is initiated. The compressor is operated at full discharge capacity. Operation of an expansion valve is initiated whereby suction pressure at the suction pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 30 psig and discharge pressure at the discharge pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 350 psig. Refrigerant vapor is introduced from the refrigerant holding tank into the refrigerant circulation circuit until the suction pressure is reduced to below about 15 psig, after which flow of the refrigerant vapor from the refrigerant holding tank is terminated. Natural gas is then introduced into a natural gas liquefier, resulting in liquefaction of the natural gas.

Kountz, Kenneth J. (Palatine, IL); Bishop, Patrick M. (Chicago, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Sub-$\\rm ?^{3}$-Volume Cantilever-based Fabry-Pérot Cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the realization of an open plane-concave Fabry-P\\'erot resonator with a mode volume of $\\lambda^3/2$ at optical frequencies. We discuss some of the unconventional features of this new microcavity regime and show that the ultrasmall mode volume allows us to detect cavity resonance shifts induced by single nanoparticles even at quality factors as low as $120$. Being based on low-reflectivity micromirrors fabricated on a silicon cantilever, our experimental arrangement provides broadband operation, tunability of the cavity resonance, lateral scanning and promise for optomechanical studies.

Hrishikesh Kelkar; Daqing Wang; Diego Martín-Cano; Björn Hoffmann; Silke Christiansen; Stephan Götzinger; Vahid Sandoghdar

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hot-gas filter manufacturing assessments: Volume 5. Final report, April 15, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of advanced filtration media for advanced fossil-fueled power generating systems is a critical step in meeting the performance and emissions requirements for these systems. While porous metal and ceramic candle-filters have been available for some time, the next generation of filters will include ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), intermetallic alloys, and alternate filter geometries. The goal of this effort was to perform a cursory review of the manufacturing processes used by 5 companies developing advanced filters from the perspective of process repeatability and the ability for their processes to be scale-up to production volumes. It was found that all of the filter manufacturers had a solid understanding of the product development path. Given that these filters are largely developmental, significant additional work is necessary to understand the process-performance relationships and projecting manufacturing costs. While each organization had specific needs, some common among all of the filter manufacturers were access to performance testing of the filters to aide process/product development, a better understanding of the stresses the filters will see in service for use in structural design of the components, and a strong process sensitivity study to allow optimization of processing.

Boss, D.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Emission MitigationGreenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Afforestation, Forest management, Biofuels, Ag soil, Animals, Fertilization, Rice, Grassland expansion, Manure of Biofuel strategies Examine the dynamics of mitigation strategies #12;PolicyPolicy ContextContext U

McCarl, Bruce A.

150

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Words): Use of biofuels diminishes fossil fuel combustion thereby also reducing net greenhouse gasEconomic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Uwe A. Schneider emissions. However, subsidies are needed to make agricultural biofuel production economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

151

Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

RAPID COMMUNICATION CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback diode laser will be described. The CW TEC DFB- moelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced land-based gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Program Winter 2001 Summary: for metallic components of large, land-based gas turbines call for the use of single crystal airfoils... . The complexity of the manufacture of...

155

Gas separation device based on electrical swing adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for separating one constituent, especially carbon dioxide, from a fluid mixture, such as natural gas. The fluid mixture flows through an adsorbent member having an affinity for molecules of the one constituent, the molecules being adsorbed on the adsorbent member. A voltage is applied to the adsorbent member, the voltage imparting a current flow which causes the molecules of the one constituent to be desorbed from the adsorbent member.

Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cooling an electron gas using quantum dot based electronic refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experience of working towards a PhD has been a combination of satisfaction, frustration, fun, and tedium. Occasionally it was all these in a single day. However, I have learnt a huge amount and I am indebted to all the people who gave their time and shared... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3 Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Background 5 2.1 Low-dimensional electronic devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.1 The 2D electron gas in GaAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2...

Prance, Jonathan Robert

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gas adsorption isotherm equation based on vacancy solution theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pennsylvania State University's new isotherm equation for pure gas adsorption treats the adsorption equilbrium as an osmotic equilibrium between two ''vacancy'' solutions having different compositions. One solution represents the gas phase and the other the adsorbed phase. The vacancy solution is composed of adsorbates and vacancies (imaginary entities defined as the vacuum space that acts as the solvent for the system). Penn State evaluated the developed correlation against published adsorption-isotherm data for O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, and CO on zeolite 10X and for light hydrocarbons (CH/sub 4/ to nC/sub 4/H/sub 10/) and CO/sub 2/ on Nuxit-AL activated carbon. For both adsorbents, the correlations were closer than those obtained by any other adsorption model that has been extended to gas mixtures. The new method can also represent multicomponent systems because the activity coefficient governing the nonideality of adsorbed mixtures can be readily calculated from binary parameters. These are obtained from single-component adsorption data by a procedure analogous to a bulk solution.

Suwanayuen, S.; Danner, R.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342Cubic Feet)

159

Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade Year-0ThousandYearYear Jan Feb

160

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3Year JanDecade

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384FuelYear Jan FebYearYear Jan

162

Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 A SILICON-BASED MICRO GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR POWER GENERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 A SILICON-BASED MICRO GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR POWER GENERATION X. C. Our research aims to develop a micro power generation systems based on micro gas turbine engine and a piezoelectric converter, as illustrated in Fig. 1 [6]. The micro gas turbine engine is composed of a centrifugal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

High sensitivity gas sensor based on high-Q suspended polymer photonic crystal nanocavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-sensitivity, multi-use optical gas sensors based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal cavity. These devices are implemented in versatile, flexible polymer materials which swell when in contact with a target gas, causing a measurable cavity length change. This change causes a shift in the cavity resonance, allowing precision measurements of gas concentration. We demonstrate suspended polymer nanocavity sensors and the recovery of sensors after the removal of stimulant gas from the system. With a measured quality factor exceeding 10{sup 4}, we show measurements of gas concentration as low as 600 parts per million (ppm) and an experimental sensitivity of 10?ppm; furthermore, we predict detection levels in the parts-per-billion range for a variety of gases.

Clevenson, Hannah, E-mail: hannahac@mit.edu; Desjardins, Pierre; Gan, Xuetao; Englund, Dirk, E-mail: englund@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary major deposit of manganese in the US which can be readily mined by an in situ process is located in the Emily district of Minnesota. The US Bureau of Mines Research Centers at both the Twin Cities and Salt Lake City have developed a process for extracting and refining manganese in the form of a high-purity carbonate product. This product has been formulated into pellets by a multi-step process of drying, calcination, and induration to produce relatively high-strength formulations which are capable of being used for hot fuel gas desulfurization. These pellets, which have been developed at the University of Minnesota under joint sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and the US Bureau of Mines, appear superior to other, more expensive, formulations of zinc titanate and zinc ferrite which have previously been studied for multi-cycle loading (desulfurization) and regeneration (evolution of high-strength SO{sub 2} and restoration of pellet reactivity). Although these other formulations have been under development for the past twelve years, their prices still exceed $7 per pound. If manganese pellets perform as predicted in fixed bed testing, and if a significant number of utilities which burn high-sulfur coals incorporate combined-cycle gasification with hot coal gas desulfurization as a viable means of increasing conversion efficiencies, then the potential market for manganese pellets may be as high as 200,000 tons per year at a price not less than $3 per pound. This paper discusses the role of manganese pellets in the desulfurization process with respect to the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) for power generation.

Hepworth, M.T.; Ben-Slimane, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

HIGH-RESOLUTION FINITE VOLUME METHODS FOR DUSTY GAS JETS AND MARICA PELANTI AND RANDALL J. LEVEQUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(since the sound speed is zero in the absence of pressure) and have a degenerate structure in which delta is lower than the sound speed of the pure gas phase, and can be substantially lower at high dust densities" (though in some contexts it could represent liquid droplets) and the mixture as a "dusty gas". Dusty gas

LeVeque, Randy

166

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

168

Surfactant based imbibition and induced solution gas drive process: investigation by nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drive mechanism. This imbibition and induced solution gas drive study employed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to monitor and characterize the progress of oil recovery inside the rock sample core. A specially designed core...SURFACTANT BASED IMBIBITION AND INDUCED SOLUTION GAS DRIVE PROCESS: INVESTIGATION BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE A Thesis by JAMES CALVIN COX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Cox, James Calvin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Novel Graphene-Based Inkjet-Printed WISP-Enabled Wireless Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Graphene-Based Inkjet-Printed WISP- Enabled Wireless Gas Sensor Taoran Le, Vasileios thin films produced from environmentally friendly, water-based, inkjet printed graphene oxide (GO) ink is achieved using the graphene thin films, with over 30% of material recovery observed within 5 minutes

Tentzeris, Manos

170

Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) BaseSep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14Year Jan FebBase

171

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecadeFeet) YearTotalDecadeVented andBase

173

U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousand CubicPropane,Feet) Base

174

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Simulator for unconventional gas resources multi-dimensional model SUGAR-MD. Volume I. Reservoir model analysis and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are: (1) To develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales. (2) To determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales. (3) To recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales. (4) To analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance. (5) To study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. The flow equations that are the mathematical basis of the two-dimensional model are presented. It is assumed that gas transport to producing wells in Devonian shale reservoirs occurs through a natural fracture system into which matrix blocks of contrasting physical properties deliver contained gas. That is, the matrix acts as a uniformly distributed gas source in a fracture medium. Gas desorption from pore walls is treated as a uniformly distributed source within the matrix blocks. 24 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Around the world, volatile oil and retrograde gas reservoirs are considered as complex thermodynamic systems and even more when they exhibit vertical composition variations. Those… (more)

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

EIT Based Gas Detector Design by Using Michelson Interferometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is one of the interesting phenomena of light-matter interaction which modifies matter properties for propagation of light. In other words, we can change the absorption and refractive index (RI) in neighborhood of the resonant frequency using EIT. In this paper, we have doped 3-level quantum dots in one of the Michelson Interferometer's mirror and used EIT to change its RI. So, a controllable phase difference between lights in two arms of interferometer is created. Long response time is the main drawback of Michelson interferometer based sensor, which is resolved by this technique.

Abbasian, K.; Rostami, A. [School of Engineering Emerging-Technologies, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51666 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, M. H. [Tabriz Oil Refining Company, Tabriz-Azarshahr freeway, Sardorud forked road, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan MonthlyProduction%Reserves Based

179

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear Jan Feb MarFeet)BasedProduction

180

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 KentuckyYearDecadeBarrels) Reserves Based

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Louisiana--South Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)Based Production (Million Barrels)Production

182

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)Based ProductionReservesProduction (Million

183

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)BasedFeet) Proved ReservesProduction

184

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)BasedFeet)(Million Barrels)

185

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)BasedFeet)(Million

186

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87 1967-2010Barrels) Reserves Based Production

187

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam CoalReserves (MillionYear Jan FebFoot)Barrels) Reserves Based

188

Joint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling-based stochastic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypothesis using a sampling-based stochastic model, based on a typical situation of gas explorationJoint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling- based stochastic model Jinsong Chen*, G. Michael Hoversten, and D. W. Vasco, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Chen, Jinsong

189

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine component  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine in gas turbine compressors. However, the model disc (blisk) designs which are used by the aerospace industry in gas turbine compressors. The tool

Sóbester, András

191

Baseline data on utilization of low-grade fuels in gas turbine applications. Volume 3. Emissions evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of field tests was conducted on two residual-oil-fired gas turbine/heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) comprising a Westinghouse PACE 260-MW combined-cycle unit. The objective of these tests was to determine base load emission levels (1) with and without afterburners in service, (2) with and without water injection, and (3) following a turbine wash. A brief series of tests was also made at reduced operating loads. Emission measurements included (1) gaseous constituents measured by continuous monitoring instrumentation (O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, NO, NO/sub x/, and SO/sub 2/) and by wet chemistry methods (SO/sub 3/, aldehydes, and chlorides) and (2) particulate characteristics (mass loading, smoke spot number, submicron particle size, and particle morphology). Corrected NO/sub x/ emissions at base load were 170 ppM (690 lb/h) and 200 ppM (625 lb/h) with and without HRSG afterburners in service, respectively. NO/sub x/ emissions decreased with water injection by 50% and were unchanged with the turbine wash. NO/sub x/ increased with load. Particulate mass loading at the HRSG stack (EPA Method 5) increased from 0.05 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu to 0.08 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu with the use of supplemental firing during non-sootblowing periods. Operation with sootblowing significantly increased these levels. CO emissions and smoke spot numbers were low for all test conditions, increasing slightly with afterburner firing, water injection, and reduced load. SO/sub 3/ and aldehyde emissions were less than 1 ppM for all tests.

Sonnichsen, T.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Natural gas monthly, April 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost effective energy projects at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Patrick AFB which is located south of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume.2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance, and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value and value index of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Elliott, D.B.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Reusable Calcium-Based Sorbent for Desulfurizing Hot Coal Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project has been to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. The sorbent should be strong, durable, inexpensive to manufacture, and capable of being reused many times. To achieve these objectives the project has focused on the development of the very promising core-in-shell sorbent.

Wheelock, T.D.; Hasler, D.J.L.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

196

High Temperature Flue Gas Desulfurization In Moving Beds With Regenerable Copper Based Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop new and improved regenerable copper based sorbent for high temperature flue gas desulfurization in a moving bed application. The targeted areas of sorbent improvement included higher effective capacity, strength and long-term durability for improved process control and economic utilization of the sorbent.

Cengiz, P.A.; Ho, K.K.; Abbasian, J.; Lau, F.S.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

198

SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are requested in several fields such as applications [1], fuel cell [2], radioactive waste storage and diverse selectivity of a sensor includes the addition of a catalyst to the tin oxide powder. In the case of hydrogen1 SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION G

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Analytical investigations of the earthquake resistance of the support base of an oil-gas platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In designing stationary oil-gas recovery platforms on the continental shelf, the need arises to compute the estimated strength of their support base during seismic events. This paper is devoted to this estimation. The paper examines a structure consisting of the superstructure of an oil-gas platform and its gravity-type base. It is possible to install earthquake-insulating supports between them. Calculations performed for the design earthquake indicated that the design of the gravity base can resist a seismic effect without special additional measures. During the maximum design earthquake, moreover, significant stresses may develop in the zone of base where the columns are connected to the upper slab of the caisson. In that case, the earthquake insulation considered for the top of the platform becomes critical.

Glagovskii, V. B.; Kassirova, N. A.; Turchina, O. A.; Finagenov, O. M.; Tsirukhin, N. A. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Method and apparatus for measuring the state of charge in a battery based on volume of battery components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The state of charge of electrochemical batteries of different kinds is determined by measuring the incremental change in the total volume of the reactive masses in the battery. The invention is based on the principle that all electrochemical batteries, either primary or secondary (rechargeable), produce electricity through a chemical reaction with at least one electrode, and the chemical reactions produce certain changes in the composition and density of the electrode. The reactive masses of the electrodes, the electrolyte, and any separator or spacers are usually contained inside a battery casing of a certain volume. As the battery is used, or recharged, the specific volume of at least one of the electrode masses will change and, since the masses of the materials do not change considerably, the total volume occupied by at least one of the electrodes will change. These volume changes may be measured in many different ways and related to the state of charge in the battery. In one embodiment, the volume change can be measured by monitoring the small changes in one of the principal dimensions of the battery casing as it expands or shrinks to accommodate the combined volumes of its components.

Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Around the world, volatile oil and retrograde gas reservoirs are considered as complex thermodynamic systems and even more when they exhibit vertical composition variations. Those systems must be characterized by an equation of state (EOS...

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Suppressing Riser-Based Slugging in Multiphase Flow by State Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the system, x1 is the total mass of gas in the volume upstream of the riser base (volume one), x2 is the total mass of gas in the riser (volum or vertical pipe sections, and is potentially damaging to downstream processing equipment such as separators

Foss, Bjarne A.

204

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 9, Formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Middle America Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Pacific margin of Mexico and Central America, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments are also included in this report. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 150 refs., 84 figs., 17 tabs.

Finley, P.; Krason, J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effective Lone Star program reduces unaccounted-for gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lone Star's program for holding down its gas losses implements individual remedies for each of six broad categories of unaccounted-for gas: measurement at other than base conditions, meter inaccuracy, meter-reading errors, accounting mistakes, unmetered or unrecorded gas use, and leakage. Even though some of these remedies will not be fully effective for 2 more years, the program's first year of operation has reduced unaccounted-for gas volumes by 9.2%.

Wallace, J.E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

Dirksen, Ruud

207

PHYSICAL REVIEW 8 VOLUME NVMBEH. 4 &5 I.ESHUAHY Nonadditive forces and vacancies in rare-gas crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW 8 VOLUME NVMBEH. 4 &5 I.ESHUAHY»» Nonadditive forces and vacancies in rare since overlap between adjacent atoms is small. A molecular model of the vacancy problem is set up. It is then seen that short-range three-body forces contribute a negligible fraction of the vacancy formation

Glyde, Henry R.

208

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Parallel High-Order Anisotropic Block-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Finite-Volume Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in propulsion systems (e.g., gas turbine engines and solid propellant rocket motors); (ii) compressible flows

Groth, Clinton P. T.

210

Particle-based Sampling and Meshing of Surfaces in Multimaterial Volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a variety of fields, from biomedical computing and computer animation to oil-and-gas explo- ration

Utah, University of

211

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Empty Space Skipping and Occlusion Clipping for Texture-based Volume Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

voxels, we introduce the concept of orthogonal opacity map, that simplifies the transformation between the volume coor- dinates and the opacity map coordinates, which is intensively used for occlusion detection. The map is updated efficiently by the GPU. The sub-volumes are then culled and clipped against the opacity

Mueller, Klaus

215

Selective gas adsorption in a magnesium-based metalorganic Young Eun Cheon, Jungeun Park and Myunghyun Paik Suh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective gas adsorption in a magnesium-based metal­organic frameworkw Young Eun Cheon, Jungeun magnesium-based porous metal­ organic framework exhibits thermal stability up to 500 1C and selective gas interpenetrated magnesium- based MOF, [Mg(TCPBDA)(H2O)2]Á6DMFÁ6H2O (1), where TCPBDA2� is N,N,N0 ,N0 -tetrakis(4

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

216

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Experimental analysis and model-based optimization of microalgae growth in photo-bioreactors using flue gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental analysis and model-based optimization of microalgae growth in photo-bioreactors using]. Besides physical and chemical methods for sequestration of CO2 from flue gas [2], microalgae culture holds great potential for converting flue gas to biomass. Microalgae can capture solar energy more efficiently

Subramanian, Venkat

218

SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data Jin Yu of Aberdeen Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, UK {jyu, ereiter, jhunter, ssripada}@csd.abdn.ac.uk Abstract: SumTime-Turbine produces textual summaries of archived time- series data from gas turbines. These summaries should help

Reiter, Ehud

219

A Cercla-Based Decision Model to Support Remedy Selection for an Uncertain Volume of Contaminants at a DOE Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) operated by the Department of Energy is challenged with selecting the appropriate remediation technology to cleanup contaminants at Waste Area Group (WAG) 6. This research utilizes value-focused thinking and multiattribute preference theory concepts to produce a decision analysis model designed to aid the decision makers in their selection process. The model is based on CERCLA's five primary balancing criteria, tailored specifically to WAG 6 and the contaminants of concern, utilizes expert opinion and the best available engineering, cost, and performance data, and accounts for uncertainty in contaminant volume. The model ranks 23 remediation technologies (trains) in their ability to achieve the CERCLA criteria at various contaminant volumes. A sensitivity analysis is performed to examine the effects of changes in expert opinion and uncertainty in volume. Further analysis reveals how volume uncertainty is expected to affect technology cost, time and ability to meet the CERCLA criteria. The model provides the decision makers with a CERCLA-based decision analysis methodology that is objective, traceable, and robust to support the WAG 6 Feasibility Study. In addition, the model can be adjusted to address other DOE contaminated sites.

Christine E. Kerschus

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ?Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP systems.

Menart, James A. [Wright State University

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ���¢��������Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.���¢������� The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP system

James A Menart, Professor

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ?2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated from amplitude-based gating are larger and more accurate, at levels that are potentially clinically significant, compared with those from temporal phase-based gating.

Jani, Shyam S., E-mail: sjani@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 2: Long-term monitoring and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. This is the second volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. The first volume described the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. This second volume updates and completes the presentation of data to compare performance of fresh coatings with weathered coatings.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus patient's effort. On average, turbine-based ventilators performed better than conventional ventilators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A High Performance Computing Platform for Performing High-Volume Studies With Windows-based Power Grid Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serial Windows-based programs are widely used in power utilities. For applications that require high volume simulations, the single CPU runtime can be on the order of days or weeks. The lengthy runtime, along with the availability of low cost hardware, is leading utilities to seriously consider High Performance Computing (HPC) techniques. However, the vast majority of the HPC computers are still Linux-based and many HPC applications have been custom developed external to the core simulation engine without consideration for ease of use. This has created a technical gap for applying HPC-based tools to today’s power grid studies. To fill this gap and accelerate the acceptance and adoption of HPC for power grid applications, this paper presents a prototype of generic HPC platform for running Windows-based power grid programs on Linux-based HPC environment. The preliminary results show that the runtime can be reduced from weeks to hours to improve work efficiency.

Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lattice Boltzmann method and gas-kinetic BGK scheme in the low-Mach number viscous flow simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and collisions process. On the other hand, the gas-kinetic BGK scheme is a finite volume scheme, where the timeLattice Boltzmann method and gas-kinetic BGK scheme in the low-Mach number viscous flow simulations method (LBM) and the gas-kinetic BGK scheme are based on the numerical discretization of the Boltzmann

Xu, Kun

231

Size distribution of recruited alveolar volumes in airway reopening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the reopening process can influence the distribution of recruited alveolar volumes and, hence, gas distribution of recruited alveolar volumes that become available for gas exchange during inflation from important quantity is the amount of alveolar volume available for gas exchange. This alveolar volume

Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

232

System and method for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a monte carlo based particle transport grid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method is disclosed for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a particle transport grid. In a first step of the method voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass are received. A second step in the method defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion. A third step in the method calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A fourth step in the method identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a fifth step in the method calculates radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes. A common volume calculation module inputs voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass, inputs voxel mass densities corresponding to a density of the target mass within each of the voxel volumes, defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion, and calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A dosel mass module, multiplies the common volumes by corresponding voxel mass densities to obtain incremental dosel masses, and adds the incremental dosel masses corresponding to the dosel volumes to obtain dosel masses. A radiation transport module identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a dose calculation module, coupled to the common volume calculation module and the radiation transport module, for calculating radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes.

Bergstrom, Paul M. (Livermore, CA); Daly, Thomas P. (Livermore, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA); Patterson, Jr., Ralph W. (Livermore, CA); Schach von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA); Garrett, Dewey N. (Livermore, CA); House, Ronald K. (Tracy, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L. (Livermore, CA); Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Fujino, Donald H. (San Leandro, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Volume 1, Quarterly report No. 5, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth quarterly report for this project. This project is divided into three phases. Phase 1, which has been completed, involved design, engineering, and procurement for the CZD system, duct and facility modifications, and supporting equipment. Phase 2, also completed, included equipment acquisition and installation, facility construction, startup, and operator training for parametric testing. Phase 3 broadly covers testing, operation and disposition, but only a portion of Phase 3 was included in Budget Period 1. That portion was concerned with parametric testing of the CZD system to establish the optimum conditions for an extended, one-year, continuous demonstration. As of December 31, 1991, the following goals have been achieved. (1) Nozzle Selection - A modified Spraying Systems Company (SSC) atomizing nozzle has been selected for the one-year continuous CZD demonstration. (2) SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} Reduction - Preliminary confirmation of 50% SO{sub 2} reduction has been achieved, but the NO{sub x} reduction target cannot be confirmed at this time. (3) Lime Selection - Testing indicated an injection rate of 40 to 50 gallons per minute with a lime slurry concentration of 8 to 10% to achieve 50% SO{sub 2} reduction. There has been no selection of the lime to be used in the one year demonstration. (4) ESP Optimization - Tests conducted to date have shown that lime injection has a very beneficial effect on ESP performance, and little adjustment may be necessary. (5) SO{sub 2} Removal Costs - Testing has not revealed any significant departure from the bases on which Bechtel`s original cost estimates (capital and operating) were prepared. Therefore, SO{sub 2} removal costs are still expected to be in the range of $300/ton or less.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Natural gas monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

236

Published in `AI Communications 9 journal', pp1-17. Published by IOS Press (1996) TIGERTM: Knowledge Based Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Knowledge Based Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring Dr. Robert Milne and Dr. Charlie Nicol Intelligent, 11 Colon, Barcelona, 08222 Terrassa. Spain 1. INTRODUCTION Given the critical nature of gas turbines and increasing the availability of the gas turbine. Routine preventative maintenance techniques have been used

Travé-Massuyès, Louise

237

Development of a hydrogen generator based on the partial oxidation of natural gas integrated with PEFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As is well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas. A valid alternative could be a process based on partial oxidation of methane, since the process is mildly exothermic and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed. This paper covers the activities, performed by CNR Institute Transformation and Storage of Energy, Messina, Italy, on theoretical and experimental studies for a compact hydrogen generator, via catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane, integrated with a PEFC (Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell). In particular, the project focuses the attention on methane partial oxidation via heterogeneous selective catalysts, in order to: demonstrate the basic Catalytic Selective Partial Oxidation of Methane (CSPOM) technology in a subscale prototype, equivalent to a nominal output of 5 kWe; develop the CSPOM technology for its application in electric energy production by means of fuel cells; assess, by a balance of plant analysis, and a techno-economic evaluation, the potential benefits of the CSPOM for different categories of fuel cells.

Recupero, V.; Pino, L.; Di Leonardo, R.; Lagana, M. [Inst. CNR-TAE, Messina (Italy)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

17th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers presented at the following sessions: adsorption; noble gas treatment; personnel education and training; filtration and filter testing; measurement and instrumentation; air cleaning equipment response to accident related stress; containment venting air cleaning; and an open end session. Twenty-eight papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. Ten papers had been entered earlier.

First, M.W. (ed.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Volume 158,number 3,4 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS YJune 1989 ION MIGRATION FOLLOWING CHARGE TRANSFER REACTIONS IN RARE-GAS SOLIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that photoinduced charge transfer processes in rare-gas solids, such as Xe+C& +2hv+ Xe+Cl- +Cl result in highly of photochemical processes in rare-gas solids is motivated in part by the fact that these sys- tems act as solvents crystals or rare-gas solids [ 2 1.In most studied processes, the rare-gas solid seems in- deed to act

Apkarian, V. Ara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fast Model Based Approximation of the Closed-loop Performance Limits of Gas/Liquid Inline Separators for Accelerated Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trend in the oil and gas (exploration & production) industry is to use compact ­centrifugal forces based the centrifugal forces necessary for separating the light from the heavy component. The resulting separation force) to keep the downstream pumps and compressors within a proper operating range (preventing e.g. cavitation

Van den Hof, Paul

242

Development and Evaluation of a Coupled Photosynthesis-Based Gas Exchange Evapotranspiration Model (GEM) for Mesoscale Weather Forecasting Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and Evaluation of a Coupled Photosynthesis-Based Gas Exchange Evapotranspiration Model (GEM) for Mesoscale Weather Forecasting Applications DEV NIYOGI Department of Agronomy, and Department form 13 May 2008) ABSTRACT Current land surface schemes used for mesoscale weather forecast models use

Niyogi, Dev

243

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionto centralized hydrogen production. One key question thatCalifornia, Davis Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The 2006 Russia-Ukraine Natural Gas Dispute: A mechanisms based approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses the factors which lead the Russian government to increase natural gas prices for Ukraine in 2006. Through the use of methodological individualism,… (more)

Daley, Stephen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Development of a Calicum-Based Sorbent for Hot Gas Cleanup.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further review of the technical literature has provided additional information which will support the development of a superior calcium-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in IGCC systems. Two general methods of sorbent preparation are being investigated. One method involves impregnating a porous refractory substrate with calcium while another method involves pelletizing lime or other calcium containing materials with a suitable binder. Several potential substrates, which are made of alumina and are commercially available, have been characterized by various methods. The surface area and apparent density of the materials have been measured, and it has been shown that some of the high surface area materials (i.e., 200-400 m{sub 2}/g) undergo a large decrease in surface area when heated to higher temperatures. Some of the lower surface area materials (i.e., 1-30 m{sub 2}/g) have been successfully impregnated with calcium by soaking them in a calcium nitrate solution and then heat treating them to decompose the nitrate. Potentially useful sorbents have also been prepared by pelletizing type I Portland cement and mixtures of cement and lime.

Wheelock, T.W.; Constant, K.; Doraiswamy, L.K.; Akiti, T.; Zhu, J.; Amanda, A.; Roe, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Four-dimensional image-based treatment planning: Target volume segmentation and dose calculation in the presence of respiratory motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe approaches to four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning, including acquisition of 4D-CT scans, target delineation of spatio-temporal image data sets, 4D dose calculations, and their analysis. Methods and Materials: The study included patients with thoracic and hepatocellular tumors. Specialized tools were developed to facilitate visualization, segmentation, and analysis of 4D-CT data: maximum intensity volume to define the extent of lung tumor motion, a 4D browser to examine and dynamically assess the 4D data sets, dose calculations, including respiratory motion, and deformable registration to combine the dose distributions at different points. Results: Four-dimensional CT was used to visualize and quantitatively assess respiratory target motion. The gross target volume contours derived from light breathing scans showed significant differences compared with those extracted from 4D-CT. Evaluation of deformable registration using difference images of original and deformed anatomic maps suggested the algorithm is functionally useful. Thus, calculation of effective dose distributions, including respiratory motion, was implemented. Conclusion: Tools and methods to use 4D-CT data for treatment planning in the presence of respiratory motion have been developed and applied to several case studies. The process of 4D-CT-based treatment planning has been implemented, and technical barriers for its routine use have been identified.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) and Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willet, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

250

CERIA-BASED WATER-GAS-SHIFT CATALYSTS S. Swartz, A-M. Azad, M. Seabaugh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on pure hydrogen or a hydrogen-rich gas with little or no carbon monoxide. In the near term, fuel cells used in fuel processors. This reaction increases the hydrogen content and reduces the carbon monoxide) to the reactor. The reactor section incorporates a bypass loop, which allows for baseline gas chromatograph

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

251

Nickel-Based Superalloy Welding Practices for Industrial Gas Turbine Applications M.B. Henderson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alloy components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder components using methods, such as gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB) and laser welding, and methods and post-weld heat treatment procedures, if necessary. Increasingly to achieve through-life cost reduction

Cambridge, University of

252

Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An artificial intelligence approach to model-based gas lift troubleshooting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gas lift injection pressure is too high, I have not seen this pressure in the system before. . . . . something is wrong! Gas lift injection pressure is greater than the value given by the computerized gas lift design model C 3 O O 0 0 O... porous medium is proportional to the pressure or hydraulic gradient and to the cross-sectional area normal to the direction of flow and inversely proportional to the viscosity of the fluid. CO C 3 FLUID THROUGH POROUS MEDIUM 0 0 r)( r Fig. 2. 3...

Ortiz-Volcan, Jose Luis

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Feasibility of Natural Gas as a Fuel Source for Modern Land-Based Drilling Rigs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of replacing diesel with natural gas as a fuel source for modern drilling rigs. More specifically, this thesis (1) establishes a control baseline by examining operational characteristics...

Nunn, Andrew Howard

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

PFB coal fired combined cycle development program. Advanced hot gas cleanup concept evaluation (Task 4. 3). Volume A. Aerodyne cyclone evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of testing of a rotary flow cyclone, manufactured by Aerodyne Development Corporation under license by Siemens Kraftwerk Union. This cyclone was selected for evaluation due to the unusually high separative efficiencies claimed by the manufacturer (based on developer data), and relative lack of open literature data. The most significant finding of this work was the observation that electrostatic forces could enhance or, in fact, dominate the separation process. Separative efficiencies, with electrostatic forces present, were found to be substantially independent of flow rate and, by inference, could be independent of unit size. This finding suggests that large cyclones with natural or augmented electrostatic forces employed in the hot gas cleanup train of the CFCC system may not suffer the performance degradation compared to small cyclones, as projected from conventional inertial theory. This is of special importance since the use of many small cyclones in parallel, or multicyclones, commonly suffers from fouling and this approach is not recommended in the CFCC application. The original objective of this investigation was to assess the relative merits of the Aerodyne cyclone separator. It was found from both the cold flow and the hot flow tests that its separative efficiencies are disappointingly poorer than expectations (in agreement with Westinghouse results), and even poorer than conventional cyclones.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

PFB Coal Fired Combined Cycle Development Program. Advanced hot gas cleanup concept evaluation (Task 4. 3). Volume A. Aerodyne cyclone evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of testing of a rotary flow cyclone, manufactured by Aerodyne Development Corporation under license by Siemens Kraftwerk Union. This cyclone was selected for evaluation due to the unusually high separative efficiencies claimed by the manufacturer (based on developer data), and relative lack of open literature data. The most significant finding of this work was the observation that electrostatic forces could enhance or, in fact, dominate the separation process. Separative efficiencies, with electrostatic forces present, were found to be substantially independent of flow rate and, by inference, could be independent of unit size. Hence this finding offers a major hope that large cyclones employed in the hot gas cleanup train of the CFCC system may not suffer the performance degradation compared to small cyclones, as projected from conventional inertial theory. The separative efficiencies of the Aerodyne cyclone separator were found from both the cold flow and the hot flow tests to be disappointingly poorer than expectations (in agreement with Westinghouse results), and even poorer than conventional cyclones. (LTN)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Natural gas monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summaries of the electric utilities performance-based rate plans for the following companies: Alabama Power Company; Central Maine Power Company; Consolidated Edison of New York; Mississippi Power Company; New York State Electric and Gas Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; PacifiCorp; Pacific Gas and Electric; Southern California Edison; San Diego Gas & Electric; and Tucson Electric Power. In addition, this document also contains information about LBNL`s Power Index and Incentive Properties of a Hybrid Cap and Long-Run Demand Elasticity.

Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hill, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 34A, NOVEMBER 2003--2633 nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys.[58  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-atomized Ni (Ni-118, purity 99.6 pct) from Praxair Surface Technologies (Indianapolis, IN). A nitrogen- gas

DuPont, John N.

263

Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

264

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. natural gas proved reserves 2 --estimated as "wet" gas which includes natural gas plant liquids Federal Offshore, California, Alaska, and North Dakota) in 2009. Texas had the largest proved reserves to render the gas unmarketable. Natural gas plant liquids may be recovered from volumes of natural gas, wet

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

265

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1,Scientific Bases and Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S&ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S&ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054 [DIRS 124754

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Laser-based data acquisition in gas centrifuge environments using optical fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating environment of gas centrifuges poses three basic experimental problems: rotating reference frame, corrosive effects of UF/sub 6/ gas, and vacuum coupling. Diagnostic experiments in this environment effectively use fiber optics as laser transport systems and data extraction channels. Access to the interior of rotating centrifuges is only from a central nonrotating column assembly. Optical paths are often long and difficult to measure in static conditions with precision necessary in operating conditions. Residual traces of HF gas, from UF/sub 6/, damage exposed optical components over time. Diagnostic measurements requiring pulsed laser sources and analysis of fluorescence emissions, both from UF/sub 6/ gas and from temperature-sensitive phosphor are described, with emphasis on optical fiber components and experimental design configurations. The studies were done at Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant through the Centrifuge Physics Department of the Centrifuge Division. The advantages of fiber optics methods include: optical path flexibility, small and adaptable size of components, utility in connection with moveable assemblies, and relative ease of vacuum isolation. 3 references, 6 figures.

Cates, M. R.; Allison, S. W.; Marshall, B.; Davies, T. J.; Franks, L. A.; Nelson, M. A.; Noel, B. W.

1984-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales: Volume 2, Expansion of the Moving-Bed Hydroretorting Data Base for Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive data base was developed for six Eastern oil shales: Alabama Chattanooga, Indiana New Albany, Kentucky Sunbury, Michigan Antrim, Ohio Cleveland, and Tennessee Chattanooga shales. The data base included the hydroretorting characteristics of the six shales, as well as the retorting characteristics in the presence of synthesis gas and ionized gas. Shale gasification was also successfully demonstrated. Shale fines (20%) can produce enough hydrogen for the hydroretorting of the remaining 80% of the shale. The amount of fines tolerable in a moving bed was also determined. 16 refs., 59 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Results of an international study on a high-volume plasma-based neutron source for fusion blanket development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of scenarios for fusion facilities were evaluated using a cost/benefit/risk analysis approach. Blanket tests in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) alone with a fluence of 1 MW.yr/m{sup 2} can address most of the needs for concept verification, but it cannot adequately address the blanket component reliability growth/demonstration testing requirements. An effective path to fusion DEMO is suggested. It involves two parallel facilities: (a) ITER to provide data on plasma performance, plasma support technology, and system integration and (b) a high-volume plasma-based neutron source (HVPNS) dedicated to testing, developing, and qualifying fusion nuclear components and material combinations for DEMO. For HVPNS to be attractive and cost effective, its capital cost must be significantly lower than ITER, and it should have low fusion power (nearly 150 MW). Exploratory studies indicate the presence of a design window with a highly driven plasma. A testing and development strategy that includes HVPNS would decisively reduce the high risk of initial DEMO operation with a poor blanket system availability and would make it possible - if operated parallel to the ITER basic performance phase - to meet the goal of DEMO operation by the year 2025. Such a scenario with HVPNS parallel to ITER provides substantial savings in the overall R&D cost toward DEMO compared with an ITER-alone strategy. 75 refs., 13 figs., 31 tabs.

Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Berk, S.E. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inlet is significant for modeling cyclic deformation in directionally solidified and single crystal turbine blades

Li, Mo

271

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effect of confining pressure on pore volume in tight sandstones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of confining pressure on the pore volume of some tight sandstones from the Uinta Basin, Utah, was investigated. A new method based on the pressure-volume relationships of a gas was developed and used to measure pore volume reduction. The results were compared with the results obtained using the more common method that involves the measurement of liquid expelled from a saturated core and were found to be in good agreement. Pore volume compressibility of the samples studies is in the range of values reported by other investigators and ranges from 2.0 x 10/sup -6/ to 1.3 x 10/sup -5/ pv/pv/psi at a confining pressure of 5,000 psi.

Sampath, K.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the conventional gas reserve of 1.5x10 14 m 3 ofconventional oil and gas reserves, the assessment of theconventional fossil fuel reserves, gas hydrates are emerging

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the second involves gas and hydrate (Class 1G, water-poorpriorities for marine gas hydrates, Fire In The Ice, NETLCollett, T. , 1993, Natural gas hydrates of the Prudhoe Bay

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Simulating the daily gasoline price-setting behaviour of gas stations in Cincinnati by agent-based modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the retail gasoline market, gas stations as independent entities set gas prices according to a number of factors related to global and local economic… (more)

Zhou, Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Natural gas monthly, January 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Natural gas monthly, November 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Natural gas monthly, February 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Carbon capture by sorption-enhanced water-gas shift reaction process using hydrotalcite-based material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel route for precombustion decarbonization is the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process. In this process carbon dioxide is removed from a synthesis gas at elevated temperature by adsorption. Simultaneously, carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide by the water-gas shift reaction. The periodic adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide is induced by a pressure swing cycle, and the cyclic capacity can be amplified by purging with steam. From previous studies is it known that for SEWGS applications, hydrotalcite-based materials are particularly attractive as sorbent, and commercial high-temperature shift catalysts can be used for the conversion of carbon monoxide. Tablets of a potassium promoted hydrotalcite-based material are characterized in both breakthrough and cyclic experiments in a 2 m tall fixed-bed reactor. When exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, steam, and nitrogen at 400{sup o}C, the material shows a breakthrough capacity of 1.4 mmol/g. In subsequent experiments the material was mixed with tablets of promoted iron-chromium shift catalyst and exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, steam, hydrogen, and nitrogen. It is demonstrated that carbon monoxide conversion can be enhanced to 100% in the presence of a carbon dioxide sorbent. At breakthrough, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide simultaneously appear at the end of the bed. During more than 300 cycles of adsorption/reaction and desorption, the capture rate, and carbon monoxide conversion are confirmed to be stable. Two different cycle types are investigated: one cycle with a CO{sub 2} rinse step and one cycle with a steam rinse step. The performance of both SEWGS cycles are discussed.

van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Hufton, J.R.; van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

A pressure gauge based on gas density measurement from analysis of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a gas-density gauge based on the analysis of the thermally-driven fluctuations of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. The fluctuations are modeled as a ring-down of a simple harmonic oscillator, which allows fitting of the resonance frequency and damping of the cantilever, which in turn yields the gas density. The pressure is obtained from the density using the known equation of state. In the range 10-220 kPa, the pressure readings from the cantilever gauge deviate by an average of only about 5% from pressure readings on a commercial gauge. The theoretical description we use to determine the pressure from the cantilever motion is based upon the continuum hypothesis, which sets a minimum pressure for our analysis. It is anticipated that the cantilever gauge could be extended to measure lower pressures given a molecular theoretical description. Alternatively, the gauge could be calibrated for use in the non-continuum range. Our measurement technique is similar to previous AFM cantilever measurements, but the analysis produces improved accuracy.

Seo, Dongjin; Ducker, William A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Paul, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thermionic-combustor combined-cycle system. Volume III. A thermionic converter design for gas-turbine combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermionic converter design is strongly influenced by the configuration of the heat source and heat sink. These two externally imposed conditions are of major importance in arriving at a viable converter design. In addition to these two factors, the economical and reliable transfer of energy internally within the converter is another major item in the design. The effects of the engineering trade-offs made in arriving at the design chosen for the Gas Turbine Combined Cycle combustor are reviewed.

Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Refueling Stations SMR station Pipeline Station SMR Module Cost (HGM-1000) SMR Module Output 600 kg/day Compressor Base Cost (

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cooking the volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooking possesses a system of units of measurement, that includes measures of volumes based on pre-metric units. This paper discusses the cooking measures and compares their features with those of the ancient Roman measures of capacity.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

289

Volume-translated cubic EoS and PC-SAFT density models and a free volume-based viscosity model for hydrocarbons at extreme temperature and pressure conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focuses on providing the petroleum reservoir engineering community with robust models of hydrocarbon density and viscosity at the extreme temperature and pressure conditions (up to 533 K and 276 MPa, respectively) characteristic of ultra-deep reservoirs, such as those associated with the deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Our strategy is to base the volume-translated (VT) Peng–Robinson (PR) and Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) cubic equations of state (EoSs) and perturbed-chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) on an extensive data base of high temperature (278–533 K), high pressure (6.9–276 MPa) density rather than fitting the models to low pressure saturated liquid density data. This high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) data base consists of literature data for hydrocarbons ranging from methane to C{sub 40}. The three new models developed in this work, HTHP VT-PR EoS, HTHP VT-SRK EoS, and hybrid PC-SAFT, yield mean absolute percent deviation values (MAPD) for HTHP hydrocarbon density of ?2.0%, ?1.5%, and <1.0%, respectively. An effort was also made to provide accurate hydrocarbon viscosity models based on literature data. Viscosity values are estimated with the frictional theory (f-theory) and free volume (FV) theory of viscosity. The best results were obtained when the PC-SAFT equation was used to obtain both the attractive and repulsive pressure inputs to f-theory, and the density input to FV theory. Both viscosity models provide accurate results at pressures to 100 MPa but experimental and model results can deviate by more than 25% at pressures above 200 MPa.

Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.; Soong, Yee; Baled, Hseen; O Enick, Robert M; Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh,Mark A.

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Incentive-based approaches for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions : issues and prospects for India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a consequence of the flexibility mechanisms incorporated in the Kyoto Protocol, incentive-based policies such as emissions trading and the clean development mechanism are being widely discussed in the context of greenhouse ...

Gupta, Shreekant.

292

Driving and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Evidence Base and How to Learn More  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessed) Policies TelecommuFng Employer-Based Trip ReducFon Car-Sharing Pricing policies not in models · High occupancy toll lanes · Real time parking pricing · Bicycle sharing

California at Davis, University of

293

Annual review of energy. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The many continuing efforts around the world to deal with the issues of energy supply, demand, and environmental impact are reviewed. This volume carries reviews of recent developments in solar-photovoltaic technology and inertial-confinement fusion as long-term options. Progress in some important nearer-term energy-supply areas is reviewed by contributions in the fields of battery energy storage and coal clean-up technology. In the area of energy sociology, the interesting and poorly understood topic of public opinion about energy is reviewed. The subject of energy economics is represented by a review of the role of governmental incentives in energy production. Topics related to the environmental aspects of energy technologies include coastal flooding from atmospheric carbon dioxide warming, risks of liquefied natural gas and petroleum gas, and the environmental impacts of renewable energy sources. Continuing the practice of earlier volumes to review the energy perspective of a particular region or country, Volume 5 carries a review of emerging energy technologies in island environments, typified by the case of Hawaii. Finally, the energy problem from the perspective of developing countries is reviewed by two papers, the first on renewable energy resources for developing countries, and the second on the problem of energy for the people of Asia and the Pacific. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 12 reviews for the Energy Data Base (EDB); all will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and three in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Hollander, J.M.; Simmons, M.K.; Wood, D.O. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemistry of tributyl phosphate and nitric acid at constant volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the reaction of tributyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The reaction pressure of TBP/HNO{sub 3} mixtures as a function of time was measured under constant volume. A simplified model, which parametrically includes autocatalysis, was used to plot the total gas production of the reaction as a function of time. Comparison of the functions shows a rough equivalence in the induction time, reaction time, and total gas production. Predictions of the amounts of reaction products as a function of time were made based on assumptions regarding autocatalysis and using rate constants from experimental data. The derived reaction mechanisms and experimental results have several implications. Tests with a large amount of venting and high surface to volume ratio will show very different behavior than tests with increasing confinement and low surface to volume ratios. The amount alkyl nitrate, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen that reacts within the organic phase is limited by their solubilities and volatilities. The overall yield of both heat and gas per mol of nitric acid or TBP will vary significantly depending on the amount of solution, free volume, and vessel vent capacity.

Agnew, S.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Morris, J.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Review of automated custody transfer equipment for large-volume gas flow measurement. Final report, August 1, 1987-February 28, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of electronic automation on the accuracy of gas custody transfer measurements was investigated. The term Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) denotes both electronic flow correctors (for positive displacement meters) and flow computers (for orifice plate measurements). Electronic devices have potential to be slightly more accurate than their mechanical counterparts. Electronic systems have the additional benefits of greater application flexibility, reduced flow corrector inventory, reduced maintenance and calibration requirements, and data storage and communication capability. The primary concerns with EFM equipment are compatibility between units made by different manufacturers and their ability to function under extreme environmental conditions.

Rush, W.F.; Tamosaitis, V.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Biophysical Journal Volume 85 August 2003 11351144 1135 A General Model for Amyloid Fibril Assembly Based on Morphological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to form amyloid fibrils in vitro including acylphosphatase (Chiti et al., 2000), cold-shock proteinBiophysical Journal Volume 85 August 2003 1135­1144 1135 A General Model for Amyloid Fibril of fibrillar species formed during fibrillation of a-synuclein, insulin, and the B1 domain of protein G

Mochrie, Simon

297

Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003...

Hansen, Nels Edward

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Natural gas monthly, June 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Natural gas monthly, November 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Natural gas monthly, June 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural gas monthly, July 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Natural gas monthly, April 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

NONE

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

Natural gas monthly, October 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural Gas Monthly, March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1996-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Natural gas monthly, June 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Natural gas monthly, September 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Natural gas monthly, May 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling metallic nanoparticle synthesis in a magnetron-based nanocluster source by gas condensation of a sputtered vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by inert-gas condensation of a sputtered metallic vapor using a dedicated commercial reactor. By controlling the time of residence of NPs in the carrier gas phase via the tuning of the collision path length, Cu NPs were produced. They exhibit various and well controlled diameters (3-10 nm) and a relatively narrow size dispersion. On the basis of these experimental results, a detailed modeling of NP nucleation and growth based on the classical nucleation theory was developed. It takes into account the peculiar geometry and thermal profile of the NP reactor. The simulated curves, calculated by a MATLAB program developed for that purpose, exhibit a good qualitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, they highlight the role of process parameters and the strong influence of the reactor temperature profile on the NP size distribution. In the future, such calculations could be used for the optimization of the NP source design in order to increase its efficiency and reproducibility.

Quesnel, E; Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Muffato, V [CEA-G/DRT/LITEN/DTNM, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Africa planned gas lines will meet future demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The burgeoning European market for natural gas is expected to create major gas line construction. The potential for North Africa looks particularly promising in 1991. Italy's ENI has proposed a 6,000-km (3,728-mi) gas network in North Africa to connect gas-rich Libya and Algeria with Morocco and Mauritania, making large volumes available to the European market. According to the proposal, a gas line would run from the Sirte Basin in Libya west to Mauritania. Extending the line eastward through Egypt and on to the Arabian Peninsula would provide export access. In this paper initial studies are examine reserve projections for the next 20 years, then based on results, a transmission/distribution network will be designed, including an offshore gathering system.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Novel Carbon Nanotube-Based Nanostructures for High-Temperature Gas Sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is to examine the feasibility of using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a high temperature sensor material for fossil energy systems where reducing atmospheres are present. In the initial period of research, we fabricated capacitive sensors for hydrogen sensing using vertically aligned MWCNTs. We found that CNT itself is not sensitive to hydrogen. Moreover, with the help of Pd electrodes, hydrogen sensors based on CNTs are very sensitive and fast responsive. However, the Pd-based sensors can not withstand high temperature (T<200 C). In the last year, we successfully fabricated a hydrogen sensor based on an ultra-thin nanoporous titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) film supported by an AAO substrate, which can operate at 500 C with hydrogen concentrations in a range from 50 to 500 ppm.

Zhi Chen; Kozo Saito

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as shown in equation (2), (2) ) NR is the net revenue ($ per acre), TR is the total revenue ($ per acre), TVC is the total variable cost ($ per acre), and TFC is the total fixed cost ($ per acre). 21 3.1.2 Calculation of Breakeven Carbon Price (BCP...) The Breakeven Carbon price (BCP) is calculated according to equation (3). (3) BCPQGHGPDC =?? )( or (4) BCPQGHGQGHG NR base base = ? ? ) The GHG quantity in the denominator of equation (3) is the amount of net GHGE stored or emitted by each alternative...

Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mid-Infrared Laser based Gas Sensor Technologies for Environmental Monitoring,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), thermoelectrically cooled (TEC) and room tem- perature operated quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) for the detection analysis will be reported. These sensors employ a 2f wavelength modulation (WM) technique based on quartz region. Keywords: laser spectroscopy, quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy, wavelength modulation

315

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Natural gas monthly, April 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Natural gas monthly, October 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Unaccounted-for gas cost allocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As competitive pressures grow, gas utility managers have stepped up their search for ways to ensure that rates remain competitive. This challenge is particularly acute in the large commercial and industrial market segments, which are most typically [open quotes]at risk.[close quotes] A variety of cost-allocation studies have been undertaken to determine more accurately what costs are associated with serving market segments, and which costs should be recovered from each. Because there are clear winners and losers in this process (at least, it is clear who wins and loses in the short term), these reallocations have been hotly debated and fiercely litigated. Any proposed change in allocation must be supported by either compelling logic or empirical evidence. This article suggests a method of reallocating the costs associated with unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes, based on results from two studies of the elements contributing to UAF gas.

Ozenne, D.G. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed study of the catalyst composition, preparation and activation protocol of Fe-based catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) have been carried out in this project. We have studied the effects of different promoters on the catalytic performance of Fe-based catalysts. Specifically, we have focused on how their sequence of addition dramatically influences the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The resulting procedures have been optimized to improve further upon the already unprecedented rates and C{sub 5+} selectivities of the Fe-based catalysts that we have developed as part of this project. Selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbon was close to 90 % (CO{sub 2}-free basis) and CO conversion rate was about 6.7 mol h{sup -1} g-at Fe{sup -1} at 2.14 MPa, 508 K and with substoichiometric synthesis gas; these rates were larger than any reported previously for Fe-based FTS catalysts at these conditions. We also tested the stability of Fe-based catalysts during FTS reaction (10 days); as a result, the high hydrocarbon formation rates were maintained during 10 days, though the gradual deactivation was observed. Our investigation has also focused on the evaluation of Fe-based catalysts with hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams (H{sub 2}/CO=1). We have observed that the Fe-based catalysts prepared in this project display also a high hydrocarbon synthesis rate with substoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=1) stream, which is a less desirable reactant mixture than stoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=2). We have improved the catalyst preparation protocols and achieved the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported at the low temperatures required for selectivity and stability. Also, we have characterized the catalyst structural change and active phases formed, and their catalytic behavior during the activation process to evaluate their influences on FTS reaction. The efforts of this project led to (i) structural evolution of Fe-Zn oxide promoted with K and Cu, and (ii) evaluation of hydrocarbon and CH{sub 4} formation rates during activation procedures at various temperature and H{sub 2}/CO ratios. On the basis of the obtained results, we suggest that lower reactor temperature can be sufficient to activate catalysts and lead to the high FTS performance. In this project, we have also carried out a detailed kinetic and mechanistic study of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis with Fe-based catalysts. We have proposed a reaction mechanism with two CO activation pathways: unassisted and H-assisted. Both routes lead to the formation of the same surface monomers (CH{sub 2}). However, the oxygen removal mechanism is different. In the H-assisted route, oxygen is removed exclusively as water, while oxygen is rejected as carbon dioxide in the unassisted CO dissociation. The validity of the mechanism here proposed has been found to be in agreement with the experimental observation and with theoretical calculations over a Fe(110) surface. Also, we have studied the validity of the mechanism that we propose by analyzing the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} kinetic isotope effect (r{sub H}/r{sub D}) over a conventional iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst Fe-Zn-K-Cu. We have observed experimentally that the use of D{sub 2} instead of H{sub 2} leads to higher hydrocarbons formation rates (inverse kinetic isotopic effect). On the contrary, primary carbon dioxide formation is not influenced. These experimental observations can be explained by two CO activation pathways. We have also explored the catalytic performance of Co-based catalysts prepared by using inverse micelles techniques. We have studied several methods in order to terminate the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} support including impregnation, urea homogeneous deposition-precipitation, or zirconium (IV) ethoxide titration. Although hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be stoichiometrically titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, a requirement to prevent the formation of strongly-interacting Co oxide species on SiO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{

Enrique Iglesia; Akio Ishikawa; Manual Ojeda; Nan Yao

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation,(Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production

323

Texas--RRC District 9 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation,(Million(Million(Million Barrels) Reserves Based

324

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14DeliveriesProved ReservesAdjustmentsBased

325

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high-temperature furnace (HITAF): Volume 3. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing of an atmospheric circulating bed pyrolyzer was done at Southern Illinois University. A variety of experiments have been conducted in a laboratory scale pyrolyzer with coal input flow rates from 2 to 6 lb/h. three feed coal particle sizes, corresponding to a nominal -40 mesh, -30 mesh and -18 mesh were used. The limestone used in the tests was a Genstar limestone. Parameters investigated in the tests include the influence of superficial velocity, temperature and coal-air mass ratios. Char particle size distributions under various test conditions have been measured and the char composition determined. Fuel gas composition, yields and heating values have been investigated. Char morphology has been studied using scanning electron microscopy. Char reactivity for selected samples has been measures, and the influence of feed coal size, bed temperature and superficial velocity has been determined. Material balance calculations have been performed and found to be in very good agreement. Energy audit calculations for the process have been made to investigate the flow of energy and to estimate the losses during the process. Full details of the data, results obtained and conclusions drawn are presented.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of synthetic-fuel character effects on rich-lean stationary gas-turbine combustion systems. Volume 2. Full-scale test program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of burner geometric scale on the emissions and performance produced by staged, rich lean combustors was investigated. Tests were conducted using a 25-cm diameter burner and the results obtained were compared with results previously obtained using a similar, but smaller (12.5-cm diameter) burner. The larger burner employed a convectively-cooled rich-burn section; the size of the burner is the size of the burner cans employed in the 25 Megawatt FT4 industrial gas turbine. Scale effects are of concern in staged rich/lean combustors because of the suspected critical importance of quench air jet penetration and fuel injector spray distribution, both processes being scaled dependent. Tests were conducted both with No. 2 petroleum distillate and with a nitrogen-bearing, middle-distillate synthetic fuel produced by the H-Coal process. Measurements of burner exit temperature profile, liner temperature, gaseous emission, and smoke emissions are presented and the results compared with subscale test results.

Kennedy, J.B.; McVey, J.B.; Rosfjord, T.J.; Russel, P.; Beal, G.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Detection of gas leakage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

PFB coal fired combined cycle development program. Advanced hot gas cleanup concept evaluation (Task 4. 3). Volume B. Developmental cyclone evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of cold flow model testing of a conventional reverse-flow cyclone containing several developmental features designed to improve its separative performance. The four advanced features evaluated were: Outlet Scroll Skimming - to remove particles from the high dust concentration region at the periphery of the outlet dust; Base Purge - to reduce reentrainment of dust from the disengagement hopper; Increased Outlet Duct Engagement - to reduce short-circuiting of the inlet dust into the outlet; and Vortex Shield - to stabilize the point of vortex attachment at the cyclone base and thus reduce base pickup. A schematic of the advanced cyclone, showing the various developmental features, is provided. The results of the cold flow experiments showed that substantial improvement (approximately 30% reduction in exhaust emission) could be obtained from outlet skimming or from increased engagement of the exhaust dust. Furthermore, the effects of these features are additive so that about 60% overall reduction in emissions could be achieved by incorporating both of these elements. On the other hand, the vortex shield and the base purge had little effect on the separative performance. Almost all of the experimental results exhibited strong electrostatic influence. At high flowrates, the separative performance of the cyclone decreased as the flowrate was reduced, as expected from cyclone theory. Although the improvements obtained with the developmental cyclone are significant, further improvements appear possible with the Air Shield cyclone and the Electrocyclone. Consequently, subsequent efforts under the CFCC program were focused on these concepts.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

CAN SORBENT-BASED GAS PHASE AIR CLEANING FOR VOCS SUBSTITUTE FOR VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings, as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sorbent-Based Gas Phase Air Cleaning for VOCs in CommercialBuildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a review of current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The fundamental principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, novel sorbent technologies are described, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

Fisk, William J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities for feedstocks consisting of synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third and fourth reporting periods, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based FT catalysts with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During the fifth reporting period, we studied the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance, specifically how their sequence of addition dramatically influenced the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We also continued our studies of the kinetic behavior of these materials. Specifically, the effects of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} on the rates and selectivities of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis reactions led us to propose a new sequence of elementary steps on Fe and Co Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. More specifically, we were focused on the roles of hydrogen-assisted and alkali-assisted dissociation of CO in determining rates and CO{sub 2} selectivities. During this sixth reporting period, we have studied the validity of the mechanism that we propose by analyzing the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} kinetic isotope effect (r{sub H}/r{sub D}) over a conventional iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst Fe-Zn-K-Cu. We have observed experimentally that the use of D{sub 2} instead of H{sub 2} leads to higher hydrocarbons formation rates (inverse kinetic isotopic effect). On the contrary, primary carbon dioxide formation is not influenced. These experimental observations can be explained by the two CO activation pathways we propose. During this reporting period, the experimental kinetic study has been also complemented with periodic, self-consistent, DFT-GGA investigations in a parallel collaboration with the group of Manos Mavrikakis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These DFT calculations suggest minimal energy paths for proposed elementary steps on Fe(110) and Co(0001) surfaces. These calculations support our novel conclusions about the preferential dissociation of CO dissociation via H-assisted pathways on Fe-based catalysts. Unassisted CO dissociation also occurs and lead to the formation of CO{sub 2} as a primary oxygen scavenging mechanism after CO dissociation on Fe-based catalysts. Simulations and our experimental data show also that unassisted CO dissociation route is much less likely on Co surfaces and that hydrocarbons form exclusively via H-assisted pathways with the formation of H{sub 2}O as the sole oxygen rejection product. We have also started a study of the use of colloidal precipitation methods for the synthesis of small Fe and Co clusters using recently developed methods to explore possible further improvements in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities. We have found that colloidal synthesis makes possible the preparation of small cobalt particles, although large amount of cobalt silicate species, which are difficult to reduce, are formed. The nature of the cobalt precursor and the modification of the support seem to be critical parameters in order to obtain highly dispersed and reducible Co nanoparticles.

Akio; Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 29, 2002/pp. 11151121 LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF AN ULTRALOW NOx PREMIXED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). It is based on lean premixed combustion combined with flue gas recir- culation (FGR) and partially reformed were tested in a prototype steam reformer, and the results were used to estimate reactor volume efficiency at relatively low temperatures and high space velocities, which indicates that the reformer can

Knowles, David William

336

Tap Density Equations of Granular Powders Based on the Rate Process Theory and the Free Volume Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tap density of a granular powder is often linked to the flowability via Carr Index that measures how tight a powder can be packed, under an assumption that more easily packed powders usually flow poorly. Understanding how particles are packed is important for revealing why a powder flows better than others. There are two types of empirical equations that were proposed to fit the experimental data of packing fractions vs. numbers of taps in literature: The inverse logarithmic and the stretched exponential. Using the rate process theory and the free volume concept, we obtain the tap density equations and they can be reducible to the two empirical equations currently widely used in literature. Our equations could potentially fit experimental data better with an additional adjustable parameter. The tapping amplitude and frequency, the weight of the granular materials, and the environment temperature are grouped into one parameter that weighs the pace of packing process. The current results, in conjunction with our previous findings, may imply that both dry(granular)and wet(colloidal and polymeric) particle systems are governed by the same physical mechanisms in term of the role of the free volume and how particles behave (a rate controlled process).

Tian Hao

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaskan gas hydrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and finally the prospects for methane hydrates. NATURAL GAS AND THE RECOVERY PROCESS The primary... Coal Bed Methane Shale Gas Methane Hydrates Volume...

338

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

27–29 in T. Wirth, editor. Inventory of U.S. greenhouse gasfor national greenhouse gas inventories. Volume 2.National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme Task Force

Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A tentative reconstruction of the last interglacial and glacial inception in Greenland based on new gas measurements in the Greenland Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A tentative reconstruction of the last interglacial and glacial inception in Greenland based on new gas measurements in the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core Amaelle Landais,1 Je September 2003. [1] The disturbed stratigraphy of the ice in the lowest 10% of the Greenland GRIP ice core

Chappellaz, Jérôme

340

Petroleum Supply Annual 2004 Volume 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Annual 2004 Volume 1 June 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent dramatic changes in natural gas markets have significant implications for the scope and direction of DOE`s upstream as well as downstream natural gas R&D. Open access transportation changes the way gas is bought and sold. The end of the gas deliverability surplus requires increased reserve development above recent levels. Increased gas demand for power generation and other new uses changes the overall demand picture in terms of volumes, locations and seasonality. DOE`s Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that its R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced gas. Potential R&D projects are to be evaluated using a full fuel cycle, benefit-cost approach to estimate likely market impact as well as technical success. To assure R&D projects are evaluated on a comparable basis, METC has undertaken the development of a comprehensive natural gas technology evaluation framework. Existing energy systems models lack the level of detail required to estimate the impact of specific upstream natural gas technologies across the known range of geological settings and likely market conditions. Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) research during FY 1993 developed and implemented this comprehensive, consistent natural gas system evaluation framework. Rather than a isolated research activity, however, GSAM represents the integration of many prior and ongoing natural gas research efforts. When complete, it will incorporate the most current resource base description, reservoir modeling, technology characterization and other geologic and engineering aspects developed through recent METC and industry gas R&D programs.

Godec, M.; Haas, M.; Pepper, W.; Rose, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural gas monthly, July 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural gas monthly, August 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Factors that affect fracture fluid clean-up and pressure buildup test results in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering effort with a complete formation evaluation prior to the stimulation treatment can one understand a well containing a vertical hydraulic fracture. If the reservoir produces substantial volumes of either fracture fluid or formation water, along... and Water Permeability . . . 21 Fracture Relative Gas and Water Permeability . . . . . . 24 Created and Propped Fracture Lengths as a Function of Treatment Volume Based on FRACDIM ZI One Quarter of a Square Pattern with Wellbore Centered in Middle...

Montgomery, Kevin Todd

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. During this quarter cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests of the sorbents Cu{sub 2}Cr-O and Cu-Ce-0 were conducted using different compositions of the feed gases to investigate the effects of H{sub 2}0, H{sub 2} and CO. These tests were conducted in a packed-bed microreactor at 850{degrees}C. The results of these tests showed that H{sub 2} and CO (along with C02) had a significant effect on the H{sub 2}S pre-breakthrough levels, whereas H{sub 2}0 did not have an effect. The physical properties of the fresh and reacted samples of the Cu-2Cr-O and Cu-Ce-0 sorbents prepared in this program and used in the cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests were also measured. In addition, sulfidation/regeneration tests were conducted using two commercial copper chromite sorbents (G-13 and G-89, United Catalyst, Inc.) and a zinc titanate sorbent (L-3014) in a one-inch fluidized-bed reactor at 650{degrees}C. The G-13 sorbent appears to have a much higher sulfur capacity than the G-89 sorbent.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, L.; Patel, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Design, Synthesis and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities for synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third and fourth reporting periods, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based materials with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During the fifth and sixth reporting period, we studied the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance, specifically how their sequence of addition dramatically influenced the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We also continued our studies of the kinetic behavior of these materials during the sixth reporting period. Specifically, the effects of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} on the rates and selectivities of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis reactions led us to propose a new sequence of elementary steps on Fe and Co Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Finally, we also started a study of the use of colloidal precipitation methods for the synthesis small Co clusters using recently developed methods to explore possible further improvements in FTS rates and selectivities. We found that colloidal synthesis makes possible the preparation of small cobalt particles, although large amount of cobalt silicate species, which are difficult to reduce, were formed. During this seventh reporting period, we have explored several methods to modify the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} by using either a homogeneous deposition-precipitation method or surface titration of Si-OH on SiO{sub 2} with zirconium (IV) ethoxide to prevent the formation of unreducible and unreactive CoO{sub x} species during synthesis and FTS catalysis. We have synthesized monometallic Co/ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Co loadings (11-20 wt%) by incipient wetness impregnation methods and characterized the prepared Co supported catalysts by H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and H{sub 2}-chemisorption. We have measured the catalytic performance in FTS reactions and shown that although the hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be fully titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} surface can improve the Co clusters dispersion and lead to a larger number of exposed Co surface atoms after reduction and during FTS reactions. During this seventh reporting period, we have also advanced our development of the reaction mechanism proposed in the previous reporting period. Specifically, we have shown that our novel proposal for the pathways involved in CO activation on Fe and Co catalysts is consistent with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations carried out in collaboration with Prof. Manos Mavrikakis (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Finally, we have also worked on the preparation of several manuscripts describing our findings about the preparation, activation and mechanism of the FTS with Fe-based catalysts and we have started redacting the final report for this project.

Akio Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Gubler, Philipp; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Nishida, Yusuke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Philipp Gubler; Naoki Yamamoto; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Yusuke Nishida

2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

Natural gas monthly, April 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Natural gas monthly, December 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Natural gas monthly, October 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Natural gas monthly, May 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Natural gas monthly, June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Natural gas monthly, March 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Natural gas monthly, May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Oil and Gas Air Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the relation of hot-air temperature, oil or gas consumption and fresh airflow is determined based on energy equilibrium....

Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

1. A tank of volume V is to be filled with an ideal gas. Initially the tank is at P1and T1.the port is regulated with a valve, and the port properties are constant at Tin.The tank is well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. A tank of volume V is to be filled with an ideal gas. Initially the tank is at P1and T1.the port is regulated with a valve, and the port properties are constant at Tin.The tank is well insulated so the process is adiabatic. If the final pressure of the tank is Pz,determine the finaltemperature of the tank T

Huang, Haimei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

Wood, John H.; Grape, Steven G.; Green, Rhonda S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 2, Technical basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume, Volume 2, contains the technical basis for the 1992 PA. Specifically, it describes the conceptual basis for consequence modeling and the PA methodology, including the selection of scenarios for analysis, the determination of scenario probabilities, and the estimation of scenario consequences using a Monte Carlo technique and a linked system of computational models. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume I contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the EPA`s Environmental Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses related to the preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191B. Volume 5 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance. Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

364

Behavior-Based Transportation Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Under the Clean Development Mechanism Transport-Efficient Development in Nanchang, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a methodology, consistent with the Kyoto Protocol?s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction benefits of transport efficient development (TED). TED aims to reduce ...

Zegras, P. Christopher

365

Gas Separation Using Membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial membrane-based gas separator systems based upon high-flux, asymmetric polysulfone hollow fibers were first introduced in 1977 by Monsanto. These systems were packaged in compact modules containing large amounts of permeation surface area...

Koros, W. J.; Paul, D. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Constrained Inverse Volume Rendering for Planetary Nebulae Marcus Magnor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse Volume Rendering I.4.m [Image Processing and Computer Vision]: Miscellaneous--Volumetric Modeling that we are observing 2D projections of 3D volumes of glowing gas, the actual spatial struc- ture of PNeConstrained Inverse Volume Rendering for Planetary Nebulae Marcus Magnor MPI Informatik, Germany

Utah, University of

368

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design of a dual port volume measuring system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A volume measuring system is described which uses the ideal gas law and pressure measurements to determine an unknown vessel's volume when a gas expands into that vessel from a known volume. The design, the engineering principles, the calibration, and the accuracy of this computer-controlled system are all discussed. A set of electrical and mechanical drawings of the system is included. 3 refs., 6 figs.

Klevgard, P.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Working Gas Volume Change from Year Ago  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYearFeet)perWesternPipeline2 U.S.3-377,507

371

Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encountered when operating under conditions with high gas volume fractions (GVF). Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency when operating under wet-gas conditions, GVF over 95%. Field operations have revealed severe vibration...

Chan, Evan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method of making improved gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making an adsorbent carbon fiber based monolith having improved methane gas storage capabilities is disclosed. Additionally, the monolithic nature of the storage carbon allows it to exhibit greater thermal conductivity than conventional granular activated carbon or powdered activated carbon storage beds. The storage of methane gas is achieved through the process of physical adsorption in the micropores that are developed in the structure of the adsorbent monolith. The disclosed monolith is capable of storing greater than 150 V/V of methane [i.e., >150 STP (101.325 KPa, 298K) volumes of methane per unit volume of storage vessel internal volume] at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi).

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael R. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optimization of condensing gas drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

Lofton, Larry Keith

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Single-QCL-based absorption sensor for simultaneous trace-gas detection of CH4 and N2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compact multipass gas cell (MGC). This sensor uses a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave­8]. A compact mid-infrared absorption spectrometer for N2O and CH4 was developed using thermoelectrically cooled.04 cm-1 ) and N2O (1274.61 cm-1 ) lines at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Wavelength modulation spec- troscopy

375

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves, 1992 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1992, as well as production volumes for the United States, and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1992. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production data presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1992 is provided.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

Kirby, Mike

377

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

What is shale gas and why is it important?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Automated gas chromatography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Low current plasmatron fuel converter having enlarged volume discharges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel apparatus and method is disclosed for a plasmatron fuel converter ("plasmatron") that efficiently uses electrical energy to produce hydrogen rich gas. The volume and shape of the plasma discharge is controlled by a fluid flow established in a plasma discharge volume. A plasmatron according to this invention produces a substantially large effective plasma discharge volume allowing for substantially greater volumetric efficiency in the initiation of chemical reactions within a volume of bulk fluid reactant flowing through the plasmatron.

Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA); Alexeev, Nikolai (Moscow, RU); Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Samokhin, Andrei (Moscow, RU)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Preliminary evaluation of a concept using microwave energy to improve an adsorption-based, natural gas clean-up process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation performed to: (1) determine if microwave energy could be used to regenerate a zeolite adsorbent and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of using microwave energy to improve the desorption phase of a pressure swing adsorption process applied to upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Microwave regeneration was evaluated by comparing the adsorption characteristics of a zeolite preconditioned by heating under vacuum to the characteristics of the same zeolite after various lengths of exposure to microwave energy. The applicability of microwave regeneration to natural gas cleanup was evaluated by measuring the rise in adsorbent temperature resulting from the microwave exposure. Microwave energy consumed by heating the adsorbent is not productive and must therefore be minimal for a process to be economically viable. Exposure of the methane-saturated chabazite for 2 minutes to microwave energy effectively regenerated the adsorbent, but resulted in a 75{degrees}F (42{degrees}C) rise in adsorbent temperature. This temperature rise indicates that the concept is unacceptable for natural gas processing due to excessive energy consumption.

Grimes, R.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Natural gas monthly, October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results...

385

Cylinder inspection logs and analytical data LCRU-001 through LCRU-063. Volume 3, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ERC sampled, analyzed, and recontainerized when necessary gas cylinders of various chemicals in storage at LANL TA-54 Area L. This report summarizes the operation. This is Volume 3 of five volumes.

NONE

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARE Update Volume11, No.3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy—energy from coal and energy from natural gas. Anof energy—energy from coal and energy from natural gas. Anbiorefinery uses only coal-based energy Net GHG displacement

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D; Hardesty, Shermain

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gas-Saving Tips  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Properly Tuned Fixing a car that is noticeably out of tune or has failed an emis- sions test can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4 percent. However, results vary based on...

388

Diagnosis of "fizz-gas" and gas reservoirs in deep-water environment De-hua Han, X RPL, Houston Unversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure (shallow depth gas modulus is much less than 0.1 GPa. Even few percent volume fraction are a result of complicated geological processes which form a reservoir. Introduction "Fizz-water" or "Fizz-gasMixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume

389

Volume Comparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface. | EMSLVisualizingwith SalicylamideVolume

390

Supersonic gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of Criteria and Identification of Particle Cluster Size Based on Measurements of Void Fraction in Gas-Solid Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A circulating fluidized bed (CFB) built at FIU was used to study particle motion in the riser in order to simulate flow regimes in a cold gasifier. High speed imaging was used in order to capture the dynamics of the particles flowing in the riser. The imaging method used here is called the shadow sizing technique which allowed the determination of particle areas and trajectories at various flow rates in the riser. The solid volume fraction and particle velocities calculated using the images acquired during the experiments can be related to granular temperature in order to detect formations of clusters in the riser section of the CFB. The shadow sizing technique was observed to be an effective method in detecting dynamics of particles in motion and formation of clusters when supported with high-speed imaging.

David Roelant; Seckin Gokaltun

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied, using CO2 as the transferred species and sodium hydroxide as the alkaline agent in water. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the parametric dependencies. The experimental data were empirically correlated.

S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important = CL (CL + HcVG) (6) where CL = liquid phase concentration, VL = liquid volume, CG = gas phase concentration, VG = gas volume, Hc = dimensionless Henry's law coefficient and M = mass of gas. Now use two

Stenstrom, Michael K.

394

Viability Assessment Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis* Department of Computer and then rendered using an unstructured volume rendering technique. Unless a detailed refinement of the flow volume-dimensional texture mapping and an interval volume segmentation coupled with a tetrahedron projection-based renderer

Crawfis, Roger

396

A new perspective on usability: Towards a usable gas-desulphurization agent-based model at Shell P&T:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While agent-based models (ABM) are increasingly used to study overall system behaviour of various systems, they can also be hard to use by people and… (more)

Boonstra, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural gas monthly, September 1990. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030CO2","N5010CO2","N5020CO2","N5070CO2","N5050CO2","N5060CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Colorado Natural Gas in Underground...

399

Gas concentration measurement instrument based on the effects of a wave-mixing interference on stimulated emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring partial pressures of gaseous components within a mixture. The apparatus comprises generally at least one tunable laser source, a beam splitter, mirrors, optical filter, an optical spectrometer, and a data recorder. Measured in the forward direction along the path of the laser, the intensity of the emission spectra of the gaseous component, at wavelengths characteristic of the gas component being measured, are suppressed. Measured in the backward direction, the peak intensities characteristic of a given gaseous component will be wavelength shifted. These effects on peak intensity wavelengths are linearly dependent on the partial pressure of the compound being measured, but independent of the partial pressures of other gases which are present within the sample. The method and apparatus allow for efficient measurement of gaseous components. 9 figs.

Garrett, W.R.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

400

Gas concentration measurement instrument based on the effects of a wave-mixing interference on stimulated emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring partial pressures of gaseous components within a mixture. The apparatus comprises generally at least one tunable laser source, a beam splitter, mirrors, optical filter, an optical spectrometer, and a data recorder. Measured in the forward direction along the path of the laser, the intensity of the emission spectra of the gaseous component, at wavelengths characteristic of the gas component being measured, are suppressed. Measured in the backward direction, the peak intensities characteristic of a given gaseous component will be wavelength shifted. These effects on peak intensity wavelengths are linearly dependent on the partial pressure of the compound being measured, but independent of the partial pressures of other gases which are present within the sample. The method and apparatus allow for efficient measurement of gaseous components.

Garrett, W. Ray (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gas in psia pressure of gas in psia at time t constant production rate of gas in moles per year production rate at time t in moles per year ideal gas constant constant rate of water injection in cubic feet of the reservoir in cubic feet, below which gas production ceases initial reservoir volume in cubic feet reservoir

Waterman, Michael S.

402

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

HC-1 Ideal Gas and Absolute Zero Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names__________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that you always start with the same volume and pressure. 3) Compress the gas in the syringe as slowly as possible clicking at 5cm3 intervals and recording the volume. You can continue to slowly compress the gas reasoning. b) What do we call this process? #12;HC-1 Ideal Gas and Absolute Zero Name

Winokur, Michael

404

Educing the volume out of the phase space boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explicitly show that, in a system with T-duality symmetry, the configuration space volume degrees of freedom may hide on the surface boundary of the region of accessible states with energy lower than a fixed value. This means that, when taking the decompactification limit (big volume limit), a number of accessible states proportional to the volume is recovered even if no volume dependence appears when energy is high enough. All this behavior is contained in the exact way of computing sums by making integrals. We will also show how the decompactification limit for the gas of strings can be defined in a microcanonical description at finite volume.

Manuel A. Cobas; M. A. R. Osorio; María Suárez

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

A layered surface acoustic wave gas sensor based on a polyaniline/In2O3 nanofibre composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyaniline/In 2 O 3 Nanofiber Composite A. Z. Sadek *1 , W.In 2 O 3 nanofiber composite based layered surface acousticIn 2 O 3 nanoparticle composite. The nanocomposite was

Sadek, A Z; Wlodarski, W; Shin, K; Kaner, Richard B; Kalantar-zadeh, K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Control apparatus for hot gas engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mean pressure power control system for a hot gas (Stirling) engine utilizing a plurality of supply tanks for storing a working gas at different pressures. During pump down operations gas is bled from the engine by a compressor having a plurality of independent pumping volumes. In one embodiment of the invention, a bypass control valve system allows one or more of the compressor volumes to be connected to the storage tanks. By selectively sequencing the bypass valves, a capacity range can be developed over the compressor that allows for lower engine idle pressures and more rapid pump down rates.

Stotts, Robert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Tile-Based Fisher-Ratio Software for Improved Feature Selection Analysis of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC – TOFMS) is a highly capable instrumental platform that produces complex and information-rich multi-dimensional chemical data. The complex data can be overwhelming, especially when many samples (of various sample classes) are analyzed with multiple injections for each sample. Thus, the data must be analyzed in such a way to extract the most meaningful information. The pixel-based and peak table-based algorithmic use of Fisher ratios has been used successfully in the past to reduce the multi-dimensional data down to those chemical compounds that are changing between classes relative to those that are not (i.e., chemical feature selection). We report on the initial development of a computationally fast novel tile-based Fisher-ratio software that addresses challenges due to 2D retention time misalignment without explicitly aligning the data, which is a problem for both pixel-based and peak table- based methods. Concurrently, the tile-based Fisher-ratio software maximizes the sensitivity contrast of true positives against a background of potential false positives and noise. To study this software, eight compounds, plus one internal standard, were spiked into diesel at various concentrations. The tile-based F-ratio software was able to discover all spiked analytes, within the complex diesel sample matrix with thousands of potential false positives, in each possible concentration comparison, even at the lowest absolute spiked analyte concentration ratio of 1.06.

Marney, Luke C.; Siegler, William C.; Parsons, Brendon A.; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Characterization of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Hybrid System Based on a Factorial Design of Experiments Using Hardware Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full factorial experimental design and a replicated fractional factorial design were carried out using the Hybrid Performance (HyPer) project facility installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. Department of Energy to simulate gasifer/fuel cell/turbine hybrid power systems. The HyPer facility uses hardware in the loop (HIL) technology that couples a modified recuperated gas turbine cycle with hardware driven by a solid oxide fuel cell model. A 34 full factorial design (FFD) was selected to study the effects of four factors: cold-air, hot-air, bleed-air bypass valves, and the electric load on different parameters such as cathode and turbine inlet temperatures, pressure and mass flow. The results obtained, compared with former results where the experiments were made using one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT), show that no strong interactions between the factors are present in the different parameters of the system. This work also presents a fractional factorial design (ffd) 34-2 in order to analyze replication of the experiments. In addition, a new envelope is described based on the results of the design of experiments (DoE), compared with OFAT experiments, and analyzed in an off-design integrated fuel cell/gas turbine framework. This paper describes the methodology, strategy, and results of these experiments that bring new knowledge concerning the operating state space for this kind of power generation system.

Restrepo, Bernardo; Banta, Larry E.; Tucker, David

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Appears in Proceedings of IEEE Visualization '00 (October 2000, Salt Lake City, UT), IEEE Computer Society Press, pp. Volume Illustration: Non-Photorealistic Rendering of Volume Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society Press, pp. 195-202. Volume Illustration: Non-Photorealistic Rendering of Volume Models David Ebert the structure of a volume model is a problem not fully solved by existing volume rendering approaches. Physics-based volume rendering approaches create images which may match the appearance of translucent materials

Adali, Tulay

411

North American Natural Gas Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

North American Natural Gas Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Natural gas imports and exports: First quarter report 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Fuels Programs prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This quarter`s focus is market penetration of gas imports into New England. Attachments show the following: % takes to maximum firm contract levels and weighted average per unit price for the long-term importers, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters, volumes and prices for gas imported on short-term or spot market basis, and gas exported short-term to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural gas imports and exports, fourth quarter report 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Natural gas imports and exports, first quarter report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent reporting quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Natural gas imports and exports, third quarter report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

State energy price system. Volume I: overview and technical documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study utilizes existing data sources and previous analyses of state-level energy prices to develop consistent state-level energy prices series by fuel type and by end-use sector. The fuels are electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel oil, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. The end-use sectors are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Based upon an evaluation of existing data sources, recommendations were formulated on the feasible approaches for developing a consistent state energy price series. The data series were compiled based upon the approaches approved after a formal EIA review. Detailed documentation was provided, including annual updating procedures. Recommendations were formulated for future improvements in the collection of data or in data processing. Generally, the geographical coverage includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information on state-level energy use was generally taken from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Corresponding average US prices are also developed using volumes reported in SEDS. To the extent possible, the prices developed are quantity weighted average retail prices. Both a Btu price series and a physical unit price series are developed for each fuel. The period covered by the data series is 1970 through 1980 for most fuels, though prices for electricity and natural gas extend back to 1960. (PSB)

Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

Farmer, J C

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

420

World Gas Conference Tokyo, June 1-5, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22nd World Gas Conference Tokyo, June 1-5, 2003 HYDRATE NON-PIPELINE TECHNOLOGY FOR TRANSPORT OF NATURAL GAS Jón S. Gudmundsson, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Oscar F. Graff, Aker Kvaerner Technology AS SUMMARY The economics of natural gas transport depends greatly on the annual volumes

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mid-infrared gas sensing using a photonic bandgap fiber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The gas filling process of the air core is described, and qualitative methane concentrations measurements. Introduction Sensing of gas species and their concentrations is widely used for process control [1-proven technique requires a spectrometer and a sensing volume (gas cell) in which the light can interact

422

Ideal Gas Carnot Engines and Efficiency Chemistry 223  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's experiment T and N were held fixed but the volume accessible by the gas, V, and hence N/V, changed gas equation of state. For an adiabatic process, d- Q = 0. After a little algebra, Eq. (1) canIdeal Gas Carnot Engines and Efficiency Chemistry 223 Fig. 1. The Carnot Cycle The Carnot engine

Ronis, David M.

423

The contribution of knowledge bases to compliance assessment : a case study of industrial maintenance in the gas sector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particularly in the field of health, safety and environmental (HSE) risk management. Collaborative research the management of regulatory compliance. Originally oriented towards HSE issues, the long-term intention compliance management system. This paper therefore discusses the criteria for a knowledge base management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed. Similarly, if a fire were to break out anywhere in the D-ZERO Hall, fire sensors would stop the output of all flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed, by unpowering electrically controlled solenoid valves that are normally closed in the event of a power failure. Fire sensor contacts have not yet been installed.

Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Biogenic gas nanostructures as ultrasonic molecular reporters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogenic gas nanostructures as ultrasonic molecular reporters Mikhail G. Shapiro1,2,3 *, Patrick W on the nanoscale. Here, we introduce a new class of reporters for ultrasound based on genetically encoded gas nanostructures from microorganisms, including bacteria and archaea. Gas vesicles are gas-filled protein

Schaffer, David V.

426

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

VOLUME 80, NUMBER 9 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 2 MARCH 1998 Giant Spin Relaxation of an Ultracold Cesium Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of attention. The atomic sample is spin polarized and confined in a mag- netic trap. The condensation of an Ultracold Cesium Gas J. Söding, D. Guéry-Odelin, P. Desbiolles, G. Ferrari,* and J. Dalibard Laboratoire of magnitude larger than predicted, ruling out a Bose-Einstein condensation of Cs in this internal state. [S

Guéry-Odelin, David

429

VOLUME 81, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 JULY 1998 Bobylev-Krook-Wu Modes for Multicomponent Gas Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Krook-Wu (BKW) mode. The BKW mode is of physical interest for ex- plicit modeling of some nonequilibrium] that the conditions of the BKW mode exis- tence formulated in [3] could be weakened. As a matter of fact, the BKW modes were not considered in [4]. Re- cently, in [5] the BKW modes were obtained for a binary gas

Meleshko, Sergey V.

430

VOLUME 83, NUMBER 16 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 18 OCTOBER 1999 Probing Porous Media with Gas Diffusion NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can include granular materials, foams, ceramics, reservoir rocks, and animal lungs and sinuses with nonsolid porous systems, such as wet foams, and with structures in living subjects (e.g., lungs and sinuses

Walsworth, Ronald L.

431

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 3, Appendix B: NO{sub x} and alkali vapor control strategies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Controlled Dispensing and Mixing of Pico- to Nanoliter Volumes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dispensing and Mixing of Pico- to Nanoliter Volumes Using On-Demand Droplet-Based Microfluidics. Controlled Dispensing and Mixing of Pico- to Nanoliter Volumes Using On-Demand...

434

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Unconventional resources ................................................................................. 1 1.2 Oil shale and shale oil ....................................................................................... 6 1.3 Production from unconventional..., heavy oil, shale gas and shale oil. On the other hand, conventional reservoirs can be produced at economic flow rates and produce economic volumes of oil and gas without large stimulation treatments or any special recovery process. Conventional...

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Integrated Energy Policy Report Subsidiary Volume: PUBLIC INTEREST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption Trends 30 Natural Gas Use by Sector 30 Natural Gas End-Use 32 CHAPTER 3: ENERGY EFFICIENCYCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Integrated Energy Policy Report Subsidiary Volume: PUBLIC INTEREST Hall, Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division #12;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Public

436

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? Americanto Implement the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta?Paper Series Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Natural Gas Monthly August 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. Explanatory notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Creep performance of candidate SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials for land-based, gas turbine engine components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tensile creep-rupture of a commercial gas pressure sintered Si3N4 and a sintered SiC is examined at 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. These 2 ceramics are candidates for nozzles and combustor tiles that are to be retrofitted in land-based gas turbine engines, and there is interest in their high temperature performance over service times {ge} 10,000 h (14 months). For this long lifetime, a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038/1150 C and 125 Mpa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded for Si3N4; for SiC, the corresponding numbers are 300 Mpa at 1038 C, 250 MPa at 1150 C, and 180 MPa at 1350 C. Creep-stress exponents for Si3N4 are 33, 17, and 8 for 1038, 1150, 1350 C; fatigue- stress exponents are equivalent to creep exponents, suggesting that the fatigue mechanism causing fracture is related to the creep mechanism. Little success was obtained in producing failure in SiC after several decades of time through exposure to appropriate tensile stress; if failure did not occur on loading, then the SiC specimens most often did not creep-rupture. Creep-stress exponents for the SiC were determined to be 57, 27, and 11 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. For SiC, the fatigue-stress exponents did not correlate as well with creep-stress exponents. Failures that occurred in the SiC were a result of slow crack growth that initiated from the surface.

Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Multifunctional Nanowire/film Composites based Bi-modular Sensors for In-situ and Real-time High Temperature Gas Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report to the Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory for DE-FE0000870 covers the period from 2009 to June, 2013 and summarizes the main research accomplishments, which can be divided in sensing materials innovation, bimodular sensor demonstration, and new understanding and discoveries. As a matter of fact, we have successfully completed all the project tasks in June 1, 2013, and presented the final project review presentation on the 9th of July, 2013. Specifically, the major accomplishments achieved in this project include: 1) Successful development of a new class of high temperature stable gas sensor nanomaterials based on composite nano-array strategy in a 3D or 2D fashion using metal oxides and perovskite nanostructures. 2) Successful demonstration of bimodular nanosensors using 2D nanofibrous film and 3D composite nanowire arrays using electrical resistance mode and electrochemical electromotive force mode. 3) Series of new discoveries and understandings based on the new composite nanostructure platform toward enhancing nanosensor performance in terms of stability, selectivity, sensitivity and mass flux sensing. In this report, we highlight some results toward these accomplishments.

Gao, Pu-Xian; Lei, Yu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effect of molybdenum plus chromium on the corrosion of iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base alloys in basaltic lava and simulated magmatic gas at 1150/sup 0/C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of several binary and ternary alloys in a magma environment was studied. Binary alloys containing molybdenum and ternary alloys containing chromium and molybdenum were exposed to basaltic lava at 1150/sup 0/C for periods of 24 and 96 hours. A cover gas was used to produce oxygen and sulfur fugacities corresponding to those of the gases dissolved in basaltic melts. Three base metals were used. These included iron, nickel, and cobalt. The primary reactions in binary alloys were found to be sulfidation. Oxide scales with a spinel layer formed on ternary alloys. The synergistic effect of molybdenum and chromium additions in ternary alloys exhibited superior corrosion resistance to binary alloys which formed base-metal sulfides down grain-boundaries. Extensive analyses of the reaction products by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, electron microprobe analysis, and metallography are presented for each alloys. The products formed are discussed with reference to thermodynamic stability diagrams, and the reaction path concept is used to explain some of the corrosion.

Ehrlich, S.A.; Douglass, D.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Overview and Links  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview and Links About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Regional Overviews and Links to Pipeline...

442

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production...

443

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

444

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1992. Volume 2, Energy production research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II includes: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Volume 3: Characterization of representative reservoirs -- South Marsh Island 73, B35K and B65G Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a detailed study of two Gulf of Mexico salt dome related reservoirs and the application of a publicly available PC-based black oil simulator to model the performances of gas injection processes to recover attic oil. The overall objective of the research project is to assess the oil reserve potential that could result from the application of proven technologies to recover bypassed oil from reservoirs surrounding piercement salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico. The specific study objective was to simulate the primary recovery and attic gas injection performance of the two subject reservoirs to: (1) validate the BOAST model; (2) quantify the attic volume; and (3) predict the attic oil recovery potential that could result from additional updip gas injection. The simulation studies were performed on the B-35K Reservoir and the B-65G Reservoir in the South Marsh Island Block 73 Field using data provided by one of the field operators. A modified PC-version of the BOAST II model was used to match the production and injection performances of these reservoirs in which numerous gas injection cycles had been conducted to recover attic oil. The historical performances of the gas injection cycles performed on both the B-35K Reservoir and B-65G Reservoir were accurately matched, and numerous predictive runs were made to define additional potential for attic oil recovery using gas injection. Predictive sensitivities were conducted to examine the impact of gas injection rate, injection volume, post-injection shut-in time, and the staging of gas injection cycles on oil recovery.

Young, M.A.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Kimbrell, W.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering; Sawyer, W.K. [Mathematical and Computer Services, Inc., Danville, VA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Gasification Evaluation of Gas Turbine Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a preliminary assessment of the potential for use in gas turbines and reciprocating gas engines of gases derived from biomass by pyrolysis or partial oxidation with air. Consideration was given to the use of mixtures of these gases with natural gas as a means of improving heating value and ensuring a steady gas supply. Gas from biomass, and mixtures with natural gas, were compared with natural gas reformates from low temperature partial oxidation or steam reforming. The properties of such reformates were based on computations of gas properties using the ChemCAD computational tools and energy inputs derived from known engine parameters. In general, the biomass derived fuels compare well with reformates, so far as can be judged without engine testing. Mild reforming has potential to produce a more uniform quality of fuel gas from very variable qualities of natural gas, and could possibly be applied to gas from biomass to eliminate organic gases and condensibles other than methane.

Battelle

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati on in single-shell tank (SST) waste forms. The much higher void being currently observed in SY-101 represents essentially a new crust configuration, and the mechanisms for sudden gas release need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the situation of gas bubbles in crust based on the previous work on gas bubble retention, migration, and release in simulants and actual waste. We have also conducted some visual observations of bubble migration through simulated crusts to help understand the interaction of the various mechanisms.

SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gas turbine sealing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sealing apparatus in a gas turbine. The sealing apparatus includes a seal housing apparatus coupled to a disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable therewith during operation of the gas turbine. The seal housing apparatus comprises a base member, a first leg portion, a second leg portion, and spanning structure. The base member extends generally axially between forward and aft rows of rotatable blades and is positioned adjacent to a row of stationary vanes. The first leg portion extends radially inwardly from the base member and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The second leg portion is axially spaced from the first leg portion, extends radially inwardly from the base member, and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The spanning structure extends between and is rigidly coupled to each of the base member, the first leg portion, and the second leg portion.

Marra, John Joseph; Wessell, Brian J.; Liang, George

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Economics of Electric Compressors for Gas Transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) option. Outside of these regions, new electric drives as well as gas fueled reciprocating engines and turbines are being considered for replacement of older reciprocating gas engines and compressor units, based on improved operating efficiency. We review...

Schmeal, W. R.; Hibbs, J. J.

452

An efficient high-order finite difference gas-kinetic scheme for the Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-kinetic scheme is constructed. Different from the previous high-order finite volume gas-kinetic method [Li, Xu) Preprint submitted to Elsevier April 17, 2013 #12;covers the gas evolution process from the particle free a new finite volume gas-kinetic scheme has been developed [27], which significantly reduces

Xu, Kun

453

Assessment of coal bed gas prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal bed gas is an often overlooked source of clean, methane-rich, H{sub 2}S-free natural gas. The economic development of coal bed gas requires a knowledge of coal gas reservoir characteristics and certain necessary departures from conventional evaluation, drilling, completion, and production practices. In many ways coal seam reservoirs are truly unconventional. Most coals sufficient rank have generated large volumes of gas that may be retained depth in varying amounts through adsorption. Coal gas production can take place only when the reservoir pressure is reduced sufficiently to allow the gas to desorb. Gas flow to the well bore takes place through a hierarchy of natural fractures, not the relatively impermeable coal matrix. Economic production is dependent upon critical factors intrinsic to the reservoir, including coal petrology, gas content, internal formation stratigraphy, fracture distribution, hydrogeology, in situ stress conditions, initial reservoir pressure and pressure regime, and the presence or absence of a {open_quote}free{close_quotes} gas saturation. Further, the coal bed reservoir is readily subject to formation damage through improper drilling, completion, or production techniques. This presentation will review the data types critical to the assessment of any coal seam gas prospect, suggest an outline method for screening such prospects, and point out some possible pitfalls to be considered in any coal bed gas development project.

Moore, T.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wang, P. [Beijing Sciample Technology Co., Ltd., Beijing, 100190 (China)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

CFD Validation of Gas Injection in Flowing Mercury over Vertical Smooth and Grooved Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The nuclear spallation reaction occurs when a proton beam hits liquid mercury. This interaction causes thermal expansion of the liquid mercury which produces high pressure waves. When these pressure waves hit the target vessel wall, cavitation can occur and erode the wall. Research and development efforts at SNS include creation of a vertical protective gas layer between the flowing liquid mercury and target vessel wall to mitigate the cavitation damage erosion and extend the life time of the target. Since mercury is opaque, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used as a diagnostic tool to see inside the liquid mercury and guide the experimental efforts. In this study, CFD simulations of three dimensional, unsteady, turbulent, two-phase flow of helium gas injection in flowing liquid mercury over smooth, vertically grooved and horizontally grooved walls are carried out with the commercially available CFD code Fluent-12 from ANSYS. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) model is used to track the helium-mercury interface. V-shaped vertical and horizontal grooves with 0.5 mm pitch and about 0.7 mm depth were machined in the transparent wall of acrylic test sections. Flow visualization data of helium gas coverage through transparent test sections is obtained with a high-speed camera at the ORNL target test facility (TTF). The helium gas mass flow rate is 8 mg/min and introduced through a 0.5 mm diameter port. The local mercury velocity is 0.9 m/s. In this paper, the helium gas flow rate and the local mercury velocity are kept constant for the three cases. Time integration of predicted helium gas volume fraction over time is done to evaluate the gas coverage and calculate the average thickness of the helium gas layer. The predicted time-integrated gas coverage over vertically grooved and horizontally grooved test sections is better than over a smooth wall. The simulations show that the helium gas is trapped inside the grooves. The predicted time-averaged gas coverage is in good qualitative agreement with the measured gas coverage.

Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Gas turbine diagnostic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the given article the methods of parametric diagnostics of gas turbine based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The diagnostic map of interconnection between some parts of turbine and changes of corresponding parameters has been developed. Also we have created model to define the efficiency of the compressor using fuzzy logic algorithms.

Talgat, Shuvatov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

NumericalS imulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

words:fi nite volume method,fi lm cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation] for cooling turbine blades. An overview of previous experim0 tal studies and theoreticalm dels is given

459

U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed an advanced coal gasification process. The U-GAS process has been extensively tested in a pilot plant to firmly establish process feasibility and provide a large data base for scale-up and design of the first commercial plant. The U-GAS process is considered to be one of the more flexible, efficient, and economical coal gasification technologies developed in the US during the last decade. The U-GAS technology is presently available for licensing from GDC, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of IGT. The U-GAS process accomplishes four important functions in a single-stage, fluidized-bed gasifier: It decakes coal, devolatilizes coal, gasifies coal, and agglomerates and separates ash from char. Simultaneously with coal gasification, the ash is agglomerated into spherical particles and separated from the bed. Part of the fluidizing gas enters the gasifier through a sloping grid. The remaining gas flows upward at a high velocity through the ash agglomerating device and forms a hot zone within the fluidized bed. High-ash-content particles agglomerate under these conditions and grow into larger and heavier particles. Agglomerates grow in size until they can be selectively separated and discharged from the bed into water-filled ash hoppers where they are withdrawn as a slurry. In this manner, the fluidized bed achieves the same low level of carbon losses in the discharge ash generally associated with the ash-slagging type of gasifier. Coal fines elutriated from the fluidized bed are collected in two external cyclones. Fines from the first cyclone are returned to the bed and fines from the second cyclone are returned to the ash agglomerating zone, where they are gasified, and the ash agglomerated with bed ash. The raw product gas is virtually free of tar and oils, thus simplifying ensuing heat recovery and purification steps.

Schora, F.C.; Patel, J.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Yes, you can control lost and unaccounted-for gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1982, lost and unaccounted-for gas cost the US gas industry $1.983 billion, based on a gas worth of $5.00/1000 CF. A survey of key gas operators across the country produced a list of 23 suggestions for reducing gas losses in the areas of leakage control, measurement practices, accounting accuracy, and theft prevention.

Hale, D.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Volume 156,number I CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 March 1989 PHOTOFRAGMENT ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume 156,number I CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 March 1989 PHOTOFRAGMENT ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS FROMJKM) eigenstate. For a proper analysis of the subsequent gas-gas or gas-surface collision experiments) photofragments, which are detected via a 2 + 1 REMPI process at the same wavelength used to cause

Zare, Richard N.

462

Computer News, Volume 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

463

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

464

Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 1, Discussion and glass durability data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. Data collected throughout the world are included in the data base; current emphasis is on waste glasses and their properties. The goal is to provide a data base of properties and compositions and an analysis of dominant property trends as a function of composition. This data base is a resource that nuclear waste producers, disposers, and regulators can use to compare properties of a particular high-level nuclear waste glass product with the properties of other glasses of similar compositions. Researchers may use the data base to guide experimental tests to fill gaps in the available knowledge or to refine empirical models. The data are incorporated into a computerized data base that will allow the data to be extracted based on, for example, glass composition or test duration. 3 figs.

Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Natural gas monthly, August 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z