Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas dedicated to oil and gas exploration. Our system combines probe- based volume rendering with data processing Seismic interpretation is an important task in the oil and gas exploration-production (EP) workflow [9, 26

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

J. Dimock

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

3

Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

Stotts, Robert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

Natural gas annual 1992. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data for the Nation from 1930 to 1992, and by State from 1967 to 1992. The Supplement of this report presents profiles of selected companies.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Natural Gas Annual 1994 Volume 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4)/2 4)/2 Distribution Category/UC-950 Natural Gas Annual 1994 Volume 2 November 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superin- tendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Telephone orders may be directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Main Order Desk (202) 512-1800 FAX: (202) 512-2250 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F

7

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas & Galaxy Evolution ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, 2000 J. E. Hibbard, M. P. Rupen and J. H. van Gorkom, eds. Gas/Star O#11;sets in Tidal Tails J. C. Mihos Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 Abstract. We use numerical simulations to study the development of gas/star o#11;sets

Mihos, Chris

8

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 39,062 39,062...

9

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Gas lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book describes the fundamentals of gas lasers. It provides information and data on neutral gas lasers, ionized gas lasers, and molecular gas lasers. Concluding this volume is an extensive table of all gas laser wavelengths.

Weber, M.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Methods for determining vented volumes during gas well blowouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods are presented for determining vented volumes during gas well blowouts. The methods described apply to gas production in which no liquids phase(s), hydrocarbon and/or water, are present in the gas. Each method is illustrated with a numerical example. Sensitivity analyses provide estimates of probable errors. The method of crossplotting formation and flow string resistances is the only one which does not require special measurements. It is therefore applicalbe to cratered wells and underwater blowouts. The report includes several suggestions for investigations which might lead to better methods.

Hawkins, M.F. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermodynamical Consistency of Excluded Volume Hadron Gas Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new excluded volume hadron gas model by Singh et al. [1-7] is critically discussed. We demonstrate that in this model the results obtained from relations between thermodynamical quantities disagree with the corresponding results obtained by statistical ensemble averaging. Thus, the model does not satisfy the requirements of thermodynamical consistency.

M. I. Gorenstein

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 228,019 220,410 215,229 215,377 219,838 224,572 230,226 236,154 239,871 243,782 241,829 227,519 1991 225,964 215,495 211,852 213,588 218,084 228,720 234,297 240,868 252,335 263,855 255,740 241,570 1992 221,741 209,087 205,548 208,105 217,022 225,236 236,833 247,704 258,372 267,472 258,308 237,797 1993 218,826 208,027 205,378 210,868 217,693 225,793 236,688 247,032 259,649 265,238 258,580 240,957 1994 222,694 213,205 210,208 212,114 217,678 224,185 234,433 245,426 257,120 266,215 261,645 243,875 1995 223,356 212,480 208,011 207,340 211,295 219,417 229,558 244,448 256,135 263,260 252,590 237,557

14

Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 59,806 56,937 55,229 54,606 57,328 55,249 67,314 75,921 83,365 86,778 66,668 58,461 1991 61,574 54,369 50,745 51,761 54,314 60,156 66,484 70,498 74,646 75,367 70,399 63,453 1992 59,541 59,119 59,059 60,896 64,403 67,171 70,690 75,362 78,483 79,756 74,021 67,181 1993 61,308 56,251 52,595 52,028 58,713 65,349 69,968 75,120 80,183 85,406 79,818 75,184 1994 70,826 63,733 66,678 68,028 74,061 78,089 83,551 89,773 98,223 102,035 99,841 94,306 1995 86,450 83,059 79,507 80,647 84,154 90,012 97,005 100,430 101,993 102,510 103,779 93,925

15

New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 124,150 116,994 113,349 121,215 131,103 139,757 148,861 155,592 158,419 160,981 150,947 1991 127,051 118,721 114,190 117,571 124,275 132,029 140,317 149,058 157,799 163,054 158,736 151,036 1992 146,171 131,831 119,880 122,969 132,698 142,107 153,543 163,508 169,298 172,708 169,361 158,828 1993 145,521 129,184 118,756 122,771 133,838 144,835 154,895 162,969 172,642 174,589 171,253 161,801 1994 143,310 129,129 120,675 129,563 138,273 150,582 159,688 168,628 173,584 174,977 172,352 163,470 1995 149,768 135,478 129,570 130,077 138,659 150,010 156,744 165,026 173,947 175,635 165,945 148,196

16

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 296,629 281,511 286,917 279,978 298,202 307,083 317,720 325,432 332,591 338,392 353,804 327,277 1991 283,982 278,961 284,515 298,730 313,114 323,305 324,150 328,823 338,810 342,711 317,072 306,300 1992 288,415 280,038 276,287 282,263 290,192 301,262 318,719 326,705 339,394 346,939 330,861 299,990 1993 275,054 253,724 246,989 257,844 277,833 296,860 311,870 325,201 341,207 348,646 330,986 316,146 1994 285,115 259,794 257,148 273,797 298,007 311,154 327,281 340,312 349,174 353,630 350,671 334,502 1995 310,835 297,169 287,302 291,768 308,245 320,842 327,910 326,131 338,685 351,385 343,918 320,269

17

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 293,785 290,491 289,197 288,193 293,815 288,808 290,947 293,015 295,663 296,921 295,421 290,602 1991 289,270 287,858 286,548 286,491 287,718 288,959 290,667 292,107 292,226 290,844 288,112 284,559 1992 281,148 279,325 278,909 279,042 280,038 280,751 281,777 282,543 282,117 280,760 277,412 271,811 1993 266,711 262,291 259,532 257,822 256,665 255,940 257,149 257,450 257,904 257,816 253,710 250,503 1994 246,679 239,940 238,777 237,993 238,931 240,738 242,090 243,176 244,948 245,981 244,275 241,603 1995 238,103 236,109 235,420 236,218 237,498 239,637 242,554 245,760 246,856 246,301 243,255 238,004

18

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 888,010 816,597 813,746 830,132 876,457 908,444 941,985 966,686 1,002,402 1,021,144 997,644 956,234 1995 902,782 884,830 865,309 860,012 897,991 945,183 975,307 986,131 1,011,948 1,032,357 1,033,363 982,781 1996 896,744 853,207 837,980 849,221 885,715 916,778 929,559 928,785 946,748 949,983 939,649 899,689 1997 833,239 796,139 788,601 801,955 844,880 890,703 923,845 947,277 969,170 980,388 967,286 880,627 1998 828,658 780,476 768,264 773,053 823,311 872,913 900,181 925,287 965,846 1,001,548 1,009,978 953,379

19

Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 96,943 93,233 91,600 91,945 93,696 95,361 97,632 101,323 105,497 108,028 108,772 105,317 1991 99,409 90,625 87,381 86,706 88,659 89,700 93,022 97,673 102,161 119,470 106,066 101,121 1992 94,379 89,893 85,767 85,259 86,457 88,999 94,154 98,267 103,478 106,422 103,871 100,288 1993 95,109 90,016 87,368 88,414 89,388 91,515 95,971 100,516 104,709 106,058 104,160 101,505 1994 95,846 92,274 90,200 89,473 89,417 91,870 97,002 101,310 105,300 109,518 110,149 107,215 1995 101,661 95,902 93,464 92,724 93,156 94,955 97,862 101,470 106,201 110,610 111,401 106,609

20

Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 806,109 754,941 721,785 717,863 749,618 782,498 812,054 847,731 881,760 900,526 903,640 870,265 1991 801,635 753,141 727,699 720,275 751,641 781,883 810,535 844,477 877,485 904,206 885,341 851,258 1992 791,129 743,484 716,909 709,150 742,812 774,578 805,097 843,543 878,334 905,597 887,454 844,108 1993 783,875 735,236 710,377 713,214 746,899 779,762 810,546 844,320 882,456 907,957 898,655 854,691 1994 781,826 737,719 723,108 722,735 746,576 776,189 808,832 843,372 880,762 907,622 898,872 866,846 1995 803,422 745,457 721,311 716,886 745,970 774,803 804,912 837,002 868,941 899,868 885,665 841,580

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 439,384 418,280 409,494 412,498 435,089 454,844 474,266 493,301 510,714 521,774 518,006 489,515 1991 477,781 454,923 439,191 448,258 461,362 490,259 505,168 523,544 538,399 546,343 533,483 506,672 1992 463,200 428,363 392,474 394,514 420,383 452,412 478,259 500,938 516,378 527,568 522,419 491,542 1993 452,510 407,121 368,376 371,641 401,431 433,291 462,741 490,248 515,994 522,961 510,471 470,120 1994 413,475 378,216 361,279 377,103 406,526 438,293 471,603 498,156 519,996 530,505 526,490 498,597 1995 448,479 410,867 391,082 385,953 413,796 445,322 472,162 495,448 513,913 522,766 498,715 455,782

22

Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 245,145 234,971 229,066 227,002 227,589 232,695 244,279 256,395 272,036 278,715 307,106 283,959 1991 247,980 246,067 240,702 238,606 244,878 254,222 257,114 260,728 271,373 282,551 273,225 274,836 1992 267,254 254,115 244,632 239,589 241,818 244,415 248,599 260,231 270,362 273,183 262,414 247,855 1993 229,148 213,533 208,832 213,112 235,850 247,585 253,023 261,780 276,136 278,233 268,816 259,719 1994 243,371 229,217 228,379 229,034 240,066 245,355 256,229 268,820 278,655 283,143 276,402 266,198 1995 251,176 239,135 228,409 230,202 239,892 252,703 252,472 252,461 269,034 280,066 272,406 255,483

23

Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 167,899 166,624 167,576 172,320 177,680 185,467 192,473 199,674 202,983 198,545 192,581 1991 183,697 180,169 176,535 181,119 183,491 186,795 192,143 195,330 198,776 198,351 191,831 189,130 1992 189,866 188,587 183,694 182,008 180,781 182,342 185,893 187,501 191,689 202,391 200,871 197,857 1993 192,736 181,774 172,140 171,465 177,888 185,725 193,275 198,075 204,437 205,524 199,683 188,970 1994 170,283 157,974 153,378 158,141 167,847 177,200 186,856 193,717 197,308 200,665 200,993 192,700 1995 179,376 166,756 162,223 165,687 178,354 185,982 192,799 196,645 203,357 205,882 196,585 185,704

24

Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 79,285 79,603 80,373 85,161 89,985 93,156 99,475 104,348 108,323 111,705 112,191 106,545 1991 91,368 86,763 86,679 92,641 96,297 98,701 100,991 103,104 108,211 112,270 104,184 98,741 1992 89,008 87,873 85,498 85,665 89,979 94,898 99,555 100,116 106,504 107,770 107,015 100,433 1993 94,466 86,908 80,802 83,305 90,316 94,786 99,933 103,264 109,076 109,790 108,869 101,774 1994 92,881 89,305 92,689 97,058 101,796 102,770 109,298 114,566 116,697 120,326 121,207 115,933 1995 107,126 102,620 98,569 103,285 110,250 111,888 116,039 116,791 123,081 125,717 116,280 109,906

25

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 456,385 449,625 443,662 508,009 518,658 531,197 544,212 538,450 539,191 556,768 562,961 526,092 1991 444,671 436,508 436,440 453,634 468,302 487,953 491,758 497,878 513,315 517,099 502,004 486,831 1992 455,054 440,895 435,515 438,408 456,948 469,532 491,515 508,950 511,787 516,598 496,232 459,458 1993 414,216 388,921 376,731 396,804 423,544 444,755 453,961 466,560 450,853 457,581 445,059 431,719 1994 381,924 342,046 350,039 374,226 407,219 419,997 446,215 462,725 485,146 495,417 500,640 478,036 1995 465,108 443,908 434,564 455,756 479,313 497,829 498,982 490,940 510,646 520,173 509,944 463,202

26

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 66,554 61,757 56,567 52,684 52,375 56,614 62,829 68,028 73,035 74,259 80,053 1991 71,524 69,768 62,807 61,367 62,448 66,425 70,705 75,800 80,506 82,065 83,134 82,145 1992 78,319 74,888 68,199 64,030 63,685 65,682 69,830 76,095 82,007 84,134 81,041 78,303 1993 73,838 68,733 66,224 62,799 65,511 70,157 73,322 77,155 81,457 81,981 79,475 78,303 1994 72,798 67,880 65,147 60,034 65,538 67,050 71,639 76,943 82,093 82,347 80,736 77,356 1995 73,047 69,545 64,567 59,852 62,142 70,945 73,047 77,326 80,150 81,357 82,831 77,475

27

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 50,980 47,820 48,924 49,656 52,214 53,271 55,370 58,030 60,465 61,702 59,577 58,586 1991 55,450 52,159 50,537 51,458 52,941 54,594 55,998 58,233 60,342 61,017 61,304 61,207 1992 56,350 51,413 48,752 47,855 51,162 53,850 55,670 58,057 60,123 61,373 61,882 59,775 1993 56,503 52,155 50,240 49,746 51,939 53,114 54,206 55,924 58,423 61,103 61,504 58,605 1994 52,059 49,590 50,127 51,375 53,420 54,885 56,985 58,443 59,992 61,761 60,987 59,854 1995 57,642 53,398 53,293 53,049 55,049 57,080 56,891 58,074 60,121 61,273 60,740 57,798

28

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 27,878 27,848 27,810 27,846 27,946 28,419 28,946 29,427 29,707 29,734 29,656 29,429 1991 27,498 27,132 26,811 26,616 26,747 27,086 27,573 27,587 27,587 27,587 26,958 26,294 1992 25,642 25,124 24,681 24,523 24,507 25,016 25,868 26,532 26,966 26,770 26,404 25,781 1993 25,148 24,276 23,798 23,676 22,852 22,866 22,856 22,856 22,856 22,731 22,096 21,239 1994 19,771 18,729 17,426 17,116 17,647 18,199 18,762 19,566 19,776 19,712 19,354 18,757 1995 17,752 16,999 16,460 16,330 16,541 17,854 19,348 20,738 20,895 20,815 20,197 18,048

29

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 516,257 477,783 453,124 462,399 511,406 619,401 671,431 711,942 717,828 719,002 665,421 1991 543,808 501,265 471,608 482,628 527,550 545,866 569,927 607,093 651,148 669,612 658,358 627,857 1992 559,416 497,895 441,187 445,158 485,227 535,829 579,713 622,943 665,414 690,920 692,280 650,707 1993 580,189 479,149 417,953 444,095 494,680 547,289 592,762 632,195 680,452 695,718 689,050 639,761 1994 532,216 455,494 434,081 475,107 527,242 583,595 634,007 677,221 700,758 716,066 696,721 656,431 1995 590,100 497,162 469,515 481,690 525,118 578,640 611,291 648,080 695,988 713,882 669,744 594,750

30

Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 377,554 379,627 371,519 372,188 379,245 393,418 407,240 421,000 435,705 450,886 459,955 452,883 1991 405,740 373,892 361,085 367,797 387,769 411,591 425,349 435,719 453,303 477,425 464,906 433,184 1992 387,456 358,639 345,049 348,097 369,129 388,728 403,713 413,375 432,171 452,989 447,115 411,919 1993 365,128 321,651 298,841 302,181 340,366 375,731 402,638 430,431 466,345 481,609 468,227 421,634 1994 376,035 357,247 343,892 365,948 400,035 421,714 451,504 474,085 497,428 506,525 502,477 463,847 1995 412,075 372,991 364,320 374,312 392,968 420,738 441,510 442,655 466,060 480,119 455,669 408,882

31

California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 369,842 350,519 355,192 376,146 401,513 414,633 418,894 421,696 426,235 440,326 397,785 1991 376,267 376,879 359,926 380,826 407,514 431,831 445,387 448,286 448,383 448,081 441,485 417,177 1992 374,166 357,388 341,665 355,718 382,516 404,547 418,501 431,069 445,438 455,642 446,085 390,868 1993 357,095 337,817 348,097 356,320 385,972 399,994 423,027 433,552 448,573 461,473 446,120 411,943 1994 372,605 328,438 327,546 346,463 374,574 394,821 412,465 421,818 438,754 450,997 434,260 408,636 1995 377,660 373,010 365,068 362,271 388,641 414,650 428,646 426,927 442,131 460,286 462,316 436,346

32

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 799 683 623 539 539 539 673 807 919 1,022 1,126 1,127 1999 996 872 741 661 658 802 909 985 1,089 1,194 1,251 1,195 2000 1,031 855 792 729 711 711 711 711 711 760 874 959 2001 963 903 830 761 865 978 1,009 1,072 1,118 1,180 938 937 2002 987 988 990 990 965 962 949 945 942 940 852 852 2003 744 634 566 519 554 630 705 800 803 848 848 787 2004 684 633 621 652 685 731 794 849 854 879 867 826 2005 784 704 605 524 483 466 466 466 428 419 413 400

33

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 82,538 81,491 81,181 82,095 83,472 85,002 83,477 83,923 85,020 84,918 81,317 1991 79,407 78,372 77,653 78,788 81,843 83,985 83,721 83,657 84,562 84,253 83,847 81,475 1992 79,888 78,880 78,837 79,448 81,080 83,708 85,758 86,968 88,154 87,853 85,260 81,824 1993 78,414 76,448 75,412 76,380 79,328 82,649 85,226 87,084 88,593 88,564 86,793 84,418 1994 81,833 79,100 79,242 80,202 82,339 83,239 85,362 85,709 87,835 88,765 88,935 86,932 1995 84,820 83,825 82,895 82,697 83,340 84,206 35,388 35,566 35,950 35,183 33,585 31,992

34

Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1995 1,379 1,377 1,113 1,113 1,140 1,182 1,218 1,436 2,028 1,955 1,766 1,365 1996 1,311 1,014 852 1,006 1,373 2,042 2,247 2,641 3,081 3,198 3,069 2,309 1997 1,778 1,594 1,619 1,749 2,020 2,113 2,156 2,443 2,705 2,956 2,713 2,713 1998 1,963 1,775 1,527 1,772 1,917 2,540 2,531 2,730 2,329 2,942 2,943 2,805 1999 1,992 1,878 1,566 1,703 2,173 2,383 2,618 2,699 3,101 3,024 3,158 2,969 2000 2,055 2,053 2,368 2,302 2,392 2,999 3,080 3,080 2,970 2,828 2,624 2,539 2001 2,210 2,451 1,847 2,041 1,997 2,574 2,728 2,841 2,859 2,739 5,527 5,538

35

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 706,889 648,325 624,515 616,656 665,124 729,161 807,726 878,119 930,596 949,922 938,864 867,940 1991 743,402 679,102 654,930 682,092 729,387 786,753 845,224 891,823 911,554 952,843 894,499 818,602 1992 733,877 658,347 592,859 592,608 637,515 705,740 780,590 849,043 917,537 946,090 899,631 810,348 1993 710,139 607,908 543,589 559,454 637,732 723,706 807,040 889,450 955,444 989,143 937,100 847,136 1994 702,694 613,074 582,416 623,584 696,448 770,914 845,328 922,211 987,829 1,019,096 999,421 936,290 1995 830,235 717,515 666,164 665,004 718,094 783,569 857,995 914,295 966,578 998,665 931,432 813,622

36

West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 406,358 395,084 390,792 397,000 415,841 433,111 451,251 467,272 480,567 484,278 484,868 464,807 1991 434,160 413,996 410,940 418,771 433,924 450,027 464,274 474,984 483,421 487,004 475,927 453,446 1992 423,942 396,889 367,681 369,328 393,606 411,353 433,399 452,065 465,496 478,316 472,378 449,402 1993 417,527 374,171 344,142 349,414 388,771 415,925 435,814 454,993 475,298 482,458 468,770 435,687 1994 379,825 347,246 330,957 352,059 377,614 406,195 433,763 456,009 476,854 482,830 475,145 450,055 1995 406,251 364,959 352,876 358,628 383,018 407,328 422,458 431,357 449,075 463,546 440,460 401,144

37

Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 3,654 3,215 2,903 3,108 3,416 3,720 3,906 4,241 4,507 4,731 4,691 4,330 1999 4,004 3,548 3,215 3,397 3,666 3,872 4,078 4,280 4,691 4,792 4,599 4,118 2000 3,398 3,283 3,289 3,456 3,735 3,941 4,160 4,366 4,357 4,785 4,434 3,720 2001 3,183 3,135 2,844 3,275 3,788 4,180 4,424 4,728 4,988 5,013 5,073 4,875 2002 4,401 3,728 3,339 3,462 4,014 4,285 4,568 4,709 5,017 5,225 4,945 4,451 2003 3,429 2,933 2,754 3,047 3,494 3,969 4,381 5,469 6,083 6,035 6,003 5,458 2004 4,324 3,958 3,647 3,806 4,539 4,866 5,121 5,915 6,379 7,223 7,191 6,185

38

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 6,996 5,657 4,959 6,140 7,648 8,892 9,656 10,292 10,664 10,853 10,808 10,057 1991 8,982 8,017 6,250 5,271 5,985 7,539 8,997 10,089 10,763 11,102 11,125 10,638 1992 9,070 7,530 5,944 5,502 7,074 8,614 9,809 10,819 11,272 11,445 10,346 9,766 1993 7,848 6,452 5,724 5,298 6,942 8,240 9,421 10,463 11,041 11,531 10,800 9,697 1994 8,436 7,309 6,364 5,544 6,754 8,253 9,449 10,524 11,208 11,462 11,025 10,388 1995 8,710 8,325 7,885 8,752 9,932 10,965 11,661 11,661 12,147 12,147 12,090 11,268 1996 10,016 9,076 8,424 8,293 9,015 10,188 11,321 11,758 11,862 11,655 11,103 9,863

39

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 32,289 31,416 31,096 32,921 25,403 33,699 37,281 40,474 42,033 45,200 46,210 43,675 1991 40,230 38,226 36,059 39,127 42,052 45,061 46,102 44,144 46,786 46,696 46,457 47,414 1992 45,395 44,683 43,948 42,349 42,253 42,795 40,695 42,640 43,838 46,401 45,364 45,776 1993 43,130 38,966 38,843 35,916 38,621 39,842 40,111 37,793 38,782 40,310 37,597 37,680 1994 34,718 33,061 33,341 31,698 33,727 34,304 34,155 34,287 38,474 40,591 40,040 39,500 1995 37,356 37,353 37,790 38,013 39,236 40,341 40,358 39,269 39,788 39,823 38,746 37,256

40

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 3,605,263 3,281,694 3,164,033 3,297,696 3,531,074 3,786,195 4,043,225 4,279,875 4,477,279 4,588,167 4,522,088 4,292,649 1995 3,905,789 3,514,201 3,360,765 3,369,823 3,576,559 3,812,014 3,968,751 4,159,006 4,362,855 4,483,271 4,279,539 3,905,710 1996 3,483,209 3,190,123 2,987,233 3,052,606 3,272,105 3,557,334 3,859,973 4,122,060 4,364,848 4,508,821 4,334,814 4,094,033 1997 3,630,708 3,381,047 3,190,271 3,205,661 3,398,322 3,660,850 3,905,985 4,151,456 4,379,374 4,493,802 4,383,068 4,084,339 1998 3,774,740 3,544,699 3,335,505 3,436,983 3,680,419 3,909,517 4,166,130 4,309,452 4,461,762 4,580,963 4,542,742 4,295,021

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 6,363 5,796 5,866 6,343 6,672 6,784 6,916 6,964 7,025 7,052 7,050 6,662 1991 6,206 5,968 5,862 6,017 6,274 6,586 6,878 6,869 6,962 6,928 6,846 6,789 1992 6,341 6,211 5,883 5,675 6,064 6,371 6,668 6,848 6,974 6,970 6,962 6,759 1993 6,363 5,945 5,527 5,479 5,796 6,140 6,549 6,678 6,916 6,999 6,923 6,612 1994 6,085 5,890 5,700 5,543 5,892 6,265 6,634 6,836 6,985 6,983 6,979 6,907 1995 6,394 5,917 5,660 5,613 5,944 6,207 6,513 6,744 6,985 6,991 6,988 6,733 1996 5,952 5,692 5,470 5,558 5,924 6,219 6,506 6,716 6,918 6,951 6,920 6,693

42

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,433,462 1,329,400 1,322,914 1,388,877 1,498,496 1,553,493 1,643,445 1,714,361 1,785,350 1,819,344 1,810,791 1,716,773 1995 1,601,428 1,510,175 1,467,414 1,509,666 1,586,445 1,662,195 1,696,619 1,688,515 1,768,189 1,818,098 1,757,160 1,613,046 1996 1,436,765 1,325,994 1,223,139 1,264,513 1,334,894 1,395,779 1,443,970 1,525,797 1,631,006 1,686,652 1,614,154 1,519,539 1997 1,379,108 1,303,888 1,356,678 1,385,616 1,461,221 1,536,339 1,542,480 1,596,011 1,683,987 1,770,002 1,707,810 1,559,636 1998 1,456,136 1,442,993 1,420,644 1,515,050 1,610,474 1,666,304 1,739,745 1,803,097 1,840,984 1,950,772 1,945,897 1,807,163

43

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

44

No-migration variance petition: Draft. Volume 4, Appendices DIF, GAS, GCR (Volume 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by national defense-related activities. Approximately 2.6 million cubic feet of the se waste have been generated and are stored at various facilities across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), was sited and constructed to meet stringent disposal requirements. In order to permanently dispose of TRU waste, the DOE has elected to petition the US EPA for a variance from the Land Disposal Restrictions of RCRA. This document fulfills the reporting requirements for the petition. This report is volume 4 of the petition which presents details about the transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags; gas generation reactions and rates during long-term WIPP operation; and geological characterization of the WIPP site.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Volume Tracking  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" ,"Daily Period",,"Containment Total" ,"Oil","Gas","Oil","Gas" "End Period","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Rate","Rate","Cumulative","Cumulative" "MM/DD/YY 00:00","(bo)","(mmcf)","(bbls)","(mmcf)","Comment" 40333,16.486,0,16.486,0,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40334,6060.70543,15.666,6077.19143,15.666,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40335,10496.19429,22.00800001,16573.38572,37.674,"Oil rate based on metered volume"

46

Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

,"AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030872m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030872m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

49

,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030882m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030882m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

50

,"AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030892m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030892m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

51

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 1991 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 1992 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 250,206 1993 250,206 250,206 247,228 246,345 247,699 247,950 247,109 248,215 248,944 251,050 247,420 247,425 1994 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 247,435 247,435 247,435 247,435 1995 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419

52

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 352,686 352,686 352,686 351,920 352,686 352,686 353,407 353,407 353,407 353,407 359,236 358,860 1991 349,459 348,204 334,029 335,229 353,405 349,188 350,902 352,314 353,617 354,010 353,179 355,754 1992 358,198 353,313 347,361 341,498 344,318 347,751 357,498 358,432 359,300 359,504 359,321 362,275 1993 362,222 358,438 351,469 354,164 360,814 359,349 359,455 359,510 359,530 361,433 360,977 360,971 1994 360,026 357,906 358,611 360,128 361,229 361,294 361,339 361,335 361,335 361,335 361,238 362,038 1995 357,538 357,538 357,538 356,900 357,006 356,909 357,848 357,895 357,967 357,994 357,994 358,094

53

Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 0 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 1991 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 18,800 18,800 18,800 1992 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 1993 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 1994 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 1995 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 21,123

54

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 1991 47,530 47,483 47,483 47,483 47,483 47,868 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 1992 48,150 48,150 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 47,851 48,049 1993 48,039 48,049 48,049 48,049 47,792 48,049 48,049 48,049 48,049 49,038 70,555 70,688 1994 71,043 71,801 71,955 71,959 71,959 71,959 71,959 71,959 71,959 72,652 72,671 72,671 1995 74,188 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 77,682

55

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 1991 264,324 264,324 264,304 264,497 265,121 265,448 265,816 266,390 262,350 266,030 267,245 267,245 1992 267,245 267,245 265,296 262,230 262,454 263,788 266,852 260,660 257,627 258,575 259,879 262,144 1993 261,841 255,035 251,684 252,604 253,390 254,839 253,518 254,115 254,299 254,043 254,646 251,132 1994 263,981 263,749 263,836 264,541 265,702 266,435 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 1995 266,702 266,702 266,643 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 267,311

56

Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume is ... which indicates fast (involving branching chain reactions) ignition of the gas mixture. A conclusion is ... regar...

S. Yu. Kazantsev; I. G. Kononov; I. A. Kossyi; N. M. Tarasova…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production (Billion Cubic Feet)...

58

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1015325 Final Report, July 2007 Each of the ... scenarios showed significant Greenhouse Gas reductions due to PHEV fleet penetration ... ... PHEVs adoption results in significant reduction in the consumption of petroleum fuels. ' ' DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI). NEITHER EPRI, ANY MEMBER OF EPRI, ANY COSPONSOR, THE ORGANIZATION(S) BELOW, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING

62

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:11 PM"

64

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:12 PM"

65

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:11 PM"

66

,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030md2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030md2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:05 PM"

67

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:06 PM"

68

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:11 PM"

69

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030mt2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030mt2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:07 PM"

70

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:05 PM"

71

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:07 PM"

72

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ok2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ok2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:09 PM"

73

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:01 PM"

74

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:03 PM"

75

,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030mo2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030mo2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:06 PM"

76

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:03 PM"

77

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:10 PM"

78

,"Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030il2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030il2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:02 PM"

79

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:04 PM"

80

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ny2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ny2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:08 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_sat_sak_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_sat_sak_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:57:19 PM"

82

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:00 PM"

83

Thermodynamics and fluctuations of conserved charges in Hadron Resonance Gas model in finite volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermodynamics of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collision experiments are usually studied as a system of infinite volume. Here we report on possible effects for considering a finite system size for such matter in the framework of the Hadron Resonance Gas model. The bulk thermodynamic variables as well as the fluctuations of conserved charges are considered. We find that the finite size effects are insignificant once the observables are scaled with the respective volumes. The only substantial effect is found in the fluctuations of electric charge which may therefore be used to extract information about the volume of fireball created in heavy-ion collision experiments.

Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Samanta, Subhasis; Sur, Subrata

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030va2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:12 PM"

85

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume (MMcf)" Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030oh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:09 PM"

86

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Finite Volume Based Computer...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search...

87

Digital volume imaging of the PEFC gas diffusion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a key role in the overall performance/durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Of profound importance, especially in the context of water management and flooding phenomena, is the influence of the underlying pore morphology and wetting characteristics Of the GDL microstructure. In this article, we present the digital volumetric imaging (DVI) technique in order to generate the 3-D carbon paper GDL microstructure. The internal pore structure and the local microstructural variations in terms of fiber alignment and fiber/binder distributions are investigated using the several 3-D thin sections of the sample obtained from DVI.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL; Shim, Eunkyoung [NC ST

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Resilience-Based Design of Natural Gas Distribution Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study Resilience-Based Design of Natural Gas Distribution Networks G. P. Cimellaro, Ph.D., A response to natural disasters. In this paper, a new performance index measuring the functionality of a gas; Disaster resilience; Vulnerability; Gas networks; Damage assessment; Lifelines; Serviceability; Natural gas

Bruneau, Michel

89

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

90

Colorado Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

91

Detecting gas flares and estimating flaring volumes at individual flow stations using MODIS data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas flaring has gained global recognition as a prominent agent of pollution, leading to the establishment of the Global Gas Flaring Reduction (GGFR) initiative, which requires an objective means of monitoring flaring activity. Because auditable information on flaring activity is difficult to obtain there have recently been attempts to detect flares using satellite imagery, typically at global scales. However, to adequately assess the environmental and health impacts of flaring from local to regional scales, it is important that we have a means of acquiring information on the location of individual active flaring sites and the volume of gas combusted at these sites. In this study we developed an approach to the retrieval of such information using nighttime MODIS thermal imagery. The MODIS flare detection technique (MODET) and the MODIS flare volume estimation technique (MOVET) both exploit the absolute and contextual radiometric response of flare sites. The levels of detection accuracy and estimation error were quantified using independent observations of flare location and volume. The MODET and MOVET were applied to an archive of MODIS data spanning 2000–2014 covering the Niger Delta, Nigeria, a significant global hotspot of flaring activity. The results demonstrate the substantial spatial and temporal variability in gas flaring across the region, between states and between onshore and offshore sites. Thus, whilst the estimated total volume of gas flared in the region over the study period is large (350 Billion Cubic Metres), the heterogeneity in the flaring indicates that the impacts of such flares will be highly variable in space and time. In this context, the MODET and MOVET offer a consistent and objective means of monitoring flaring activity over an appropriate range of scales and it is now important that their robustness and transferability is tested in other oil-producing regions of the world.

Obinna C.D. Anejionu; G. Alan Blackburn; J. Duncan Whyatt

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application Arthur VALLERON a,b , Christophe, Engineering Materials Department The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

94

Methods for determining vented volumes during gas-condensate and oil-well blowouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods are presented for determining vented volumes during gas-condensate and oil well blowouts. Each method is illustrated with a numerical example. The method of crossplotting formation and flow string resistances is the only one which does not require special measurements. It is, therefore, applicable to cratered wells and underwater blowouts. The report includes several suggestions for investigations which might lead to better methods.

Hawkins, M.F. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Description of Hot and Dense Hadron Gas Properties in a New Excluded-Volume model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new equation of state for a hot and dense hadron gas (HG) is obtained where the finite hard-core size of baryons has been incorporated in a thermodynamically consistent formulation of excluded volume correction. Our model differs from other existing approaches on the following points. We assign a hard-core volume only to each baryon and mesons though possess a small volume but they can fuse and interpenetrate into one another. Use of the full quantum statistics is made in obtaining the grand canonical partition function where excluded-volume correction has been incorporated by explicitly integrating over volume. We thus find that the new model works even for the cases of extreme temperatures and/or densities where most of other approaches fail. The model does not violate causality even at extreme densities. The temperature and density dependence of various thermodynamical quantities, e.g. pressure, baryon density, entropy and energy density compare well with the results of other microscopic HG models. After suitable parametrization of the centre-of-mass energy in terms of temperature and baryon chemical potential, we explore some new freeze-out criteria which exhibit full independence of the collision energy and of the structures of the colliding nuclei. We further demonstrate the suitability of our model in explaining various experimental results of the multiplicity-ratios of various particles and their antiparticles. Finally, we use our excluded-volume model to obtain the transport behaviour of the hot and/or dense HG such as shear viscosity to entropy ratio, speed of sound etc. and compare the results with earlier calculations.

S. K. Tiwari; P. K. Srivastava; C. P. Singh

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

98

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

99

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

100

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

HERA-B Gas Systems The gas mixture, the gas volume of the corresponding detector and the required gas flow are given. All detectors are operating at nominal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stations in external gas hut 6 nonflammable pressure reducer stations CF4, Xe, CO2, Ar/CF4, reserve, reserve 3 flammable pressure reducer stations C2H6O, CH4, Ar/CH4 2 stations for cool liquids Ar, N2 4 gas stations without recyling ITR, high pt inner, high pt outer, Muon pixel 4 gas stations with gas recyling

103

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis The portfolio-based planning process for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation offers an approach to: Evaluating the GHG reduction potential at the site, program, and agency level Identifying strategies for reducing those emissions Prioritizing activities to achieve both GHG reduction and cost objectives. Portfolio-based management for GHG mitigation helps agencies move from "peanut-butter-spreading" obligations for meeting GHG reduction targets evenly across all agency operating units to strategic planning of GHG reduction activities based on each operating unit's potential and cost to reduce emissions. The result of this prioritization will lay the foundation

104

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 4,898,000 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 5,445,000 NA 4,962,000 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 5,553,000 5,706,000 5,691,000 5,374,000 1976 4,817,000 4,617,000 4,496,000 4,607,000 4,827,000 5,116,000 5,412,000 5,698,000 5,946,000 5,966,000 5,713,000 5,250,000 1977 4,580,000 4,446,000 4,501,000 4,713,000 5,024,000 5,330,000 5,665,000 5,945,000 6,188,000 6,302,000 6,224,000 5,866,000 1978 5,193,000 4,683,000 4,497,000 4,608,000 4,870,000 5,217,000 5,550,000 5,904,000 6,224,000 6,402,000 6,352,000 6,020,000

106

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 6,608,635 6,024,215 5,879,115 6,092,050 6,491,219 6,831,426 7,075,486 7,319,424 7,716,989 8,105,566 8,142,609 7,763,772 2012 7,219,136 6,758,315 6,794,584 6,936,421 7,219,444 7,453,546 7,588,106 7,753,994 8,044,851 8,294,299 8,171,574 7,785,322 2013 7,058,361 6,453,590 6,073,437 6,206,822 6,622,745 6,996,261 7,270,844 7,540,119 7,893,364 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

107

Gas-self-filter-based erbium-doped fiber loop laser for gas detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An erbium-doped fiber (EDF) loop laser, based on a gas-self-filter (GSF), is developed with single or multiple wavelength emission. The GSF is a type of Mach–Zehnder...

Guo, Kaikai; Lou, Xiutao; Yan, Chunsheng; Mei, Liang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fact-based communication: the Shale Gas Information Platform SHIP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In response to an increasingly expressed need for factual information, a science-based information web portal, the Shale Gas Information Platform SHIP, was developed. At the core of the project i...

Andreas Hübner; Brian Horsfield; Ingo Kapp

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Place Volumes and Liquid Recovery for Volatile Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs. (December 2000) Juan Manual Jaramillo Arias, B. S. , Universidad de America; B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Colombia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Maria A. Barrufet... Reservoir Performance 2. 2 Equation of State Review. . 2. 3 Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR EOS). 2. 4 Vapor Liquid Equilibria. . 2. 5 Volume Translation. 2. 6 Pseudoization or Lumping. 2. 7 Heavy Fraction Characterization. . 2. 8 Compositional...

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage - Base Gas (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- Base Gas (MMcf)" - Base Gas (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage - Base Gas (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5500us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5500us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:32 PM"

112

The effect of high-pressure injection of gas on the reservoir volume factor of a crude oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF HIGH-PRESSURE INJECTION OF GAS ON THE RESERVOIR VOLUME FACTOR OF A CRUDE OIL A Thesis By+ BAXTER DS'kONEYCUTT o Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, i957 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECT OF HIGH-PRESSURE INJECTION OF GAS ON THE RESERVOIR VOLUME FACTOR OF A CRUDE OIL A Thesis By BAXTER D. HONEYCUTT Appro d as to style...

Honeycutt, Baxter Bewitt

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gas turbine performance prognostic for condition-based maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines experience degradations over time that cause great concern to gas turbine users on engine reliability, availability and operating costs. Gas turbine diagnostics and prognostics is one of the key technologies to enable the move from time-scheduled maintenance to condition-based maintenance in order to improve engine reliability and availability and reduce life cycle costs. This paper describes a prognostic approach to estimate the remaining useful life of gas turbine engines before their next major overhaul based on historical health information. A combined regression techniques, including both linear and quadratic models, is proposed to predict the remaining useful life of gas turbine engines. A statistic “compatibility check” is used to determine the transition point from a linear regression to a quadratic regression. The developed prognostic approach has been applied to a model gas turbine engine similar to Rolls-Royce industrial gas turbine AVON 1535 implemented with compressor degradation over time. The analysis shows that the developed prognostic approach has a great potential to provide an estimation of engine remaining useful life before next major overhaul for gas turbine engines experiencing a typical soft degradation.

Y.G. Li; P. Nilkitsaranont

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advanced illumination techniques for GPU-based volume raycasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volume raycasting techniques are important for both visual arts and visualization. They allow efficient generation of visual effects and visualization of scientific data obtained by tomography or numerical simulation. Volume-rendering techniques are ...

Markus Hadwiger; Patric Ljung; Christof Rezk Salama; Timo Ropinski

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Enahancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit W, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. At each site where the techno!o@es were to be demonstrated, petiormance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NO. and 50 percent for SO2. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 67.2% and S02 emissions by 52.6%. For the cyclone-fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9%.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where the technologies were to be demonstrated, performance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NOX and 50 percent for S02. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 67.2?40 and SOZ emissions by 52.6Y0. For the cyclone-fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9Y0.

None

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Efficient Use of Natural Gas Based Fuels in Heavy-Duty Engines...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Use of Natural Gas Based Fuels in Heavy-Duty Engines Efficient Use of Natural Gas Based Fuels in Heavy-Duty Engines Natural gas and other liquid feedstocks for transportation fuels...

119

WaVPeak: picking NMR peaks through wavelet-based smoothing and volume-based filtering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Tramontano Motivation: Nuclear magnetic resonance...the literature. The dataset comprises 32 2D and 3D...the last two decades, nuclear magnetic resonance...volume-based filtering. | Nuclear magnetic resonance...the literature. The dataset comprises 32 2D and 3D......

Zhi Liu; Ahmed Abbas; Bing-Yi Jing; Xin Gao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Art Pre-ARES Engines Characterized by the following: Limited investment in natural gas engines, based on derivatives of larger volume diesel engines Low...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4,302,792 4,302,341 4,302,108 4,303,570 4,304,364 4,301,779 4,300,139 4,300,269 4,301,291 4,301,737 4,299,727 4,301,752 2012 4,309,129 4,309,505 4,321,454 4,325,195 4,332,383 4,338,100 4,342,905 4,347,859 4,351,797 4,365,049 4,372,359 4,372,412 2013 4,365,146 4,365,297 4,363,812 4,363,259 4,367,088 4,370,387 4,351,118 4,348,089 4,348,899 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Underground Base

122

Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 112,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 1991 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 109,573 1992 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 1993 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 169,892 168,573 168,573 1994 168,573 167,495 167,495 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 1995 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491 167,491

123

U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2,864,000 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,042,000 NA 2,912,000 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,085,000 3,107,000 3,150,000 3,162,000 1976 3,169,000 3,173,000 3,170,000 3,184,000 3,190,000 3,208,000 3,220,000 3,251,000 3,296,000 3,302,000 3,305,000 3,323,000 1977 3,293,000 3,283,000 3,286,000 3,286,000 3,293,000 3,300,000 3,317,000 3,346,000 3,364,000 3,373,000 3,403,000 3,391,000 1978 3,374,000 3,373,000 3,374,000 3,377,000 3,379,000 3,381,000 3,386,000 3,403,000 3,411,000 3,444,000 3,425,000 3,473,000

124

Arkansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 1991 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 19,202 1992 19,202 19,202 19,112 19,021 19,007 19,007 19,007 19,007 19,007 18,887 18,748 18,615 1993 18,607 18,523 18,484 18,472 18,156 17,897 17,888 17,888 17,888 17,833 17,675 17,528 1994 17,388 17,269 16,711 16,438 16,311 16,225 16,140 16,354 16,350 16,246 15,873 15,289 1995 14,948 14,752 14,578 14,448 14,352 14,280 14,207 14,137 14,066 13,992 13,923 13,856

125

Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 74,572 74,572 74,558 74,558 74,558 74,565 74,572 74,572 74,572 74,572 74,572 74,729 1991 74,588 70,962 70,956 70,856 70,892 70,956 70,957 70,962 70,962 81,536 71,050 71,050 1992 71,050 71,050 71,005 70,920 71,043 71,050 71,050 71,050 71,050 71,139 71,139 71,139 1993 71,407 71,390 71,377 71,255 71,338 71,407 71,407 71,407 71,407 71,453 71,453 71,453 1994 72,222 72,222 72,098 72,077 72,222 72,222 72,222 72,222 72,222 73,641 73,741 73,791 1995 73,929 73,929 73,922 73,825 73,929 73,929 73,929 73,929 74,229 74,429 74,754 74,779

126

Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 179,462 191,402 190,669 1991 188,597 191,203 191,198 191,198 191,126 192,733 192,736 192,798 192,798 192,805 192,563 192,563 1992 190,943 190,963 190,914 190,591 190,765 190,714 190,611 190,578 190,606 190,643 189,320 186,399 1993 184,254 180,510 181,152 186,315 189,044 189,057 188,824 186,164 186,181 185,408 181,564 183,536 1994 190,374 187,573 188,582 188,256 190,547 190,296 191,566 191,592 191,834 191,834 191,834 191,834 1995 191,884 191,872 190,411 191,131 191,131 192,555 187,380 187,380 187,380 186,186 181,501 181,501

127

Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 31,205 31,205 31,205 31,205 31,353 31,205 31,501 31,638 31,735 31,754 30,652 30,652 1991 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 34,651 1992 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,130 59,127 59,382 1993 59,382 59,382 59,382 59,382 59,382 59,382 59,382 59,427 59,427 59,427 60,746 60,746 1994 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,746 60,782 60,782 1995 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782 60,782

128

Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 167,385 163,458 167,385 163,458 167,385 167,385 167,385 167,385 167,385 167,385 173,097 172,762 1991 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 1992 172,757 172,757 172,368 172,573 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 172,757 176,765 176,765 1993 228,593 227,252 227,560 226,942 228,574 229,750 229,765 229,765 229,765 229,765 229,765 229,765 1994 229,091 224,523 224,367 224,291 224,533 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 1995 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 224,523 225,098 225,098 227,652 227,652

129

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 395,529 395,529 395,529 395,529 395,529 395,180 396,744 396,491 396,293 396,099 395,934 395,790 1991 394,527 393,885 392,506 394,146 413,930 413,764 413,617 413,530 413,468 413,390 413,242 413,275 1992 413,430 413,426 413,356 413,302 413,258 413,224 413,182 413,226 413,225 413,194 413,136 413,069 1993 413,736 413,707 410,316 411,038 415,626 420,299 420,682 420,660 420,562 420,591 420,609 420,600 1994 420,550 419,736 419,697 419,700 419,661 419,628 419,590 419,634 419,594 419,592 419,547 419,404 1995 419,289 419,190 419,148 419,101 419,044 419,000 419,000 421,522 421,421 421,080 419,859 420,726

130

Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 1991 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 1992 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 1993 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 1994 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 1995 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600 21,600

131

Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 1991 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 1992 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 1993 105,430 105,394 105,392 105,446 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 1994 105,433 105,433 105,383 105,383 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 1995 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,433 105,987

132

Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 1991 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 1992 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 1993 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 1994 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 1995 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677 46,677

133

Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 338,916 336,243 331,979 1991 357,743 357,743 357,743 357,674 351,476 357,598 357,566 357,743 357,743 357,743 357,743 357,743 1992 357,689 357,689 356,333 355,927 356,779 356,747 356,880 357,810 357,808 357,856 357,856 358,966 1993 358,966 357,823 354,044 354,688 357,895 358,113 358,082 358,926 358,924 358,966 358,966 358,966 1994 358,966 358,966 356,018 355,988 355,957 358,034 358,005 358,858 358,965 358,966 358,966 357,046 1995 357,046 357,046 356,210 355,761 355,728 355,718 352,486 353,468 353,824 353,824 353,824 353,824

134

Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles Hansen, Chris Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lake City, UT 84112 USA March 24, 2005 Abstract: While low cost PC graphics hardware has proven1 Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles;Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1 Hanspeter Pfister2 Charles Hansen1

Utah, University of

135

An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Manganese-based sorbents for coal gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to perform a preliminary screening on a particular Mn-based sorbent, CST-939 (from Chemetals), for hot gas desulfurization. The purpose of the preliminary screening is to determine which temperature and type of coal gas this sorbent demonstrates the greatest capacity and efficiency for sulfur removal. The following conclusions were made from the data collected on the CST-939 sorbent: The sorbent efficiency and capacity are much greater at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) than at 871{degrees}C (1,600{degrees}F). The sorbent efficiency and capacity are much greater in the presence of the more highly-reducing Shell gas than with the less-reducing KRW gas. The sorbent showed tremendous capacity for sulfur pickup, with actual loadings as high as 21 weight percent. Oxidative regeneration at 871{degrees}C (1,600{degrees}F) appeared to decompose sulfate; however, unusually high SO{sub 2} release during the second sulfidations and/or reductive regenerations indicated incomplete regeneration. The average crush strength of the reacted sorbent did not indicate any loss of strength as compared to the fresh sorbent. Superior sorbent performance was obtained in the presence of simulated Shell gas at 538{degrees}C (1,000{degrees}F).

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Fisher, E.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Goyette, W.J. [Chemetals, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

EMAT based inspection of natural gas pipelines for SSC cracks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EMAT-Based Inspection of Natural Gas EMAT-Based Inspection of Natural Gas Pipelines for Stress Corrosion Cracks FY2004 Report Venugopal K. Varma, Raymond W. Tucker, Jr., and Austin P. Albright Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 1 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

138

Modeling twin-screw multiphase pump performance during periods of high gas volume fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pumping adds energy to an unprocessed effluent stream acting as a combined pump and compressor, permitting the recovery of oil and gas on an economical basis. In practice, multiphase production is characterized by wide fluctuations in the gas and liquid...

Singh, Aditya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2,700,245 2,697,308 2,696,823 2,698,489 2,699,802 2,699,840 2,700,331 2,701,227 2,701,285 2,702,703 2,702,571 2,703,149 1995 2,699,674 2,699,575 2,696,880 2,695,400 2,726,268 2,726,255 2,668,312 2,671,818 2,672,399 2,672,258 2,671,362 2,672,808 1996 2,670,906 2,670,070 2,646,056 2,654,836 2,659,533 2,667,092 2,667,020 2,665,705 2,668,975 2,669,980 2,670,274 2,670,239 1997 2,665,398 2,669,603 2,668,763 2,665,910 2,662,796 2,675,047 2,675,015 2,676,601 2,676,773 2,677,093 2,676,542 2,667,760 1998 2,666,003 2,666,279 2,666,299 2,664,193 2,663,159 2,660,954 2,703,770 2,665,205 2,664,714 2,662,805 2,664,518 2,664,462

140

West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 310,640 310,640 310,640 310,640 310,640 310,640 311,765 311,765 311,765 311,765 312,670 309,331 1991 331,618 332,229 331,898 332,278 332,288 332,288 331,275 332,283 332,269 332,264 332,259 332,070 1992 336,854 336,689 335,303 335,602 335,965 336,044 336,309 336,528 336,527 336,526 336,525 305,441 1993 305,478 304,578 302,471 303,053 304,099 304,385 304,701 304,701 304,701 306,270 305,949 305,949 1994 308,278 308,273 310,295 310,293 310,380 308,308 308,321 308,326 308,316 308,316 308,226 309,677 1995 309,677 309,677 309,677 310,207 310,237 310,337 302,437 302,392 302,347 302,320 302,320 302,220

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,039,864 1,032,160 1,033,297 1,032,517 1,037,294 1,037,338 1,038,940 1,036,193 1,037,422 1,035,931 1,035,050 1,043,103 1995 1,051,669 1,054,584 1,051,120 1,051,697 1,052,949 1,062,613 1,058,260 1,054,218 1,054,870 1,051,687 1,056,704 1,060,588 1996 1,067,220 1,062,343 1,027,692 1,040,511 1,055,164 1,056,516 1,052,009 1,051,395 1,052,015 1,048,151 1,052,057 1,053,173 1997 1,064,968 1,054,977 1,059,316 1,059,050 1,059,706 1,064,515 1,063,554 1,063,029 1,066,254 1,064,123 1,065,557 1,065,151 1998 1,064,741 1,058,297 1,057,927 1,057,506 1,060,241 1,055,941 1,055,660 1,055,056 1,056,417 1,057,591 1,057,539 1,038,925

142

Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 2,345 2,371 2,369 2,366 2,361 2,356 2,353 2,347 2,289 2,382 2,436 2,433 1999 2,485 2,478 2,470 2,467 2,464 2,459 2,437 2,450 2,443 2,434 2,424 2,410 2000 2,400 2,441 2,475 2,394 2,094 2,094 2,094 2,152 2,134 2,192 2,192 2,192 2001 2,192 2,312 2,312 2,312 2,312 2,312 2,312 2,312 2,312 2,362 2,362 2,372 2002 2,372 2,372 2,372 2,372 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2003 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,387 2,759 2,836 2,754 2,836 2,836 2004 2,754 2,763 2,782 2,782 2,833 2,876 2,933 2,989 3,126 3,108 3,108 3,108

143

U.S. Natural Gas Salt - Underground Storage - Base Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- Underground Storage - Base Gas (Million Cubic Feet) - Underground Storage - Base Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Salt - Underground Storage - Base Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 37,195 37,953 38,265 39,605 40,331 40,911 41,345 41,371 41,613 42,615 43,588 43,588 1995 54,076 54,066 54,066 54,312 54,066 54,312 54,312 54,312 54,001 55,000 55,071 59,730 1996 62,988 63,041 62,749 63,041 63,271 63,462 59,890 59,989 60,287 60,350 64,182 64,105 1997 65,372 59,134 65,057 65,341 64,803 65,641 65,476 65,444 65,182 66,477 66,819 67,223 1998 66,915 66,411 67,753 68,264 68,293 65,998 66,057 65,620 67,489 67,451 67,537 66,984 1999 67,311 67,043 67,036 67,055 66,792 65,336 65,291 66,176 67,001 66,993 67,017 68,616

144

Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 1991 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 1992 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 1993 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 3,291 1994 3,291 3,291 3,291 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 1995 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 1996 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896 4,896

145

AN ADAPTIVE SURFACE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD BASED ON VOLUME MESHES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

makes use of a (standard) outer volume mesh to discretize an equation on a two-dimensional surface, interface, finite element, level set method, adaptivity, error estimator AMS subject classification. 65N15 measure The first author was partially supported by National Science Foundation grant DMS-1016094

Demlow, Alan

146

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ultrasonic flowmeter offers new approach to large-volume gas measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to provide a measurement tool for performing transmission-pipeline efficiency studies and aid in gas control and intercompany gas transfer. A single path, contrapropagating ultrasonic flowmeter can be calibrated to accurately measure gas flow rates in large-diameter pipelines over a wide range of flows. The agreement between a multiple-run orifice measurement station and the ultrasonic flowmeter is within + 0.5%. Uncertainty in the meter calibration is a function of the ability to predict the flow profile of the gas stream.

Munk, W.D.

1982-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 147 1980's 159 161 157 157 179 168 169 162 162 165 1990's 158 153 147 153 157 145 162 174 178 199 2000's 208 215 207 191 182 174 182 181 173 178 2010's 224 211 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Lower 48 States Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production Lease Condensate

149

Dynamic Allocation of a Domestic Heating Task to Gas-Based and Heatpump-Based Heating Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Allocation of a Domestic Heating Task to Gas-Based and Heatpump-Based Heating Agents Jan for a domestic heating task is introduced and analysed. The model includes two alternative heating agents (for gas-based heating and for heatpump-based heating), and a third allocation agent which determines

Treur, Jan

150

Transaction-Based Building Controls Framework, Volume 1: Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document proposes a framework concept to achieve the objectives of raising buildings’ efficiency and energy savings potential benefitting building owners and operators. We call it a transaction-based framework, wherein mutually-beneficial and cost-effective market-based transactions can be enabled between multiple players across different domains. Transaction-based building controls are one part of the transactional energy framework. While these controls realize benefits by enabling automatic, market-based intra-building efficiency optimizations, the transactional energy framework provides similar benefits using the same market -based structure, yet on a larger scale and beyond just buildings, to the society at large.

Somasundaram, Sriram; Pratt, Robert G.; Akyol, Bora A.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Foster, Nikolas AF; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Somani, Abhishek; Steckley, Andrew C.; Taylor, Zachary T.

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Gas Turbine Based Power Cycles - A State-of-the-Art Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbines have been used in wide ranging applications ... This paper provides the historical evolution of the gas turbine (GT) based power cycles. A detailed ... , modified Brayton cycles under development by ...

R. K. Bhargava; M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Metalorganic frameworks Gas-Sorption Properties of Cobalt(II)Carborane-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal�organic frameworks Gas-Sorption Properties of Cobalt(II)�Carborane-Based Coordination materials, and nanostructures. Interestingly however, none of these studies address how the gas-sorption

153

Gas-insulated substations: Reliability Research Program: Volume 1, Operational characteristics and recommendations: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains a comparative evaluation of existing transmission system reliability programs (SYREL, GATOR, RECS) and relevant mathematical methods for transmission reliability analysis. Several new and enhanced methods in the areas of network analysis, contingency selection, remedial action, and reliability index calculation, developed and tested during the project, are described. Recommendations for methods to be used in a production grade transmission reliability assessment program are presented. 49 figs., 11 tabs.

Boggs, S.A.; Chu, F.Y.; Collod, M.; Ford, G.L.; Fujimoto, N.; Harvey, S.; Stuckless, H.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Field evaluation of cofiring gas with coal for quantifying operational benefits and emissions trim in a utility boiler. Volume 2. Topical report, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume consists of 14 appendixes to accompany volume 1 of the report, and covers the following test data: analysis of coal, fylash, and bottom ash samples; cleanliness factors; slagging observation record sheets; stack opacity measurements; stack sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides measurements; total coal flow; fuel gas flow; furnace exit gas temperature; percent oxygen at economizer outlet; percent excess air; bulk steam temperatures at secondary superheater and reheater outlets; secondary superheater and reheater tube outlet leg temperatures; unit heat rate; and models used for data interpretation.

Clark, K.J.; Torbov, T.S.; Impey, R.J.; Hara, K.G.; Burnett, T.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model [1] NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model This model calculates the 2005 national average life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for petroleum-based fuels sold or distributed in the United

156

Condition Based Monitoring of Gas Turbine Combustion Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop sensors that allow condition based monitoring of critical combustion parts of gas turbines. Siemens teamed with innovative, small companies that were developing sensor concepts that could monitor wearing and cracking of hot turbine parts. A magnetic crack monitoring sensor concept developed by JENTEK Sensors, Inc. was evaluated in laboratory tests. Designs for engine application were evaluated. The inability to develop a robust lead wire to transmit the signal long distances resulted in a discontinuation of this concept. An optical wear sensor concept proposed by K Sciences GP, LLC was tested in proof-of concept testing. The sensor concept depended, however, on optical fiber tips wearing with the loaded part. The fiber tip wear resulted in too much optical input variability; the sensor could not provide adequate stability for measurement. Siemens developed an alternative optical wear sensor approach that used a commercial PHILTEC, Inc. optical gap sensor with an optical spacer to remove fibers from the wearing surface. The gap sensor measured the length of the wearing spacer to follow loaded part wear. This optical wear sensor was developed to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. It was validated in lab tests and installed on a floating transition seal in an F-Class gas turbine. Laboratory tests indicate that the concept can measure wear on loaded parts at temperatures up to 800{degrees}C with uncertainty of < 0.3 mm. Testing in an F-Class engine installation showed that the optical spacer wore with the wearing part. The electro-optics box located outside the engine enclosure survived the engine enclosure environment. The fiber optic cable and the optical spacer, however, both degraded after about 100 operating hours, impacting the signal analysis.

Ulerich, Nancy; Kidane, Getnet; Spiegelberg, Christine; Tevs, Nikolai

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia July 5, 2011 DOE/NETL- 2010/1402 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

158

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation March 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1396 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

159

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa Department of Structural systems. No models are available in literature to measure the performance of natural gas network of natural or manmade hazard which might lead to the disruption of the system. The gas distribution network

Bruneau, Michel

160

Wood Pellets for UBC Boilers Replacing Natural Gas Based on LCA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Pellets for UBC Boilers Replacing Natural Gas Based on LCA Submitted to Dr. Bi By Bernard Chan Pellets for UBC Boilers Replacing Natural Gas" By Bernard Chan, Brian Chan, and Christopher Young Abstract This report studies the feasibility of replacing natural gas with wood pellets for UBC boilers. A gasification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications Alexander Singh industrial applications such as the smart grid and oil and gas are continuously monitored. The massive to positively impact the bottom line. In the oil and gas industry, modern oil rigs are outfitted with thousands

Slatton, Clint

162

A Multimedia Workflow-Based Collaborative Engineering Environment for Oil & Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Multimedia Workflow-Based Collaborative Engineering Environment for Oil & Gas Industry Ismael H the control and execution of large and complex industrial projects in oil and gas industry. The environment governmental oil & gas company. The necessity of collaboration is especially acute in the field of computer

Barbosa, Alberto

163

Graphene based surface plasmonics in microfiber multimode interferometer for gas sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Graphene based surface plasmonics in microfiber multimode interferometer is proposed for realization of sub ppm sensitive, temperature independent, and compact fiber-optic gas sensor.

Yao, Baicheng; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Anqi; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Zegao; Cheng, Yang; Gong, Yuan; Zhang, Weili; Chen, Yuanfu; Chiang, K S

164

Flame kernel characterization of laser ignition of natural gas–air mixture in a constant volume combustion chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, laser-induced ignition was investigated for compressed natural gas–air mixtures. Experiments were performed in a constant volume combustion chamber, which simulate end of the compression stroke conditions of a SI engine. This chamber simulates the engine combustion chamber conditions except turbulence of air–fuel mixture. It has four optical windows at diametrically opposite locations, which are used for laser ignition and optical diagnostics simultaneously. All experiments were conducted at 10 bar chamber pressure and 373 K chamber temperature. Initial stage of combustion phenomena was visualized by employing Shadowgraphy technique using a high speed CMOS camera. Flame kernel development of the combustible fuel–air mixture was investigated under different relative air–fuel ratios (?=1.2?1.7) and the images were interrogated for temporal propagation of flame front. Pressure-time history inside the combustion chamber was recorded and analyzed. This data is useful in characterizing the laser ignition of natural gas–air mixture and can be used in developing an appropriate laser ignition system for commercial use in SI engines.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Kewal Dharamshi; Avinash Kumar Agarwal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Dynamic Allocation of a Domestic Heating Task to Gas-Based and Heatpump-Based Heating Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper a multi-agent model for a domestic heating task is introduced and analysed. The model includes two alternative heating agents (for gas-based heating and for heatpump-based heating), and a third allo...

Jan Treur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy and greenhouse gas balances of cassava-based ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biofuel production has been promoted to save fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, there have been concerns about the potential of biofuel to improve energy efficiency and mitigate climate change. This paper investigates energy efficiency and GHG emission saving of cassava-based ethanol as energy for transportation. Energy and GHG balances are calculated for a functional unit of 1 km of road transportation using life-cycle assessment and considering effects of land use change (LUC). Based on a case study in Vietnam, the results show that the energy input for and GHG emissions from ethanol production are 0.93 MJ and 34.95 g carbon dioxide equivalent per megajoule of ethanol respectively. The use of E5 and E10 as a substitute for gasoline results in energy savings, provided that their fuel consumption in terms of liter per kilometer of transportation is not exceeding the consumption of gasoline per kilometer by more than 2.4% and 4.5% respectively. It will reduce GHG emissions, provided that the fuel consumption of E5 and E10 is not exceeding the consumption of gasoline per kilometer by more than 3.8% and 7.8% respectively. The quantitative effects depend on the efficiency in production and on the fuel efficiency of E5 and E10. The variations in results of energy input and GHG emissions in the ethanol production among studies are due to differences in coverage of effects of LUC, CO2 photosynthesis of cassava, yields of cassava, energy efficiency in farming, and by-product analyses.

Loan T. Le; Ekko C. van Ierland; Xueqin Zhu; Justus Wesseler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Natural gas liquifier based on an EGD-generator-expander  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Versions are considered for preparing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in liquefiers with different cold producing units; with a throttle valve, a vortex tube, a turbo-expander. A short analysis is given for their ......

G. I. Bumagin; D. V. Borodin; A. G. Lapkova…

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

90-MW single-shaft power generating steam-gas unit based on the GTÉ-65 gas turbine and K-30-60 steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is an examination of a variant of the monoblock PGU-90 steam-gas unit developed at the “Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod” (LMZ) branch of “Silovye mashiny” based on a GTÉ-65 gas turbine unit and a K-30-...

A. S. Lebedev; O. V. Antonyuk; V. A. Mart’yanov…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Control method for mixed refrigerant based natural gas liquefier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a natural gas liquefaction system having a refrigerant storage circuit, a refrigerant circulation circuit in fluid communication with the refrigerant storage circuit, and a natural gas liquefaction circuit in thermal communication with the refrigerant circulation circuit, a method for liquefaction of natural gas in which pressure in the refrigerant circulation circuit is adjusted to below about 175 psig by exchange of refrigerant with the refrigerant storage circuit. A variable speed motor is started whereby operation of a compressor is initiated. The compressor is operated at full discharge capacity. Operation of an expansion valve is initiated whereby suction pressure at the suction pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 30 psig and discharge pressure at the discharge pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 350 psig. Refrigerant vapor is introduced from the refrigerant holding tank into the refrigerant circulation circuit until the suction pressure is reduced to below about 15 psig, after which flow of the refrigerant vapor from the refrigerant holding tank is terminated. Natural gas is then introduced into a natural gas liquefier, resulting in liquefaction of the natural gas.

Kountz, Kenneth J. (Palatine, IL); Bishop, Patrick M. (Chicago, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Simulation of single acting natural gas Reciprocating Expansion Engine based on ideal gas model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The potential energy of high pressure gas destroyed in natural gas pressure reduction stations during pressure reduction when it passes through throttling valves. One way to recover this energy is to use a Reciprocating Expansion Engine coupled with a generator. The expansion engine is able to produce electricity as pressure decreases by recovering the potential energy. Although the expansion engine has been utilized in pressure reduction points for some time but it has not been analyzed for performance enhancement yet. In this work an advanced numerical simulation has been presented for the thermodynamic modeling of Natural Gas Single Acting Reciprocating Expansion Engine under various working conditions for high pressure ranges. The simulation has been carried out to understand the effects of various parameters and to improve performance of the engine. A range of geometric parameters such as suction diameter, piston diameter, crank radius, connecting rod length, speed were covered in this research. Because of the physical and numerical difficulties of the problem, the natural gas is assumed as an ideal gas.

Mahmood Farzaneh Gord; Mohsen Jannatabadi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Emission MitigationGreenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Afforestation, Forest management, Biofuels, Ag soil, Animals, Fertilization, Rice, Grassland expansion, Manure of Biofuel strategies Examine the dynamics of mitigation strategies #12;PolicyPolicy ContextContext U

McCarl, Bruce A.

172

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Membrane-based carbon capture from flue gas: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There has been an increasing interest in the application of membranes to flue gas separation, primarily driven by the need of carbon capture for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Historically, there has not been general consensus about the advantage of membranes against other methods such as liquid solvents for carbon capture. However, recent research indicates that advances in materials and process designs could significantly improve the separation performance of membrane capture systems, which make membrane technology competitive with other technologies for carbon capture. This paper mainly reviews membrane separation for the application to post-combustion CO2 capture with a focus on the developments and breakthroughs in membrane material design, process engineering, and engineering economics.

Rajab Khalilpour; Kathryn Mumford; Haibo Zhai; Ali Abbas; Geoff Stevens; Edward S. Rubin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gas adsorption isotherm equation based on vacancy solution theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pennsylvania State University's new isotherm equation for pure gas adsorption treats the adsorption equilbrium as an osmotic equilibrium between two ''vacancy'' solutions having different compositions. One solution represents the gas phase and the other the adsorbed phase. The vacancy solution is composed of adsorbates and vacancies (imaginary entities defined as the vacuum space that acts as the solvent for the system). Penn State evaluated the developed correlation against published adsorption-isotherm data for O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, and CO on zeolite 10X and for light hydrocarbons (CH/sub 4/ to nC/sub 4/H/sub 10/) and CO/sub 2/ on Nuxit-AL activated carbon. For both adsorbents, the correlations were closer than those obtained by any other adsorption model that has been extended to gas mixtures. The new method can also represent multicomponent systems because the activity coefficient governing the nonideality of adsorbed mixtures can be readily calculated from binary parameters. These are obtained from single-component adsorption data by a procedure analogous to a bulk solution.

Suwanayuen, S.; Danner, R.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

ADVANCED EXERGY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE GAS-TURBINE BASED CO-GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis focuses on the evaluation and improvement of a gas-turbine based co-generation system, from an exergetic point of view. A conventional exergy analysis has… (more)

AZZARELLI, GIUSEPPE

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modeling of gas-solid flow in a CFB riser based on computational particle fluid dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional model for gas-solid flow in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was developed based on computational particle ... experimental data validated the CPFD model for the CFB riser. The model pr...

Yinghui Zhang; Xingying Lan; Jinsen Gao

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

RAPID COMMUNICATION CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback diode laser will be described. The CW TEC DFB- moelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy

178

Surfactant based imbibition and induced solution gas drive process: investigation by nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACTANT BASED IMBIBITION AND INDUCED SOLUTION GAS DRIVE PROCESS: INVESTIGATION BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE A Thesis by JAMES CALVIN COX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment.... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SURFACTANT BASED IMBIBITION AND INDUCED SOLUTION GAS DRIVE PROCESS: INVESTIGATION BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE A Thesis by JAMES CALVIN COX Approved...

Cox, James Calvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

The measurement of charge for induction-based fluidic MALDI dispense event and nanoliter volume verification in real time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study preliminarily investigates whether nanoliter volumes of concentrated polar liquids and organic monomers launched to targets using induction based fluidics (IBF) can be verified through the real time...

Brent Hilker; Kevin J. Clifford…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electron heat transport in the magnetic filter of a volume plasma-based source of H?/D? ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A time-independent one-dimensional model of the electron energy balance in the region of the ... magnetic filter of a volume plasma-based ion source is justified. The local electron energy balance equation and th...

O. L. Veresov; S. V. Grigorenko; S. Yu. Udovichenko

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications- Volume I, January 2000  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An assessment of the opportunities for micropower and fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid technologies in the industrial sector.

182

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

503 * July 2012 503 * July 2012 Hydrogen photoproduction by 500 mL of sulfur/phosphorus- deprived (-S -P) algal cultures placed in PhBRs with different headspace volumes (165-925 mL). The final percentages of H 2 gas in the gas phase of the PhBRs are indicated in the figure inset; the Y-axis reports actual amounts of H 2 produced. The yield of H 2 gas in the PhBR with a historically small gas phase volume is shown as a dotted line. A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume Project: Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction Team: Maria L. Ghirardi and Michael Seibert, NREL; Sergey N. Kosourov, Khorcheska A. Batyrova, Ekaterina P. Petushkova, and Anatoly A. Tsygankov, IBBP, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

184

High sensitivity gas sensor based on high-Q suspended polymer photonic crystal nanocavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-sensitivity, multi-use optical gas sensors based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal cavity. These devices are implemented in versatile, flexible polymer materials which swell when in contact with a target gas, causing a measurable cavity length change. This change causes a shift in the cavity resonance, allowing precision measurements of gas concentration. We demonstrate suspended polymer nanocavity sensors and the recovery of sensors after the removal of stimulant gas from the system. With a measured quality factor exceeding 10{sup 4}, we show measurements of gas concentration as low as 600 parts per million (ppm) and an experimental sensitivity of 10?ppm; furthermore, we predict detection levels in the parts-per-billion range for a variety of gases.

Clevenson, Hannah, E-mail: hannahac@mit.edu; Desjardins, Pierre; Gan, Xuetao; Englund, Dirk, E-mail: englund@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri and Eduardo Jose Maguino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri methodology to be developed for hazardous gas dispersion connecting Disaster Simulation and Trace with GIS of Gas Dispersion Affected Area Overlaid on Satellite Image (using ArcGIS 9.2) Scenario-based Simulation

Shinozuka, Masanobu

186

Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Land Use Change from Jatropha Curcas-Based Jet Fuel in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Land Use Change from Jatropha Curcas-Based Jet Fuel in Brazil ... Life cycle GHG emissions of biojet fuel derived from Jatropha curcas is quantified based on empirical data from Brazilian producers accounting for land-use change. ... This is the methodology adopted by the European Community in its current Renewable Energy Directive (40). ...

Robert E. Bailis; Jennifer E. Baka

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Novel Graphene-Based Inkjet-Printed WISP-Enabled Wireless Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Graphene-Based Inkjet-Printed WISP- Enabled Wireless Gas Sensor Taoran Le, Vasileios thin films produced from environmentally friendly, water-based, inkjet printed graphene oxide (GO) ink is achieved using the graphene thin films, with over 30% of material recovery observed within 5 minutes

Tentzeris, Manos

189

Market and equipment performance analysis for the application of coal-based fuels/advanced combustion systems: Commercial and small industrial applications: Volume B, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1985, Burns and Roe Services Corporation (BRSC) under Contract No. AC22-84PC72571 with the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated a task entitled ''Market and Equipment Performance Analysis for the Application of Coal-Based Fuels/Advanced Combustion Systems.'' This volume contains the following Appendices: Commercial sector applications of coal based fuels and advanced technologies, EOS Technologies, Inc.; Estimation of fuel use and population for industrial boilers <50 mm Btu/hr and direct fired combustors <100 mm Btu/hr firing oil and gas, PEI Associates; Characteristics of oil and gas fired boilers; Characteristics of oil and gas fired process heaters; Environmental permitting considerations; States air emission rules and regulations applying to commercial/industrial boilers and process heaters <100 mm Btu/hr heat input; Advanced coal combustion systems; Application of advanced coal combustion systems to watertube boilers; Application of advanced coal combustion systems to firetube boilers; and Application of advanced coal combustion systems to process heaters.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Simulator for unconventional gas resources multi-dimensional model SUGAR-MD. Volume I. Reservoir model analysis and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are: (1) To develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales. (2) To determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales. (3) To recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales. (4) To analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance. (5) To study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. The flow equations that are the mathematical basis of the two-dimensional model are presented. It is assumed that gas transport to producing wells in Devonian shale reservoirs occurs through a natural fracture system into which matrix blocks of contrasting physical properties deliver contained gas. That is, the matrix acts as a uniformly distributed gas source in a fracture medium. Gas desorption from pore walls is treated as a uniformly distributed source within the matrix blocks. 24 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Initiation of ignition of a combustible gas mixture in a closed volume by the radiation of a high-power pulsed CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of experiments on initiating the ignition of a CH{sub 4} - O{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} triple gas mixture in a closed volume by the radiation of a high-power CO{sub 2} laser are presented. It is shown that spatially nonuniform (in the direction of the laser beam) gas heating by the laser radiation leads to formation of a fast combustion wave, propagating along the chamber axis and giving rise to 'instantaneous' ignition. At the threshold value 16.5 J of the laser radiation energy the fast combustion wave is transformed into a detonation wave, which causes an explosion and destruction of the reaction chamber.

Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Kossyi, I A; Popov, N A; Tarasova, N M; Firsov, K N

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Simulation-Based Optimization of Multistage Separation Process in Offshore Oil and Gas Production Facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation-Based Optimization of Multistage Separation Process in Offshore Oil and Gas Production Facilities ... As the demand for offshore oil platforms and eco-friendly oil production has increased, it is necessary to determine the optimal conditions of offshore oil production platforms to increase profits and reduce costs as well as to prevent environmental pollution. ... To achieve a practical design for an offshore platform, it is necessary to consider environmental specifications based on an integrated model describing all units concerned with oil and gas production. ...

Ik Hyun Kim; Seungkyu Dan; Hosoo Kim; Hung Rae Rim; Jong Min Lee; En Sup Yoon

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Risk-based performance analysis for regional hybrid fuel with compressed natural gas option  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compressed natural gas is widely used for transportation due to its competitive price and less environmental impacts compared with traditional gasoline. With the recent push to implement electric vehicles, it became important to evaluate the current transportation fuelling status and identify best scenarios to move towards greener transportation. This paper presents analysis of hybrid transportation with compressed natural gas as a fuelling option to determine the most effective way to implement regional green transportation. Intelligent modelling and simulation techniques are proposed to model transportation and fuelling process and used as basis for performance modelling and analysis for different scenarios. Compressed natural gas is found to be a superior fuel to gasoline based on given scenario conditions and criteria for regional green hybrid transportation. The proposed scenarios are applied on case studies in Ontario to confirm the high value of compressed natural gas as viable fuelling scenarios.

Hossam A. Gabbar; Raymond Bedard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Joint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling-based stochastic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypothesis using a sampling-based stochastic model, based on a typical situation of gas explorationJoint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling- based stochastic model Jinsong Chen*, G. Michael Hoversten, and D. W. Vasco, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Chen, Jinsong

198

Development and Evaluation of a Coupled Photosynthesis-Based Gas Exchange Evapotranspiration Model (GEM) for Mesoscale Weather Forecasting Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and Evaluation of a Coupled Photosynthesis-Based Gas Exchange Evapotranspiration Model with a photosynthesis-based scheme and still achieve dynamically consistent results. To demonstrate this transformative potential, the authors developed and coupled a photosynthesis, gas exchange­based surface evapotranspiration

Niyogi, Dev

199

SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data Jin Yu produces textual summaries of archived time- series data from gas turbines. These summaries should help evaluated. 1 Introduction In order to get the most out of gas turbines, TIGER [2] has been developed

Reiter, Ehud

200

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A NEW LED-LED PORTABLE CO2 GAS SENSOR BASED ON AN INTERCHANGEABLE MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NEW LED-LED PORTABLE CO2 GAS SENSOR BASED ON AN INTERCHANGEABLE MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL instrumentation. 1. INTRODUCTION CO2 is an important industrial gas for many different uses that include electrolytes [10;11]. The most popular sensors used for CO2 gas sensing in biotechnological applications

Lee, Hyowon

202

Artificial neural network based characterization of the volume of tissue activated during deep brain stimulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective. Clinical deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems can be programmed with thousands of different stimulation parameter combinations (e.g. electrode contact(s), voltage, pulse width, frequency). Our goal was to develop novel computational tools to characterize the effects of stimulation parameter adjustment for DBS. Approach. The volume of tissue activated (VTA) represents a metric used to estimate the spatial extent of DBS for a given parameter setting. Traditional methods for calculating the VTA rely on activation function (AF)-based approaches and tend to overestimate the neural response when stimulation is applied through multiple electrode contacts. Therefore, we created a new method for VTA calculation that relied on artificial neural networks (ANNs). Main results. The ANN-based predictor provides more accurate descriptions of the spatial spread of activation compared to AF-based approaches for monopolar stimulation. In addition, the ANN was able to accurately estimate the VTA in response to multi-contact electrode configurations. Significance. The ANN-based approach may represent a useful method for fast computation of the VTA in situations with limited computational resources, such as a clinical DBS programming application on a tablet computer.

Ashutosh Chaturvedi; J Luis Luján; Cameron C McIntyre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Argonne CNM Highlight: New Gas Sensor Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Gas Sensor Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes A new gas sensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes Hybrid sensor fabrication process: (top) SEM image of a few MWCNTs spanning across two neighboring Au fingers of the interdigitated electrode; (bottom) HRTEM image of a MWCNT uniformly coated with SnO nanocrystals. Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials staff in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group together with collaborative users from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee have fabricated a miniaturized gas sensor using hybrid nanostructures consisting of SnO2 nanocrystals supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In contrast to the high-temperature operation required for SnO2 nanocrystals alone, and to the insensitivity towards H2

204

Method and apparatus for measuring the state of charge in a battery based on volume of battery components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The state of charge of electrochemical batteries of different kinds is determined by measuring the incremental change in the total volume of the reactive masses in the battery. The invention is based on the principle that all electrochemical batteries, either primary or secondary (rechargeable), produce electricity through a chemical reaction with at least one electrode, and the chemical reactions produce certain changes in the composition and density of the electrode. The reactive masses of the electrodes, the electrolyte, and any separator or spacers are usually contained inside a battery casing of a certain volume. As the battery is used, or recharged, the specific volume of at least one of the electrode masses will change and, since the masses of the materials do not change considerably, the total volume occupied by at least one of the electrodes will change. These volume changes may be measured in many different ways and related to the state of charge in the battery. In one embodiment, the volume change can be measured by monitoring the small changes in one of the principal dimensions of the battery casing as it expands or shrinks to accommodate the combined volumes of its components.

Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

A Scenario-Based Hydrocarbon Production Forecast for Louisiana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fields are classified as oil or gas based on the volume of ... in cubic feet) per unit of produced oil (measured in barrels), and described through the gas–oil ratio (GOR). Cumulative GOR (CGOR) is the aggregate ...

Mark J. Kaiser; Yunke Yu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

207

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Color demultiplexer using angularly multiplexed volume holograms as a receiver optical end for VLC based on RGB white LED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The visible light communication (VLC) based on RGB white LED can obtain high communication rate, because the RGB white LED light source has a wide bandwidth by modulating each color respectively. The receiver optical end of the VLC system based on RGB white LED is commonly composed of three optical filters and three lenses. However, it is relatively large size and no integration. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and efficient color demultiplexer based on the volume holographic gratings that can separate RGB light and focus each color on different directions. The expression of the volume holographic grating vector with curved interference fringes is derived. There is an important discovery that spectral selectivity and angular selectivity change on the different positions of volume holographic grating. The filtering property and diffraction efficiency of color demultiplexer are measured and analyzed.

Zhenmin Shen; Tian Lan; Longhui Wang; Guoqiang Ni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Reusable Calcium-Based Sorbent for Desulfurizing Hot Coal Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project has been to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. The sorbent should be strong, durable, inexpensive to manufacture, and capable of being reused many times. To achieve these objectives the project has focused on the development of the very promising core-in-shell sorbent.

Wheelock, T.D.; Hasler, D.J.L.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

211

Inkjet-Printed Graphene-Based Wireless Gas Sensor Modules , Vasileios Lakafosis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inkjet-Printed Graphene-Based Wireless Gas Sensor Modules Taoran Le1 , Vasileios Lakafosis1 , Ziyin we demonstrate the use of graphene as the basis for design and development of low-cost, self-powered, battery-less, wireless sensor solutions utilizing thin films produced from environmentally friendly, water

Tentzeris, Manos

212

SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are requested in several fields such as applications [1], fuel cell [2], radioactive waste storage and diverse selectivity of a sensor includes the addition of a catalyst to the tin oxide powder. In the case of hydrogen1 SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION G

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

213

Thermodynamic-Analysis-Based Energy Consumption Minimization for Natural Gas Liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earliest NG liquefaction plants consisted of fairly simple processes based on either cascaded refrigeration or single mixed-refrigerant (MR) processes with train capacities of less than 1 million tons per annum (MTPA). ... Kano?lu, M.Exergy analysis of multistage cascade refrigeration cycle used for natural gas liquefaction Int. ...

Meiqian Wang; Jian Zhang; Qiang Xu; Kuyen Li

2011-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analytical investigations of the earthquake resistance of the support base of an oil-gas platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In designing stationary oil-gas recovery platforms on the continental shelf, the need arises to compute the estimated strength of their support base during seismic events. This paper is devoted to this estimation. The paper examines a structure consisting of the superstructure of an oil-gas platform and its gravity-type base. It is possible to install earthquake-insulating supports between them. Calculations performed for the design earthquake indicated that the design of the gravity base can resist a seismic effect without special additional measures. During the maximum design earthquake, moreover, significant stresses may develop in the zone of base where the columns are connected to the upper slab of the caisson. In that case, the earthquake insulation considered for the top of the platform becomes critical.

Glagovskii, V. B.; Kassirova, N. A.; Turchina, O. A.; Finagenov, O. M.; Tsirukhin, N. A. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 6, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates in the Panama Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Panama Basin, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, distribution of hydrates within the sediments, and the relation of hydrate distribution to other features such as salt diapirism are also included. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 63 refs., 38 figs., 7 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 9, Formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Middle America Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Pacific margin of Mexico and Central America, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments are also included in this report. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 150 refs., 84 figs., 17 tabs.

Finley, P.; Krason, J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

PHYSICAL REVIEW 8 VOLUME NVMBEH. 4 &5 I.ESHUAHY Nonadditive forces and vacancies in rare-gas crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW 8 VOLUME NVMBEH. 4 &5 I.ESHUAHY»» Nonadditive forces and vacancies in rare since overlap between adjacent atoms is small. A molecular model of the vacancy problem is set up. It is then seen that short-range three-body forces contribute a negligible fraction of the vacancy formation

Glyde, Henry R.

219

Investigation on Life-cycle Cost of Coal-based Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal-based synthetic natural gas (SNG) is considered to be a promising alternative of clean energy, especially for urban uses, to response to the insufficient supply of natural gas in China, In this paper, life cycle costing is conducted for SNG in three main urban applications: heating boiler use, residential use, and transit bus use, respectively. The results show that the SNG is competitive for residential use, while it is not as cost- effective as expected when used for heating boiler use or transit bus use. Major shortcoming of SNG is from the large environmental emissions in the production stage.

Jun Zhang; Hengchong Li; Siyu Yang; Xiuxi Li; Yu Qian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007567 Carbon Capture Scientific is developing and testing a novel, proprietary, Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) process-based technology for CO2 capture from post-combustion flue gases. GPS process-based technology has many advantages. For the solvent based process it will be able to: Reduce the energy penalty associated with solvent regeneration Increase the CO2 desorption pressure Integrate CO2 capture and compression into one step Reduce CO2 compression needs Reduce solvent degradation These advantages could potentially eliminate CO2 compression entirely, hence reducing the total parasitic power load of a CO2 capture process to about 0.14kWh/kgCO2. This power load is a 60 percent reduction compared to the baseline case of 0.38kWh/kgCO2. The economic impact of this parasitic power reduction is a reduction in the incremental cost of electricity (COE) by about 21 mills/kWh.

222

Assessment of Hydrogen Production Systems based on Natural Gas Conversion with Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Introduction of hydrogen in the energy system, as a new energy carrier complementary to electricity, is exciting much interest not only for heat and power generation applications, but also for transport and petro-chemical sectors. In transition to a low carbon economy, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies represent another way to reduce CO2 emissions. Hydrogen can be produced from various feedstocks, the most important being based on fossil fuels (natural gas and coal). This paper investigates the techno-economic and environmental aspects of hydrogen production based on natural gas reforming conversion with and without carbon capture. As CO2 capture options, gas - liquid absorption and chemical looping were evaluated. The evaluated plant concepts generate 300 MWth hydrogen (based on hydrogen LHV) with purity higher than 99.95 % (vol.), suitable to be used both in petro-chemical applications as well as for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for mobile applications. For the designs with CCS, the carbon capture rate is about 70 % for absorption-based scheme while for chemical looping-based system is >99 %. Special emphasis is put in the paper on the assessment of various plant configurations and process integration issues using CAPE techniques. The mass and energy balances have been used furthermore for techno-economic and environmental impact assessments.

Calin-Cristian Cormos; Letitia Petrescu; Ana-Maria Cormos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Larger diverters safer for shallow gas control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on reducing the back pressure buildup on the wellhead during shallow gas control which minimizes the risk of the gas broaching the seabed around the conductor pipe. This allows for an orderly procedure to divert the gas. Most diverter systems cause the gas/sand mixture to approach critical velocity, resulting in extreme wear and short life expectancy of the surface piping. Calculations based on standard drilling programs indicate that only a few existing diverter systems can handle a sizeable volume of shallow gas without creating excess back pressure on the wellhead.

Mills, D. (Glasgow Polytechnic, Glasgow (GB)); Dyhr, E. (Copeman Engineering, Copenhagen (DK))

1991-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

Dirksen, Ruud

225

Parallel High-Order Anisotropic Block-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Finite-Volume Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in propulsion systems (e.g., gas turbine engines and solid propellant rocket motors); (ii) compressible flows

Groth, Clinton P. T.

226

Particle-based Sampling and Meshing of Surfaces in Multimaterial Volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a variety of fields, from biomedical computing and computer animation to oil-and-gas explo- ration

Utah, University of

227

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baseline Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity September 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1399 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

229

Empty Space Skipping and Occlusion Clipping for Texture-based Volume Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

voxels, we introduce the concept of orthogonal opacity map, that simplifies the transformation between the volume coor- dinates and the opacity map coordinates, which is intensively used for occlusion detection. The map is updated efficiently by the GPU. The sub-volumes are then culled and clipped against the opacity

Mueller, Klaus

230

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Investment casting of {gamma}-TiAl-based alloys: Microstructure and data base for gas turbine applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investment casting is regarded as an economic processing technology for the production of {gamma}-TiAl based components for gas turbine applications. Near net-shape parts can be cast such that they are free from pores and flaws after adequate `HIP`ping. The inhomogeneous cast microstructure which results from locally varying cooling rates (e.g. in the root and foil of a blade), however, is often retained even after heat-treatments necessary to achieve a balance of properties for a given application. Appropriate modifications of the alloy chemistry may lead to an improved microstructural homogeneity in the cast parts. Data bases of properties (tensile properties, creep, fatigue and rupture strength, fracture and impact toughness, oxidation and corrosion resistance) which are relevant for potential gas turbine applications have been assessed for different cast {gamma}-TiAl alloys with different microstructures. These are compared with corresponding properties of nickel-based and iron-based superalloys {gamma}-TiAl is competing with for substitution.

Wagner, R.; Appel, F.; Dogan, B. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Optimizing production from water drive gas reservoirs based on desirability concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There are various factors which determine the optimization and economic production from water drive gas reservoirs. These factors play an important role in designing an effective reservoir development plan. The present study, in the first step, investigates the relation between recovery factor, volumetric sweep efficiency and cumulative water production with six different engineering and geologic factors using design of experiments (DOE) and response surface methodology (RSM). Next, all derived response functions are optimized simultaneously based on the concept of desirability. In this manner, part of water drive gas reservoirs is simulated using Box–Behnken design. Important factors that have been studied include reservoir horizontal permeability (Kh), permeability anisotropy (Kv/Kh), aquifer size (Vaq), gas production rate (Qg), perforated thickness (Hp) and tubing head pressure (THP). The results indicate that by combining various levels of factors and considering relative importance of each response function, optimized conditions could be raised in order to maximizing recovery factor, volumetric sweep efficiency and minimizing cumulative water production. Also high rates of gas production result poor volumetric sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough, hence ultimate recovery factor decreases by 3.2–8.4%.

Meysam Naderi; Behzad Rostami; Maryam Khosravi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Selective gas adsorption in a magnesium-based metalorganic Young Eun Cheon, Jungeun Park and Myunghyun Paik Suh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective gas adsorption in a magnesium-based metal­organic frameworkw Young Eun Cheon, Jungeun magnesium-based porous metal­ organic framework exhibits thermal stability up to 500 1C and selective gas interpenetrated magnesium- based MOF, [Mg(TCPBDA)(H2O)2]Á6DMFÁ6H2O (1), where TCPBDA2� is N,N,N0 ,N0 -tetrakis(4

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

234

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dynamic system identification and model-based fault diagnosis of an industrial gas turbine prototype  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a model-based procedure exploiting analytical redundancy for the detection and isolation of faults on a gas turbine process is presented. The main point of the present work consists of exploiting system identification schemes in connection with observer and filter design procedures for diagnostic purpose. Linear model identification (black-box modelling) and output estimation (dynamic observers and Kalman filters) integrated approaches to fault diagnosis are in particular advantageous in terms of solution complexity and performance. This scheme is especially useful when robust solutions are considered for minimise the effects of modelling errors and noise, while maximising fault sensitivity. A model of the process under investigation is obtained by identification procedures, whilst the residual generation task is achieved by means of output observers and Kalman filters designed in both noise-free and noisy assumptions. The proposed tools have been tested on a single-shaft industrial gas turbine prototype model and they have been evaluated using non-linear simulations, based on the gas turbine data.

Silvio Simani; Cesare Fantuzzi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

237

SumTime-Turbine: A Knowledge-Based System to Communicate Gas Turbine Time-Series Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SumTime-Turbine...produces textual summaries of archived time-series data from gas turbines. These summaries should help experts understand large...SumTime-Turbine is based on pattern detection, ...

Jin Yu; Ehud Reiter; Jim Hunter…

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 2: Long-term monitoring and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. This is the second volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. The first volume described the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. This second volume updates and completes the presentation of data to compare performance of fresh coatings with weathered coatings.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ?2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated from amplitude-based gating are larger and more accurate, at levels that are potentially clinically significant, compared with those from temporal phase-based gating.

Jani, Shyam S., E-mail: sjani@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

50% of daily production H 2 gas storage costs (separate fromNatural gas is currently the lowest cost hydrogen productioncosts are calculated for each station. On-site natural gas steam reformers The hydrogen production

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

A High Performance Computing Platform for Performing High-Volume Studies With Windows-based Power Grid Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serial Windows-based programs are widely used in power utilities. For applications that require high volume simulations, the single CPU runtime can be on the order of days or weeks. The lengthy runtime, along with the availability of low cost hardware, is leading utilities to seriously consider High Performance Computing (HPC) techniques. However, the vast majority of the HPC computers are still Linux-based and many HPC applications have been custom developed external to the core simulation engine without consideration for ease of use. This has created a technical gap for applying HPC-based tools to today’s power grid studies. To fill this gap and accelerate the acceptance and adoption of HPC for power grid applications, this paper presents a prototype of generic HPC platform for running Windows-based power grid programs on Linux-based HPC environment. The preliminary results show that the runtime can be reduced from weeks to hours to improve work efficiency.

Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Direct measurement of the kinetics of volume and enthalpy relaxation of an Au-based bulk metallic glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural relaxation of glasses below their glass transition is a well-studied phenomenon that still poses several open issues. With the advent of bulk metallic glasses with exceptionally low glass transition temperatures, new options are available that are based on the experimental assessment of the time dependence of several different thermodynamic quantities by direct measurements with high accuracy. In this contribution the first direct measurement of the isothermal relaxation of the volume and the enthalpy of an Au-based bulk metallic glassformer are reported and discussed with respect of the characteristics describing the underlying processes.

Bünz, J.; Wilde, G. [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Comprehensive Evaluation Model of the Development Prospect of Shale Gas Based on Fuzzy Mathematics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As an unconventional gas resource, shale gas is an practically alternative energy. Through the analysis of the current situation of shale gas development at home and abroad, this paper ascertains the influencing factors of the development prospect of ... Keywords: shale gas, fuzzy mathematics, development prospect, influence factors

Yanping Wang; Fanqi Meng

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10{sup -2} Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

Vizir, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Oks, E. M. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development of a silicon-based passive gas-liquid separation system for microscale direct methanol fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design, fabrication and performance characterisation of a passive gas-liquid separation system is presented in this paper. The gas-liquid separation system is silicon-based and its fabrication is compatible with the existing CMU design of the microscale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Both gas and liquid separators consist of staggered arrays of etched-through holes fabricated by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The gas separator is coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic polymer to substantiate the gas-liquid separation. To visually characterise the system performance, the gas-liquid separation system is made on a single wafer with a glass plate bonded on the top to form a separation chamber with a narrow gap in between. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) is applied for the low-temperature bonding. The maximum pressure for the liquid leakage of the gas separators is experimentally determined and compared with the values predicted theoretically. Several successful gas-liquid separations are observed at liquid pressures between 14.2 cmH2O and 22.7 cmH2O, liquid flow rates between 0.705 cc/min and 1.786 cc/min, and CO2 flow rates between 0.15160 cc/min to 0.20435 cc/min.

C.C. Hsieh; S.C. Yao; Yousef Alyousef

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Forest Bioenergy or Forest Carbon? Assessing Trade-Offs in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Wood-Based Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forest Bioenergy or Forest Carbon? ... Forest carbon consequences of biomass harvest for bioenergy production can significantly delay and reduce GHG mitigation and should be included in life cycle studies. ... The potential of forest-based bioenergy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when displacing fossil-based energy must be balanced with forest carbon implications related to biomass harvest. ...

Jon McKechnie; Steve Colombo; Jiaxin Chen; Warren Mabee; Heather L. MacLean

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Composites-Based Bimodular Sensors for In Situ, Real-Time High Temperature Gas Detection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Composites-Based Bimodular Sensors for In Situ, Real-Time High Temperature Gas Detection Background Real time monitoring of combustion gas composition is important for improving the efficiency of combustion processes and reducing the emission of pollutants. However, such measurement usually requires sensors to be operated at high temperatures in harsh environments. Currently, commercially available sensor technology capable of withstanding such harsh environments is extremely

253

Model-based robust fault detection and isolation of an industrial gas turbine prototype using soft computing techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study proposes a model-based robust fault detection and isolation (RFDI) method with hybrid structure. Robust detection and isolation of the realistic faults of an industrial gas turbine in steady-state conditions is mainly considered. For residual ... Keywords: Industrial gas turbine, Local linear model tree (LOLIMOT), Local linear neuro-fuzzy network, Model error modelling, Neural network, Robust fault detection and isolation

Hasan Abbasi Nozari; Mahdi Aliyari Shoorehdeli; Silvio Simani; Hamed Dehghan Banadaki

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Greenhouse Gas Implications of Fleet Electrification Based on Big Data-Informed Individual Travel Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Implications of Fleet Electrification Based on Big Data-Informed Individual Travel Patterns ... The results indicate that 1) the largest gasoline displacement (1.1 million gallons per year) can be achieved by adopting PHEVs with modest electric range (approximately 80 miles) with current battery cost, limited public charging infrastructure, and no government subsidy; 2) reducing battery cost has the largest impact on increasing the electrification rate of vehicle mileage traveled (VMT), thus increasing gasoline displacement, followed by diversified charging opportunities; 3) government subsidies can be more effective to increase the VMT electrification rate and gasoline displacement if targeted to PHEVs with modest electric ranges (80 to 120 miles); and 4) while taxi fleet electrification can increase greenhouse gas emissions by up to 115 kiloton CO2-eq per year with the current grid in Beijing, emission reduction of up to 36.5 kiloton CO2-eq per year can be achieved if the fuel cycle emission factor of electricity can be reduced to 168.7 g/km. ... (31) We scale up our results obtained from the present data set to reflect total emissions of the entire taxi fleet electrified by PHEVs with different battery size, assuming eight years of taxi service time. ...

Hua Cai; Ming Xu

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Seismic base isolation of gas insulated electrical substations: Comparison among different solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Base isolation of an outdoor 170 kV Gas-Insulated Substation conforming to ENEL standardization is proposed. The analyzed GIS has two separated phases and its layout consists of a compact block composed of five bays and two High-to-Medium Voltage power transformers. The design has been carried out following the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) requirements for seismic qualification of HV equipment. Three solutions are presented, each making use of different isolation devices: High-Damping Steel-Laminated Rubber Bearings, helical springs and visco-dampers, Friction Pendulu devices. The procedures adopted in the design of the three isolation systems are briefly explained, pointing out advantages and drawbacks of each solution.

Serino, G. [Univ. di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Analisi e Progettazione Strutturale; Bettinali, F. [ENEL s.p.a., Milano (Italy). Centro di Ricerca Idraulica e Strutturale; Bonacina, G. [ISMES s.p.a., Seriate (Italy). Div. Indagini Strutturali

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

A new BML-based RANS modelling for the description of gas turbine typical combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work is concentrated on the formulation and validation of integral models within RANS framework for the numerical prediction of the premixed and partially premixed flames occurring in gas turbine combustors. The premixed combustion modelling is based on the BML approach coupled to the mixing transport providing variable equivalence ratio. Chemistry is described by means of ILDM model solving transport equations for reaction progress variables conditioned on the flame front. Multivariate presumed PDF model is used for the turbulence-chemistry interaction treatment. Turbulence is modelled using the second moment closure (SMC) and the standard ?-? model as well. The influence of non-gradient turbulent transport is investigated comparing the gradient diffusion closure and the solution of the scalar flux transport equations. Different model combinations are assessed simulating several premixed and partially premixed flame configurations and comparing results to the experimental data. The proposed model provides good predictions particularly in combination with SMC.

A. Maltsev; A. Sadiki; J. Janicka

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Influence of reservoir heterogeneity on gas resource potential for geologically based infill drilling, Brooks and I-92 reservoirs, Frio Formation, south Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas resource potential for strategic infill drilling or recompletion in a reservoir can be calculated by subtracting gas volumes derived using the material balance (pressure decline) method from volumes derived using a volumetric method. This resource potential represents remaining gas that is not in communication with existing wells. Frio reservoirs in mature, nonassociated gas plays located downdip from the Vicksburg fault zone are characterized by multiple, vertically stacked sandstones. The Brooks reservoir, in La Gloria field, lies in a fluvial-dominated system that contains dip-elongate channel sandstone belts 1-2 mi wide. Within these belts are six or more vertically stacked channel-fill, point-bar and splay deposits. Depositional environments were interpreted from SP logs. Individual sandstones are separated vertically by thin mudstone layers and pinch out laterally into flood-plain deposits.

Jackson, M.L.W.; Ambrose, W.A. (Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Understanding and managing leakage in forest–based greenhouse–gas–mitigation projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...greenhouse-gas emissions in an area...only produce greenhouse-gas (GHG) bene...reduce GHG emissions. The leakage...mitigation (energy, transportation...emissions-reducing activities...be inversely related (notably in...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Domestic equipment for the development of gas-turbine based power engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A brief analysis of characteristics and specific features of foreign gas-turbine installations is presented. Prospects of introduction of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering of Rus...

G. G. Ol’khovskii

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Improving Model-Based Gas Turbine Fault Diagnosis Using Multi-Operating Point Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive gas turbine fault diagnosis system has been designed using a full nonlinear simulator developed in Turbotec company for the V94.2 industrial gas turbine manufactured by Siemens AG. The methods used for detection and isolation of faulty ... Keywords: monitoring, fault diagnosis, extended Kalman filter, gas turbine, simulator

Amin Salar; Seyed Mehrdad Hosseini; Behnam Rezaei Zangmolk; Ali Khaki Sedigh

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

262

CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladder points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub ref}), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm{sup 3}) and CTV (24.9 cm{sup 3}) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V{sub ref} for all patients was 129.6 cm{sup 3} for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm{sup 3} for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V{sub ref} in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and 2.15, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the conformal index and external volume index improved significantly with the CTV plan, and this improvement was more marked in Group 1. The mean values of the bladder and rectal point doses and volume fractions receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the reference dose did not differ between plans for all patients. The reduction in the mean rectal and bladder point doses and irradiated volumes for the CTV plan was statistically significant in Group 1. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided CTV planning of ICR is superior to conventional point A planning in terms of conformity of target coverage and avoidance of overdosed normal tissue volume. To ascertain the potential benefit of treatment outcome, ICR with image-guided three-dimensional plans will be pursued and correlated with the dose-volume parameters.

Shin, Kyung Hwan [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: k2onco@ncc.re.kr; Cho, Jung Keun [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joo-Young [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Yoon [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

FY 2012 Volume 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 3 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

265

17th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers presented at the following sessions: adsorption; noble gas treatment; personnel education and training; filtration and filter testing; measurement and instrumentation; air cleaning equipment response to accident related stress; containment venting air cleaning; and an open end session. Twenty-eight papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. Ten papers had been entered earlier.

First, M.W. (ed.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Magnetic Resonance Imaging- Versus Computed Tomography-Based Target Volume Delineation of the Glandular Breast Tissue (Clinical Target Volume Breast) in Breast-Conserving Therapy: An Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine MRI and CT for glandular breast tissue (GBT) volume delineation and to assess interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Fifteen breast cancer patients underwent a planning CT and MRI, consecutively, in the treatment position. Four observers (two radiation oncologists and two radiologists) delineated the GBT according to the CT and separately to the MR images. Volumes, centers of mass, maximum extensions with standard deviations (SD), and interobserver variability were quantified. Observers viewed delineation differences between MRI and CT and delineation differences among observers. Results: In cranio-lateral and cranio-medial directions, GBT volumes were delineated larger using MRI when compared with those delineated with CT. Center of mass on MRI shifted a mean (SD) 17% (4%) into the cranial direction and a mean 3% (4%) into the dorsal direction when compared with that on the planning CT. Only small variations between observers were noted. The GBT volumes were approximately 4% larger on MRI (mean [SD] ratio MRI to CT GBT volumes, 1.04 [0.06]). Findings were concordant with viewed MRI and CT images and contours. Conformity indices were only slightly different; mean conformity index was 77% (3%) for MRI and 79% (4%) for CT. Delineation differences arising from personal preferences remained recognizable irrespective of the imaging modality used. Conclusions: Contoured GBT extends substantially further into the cranio-lateral and cranio-medial directions on MRI when compared with CT. Interobserver variability is comparable for both imaging modalities. Observers should be aware of existing personal delineation preferences. Institutions are recommended to review and discuss target volume delineations and to design supplementary guidelines if necessary.

Giezen, Marina, E-mail: marinagiezen@zonnet.nl [Radiotherapy Center West, The Hague (Netherlands); Kouwenhoven, Erik [Radiotherapy Center West, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, Astrid N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Coerkamp, Emile G.; Heijenbrok, Mark [Department of Radiology, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Jansen, Wim P.A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mast, Mirjam E.; Petoukhova, Anna L. [Radiotherapy Center West, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Radiotherapy Center West, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Technology-Based Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are converting previously uneconomic oil and natural gas resources into proved reserves and production. The Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin is a success story of horizontal drilling, fracturing, and completion technologies. The recent, highly productive oil field discoveries within the Bakken Formation did not come from venturing out into deep uncharted waters heretofore untapped by man, nor from blazing a trail into pristine environs never open to drilling before. Instead, success came from analysis of geologic data on a decades-old producing area, identification of uptapped resources, and application of the new drilling and completion technology necessary to exploit them. In short, it came from using technology

268

Fast Model Based Approximation of the Closed-loop Performance Limits of Gas/Liquid Inline Separators for Accelerated Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trend in the oil and gas (exploration & production) industry is to use compact ­centrifugal forces based the centrifugal forces necessary for separating the light from the heavy component. The resulting separation force) to keep the downstream pumps and compressors within a proper operating range (preventing e.g. cavitation

Van den Hof, Paul

269

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

270

Four-dimensional image-based treatment planning: Target volume segmentation and dose calculation in the presence of respiratory motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe approaches to four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning, including acquisition of 4D-CT scans, target delineation of spatio-temporal image data sets, 4D dose calculations, and their analysis. Methods and Materials: The study included patients with thoracic and hepatocellular tumors. Specialized tools were developed to facilitate visualization, segmentation, and analysis of 4D-CT data: maximum intensity volume to define the extent of lung tumor motion, a 4D browser to examine and dynamically assess the 4D data sets, dose calculations, including respiratory motion, and deformable registration to combine the dose distributions at different points. Results: Four-dimensional CT was used to visualize and quantitatively assess respiratory target motion. The gross target volume contours derived from light breathing scans showed significant differences compared with those extracted from 4D-CT. Evaluation of deformable registration using difference images of original and deformed anatomic maps suggested the algorithm is functionally useful. Thus, calculation of effective dose distributions, including respiratory motion, was implemented. Conclusion: Tools and methods to use 4D-CT data for treatment planning in the presence of respiratory motion have been developed and applied to several case studies. The process of 4D-CT-based treatment planning has been implemented, and technical barriers for its routine use have been identified.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) and Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willet, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The 2006 Russia-Ukraine Natural Gas Dispute: A mechanisms based approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses the factors which lead the Russian government to increase natural gas prices for Ukraine in 2006. Through the use of methodological individualism,… (more)

Daley, Stephen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Computer-based gas accounting system at the TETs-26 Mosenergo cogeneration station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experience gained from the introduction and operation of microprocessor systems for metering gas consumption and its heating value at Mosenergo’s cogeneration stations is considered.

A. V. Zakharenkov; V. N. Degterev; V. V. Usanov; A. A. Shkurin…

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A dynamic prediction model for gas-water effective permeability in unsaturated coalbed methane reservoirs based on production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective permeability of gas and water in coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is vital during CBM development. However, few studies have investigated it for unsaturated CBM reservoirs rather than saturated CBM reservoirs. In this work, the dynamic prediction model (PM-Corey model) for average gas-water effective permeability in two-phase flow in saturated CBM reservoirs was improved to describe unsaturated CBM reservoirs. In the improved effective permeability model, Palmer et al. absolute permeability model segmented based on critical desorption pressure and Chen et al. relative permeability model segmented based on critical water saturation were introduced and coupled comprehensively under conditions with the identical reservoir pressures and the identical water saturations through production data and the material balance equations (MBEs) in unsaturated CBM reservoirs. Taking the Hancheng CBM field as an example, the differences between the saturated and unsaturated effective permeability curves were compared. The results illustrate that the new dynamic prediction model could characterize not only the stage of two-phase flow but also the stage of single-phase water drainage. Also, the new model can accurately reflect the comprehensive effects of the positive and negative effects (the matrix shrinking effect and the effective stress effect) and the gas Klinkenberg effect of coal reservoirs, especially for the matrix shrinkage effect and the gas Klinkenberg effect, which can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically. The new improved model is more realistic and practical than previous models.

Junlong Zhao; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Yanjun Meng; Yumin Lv; Shu Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

A versatile integrating sphere based photoacoustic sensor for trace gas monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compact versatile photoacoustic (PA) sensor for trace gas detection is reported. The sensor is based on an integrating sphere as the PA absorption cell with an organ pipe tube attached to increase the sensitivity of the PA sensor. The versatility and enhancement of the sensitivity of the PA signal is investigated by monitoring specific ro-vibrational lines of CO2 in the 2 mm wavelength region and of NO2 in the 405 nm region. The measured enhancement factor of the PA signal exceeds 1200, which is due to the acoustic resonance of the tube and the absorption enhancement of the integrating sphere relatively to a non-resonant single pass cell. It is observed that the background absorption signals are highly attenuated due to the thermal conduction and diffusion effects in the polytetrafluoroethylene cell walls. This demonstrates that careful choice of cell wall materials can be highly beneficial to the sensitivity of the PA sensor. These properties makes the sensor suitable for various practical sensor applicati...

Lassen, Mikael; Brusch, Anders; Petersen, Jan C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Vibration based damage detection of rotor blades in a gas turbine engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the problems concerning turbine rotor blade vibration that seriously impact the structural integrity of a developmental aero gas turbine. Experimental determination of vibration characteristics of rotor blades in an engine is very important from fatigue failure considerations. The blades under investigation are fabricated from nickel base super alloy through directionally solidified investment casting process. The blade surfaces are coated with platinum aluminide for oxidation protection. A three dimensional finite element modal analysis on a bladed disk was performed to know the likely blade resonances for a particular design in the speed range of operation. Experiments were conducted to assess vibration characteristics of bladed disk rotor during engine tests. Rotor blade vibrations were measured using non-intrusive stress measurement system, an indirect method of blade vibration measurement utilizing blade tip timing technique. Abnormalities observed in the vibration characteristics of the blade tip timing data measured during engine tests were used to detect the blade damage. Upon disassembly of the engine and subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection, it was observed that three blades of the rotor assembly were identified to have damaged. These are the blades that exhibited vibration abnormalities as a result of large resonant vibration response while engine tests. Further, fractographic analysis performed on the blades revealed the mechanism of blade failures as fatigue related. The root cause of blade failure is established to be high cycle fatigue from the engine run data history although the blades were put into service for just 6 h of engine operation.

S. Madhavan; Rajeev Jain; C. Sujatha; A.S. Sekhar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Morphology and Gas Adsorption Properties of Palladium?Cobalt-Based Cyanogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption and small-angle X-ray scattering. ... In addition, the presence of narrow micro- and mesoporosity in these gels makes them suitable candidates for selective gas adsorbents and filters. ... Xerogels were made by smearing out the hydrogels on a filter paper to eliminate the water. ...

Rahul S. Deshpande; Stefanie L. Sharp-Goldman; Jennifer L. Willson; Andrew B. Bocarsly; Joachim Gross; Adam C. Finnefrock; Sol M. Gruner

2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CERIA-BASED WATER-GAS-SHIFT CATALYSTS S. Swartz, A-M. Azad, M. Seabaugh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on pure hydrogen or a hydrogen-rich gas with little or no carbon monoxide. In the near term, fuel cells used in fuel processors. This reaction increases the hydrogen content and reduces the carbon monoxide) to the reactor. The reactor section incorporates a bypass loop, which allows for baseline gas chromatograph

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

282

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distributi...  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 Natural Gas End-Use Deliveries by Type of Distributor for 1996, 2000, and 2006 Volume Delivered Customers Volume Delivered Customers Volume Delivered Customers Type of...

283

Model-based robust fault detection and isolation of an industrial gas turbine prototype using soft computing techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study proposes a model-based robust fault detection and isolation (RFDI) method with hybrid structure. Robust detection and isolation of the realistic faults of an industrial gas turbine in steady-state conditions is mainly considered. For residual generation, a bank of time-delay multilayer perceptron (MLP) models is used, and in fault detection step, a passive approach based on model error modelling is employed to achieve threshold adaptation. To do so, local linear neuro-fuzzy (LLNF) modelling is utilised for constructing error-model to generate uncertainty interval upon the system output in order to make decision whether a fault occurred or not. This model is trained using local linear model tree (LOLIMOT) which is a progressive tree-construction algorithm. Simple thresholding is also used along with adaptive thresholding in fault detection phase for comparative purposes. Besides, another MLP neural network is utilised to isolate the faults. In order to show the effectiveness of proposed RFDI method, it was tested on a single-shaft industrial gas turbine prototype model and has been evaluated based on the gas turbine data. A brief comparative study with the related works done on this gas turbine benchmark is also provided to show the pros and cons of the presented RFDI method.

Hasan Abbasi Nozari; Mahdi Aliyari Shoorehdeli; Silvio Simani; Hamed Dehghan Banadaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

FY 2010 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

285

FY 2009 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

286

An artificial intelligence approach to model-based gas lift troubleshooting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gas lift injection pressure is too high, I have not seen this pressure in the system before. . . . . something is wrong! Gas lift injection pressure is greater than the value given by the computerized gas lift design model C 3 O O 0 0 O... porous medium is proportional to the pressure or hydraulic gradient and to the cross-sectional area normal to the direction of flow and inversely proportional to the viscosity of the fluid. CO C 3 FLUID THROUGH POROUS MEDIUM 0 0 r)( r Fig. 2. 3...

Ortiz-Volcan, Jose Luis

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

State Volume  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama...................... 111,656 2,614 114,270 4,476 5,810 18,610 Alaska ......................... 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 148,444 Arkansas..................... 214,868 161 215,029 237 474 977 California..................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 41,037 Colorado ..................... 493,748 1,249 494,997 16,891 23,420 63,411 Florida......................... 5,900 0 5,900 1,130 1,143 4,202 Illinois.......................... 578 0 578 63 64 271 Kansas........................ 825,825 2,731 828,556 30,617 41,115 120,221 Kentucky .....................

288

Graphene-based D-shaped fiber multicore mode interferometer for chemical gas sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this Letter, a graphene-coated D-shaped fiber (GDF) chemical gas sensor is proposed and demonstrated. Taking advantage of both the graphene-induced evanescent field enhancement and...

Wu, Y; Yao, B C; Zhang, A Q; Cao, X L; Wang, Z G; Rao, Y J; Gong, Y; Zhang, W; Chen, Y F; Chiang, K S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Monitoring System of Networked Gas Stations Based on Embedded Dynamic Web  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oil is a sort of strategic material, and therefore strengthening the management of oil material has very important significance. Aimed at the difference in communication protocol among dispensers of gas stations

Wei Huang; Kai-wen Chen; Chao Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Reliability analysis of urban gas transmission and distribution system based on FMEA and correlation operator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to improve the safety management of urban gas transmission and distribution system, failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was used to construct the reliability analysis ... the risk priority number (R...

Su Li; Weiguo Zhou

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Offshore gas conservation utilizing a turbo-expander based refrigeration extraction cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas associated with the crude produced from Occidental's Piper Field is conserved by drying it and condensing out the heavier components. This renders the gas with water and hydrocarbon dew points acceptable for transfer to St. Fergus via Total's Frigg Field Pipeline. A process which includes a turbo expander/compressor is used to extract the condensate which is spiked into the crude pipeline for eventual recovery as liquid product and fuel gas at Flotta. The turbo expander can extract 30% more condensate than a simple Joule-Thompson expansion. Gas transferred to St. Fergus is 80% methane with a net calorific value of 1000 btu/scf and a water dew point of -20 F at 1700 psig.

Ross, I.; Robinson, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tin oxide based gas sensor for in-door air quality monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tin oxide nanograins doped with 0.1 at% of antimony have shown highly sensitivity towards tail gas, carbon monoxide and second-hand smoke. Such sensors are very useful for air quality...

Zhu, Lianfeng; Gai, Guosheng; Zhang, Changyue; Ji, Xuewen; Yao, Youwei

293

METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 34A, NOVEMBER 2003--2633 nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys.[58  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-atomized Ni (Ni-118, purity 99.6 pct) from Praxair Surface Technologies (Indianapolis, IN). A nitrogen- gas

DuPont, John N.

294

Griffiss Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Electric resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). FEMP, with support from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is designing this model program for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. The program with Griffiss AFB will (1) identify and evaluate all cost-effective electric energy projects; (2) develop a schedule for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have them procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the ACC Griffiss AFB facility located near Rome, New York. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in seven common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO provides information on the initial cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. The evaluation methodology and technical and cost assumptions are also described for each ERO. Summary tables present the operational performance of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Armstrong, P.R.; Shankle, S.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Stucky, D.J.; Keller, J.M.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Dagle, J.E.; Gu, A.Y.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

296

Significant impact of 2D graphene nanosheets on large volume change tin-based anodes in lithium-ion batteries: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sn-based materials have attracted much attention as anodes in lithium ion batteries (LIBs) due to their low cost, high theoretical capacities, and high energy density. However, their practical applications are limited by the poor cyclability originating from the huge volume changes. Graphene nanosheets (GNSs), a novel two-dimensional carbon sheet with one atom thickness and one of the thinnest materials, significantly address the challenges of Sn-based anodes as excellent buffering materials, showing great research interests in LIBs. In this review, various nanocomposites of GNSs/Sn-based anodes are summarized in detail, including binary and ternary composites. The significant impact of 2D \\{GNSs\\} on the volume change of Sn-based anodes during cycling is discussed, along with with their preparation methods, properties and enhanced LIB performance.

Yang Zhao; Xifei Li; Bo Yan; Dejun Li; Stephen Lawes; Xueliang Sun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses, Volume 1: Scientific Bases and Analyses, Rev 00  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S&ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S&ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23 013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054] [DIRS 124754]). By making the large amount of information developed on Yucca Mountain available in stages, the DOE intends to provide the public and interested parties with time to review the available materials and to formulate and submit comments. Before determining whether to recommend the Yucca Mountain site, the Secretary will consider public and stakeholder comments, as well as the available technical information.

David Dobson

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Eddy?Current Inspection of Cracking in Land?Based Gas Turbine Blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a growing need in the electric utility industry to assess the remaining life of blades in gas turbines. It is quite important to nondestructively comprehend the depths of surface?breaking cracks in blades. Flexible eddy current array probes have been developed to overcome the major limitations of existing eddy current inspection systems. The use of an array of sensors allows cracks of all lengths to be detected and will ultimately allow real time data imaging to provide rapid inspection and easy interpretation. For this study using eddy current techniques crack detection equipment has been developed and applied to gas turbine Stage 1 blades for field use.

H. Fukutomi; T. Ogata

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Methane and the greenhouse-gas footprint of natural gas from shale formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We evaluate the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas obtained by high-volume hydraulic fracturing from shale formations, focusing on methane emissions. Natural gas is composed largely of methane, and 3 ... to ...

Robert W. Howarth; Renee Santoro; Anthony Ingraffea

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The modelling of biochemical-thermal coupling effect on gas generation and transport in MSW landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfill gas generation was investigated based on the theories of the thermodynamics, microbial dynamics and chemical dynamics. The coupling model was developed for describing the gas transport and heat release. And the relationship between the gas generation rate and the temperature was proposed. The parameters in the gas generation model were obtained by bioreactor test in order to evaluate the volume of gas production of the Erfeishan landfill in China. The simulation results shown that the operating life of the landfill will be overestimated if the model does not consider the thermal effect during degradation of the solid substrate.

Liu Lei; Liang Bing; Xue Qiang; Zhao Ying; Yang Chun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

An evaluation of Substitute natural gas production from different coal gasification processes based on modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal and lignite will play a significant role in the future energy production. However, the technical options for the reduction of CO2 emissions will define the extent of their share in the future energy mix. The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG) from solid fossil fuels seems to be a very attractive process: coal and lignite can be upgraded into a methane rich gas which can be transported and further used in high efficient power systems coupled with CO2 sequestration technologies. The aim of this paper is to present a modeling analysis comparison between substitute natural gas production from coal by means of allothermal steam gasification and autothermal oxygen gasification. In order to produce SNG from syngas several unit operations are required such as syngas cooling, cleaning, potential compression and, of course, methanation reactors. Finally the gas which is produced has to be conditioned i.e. removal of unwanted species, such as CO2 etc. The heat recovered from the overall process is utilized by a steam cycle, producing power. These processes were modeled with the computer software IPSEpro™. An energetic and exergetic analysis of the coal to SNG processes have been realized and compared.

S. Karellas; K.D. Panopoulos; G. Panousis; A. Rigas; J. Karl; E. Kakaras

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales: Volume 2, Expansion of the Moving-Bed Hydroretorting Data Base for Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive data base was developed for six Eastern oil shales: Alabama Chattanooga, Indiana New Albany, Kentucky Sunbury, Michigan Antrim, Ohio Cleveland, and Tennessee Chattanooga shales. The data base included the hydroretorting characteristics of the six shales, as well as the retorting characteristics in the presence of synthesis gas and ionized gas. Shale gasification was also successfully demonstrated. Shale fines (20%) can produce enough hydrogen for the hydroretorting of the remaining 80% of the shale. The amount of fines tolerable in a moving bed was also determined. 16 refs., 59 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

FY 2008 Volume 7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves

305

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Study on Oil Prices’ Effect on International Gas Prices Based on Using Wavelet Based Boltzmann Cooperative Neural Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we build up WBNNK model based on wavelet-based cooperative Boltzmann neural network and kernel density estimation. The international oil prices time series is decomposed into approximate components...

Xiazi Yi; Zhen Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

Liebowitz, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A dynamic prediction model for gas–water effective permeability based on coalbed methane production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An understanding of the relative permeability of gas and water in coal reservoirs is vital for coalbed methane (CBM) development. In this work, a prediction model for gas–water effective permeability is established to describe the permeability variation within coal reservoirs during production. The effective stress and matrix shrinkage effects are taken into account by introducing the Palmer and Mansoori (PM) absolute permeability model. The endpoint relative permeability is calibrated through experimentation instead of through the conventional Corey relative permeability model, which is traditionally employed for the simulation of petroleum reservoirs. In this framework, the absolute permeability model and the relative permeability model are comprehensively coupled under the same reservoir pressure and water saturation conditions through the material balance equation. Using the Qinshui Basin as an example, the differences between the actual curve that is measured with the steady-state method and the simulation curve are compared. The model indicates that the effective permeability is expressed as a function of reservoir pressure and that the curve shape is controlled by the production data. The results illustrate that the PM–Corey dynamic prediction model can accurately reflect the positive and negative effects of coal reservoirs. In particular, the model predicts the matrix shrinkage effect, which is important because it can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically feasible.

H. Xu; D.Z. Tang; S.H. Tang; J.L. Zhao; Y.J. Meng; S. Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Question 2: Gas procurement strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a collection of responses from natural gas distribution company representatives to questions on how the start-up of the natural gas futures market has changed gas procurement strategies, identification of procurement problems related to pipeline capacity, deliverability, or pregranted abandonment of firm transportation, the competition of separate utility subsidiaries with brokers, marketers, and other gas suppliers who sell gas to large-volume industrial or other 'noncore' customers.

Carrigg, J.A.; Crespo, J.R.; Davis, E.B. Jr.; Farman, R.D.; Green, R.C. Jr.; Hale, R.W.; Howard, J.J.; McCormick, W.T. Jr.; Page, T.A.; Ryan, W.F.; Schrader, T.F.; Schuchart, J.A.; Smith, J.F.; Stys, R.D.; Thorpe, J.A.

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

310

From carbon to light: a new framework for estimating greenhouse gas emissions reductions from replacing fuel-based lighting with LED systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is considerable well-intended, yet wishful anticipation about reducing greenhouse gas emissions by replacing fuel-based lighting in the developing world with grid-independent light-emitting diode (LED) lighting

Evan Mills; Arne Jacobson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

312

Guidelines Volume I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 1: Electricity Supply Sector Part 2: Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Part 3: Industrial Sector Electricity Supply Sector-Page 1.iii Contents of Volume I This volume, the first of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program,

313

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

EIA - Natural Gas Price Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices Prices U.S. and State prices for wellhead, imports, exports, citygate, and end-use sectors. Percentages of total volume delivered by sector. (monthly, annual). Residential and Commercial Prices by Local Distributors and Marketers Average price of natural gas delivered to residential and commercial consumers by local distribution companies and marketers, and the percent sold by local distribution companies in selected states and DC (annual). Spot and Futures Prices Henry Hub natural gas spot price and New York Mercantile Exchange futures contract prices for natural gas based on delivery at the Henry Hub in Louisiana (daily, weekly, monthly, annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

315

Performance characteristics of a MW-class SOFC/GT hybrid system based on a commercially available gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ultimate purpose of a SOFC/GT hybrid system is for distributed power generation applications. Therefore, this study investigates the possible extension of a SOFC/GT hybrid system to multi-MW power cases. Because of the matured technology of gas turbines and their commercial availability, it was reasonable to construct a hybrid system with an off-the-shelf gas turbine. Based on a commercially available gas turbine, performance analysis was conducted to find the total appropriate power for the hybrid system with consideration of the maximum allowable cell temperature. In order to maintain high performance characteristics of the hybrid system during part-load operations, it was necessary to find the optimal control strategy for the system according to the change in power required. The results of the performance analysis for part-load conditions showed that supplied fuel and air must be changed simultaneously. Furthermore, in order to prevent performance degradation, it was found that both cell temperature and turbine inlet temperature must be maintained as close as possible to design-point conditions.

Tae Won Song; Jeong Lak Sohn; Tong Seop Kim; Sung Tack Ro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfthe behavior of gas hydrate bearing sand reservoirs can beof highly-saturated gas-hydrate bearing sand in the Gulf of

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the conventional gas reserve of 1.5x10 14 m 3 ofconventional oil and gas reserves, the assessment of theconventional fossil fuel reserves, gas hydrates are emerging

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

319

Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hybrid Life-Cycle Assessment of Natural Gas Based Fuel Chains for Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The end use is passenger transportation with a sub-compact car that has an internal combustion engine for the natural gas case and a fuel cell for the methanol and hydrogen cases. ... Then, trucks are used to transport the fuels to a fueling station in Geneva, Switzerland. ... In evaluating fuel/vehicle options with the potential to improve the greenness of cars [diesel (direct injection) and ethanol in internal combustion engines, battery-powered, gasoline hybrid elec., and hydrogen fuel cells], we find no option dominates the others on all dimensions. ...

Anders Hammer Strømman; Christian Solli; Edgar G. Hertwich

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Membrane gas separation. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the research and development of gas separation and purification techniques involving the use of plastic and metal membranes. Among the topics included are isotope separation, osmotic techniques, reverse osmosis, and preparation of membranes for specific separation processes. The permeability of polymer membranes is discussed in terms of physical properties as well as molecular structure. The selectivity of polymeric films for a variety of gases is also included. (Contains a minimum of 168 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Simulating the daily gasoline price-setting behaviour of gas stations in Cincinnati by agent-based modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the retail gasoline market, gas stations as independent entities set gas prices according to a number of factors related to global and local economic… (more)

Zhou, Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Thermionic-combustor combined-cycle system. Volume III. A thermionic converter design for gas-turbine combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermionic converter design is strongly influenced by the configuration of the heat source and heat sink. These two externally imposed conditions are of major importance in arriving at a viable converter design. In addition to these two factors, the economical and reliable transfer of energy internally within the converter is another major item in the design. The effects of the engineering trade-offs made in arriving at the design chosen for the Gas Turbine Combined Cycle combustor are reviewed.

Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

December 19, 2013 December 19, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through September 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

327

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

November 7, 2013 November 7, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through August 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

328

High-pressure turbine deposition in land-based gas turbines from various synfuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash deposits from four candidate power turbine synfuels were studied in an accelerated deposition test facility. The facility matches the gas temperature and velocity of modern first-stage high-pressure turbine vanes. A natural gas combustor was seeded with finely ground fuel ash particulate from four different fuels: straw, sawdust, coal, and petroleum coke. The entrained ash particles were accelerated to a combustor exit flow Mach number of 0.31 before impinging on a thermal barrier coating (TBC) target coupon at 1150{sup o}C. Postexposure analyses included surface topography, scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. Due to significant differences in the chemical composition of the various fuel ash samples, deposit thickness and structure vary considerably for fuel. Biomass products (e.g., sawdust and straw) are significantly less prone to deposition than coal and petcoke for the same particle loading conditions. In a test simulating one turbine operating year at a moderate particulate loading of 0.02 parts per million by weight, deposit thickness from coal and petcoke ash exceeded 1 and 2 mm, respectively. These large deposits from coal and petcoke were found to detach readily from the turbine material with thermal cycling and handling. The smaller biomass deposit samples showed greater tenacity, in adhering to the TBC surface. In all cases, corrosive elements (e.g., Na, K, V, Cl, S) were found to penetrate the TBC layer during the accelerated deposition test. Implications for the power generation goal of fuel flexibility are discussed.

Bons, J.P.; Crosby, J.; Wammack, J.E.; Bentley, B.I.; Fletcher, T.H. [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cooking the volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooking possesses a system of units of measurement, that includes measures of volumes based on pre-metric units. This paper discusses the cooking measures and compares their features with those of the ancient Roman measures of capacity.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Carbon capture by sorption-enhanced water-gas shift reaction process using hydrotalcite-based material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel route for precombustion decarbonization is the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process. In this process carbon dioxide is removed from a synthesis gas at elevated temperature by adsorption. Simultaneously, carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide by the water-gas shift reaction. The periodic adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide is induced by a pressure swing cycle, and the cyclic capacity can be amplified by purging with steam. From previous studies is it known that for SEWGS applications, hydrotalcite-based materials are particularly attractive as sorbent, and commercial high-temperature shift catalysts can be used for the conversion of carbon monoxide. Tablets of a potassium promoted hydrotalcite-based material are characterized in both breakthrough and cyclic experiments in a 2 m tall fixed-bed reactor. When exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, steam, and nitrogen at 400{sup o}C, the material shows a breakthrough capacity of 1.4 mmol/g. In subsequent experiments the material was mixed with tablets of promoted iron-chromium shift catalyst and exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, steam, hydrogen, and nitrogen. It is demonstrated that carbon monoxide conversion can be enhanced to 100% in the presence of a carbon dioxide sorbent. At breakthrough, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide simultaneously appear at the end of the bed. During more than 300 cycles of adsorption/reaction and desorption, the capture rate, and carbon monoxide conversion are confirmed to be stable. Two different cycle types are investigated: one cycle with a CO{sub 2} rinse step and one cycle with a steam rinse step. The performance of both SEWGS cycles are discussed.

van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Hufton, J.R.; van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Refueling Stations SMR station Pipeline Station SMR Module Cost (HGM-1000) SMR Module Output 600 kg/day Compressor Base Cost (

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Dynamic simulation of an oxygen mixed conducting membrane-based gas turbine power cycle for CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the transient behaviour of an oxygen mixed conducting membrane (OMCM)-based gas turbine (GT) power plant. Several operation and material constraints limit the operability of the power plant. For part-load operation two strategies are analysed: (i) reduction in mass flow of air to the GT in conjunction with reduced fuel supply to the afterburner while keeping the turbine exit temperature (TET) constant (TET control strategy), and (ii) reduction of fuel supply to the afterburner at constant air supply to the GT while the TET is allowed to vary (turbine inlet temperature (TIT) control strategy). Simulation reveals that this GT power plant shows rather slow dynamics because of the recirculation of large amount of gas. The OMCM-based GT power plant is compared to a simple GT power plant with respect to design, off-design as well as transient behaviour during load reduction. Information about controlled and manipulated variables in the GT power plant is given for the development of control strategy.

Konrad Eichhorn Colombo; Olav Bolland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: NSTAR Automated Mater Reading Based Dynamic Pricing - Douglas Horton, NSTAR Electric & Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Peer Peer Review Meeting Peer Review Meeting AMR Based Dynamic Pricing y g Doug Horton NSTAR Electric & Gas Co. 6/8/2012 AMR Based Dynamic Pricing Objective Provide two-way communication of electricity cost & consumption data utilizing the customers existing meter & Internet. Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and average load. Life-cycle Funding ($K) Total Budget Total DOE Funding to Technical Scope Use customer's existing AMR meter and broadband Internet to achieve two way Total Budget Total DOE Funding Funding to Date $4,900k $2,362k $1,623k broadband Internet to achieve two way communication and "AMI" functionality Cutting-edge solution to integrate: * Existing meters E i ti I t t December 2008 * Existing Internet * Existing billing & CIS

335

Volume-translated cubic EoS and PC-SAFT density models and a free volume-based viscosity model for hydrocarbons at extreme temperature and pressure conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focuses on providing the petroleum reservoir engineering community with robust models of hydrocarbon density and viscosity at the extreme temperature and pressure conditions (up to 533 K and 276 MPa, respectively) characteristic of ultra-deep reservoirs, such as those associated with the deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Our strategy is to base the volume-translated (VT) Peng–Robinson (PR) and Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) cubic equations of state (EoSs) and perturbed-chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) on an extensive data base of high temperature (278–533 K), high pressure (6.9–276 MPa) density rather than fitting the models to low pressure saturated liquid density data. This high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) data base consists of literature data for hydrocarbons ranging from methane to C{sub 40}. The three new models developed in this work, HTHP VT-PR EoS, HTHP VT-SRK EoS, and hybrid PC-SAFT, yield mean absolute percent deviation values (MAPD) for HTHP hydrocarbon density of ?2.0%, ?1.5%, and <1.0%, respectively. An effort was also made to provide accurate hydrocarbon viscosity models based on literature data. Viscosity values are estimated with the frictional theory (f-theory) and free volume (FV) theory of viscosity. The best results were obtained when the PC-SAFT equation was used to obtain both the attractive and repulsive pressure inputs to f-theory, and the density input to FV theory. Both viscosity models provide accurate results at pressures to 100 MPa but experimental and model results can deviate by more than 25% at pressures above 200 MPa.

Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.; Soong, Yee; Baled, Hseen; O Enick, Robert M; Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh,Mark A.

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

An electron beam polarimeter based on scattering from a windowless, polarized hydrogen gas target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we present the idea to develop a precision polarimeter for low energy, intense polarized electron beams using a windowless polarized hydrogen gas cell fed by an atomic beam source. This technique would use proven technology used successfully in both the electron scattering experiments: HERMES with 27 GeV electron and positron beams at DESY, and BLAST with 850 MeV electron beams at MIT-Bates. At 100 MeV beam energy, both spin-dependent Mo/ller and elastic electron-proton scattering processes have a high cross section and sizable spin asymmetries. The concept is described and estimates for realistic rates for elastic electron-proton scattering and Mo/ller scattering are presented. A number of important issues which affect the ultimate systematic uncertainty are identified.

Bernauer, Jan; Milner, Richard [Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT, Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Review of automated custody transfer equipment for large-volume gas flow measurement. Final report, August 1, 1987-February 28, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of electronic automation on the accuracy of gas custody transfer measurements was investigated. The term Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) denotes both electronic flow correctors (for positive displacement meters) and flow computers (for orifice plate measurements). Electronic devices have potential to be slightly more accurate than their mechanical counterparts. Electronic systems have the additional benefits of greater application flexibility, reduced flow corrector inventory, reduced maintenance and calibration requirements, and data storage and communication capability. The primary concerns with EFM equipment are compatibility between units made by different manufacturers and their ability to function under extreme environmental conditions.

Rush, W.F.; Tamosaitis, V.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Midwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Midwest Region...

339

Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003...

Hansen, Nels Edward

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

340

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Interstate Pipelines Segment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Interstate Natural Gas...

342

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

343

Chemistry of tributyl phosphate and nitric acid at constant volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the reaction of tributyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The reaction pressure of TBP/HNO{sub 3} mixtures as a function of time was measured under constant volume. A simplified model, which parametrically includes autocatalysis, was used to plot the total gas production of the reaction as a function of time. Comparison of the functions shows a rough equivalence in the induction time, reaction time, and total gas production. Predictions of the amounts of reaction products as a function of time were made based on assumptions regarding autocatalysis and using rate constants from experimental data. The derived reaction mechanisms and experimental results have several implications. Tests with a large amount of venting and high surface to volume ratio will show very different behavior than tests with increasing confinement and low surface to volume ratios. The amount alkyl nitrate, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen that reacts within the organic phase is limited by their solubilities and volatilities. The overall yield of both heat and gas per mol of nitric acid or TBP will vary significantly depending on the amount of solution, free volume, and vessel vent capacity.

Agnew, S.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Morris, J.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Recycling of Flue Gas Desulfurization residues in gneiss based hot mix asphalt: Materials characterization and performances evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract On the one hand, huge amount of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) residues, produced during scrubbing flue gas, is discarded as solid waste. Such solid waste would cause serious environmental problems. One the other hand, high quality aggregates, such as limestone and basalt, are running out due to the rapid development of highway construction. Ungraded aggregates such as gneiss are therefore considered in China to replace the high quality aggregates. The application of FGD residues as a filler in gneiss based asphalt mixture has benefits both in environmental and economic sides. The main objective of this research was to visualize the raw materials characterization and evaluate the effect of FGD residues on the performance of gneiss based asphalt mixture. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetric & Thermal gravimetric (DSC–TG) were used to investigate the features of raw materials. The performance of gneiss based asphalt mixture including high-temperature deformation resistance, low-temperature crack resistance and moisture-induced damage resistance were evaluated. Dynamic creep test, three-point bending test, Retained Marshall Stability (RMS), Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR), Indirect Tensile (IDT) strength and Resilient Modulus (MR) test were conducted and analyzed. Dissipated Creep Strain Energy to fracture (DCSEf) ratio, fracture energy and model analysis were also used to evaluate moisture resistance, crack resistance and deformation resistance of asphalt mixture respectively. Research results indicate that FGD residues can partly improve the moisture resistance and crack resistance of gneiss asphalt mixture, while it might worse the high-temperature deformation resistance.

Zongwu Chen; Shaopeng Wu; Fuzhou Li; Juyong Chen; Zhehuan Qin; Ling Pang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

346

Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermodynamic analysis of an HCCI engine based system running on natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper attempts to carry out a thermodynamic analysis of a system composed of a turbocharged HCCI engine, a mixer, a regenerator and a catalytic converter within the meaning of the first and the second law of thermodynamics. For this purpose, a thermodynamic model has been developed taking into account the gas composition resulting from the combustion process and the specific heat temperature dependency of the working fluid. The analysis aims in particular to examine the influence of the compressor pressure ratio, ambient temperature, equivalence ratio, engine speed and the compressor isentropic efficiency on the performance of the HCCI engine. Results show that thermal and exergetic efficiencies increase with increasing the compressor pressure ratio. However, the increase of the ambient temperature involves a decrease of the engine efficiencies. Furthermore, the variation of the equivalence ratio improves considerably both thermal and exergetic efficiencies. As expected, the increase of the engine speed enhances the engine performances. Finally, an exergy losses mapping of the system show that the maximum exergy losses occurs in the HCCI engine.

Mohamed Djermouni; Ahmed Ouadha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inletElevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing of thermomechanical fatigue life of the next generation's Ni-base superalloys are being developed to enhance life

Li, Mo

350

Novel Carbon Nanotube-Based Nanostructures for High-Temperature Gas Sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is to examine the feasibility of using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a high temperature sensor material for fossil energy systems where reducing atmospheres are present. In the initial period of research, we fabricated capacitive sensors for hydrogen sensing using vertically aligned MWCNTs. We found that CNT itself is not sensitive to hydrogen. Moreover, with the help of Pd electrodes, hydrogen sensors based on CNTs are very sensitive and fast responsive. However, the Pd-based sensors can not withstand high temperature (T<200 C). In the last year, we successfully fabricated a hydrogen sensor based on an ultra-thin nanoporous titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) film supported by an AAO substrate, which can operate at 500 C with hydrogen concentrations in a range from 50 to 500 ppm.

Zhi Chen; Kozo Saito

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling metallic nanoparticle synthesis in a magnetron-based nanocluster source by gas condensation of a sputtered vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by inert-gas condensation of a sputtered metallic vapor using a dedicated commercial reactor. By controlling the time of residence of NPs in the carrier gas phase via the tuning of the collision path length, Cu NPs were produced. They exhibit various and well controlled diameters (3-10 nm) and a relatively narrow size dispersion. On the basis of these experimental results, a detailed modeling of NP nucleation and growth based on the classical nucleation theory was developed. It takes into account the peculiar geometry and thermal profile of the NP reactor. The simulated curves, calculated by a MATLAB program developed for that purpose, exhibit a good qualitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, they highlight the role of process parameters and the strong influence of the reactor temperature profile on the NP size distribution. In the future, such calculations could be used for the optimization of the NP source design in order to increase its efficiency and reproducibility.

Quesnel, E; Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Muffato, V [CEA-G/DRT/LITEN/DTNM, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Natural gas monthly, June 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Natural gas monthly, August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Natural gas monthly: September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Natural gas monthly, November 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

357

Dynamic neural network-based fault diagnosis of gas turbine engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a neural network-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme is presented to detect and isolate faults in a highly nonlinear dynamics of an aircraft jet engine. Towards this end, dynamic neural networks (DNN) are first developed to ... Keywords: Aircraft jet engine, Bank of filters, Computational intelligence, Dynamic neural networks, Fault detection and isolation, Fault diagnosis, Multiple model schemes

S. Sina Tayarani-Bathaie; Z. N. Sadough Vanini; K. Khorasani

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mid-Infrared Laser based Gas Sensor Technologies for Environmental Monitoring,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), thermoelectrically cooled (TEC) and room tem- perature operated quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) for the detection analysis will be reported. These sensors employ a 2f wavelength modulation (WM) technique based on quartz region. Keywords: laser spectroscopy, quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy, wavelength modulation

359

Simulation-Based Optimization Methodology for Offshore Natural Gas Liquefaction Process Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Base Case Design of Turbo-Expander Process ... In addn., the exergy anal. is conducted for N2 expander and the results indicate that the compression equipments and after coolers, expanders and LNG heat exchangers are the main contribution to the total exergy losses. ...

Kiwook Song; Sangho Lee; Seolin Shin; Ho Jae Lee; Chonghun Han

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Analysis of emission right prices in greenhouse gas emission trading via agent-based model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a participant nation model for international emission trading; adaptive agents are used to explore the conditions under which an emission trading market is successful. In this study, the participation nation models with and without ... Keywords: Agent-Based Modeling, Compliance Mechanism, Emissions Trading, Kyoto Protocol, Reinforcement Learning

Tomohiro Nakada; Keiki Takadama; Shigeyoshi Watanabe

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Cu/Zn-based catalysts improved by adding magnesium for water–gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ternary Cu/MeO/ZnO (Me: alkaline-earth metal, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) catalysts were prepared by homogeneous precipitation (hp) using urea hydrolysis. The structure and the activity for the water–gas shift reaction of these catalysts were studied compared with those of the catalysts prepared by coprecipitation (cp). The highest activity was obtained over hp-Cu/MgO/ZnO among the catalysts tested. The catalyst precursors after the precipitation contained mainly aurichalcite, (Cu,Zn)5(CO3)2(OH)16, while the decomposed products after the calcination contained apparently CuO and ZnO as crystalline phases, since the amount of Mg actually included in the catalyst was less than 1.0 at.%. The Cu metal surface area was larger and the particle size of Cu metal was smaller on the hp-catalysts than those on the cp-catalysts; nonetheless the BET surface area was sometimes larger on the latter than on the former. The addition of ?0.1 at.% of Mg was the most effective, resulting in the highest activity as well as the lowest activation energy. A good correlation was observed between the amount of Cu+ species and the activation energy of the shift reaction, suggesting that MgO significantly enhanced the formation of Cu+ species as the active sites. Even after the pre-reduction at the high temperature, 250 °C, hp-Cu/MgO/ZnO catalyst showed no significant decrease in the activity as well as no detectable sintering in the Cu metal particles during 50 h of the reaction. It was supposed that the shift reaction proceeds by a reduction–oxidation mechanism between Cu0 ? Cu+.

Tetsuya Shishido; Manabu Yamamoto; Ikuo Atake; Dalin Li; Yan Tian; Hiroyuki Morioka; Masahide Honda; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

365

FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package: Volume 2, User's guide to the EFLOW groundwater flow code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a two-dimensional finite element code, EFLOW, developed to simulate water flow in fully or variably saturated porous media. This code is one component in the FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. For variably saturated flow problems, nonlinearities caused by unsaturated soil properties, atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage faces), and water uptake by plant roots are treated using Picard or Newton-Raphson methods. For fully saturated unconfined flow problems, the governing equations are formulated in an areal plane, and nonlinear water-table boundary conditions are treated using the Picard method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. 24 refs., 39 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of synthetic-fuel character effects on rich-lean stationary gas-turbine combustion systems. Volume 2. Full-scale test program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of burner geometric scale on the emissions and performance produced by staged, rich lean combustors was investigated. Tests were conducted using a 25-cm diameter burner and the results obtained were compared with results previously obtained using a similar, but smaller (12.5-cm diameter) burner. The larger burner employed a convectively-cooled rich-burn section; the size of the burner is the size of the burner cans employed in the 25 Megawatt FT4 industrial gas turbine. Scale effects are of concern in staged rich/lean combustors because of the suspected critical importance of quench air jet penetration and fuel injector spray distribution, both processes being scaled dependent. Tests were conducted both with No. 2 petroleum distillate and with a nitrogen-bearing, middle-distillate synthetic fuel produced by the H-Coal process. Measurements of burner exit temperature profile, liner temperature, gaseous emission, and smoke emissions are presented and the results compared with subscale test results.

Kennedy, J.B.; McVey, J.B.; Rosfjord, T.J.; Russel, P.; Beal, G.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural gas monthly, October 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Natural gas monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

370

Natural gas monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed study of the catalyst composition, preparation and activation protocol of Fe-based catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) have been carried out in this project. We have studied the effects of different promoters on the catalytic performance of Fe-based catalysts. Specifically, we have focused on how their sequence of addition dramatically influences the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The resulting procedures have been optimized to improve further upon the already unprecedented rates and C{sub 5+} selectivities of the Fe-based catalysts that we have developed as part of this project. Selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbon was close to 90 % (CO{sub 2}-free basis) and CO conversion rate was about 6.7 mol h{sup -1} g-at Fe{sup -1} at 2.14 MPa, 508 K and with substoichiometric synthesis gas; these rates were larger than any reported previously for Fe-based FTS catalysts at these conditions. We also tested the stability of Fe-based catalysts during FTS reaction (10 days); as a result, the high hydrocarbon formation rates were maintained during 10 days, though the gradual deactivation was observed. Our investigation has also focused on the evaluation of Fe-based catalysts with hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams (H{sub 2}/CO=1). We have observed that the Fe-based catalysts prepared in this project display also a high hydrocarbon synthesis rate with substoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=1) stream, which is a less desirable reactant mixture than stoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=2). We have improved the catalyst preparation protocols and achieved the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported at the low temperatures required for selectivity and stability. Also, we have characterized the catalyst structural change and active phases formed, and their catalytic behavior during the activation process to evaluate their influences on FTS reaction. The efforts of this project led to (i) structural evolution of Fe-Zn oxide promoted with K and Cu, and (ii) evaluation of hydrocarbon and CH{sub 4} formation rates during activation procedures at various temperature and H{sub 2}/CO ratios. On the basis of the obtained results, we suggest that lower reactor temperature can be sufficient to activate catalysts and lead to the high FTS performance. In this project, we have also carried out a detailed kinetic and mechanistic study of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis with Fe-based catalysts. We have proposed a reaction mechanism with two CO activation pathways: unassisted and H-assisted. Both routes lead to the formation of the same surface monomers (CH{sub 2}). However, the oxygen removal mechanism is different. In the H-assisted route, oxygen is removed exclusively as water, while oxygen is rejected as carbon dioxide in the unassisted CO dissociation. The validity of the mechanism here proposed has been found to be in agreement with the experimental observation and with theoretical calculations over a Fe(110) surface. Also, we have studied the validity of the mechanism that we propose by analyzing the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} kinetic isotope effect (r{sub H}/r{sub D}) over a conventional iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst Fe-Zn-K-Cu. We have observed experimentally that the use of D{sub 2} instead of H{sub 2} leads to higher hydrocarbons formation rates (inverse kinetic isotopic effect). On the contrary, primary carbon dioxide formation is not influenced. These experimental observations can be explained by two CO activation pathways. We have also explored the catalytic performance of Co-based catalysts prepared by using inverse micelles techniques. We have studied several methods in order to terminate the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} support including impregnation, urea homogeneous deposition-precipitation, or zirconium (IV) ethoxide titration. Although hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be stoichiometrically titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, a requirement to prevent the formation of strongly-interacting Co oxide species on SiO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{

Enrique Iglesia; Akio Ishikawa; Manual Ojeda; Nan Yao

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development of a micro-cogeneration laboratory and testing of a natural gas CHP unit based on PEM fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work discusses the design and the development of a Laboratory of Micro-Cogeneration (LMC) at Politecnico di Milano. The LMC laboratory is a unique structure devoted to small-scale power generation, with the main goals of testing and improving the performance of systems that produce or utilize electric and thermal (hot and/or cold) power in a very general sense, spanning from combined heat and power (CHP) units to heaters, from absorption chillers to heat pumps, but also able to perform tests on fuel processors and electrolyzers. The laboratory features a supply of natural gas as well as H2 and O2 from a high pressure electrolyzer and of CO, CO2 and N2 from bottles, permitting to carry out experiments with simulated synthesis fuels. The maximum allowable electrical power produced, exported to the grid or to an electronic loadbank, or consumed by the system under test is 100 kW; maximum allowable thermal power is roughly 200 kW with variable temperature water circuits (from chilled water up to a 150 °C at 8 bar superheated water loop). This work outlines also the instruments used for on-line recording of thermodynamic properties, emissions and power, aiming at monitoring and reconstructing mass and energy balances. One of the first experimental campaign has been carried out on a CHP system based on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEM), a promising candidate for distributed CHP thanks to low pollutant emissions and good efficiency, rapid startup and flexibility, although affected by a rather complex fuel processing section to provide the appropriate fuel to the PEM. This work presents the experimental analysis of a 20 kW prototype PEM CHP system complete of natural gas processor. The prototype is operated at LMC to characterize the processing section and the thermodynamic performances of the overall system. Despite its non-optimized layout, the unit has shown encouraging total efficiency (76%) and primary energy saving index (6%).

S. Campanari; G. Valenti; E. Macchi; G. Lozza; N. Ravidà

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Tap Density Equations of Granular Powders Based on the Rate Process Theory and the Free Volume Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tap density of a granular powder is often linked to the flowability via Carr Index that measures how tight a powder can be packed, under an assumption that more easily packed powders usually flow poorly. Understanding how particles are packed is important for revealing why a powder flows better than others. There are two types of empirical equations that were proposed to fit the experimental data of packing fractions vs. numbers of taps in literature: The inverse logarithmic and the stretched exponential. Using the rate process theory and the free volume concept, we obtain the tap density equations and they can be reducible to the two empirical equations currently widely used in literature. Our equations could potentially fit experimental data better with an additional adjustable parameter. The tapping amplitude and frequency, the weight of the granular materials, and the environment temperature are grouped into one parameter that weighs the pace of packing process. The current results, in conjunction with our previous findings, may imply that both dry(granular)and wet(colloidal and polymeric) particle systems are governed by the same physical mechanisms in term of the role of the free volume and how particles behave (a rate controlled process).

Tian Hao

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Performance analysis of combined humidified gas turbine power generation and multi-effect thermal vapor compression desalination systems: Part 2: The evaporative gas turbine based system and some discussions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is Part 2 of the paper “Performance analysis of combined humidified gas turbine power generation and multi-effect thermal vapor compression desalination systems — Part 1: The desalination unit and its combination with a steam-injected gas turbine power system”. A combined power and water system based on the evaporative gas turbine (EvGT) is studied, and major features such as the fuel saving, power-to-water ratio, energy and exergy utilization, and approaches to performance improvement, are presented and discussed in comparison with STIG- and EvGT- based systems, to further reveal the characteristics of these two types of combined systems. Some of the main results of the paper are: the fuel consumption of water production in STIG-based combined system is, based on reference-cycle method, about 45% of a water-only unit, and that in an EvGT-based system, it is 31–54%; compared with the individual power-only and water-only units, the fuel savings of the two combined systems are 12%–28% and 10%–21%, respectively; a water production gain of more than 15% can be obtained by using a direct-contact gas-saline water heat exchanger to recover the stack heat; and the combined system are more flexible in its power-to-water ratio than currently used dual-purpose systems. Further studies on aspects such as operation, hardware cost, control complexity, and environmental impact, are needed to determine which configuration is more favorable in practice.

Yongqing Wang; Noam Lior

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

Isohashi, Fumiaki, E-mail: isohashi@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mabuchi, Seiji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Maruoka, Shintaroh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities for feedstocks consisting of synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third and fourth reporting periods, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based FT catalysts with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During the fifth reporting period, we studied the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance, specifically how their sequence of addition dramatically influenced the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We also continued our studies of the kinetic behavior of these materials. Specifically, the effects of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} on the rates and selectivities of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis reactions led us to propose a new sequence of elementary steps on Fe and Co Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. More specifically, we were focused on the roles of hydrogen-assisted and alkali-assisted dissociation of CO in determining rates and CO{sub 2} selectivities. During this sixth reporting period, we have studied the validity of the mechanism that we propose by analyzing the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} kinetic isotope effect (r{sub H}/r{sub D}) over a conventional iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst Fe-Zn-K-Cu. We have observed experimentally that the use of D{sub 2} instead of H{sub 2} leads to higher hydrocarbons formation rates (inverse kinetic isotopic effect). On the contrary, primary carbon dioxide formation is not influenced. These experimental observations can be explained by the two CO activation pathways we propose. During this reporting period, the experimental kinetic study has been also complemented with periodic, self-consistent, DFT-GGA investigations in a parallel collaboration with the group of Manos Mavrikakis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These DFT calculations suggest minimal energy paths for proposed elementary steps on Fe(110) and Co(0001) surfaces. These calculations support our novel conclusions about the preferential dissociation of CO dissociation via H-assisted pathways on Fe-based catalysts. Unassisted CO dissociation also occurs and lead to the formation of CO{sub 2} as a primary oxygen scavenging mechanism after CO dissociation on Fe-based catalysts. Simulations and our experimental data show also that unassisted CO dissociation route is much less likely on Co surfaces and that hydrocarbons form exclusively via H-assisted pathways with the formation of H{sub 2}O as the sole oxygen rejection product. We have also started a study of the use of colloidal precipitation methods for the synthesis of small Fe and Co clusters using recently developed methods to explore possible further improvements in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities. We have found that colloidal synthesis makes possible the preparation of small cobalt particles, although large amount of cobalt silicate species, which are difficult to reduce, are formed. The nature of the cobalt precursor and the modification of the support seem to be critical parameters in order to obtain highly dispersed and reducible Co nanoparticles.

Akio; Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

379

41146_R01_Volume II.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOLIERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

380

41146_R01_Volume I.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 i GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Petroleum Supply Annual 2004 Volume 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Annual 2004 Volume 1 June 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy...

382

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lewis Base Adduct Stabilized Organogallium Azides:? Synthesis and Dynamic NMR Spectroscopic Studies of Novel Precursors to Gallium Nitride and Role of Ammonia as Reactive Carrier Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lewis Base Adduct Stabilized Organogallium Azides:? Synthesis and Dynamic NMR Spectroscopic Studies of Novel Precursors to Gallium Nitride and Role of Ammonia as Reactive Carrier Gas ... Solvents were dried under argon according to standard methods; n-pentane and toluene were stored over Na/K alloy, and diethyl ether and thf over potassium benzophenoate (residual water solubility in other solvents than thf. ...

Alexander Miehr; Mike R. Mattner; Roland A. Fischer

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermodynamic-Analysis-Based Design and Operation for Boil-Off Gas Flare Minimization at LNG Receiving Terminals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LNG (liquefied natural gas) receiving terminal is an important component of the entire LNG value chain. ... Corpus Christi, TX, U.S. ...

Chaowei Liu; Jian Zhang; Qiang Xu; John L. Gossage

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas hydrate formation in a variable volume bed of silica sandamount of sand, gas, and water. Although methane hydrate has

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hot-gas filter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

au Journal de Physique 111,Volume 3, dtcembre 1993 Summary: aredownstreamof the gasifier,namelythe fuelgascooler, the hot gas filter and the ductwork liner. The gas stream......

388

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Design, Synthesis and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities for synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third and fourth reporting periods, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based materials with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During the fifth and sixth reporting period, we studied the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance, specifically how their sequence of addition dramatically influenced the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We also continued our studies of the kinetic behavior of these materials during the sixth reporting period. Specifically, the effects of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} on the rates and selectivities of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis reactions led us to propose a new sequence of elementary steps on Fe and Co Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Finally, we also started a study of the use of colloidal precipitation methods for the synthesis small Co clusters using recently developed methods to explore possible further improvements in FTS rates and selectivities. We found that colloidal synthesis makes possible the preparation of small cobalt particles, although large amount of cobalt silicate species, which are difficult to reduce, were formed. During this seventh reporting period, we have explored several methods to modify the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} by using either a homogeneous deposition-precipitation method or surface titration of Si-OH on SiO{sub 2} with zirconium (IV) ethoxide to prevent the formation of unreducible and unreactive CoO{sub x} species during synthesis and FTS catalysis. We have synthesized monometallic Co/ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Co loadings (11-20 wt%) by incipient wetness impregnation methods and characterized the prepared Co supported catalysts by H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and H{sub 2}-chemisorption. We have measured the catalytic performance in FTS reactions and shown that although the hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be fully titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} surface can improve the Co clusters dispersion and lead to a larger number of exposed Co surface atoms after reduction and during FTS reactions. During this seventh reporting period, we have also advanced our development of the reaction mechanism proposed in the previous reporting period. Specifically, we have shown that our novel proposal for the pathways involved in CO activation on Fe and Co catalysts is consistent with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations carried out in collaboration with Prof. Manos Mavrikakis (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Finally, we have also worked on the preparation of several manuscripts describing our findings about the preparation, activation and mechanism of the FTS with Fe-based catalysts and we have started redacting the final report for this project.

Akio Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Impact of agricultural-based biofuel production on greenhouse gas emissions from land-use change: Key modelling choices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent regulations on biofuels require reporting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions related to feedstock-specific biofuels. However, the inclusion of GHG emissions from land-use change (LUC) into law and policy remains a subject of active discussion, with LUC–GHG emissions an issue of intense research. This article identifies key modelling choices for assessing the impact of biofuel production on LUC–GHG emissions. The identification of these modelling choices derives from evaluation and critical comparison of models from commonly accepted biofuels–LUC–GHG modelling approaches. The selection and comparison of models were intended to cover factors related to production of agricultural-based biofuel, provision of land for feedstock, and GHG emissions from land-use conversion. However, some fundamental modelling issues are common to all stages of assessment and require resolution, including choice of scale and spatial coverage, approach to accounting for time, and level of aggregation. It is argued here that significant improvements have been made to address LUC–GHG emissions from biofuels. Several models have been created, adapted, coupled, and integrated, but room for improvement remains in representing LUC–GHG emissions from specific biofuel production pathways, as follows: more detailed and integrated modelling of biofuel supply chains; more complete modelling of policy frameworks, accounting for forest dynamics and other drivers of LUC; more heterogeneous modelling of spatial patterns of LUC and associated GHG emissions; and clearer procedures for accounting for the time-dependency of variables. It is concluded that coupling the results of different models is a convenient strategy for addressing effects with different time and space scales. In contrast, model integration requires unified scales and time approaches to provide generalised representations of the system. Guidelines for estimating and reporting LUC–GHG emissions are required to help modellers to define the most suitable approaches and policy makers to better understand the complex impacts of agricultural-based biofuel production.

Luis Panichelli; Edgard Gnansounou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost-effective) techniques to remotely detect hydrate deposits, and to monitor their changes in the course of gas production.production of gas from hydrates occurring in the Gulf of Mexico because, despite of the substantially increased complexity and cost

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Gubler, Philipp; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Nishida, Yusuke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Sedimentological control on saturation distribution in Arctic gas-hydrate-bearing sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanistic model is proposed to predict/explain hydrate saturation distribution in “converted free gas” hydrate reservoirs in sub-permafrost formations in the Arctic. This 1-D model assumes that a gas column accumulates and subsequently is converted to hydrate. The processes considered are the volume change during hydrate formation and consequent fluid phase transport within the column, the descent of the base of gas hydrate stability zone through the column, and sedimentological variations with depth. Crucially, the latter enable disconnection of the gas column during hydrate formation, which leads to substantial variation in hydrate saturation distribution. One form of variation observed in Arctic hydrate reservoirs is that zones of very low hydrate saturations are interspersed abruptly between zones of large hydrate saturations. The model was applied to data from Mount Elbert well, a gas hydrate stratigraphic test well drilled in the Milne Point area of the Alaska North Slope. The model is consistent with observations from the well log and interpretations of seismic anomalies in the area. The model also predicts that a considerable amount of fluid (of order one pore volume of gaseous and/or aqueous phases) must migrate within or into the gas column during hydrate formation. This paper offers the first explanatory model of its kind that addresses “converted free gas reservoirs” from a new angle: the effect of volume change during hydrate formation combined with capillary entry pressure variation versus depth.

Javad Behseresht; Steven L. Bryant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Natural gas monthly, March 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas analysis and geographic information systems.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Natural gas monthly, August 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature article is on US Natural Gas Imports and Exports 1994.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural gas monthly, June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Natural gas monthly, October 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

1. A tank of volume V is to be filled with an ideal gas. Initially the tank is at P1and T1.the port is regulated with a valve, and the port properties are constant at Tin.The tank is well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. A tank of volume V is to be filled with an ideal gas. Initially the tank is at P1and T1.the port is regulated with a valve, and the port properties are constant at Tin.The tank is well insulated so the process is adiabatic. If the final pressure of the tank is Pz,determine the finaltemperature of the tank T

Huang, Haimei

400

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Real-time estimation of gas turbine engine damage using a control-based Kalman filter algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a second-generation Kalman filter algorithm is described that has sufficient accuracy and response for real-time detection and estimation of gas turbine engine gas path damage caused by normal wear, mechanical failures, and ingestion of foreign objects. The algorithm was developed for in-flight operation of aircraft engines but also has application for marine and industrial gas turbines. The control measurement and microcomputer requirements are described. The performance and sensitivity to engine transients and measurement errors is evaluated. The algorithm is demonstrated with actual engine data of ice and bird ingestion tests.

Kerr, L.J.; Nemec, T.S.; Gallops, G.W. (Pratt and Whitney, United Technologies Corp., West Palm Beach, FL (US))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 2, Technical basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume, Volume 2, contains the technical basis for the 1992 PA. Specifically, it describes the conceptual basis for consequence modeling and the PA methodology, including the selection of scenarios for analysis, the determination of scenario probabilities, and the estimation of scenario consequences using a Monte Carlo technique and a linked system of computational models. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume I contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the EPA`s Environmental Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses related to the preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191B. Volume 5 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance. Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base superalloys for gas turbines and strategies for manufacture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for better gas turbine operating efficiency and reliability has resulted in tightening of specification and acceptance standards. It has been realized that some elements even at trace level, can have ...

O. P. Sinha; M. Chatterjee; V. V. R. S. Sarma; S. N. Jha

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Humidity-independent portable air-hydrogen fuel cells with slotted silicon based gas-distributing plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the characteristics of small-scale air-hydrogen fuel cells (FCs) operating in a free-breathing cathode regime. The cells are provided with a new gas-distributing element on the cathode side, wh...

E. V. Astrova; D. A. Andronikov; M. V. Gorokhov…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

409

Working Gas Volume Change from Year Ago  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

-753,656 -616,126 -473,386 -308,388 -195,536 -128,134 1973-2013 -753,656 -616,126 -473,386 -308,388 -195,536 -128,134 1973-2013 Alaska 14,007 15,277 16,187 17,087 18,569 20,455 2013-2013 Lower 48 States -767,663 -631,403 -489,573 -325,475 -214,105 -148,588 2011-2013 Alabama 131 998 -1,015 -975 -35 2,852 1996-2013 Arkansas -1,386 -1,403 -1,240 -1,239 -1,024 -1,050 1990-2013 California -6,702 -5,997 -10,684 274 24,044 28,854 1990-2013 Colorado -2,531 537 892 1,473 1,528 1,179 1990-2013 Illinois -11,767 -14,974 -8,820 -7,918 -12,002 -6,916 1990-2013 Indiana -4,126 -2,948 -2,927 -2,773 -1,025 -212 1990-2013 Iowa -6,614 -1,173 3,389 6,425 6,747 3,169 1991-2013 Kansas -38,081 -31,497 -26,449 -17,344 -10,369 -9,217 1990-2013 Kentucky -26,238 -26,922 -21,826 -15,927 -14,959 -12,801 1990-2013

410

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

411

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

412

The proceedings of the fourth (1994) international offshore and polar engineering conference. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference proceedings is one volume of a four volume set dealing with oil and gas industry operations in polar and offshore environments. This particular conference deals primarily with materials and designs for offshore platforms and tanker ships. It provides papers dealing with concretes, steels, and composite materials and the IR mechanical properties. Many papers review testing and processes for welded joints. It also provides papers which deal with fracture mechanics and corrosion protection. Approximately 74 papers have been individually abstracted and entered into the data base.

Ueda, Yukio; Tomita, Yasumitsu [eds.] [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Dos Santos, J.F. [ed.] [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht (Germany); Langen, I. [ed.] [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway); Waagaard, K. [ed.] [Veritec, Hovik (Norway)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

417

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

supply to MRT's East Line or reduce applicable delivery volumes. Colorado Interstate Gas Company announced on December 6 that the Cheyenne Compressor Stations unit that had...

420

Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encountered when operating under conditions with high gas volume fractions (GVF). Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency when operating under wet-gas conditions, GVF over 95%. Field operations have revealed severe vibration...

Chan, Evan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stability of an overheated liquid containing vapor-gas bubbles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the stability of an overheated liquid containing bubbles of an insoluble gas is considered. The critical conditions for the masses of gas bubbles, their radii, and volume concentrations are ... sys...

V. Sh. Shagapov; V. V. Koledin…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fusion of metrology data for large-scale high-volume manufacturing of polymer-based microfluidic devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The promise of miniaturisation of large-scale laboratories on to a chip as small as a credit card has attracted the attention of biologists and manufacturing engineers alike. Mass production of functional microfluidic devices assembled on such chips necessitates accurate measurement of feature sizes and other properties as part of the manufacturing process. In this paper, we first review key metrology techniques needed for the characterisation of geometry, surface and sub-surface aspects of polymer-based microfluidic devices. We note that multiple instruments are often needed to overcome compromises between 1) range and resolution 2) bandwidth (speed) and resolution. This leads to the challenge of handling the data sets from the multiple instruments, i.e., aligning and integrating the data sets for accurate metrology. We propose the use of registration markers, or 'fiducial' markers, formed in polymer samples for aligning the data sets. Data sets recorded from sample instruments, an atomic force microscope, interferometer and confocal microscope are aligned against fiducial markers. As an example metrology situation, we show that more accurate measurements of channel widths can be achieved if data from multiple instruments are aligned using fiducial markers.

Vijay Shilpiekandula; Daniel J. Burns; Shiguang Li; Zhiguang Xu; Hayden K. Taylor; Kamal Youcef-Toumi; Zhongping Fang; Ivan Reading; Soon Fatt Yoon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Volume State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 22 Volume State State or Country From/To Receipts/ Imports From Deliveries/ Exports To Net a Alabama Florida .................................................................. 0 722,558 -722,558 Georgia................................................................. 0 1,352,308 -1,352,308 Gulf of Mexico....................................................... 123,132 0 123,132 Mississippi ............................................................ 2,758,595 0 2,758,595 Tennessee............................................................ 1,744 764,749 -763,005 Total..................................................................... 2,883,471 2,839,615 43,856

425

Gas imaging by infrared gas-correlation spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a new method for visualization of gas flows based on infrared absorption and gas-correlation techniques. This result is a gray-scale or false color-coded image showing the...

Sandsten, Jonas; Edner, Hans; Svanberg, Sune

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LNG Peak Shaving and Import Facilities Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. LNG Peaking...

427

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions. Vertical discretization of grid size allows to improve aquifer influx modeling......................................... 55 Table 4.2? Reservoir model properties. ................................................................ 58 Table 4... fuel dependency will continue in the near future, increasing the need to develop economic and technologically feasible approaches to reduce and capture and dispose CO2 emissions. Geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and depleted oil and gas...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Single-QCL-based absorption sensor for simultaneous trace-gas detection of CH4 and N2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compact multipass gas cell (MGC). This sensor uses a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave­8]. A compact mid-infrared absorption spectrometer for N2O and CH4 was developed using thermoelectrically cooled.04 cm-1 ) and N2O (1274.61 cm-1 ) lines at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Wavelength modulation spec- troscopy

429

Optimization of condensing gas drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

Lofton, Larry Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Automated gas chromatography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

433

Distribution of Natural Gas: The Final Step in the Transmission Process  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June 2008 June 2008 1 Each day, close to 70 million customers in the United States depend upon the national natural gas distribution network, including natural gas distribution companies and pipelines, to deliver natural gas to their home or place of business (Figure 1). These customers currently consume approximately 20 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of natural gas per annum, accounting for about 22 percent of the total energy consumed in the United States each year. This end- use customer base is 92 percent residential units, 7 percent commercial businesses, and 1 percent large industrial and electric power generation customers. 1 However, the large- volume users, though small in number, account for more than 60 percent of the natural gas used by end users.

434

Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology for Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High-Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh PIs: F. S. Pettit, G. H. Meier Subcontractor: J. L. Beuth SCIES Project 02- 01- SR101 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/02, 36 Month Duration + 6 mo No-Cost Extension) $ 458,420 Total Contract Value ($ 412,695 DOE) Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology For Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High- Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines University of Pittsburgh - Carnegie Mellon University University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh In the next generation gas turbine, resistance to thermal cycling damage may be as important as resistance to long isothermal exposures. Moreover, metallic coatings and Thermal Barrier

435

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

What is shale gas and why is it important?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fuzzy Synthetic Evaluation of Gas Station Safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the comprehensive analysis of hazard factors and evaluation indexes in gas stations, gas station safety is assessed in a fuzzy synthetic ... comprehensive evaluation, the specific safety level of gas stations

Xiaohua Hao; Xiao Feng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Preliminary evaluation of a concept using microwave energy to improve an adsorption-based, natural gas clean-up process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation performed to: (1) determine if microwave energy could be used to regenerate a zeolite adsorbent and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of using microwave energy to improve the desorption phase of a pressure swing adsorption process applied to upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Microwave regeneration was evaluated by comparing the adsorption characteristics of a zeolite preconditioned by heating under vacuum to the characteristics of the same zeolite after various lengths of exposure to microwave energy. The applicability of microwave regeneration to natural gas cleanup was evaluated by measuring the rise in adsorbent temperature resulting from the microwave exposure. Microwave energy consumed by heating the adsorbent is not productive and must therefore be minimal for a process to be economically viable. Exposure of the methane-saturated chabazite for 2 minutes to microwave energy effectively regenerated the adsorbent, but resulted in a 75{degrees}F (42{degrees}C) rise in adsorbent temperature. This temperature rise indicates that the concept is unacceptable for natural gas processing due to excessive energy consumption.

Grimes, R.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

FE Oil and Natural Gas News  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

oil-natural-gas-news Office of Fossil Energy Forrestal oil-natural-gas-news Office of Fossil Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585202-586-6503 en Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-authorizes-additional-volume-proposed-freeport-lng-facility-export volume-proposed-freeport-lng-facility-export" class="title-link">Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas

440

Structure and function of gas vacuoles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...overlying gas phase to atmospheric pressure. Volume...film of surrounding water. From the results...to force liquid water in- side the structure...would also prevent water from accumulating inside by condensation (105). FORMATION...

A E Walsby

1972-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

VOLUME 84, NUMBER 18 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 1 MAY 2000 Microscopic View of a Two-Dimensional Lattice-Gas Ising System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Dimensional Lattice-Gas Ising System within the Grand Canonical Ensemble V. P. LaBella, D. W. Bullock, M. Anser, Z on the GaAs(001) surface and modeled as a lattice-gas Ising system. Without depositing any material, 2D Ga Ising system through the critical point and a complete Hamiltonian for modeling the GaAs(001) surface

Thibado, Paul M.

442

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas November 20, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. Projects Will Determine Whether methane Hydrates Are an Economically and Environmentally Viable Option for America's Energy Future November 15, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas The Department of Energy announced the conditional authorization for Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S. This is the fifth conditional authorization the Department has announced. October 31, 2013 Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project

444

Natural gas monthly, October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 29, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down slightly for the week on light weather load despite an end-week rally anticipating warmer weather for the approaching July 4th holiday weekend. The Henry Hub price decreased 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (0.5 percent) to close at $4.40 per MMBtu on June 29. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,432 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 24, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 78 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 26, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 18, 2011) The threat of shut-in production arising from lower Mississippi River flooding likely sent prices up temporarily at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week but the gains failed to stick. The Henry Hub price lost a modest 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.9 percent) to close at $4.15 per MMBtu on May 18. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,919 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 13, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 92 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

447

Gas-Saving Tips  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Gas-Saving Tips Gas-Saving Tips Some consumers believe fuel economy ratings are a fixed number, like engine size or cargo volume. However, a vehicle's fuel economy can vary significantly due to several factors, including how the vehicle is driven, the vehicle's mechanical condition, and the environment in which it is driven. That's good news. It means you may be able to improve your vehicle's gas mileage through proper maintenance and driving habits. In fact, studies suggest the average driver can improve his/her fuel economy by roughly 10 percent. Here are a few simple tips to help you get the best possible fuel economy from your vehicle and reduce your fuel costs. Adopt Good Driving Habits Drive Sensibly Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking)

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier week’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

450

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

451

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

452

Supersonic gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

453

Desulfurization behavior of iron-based sorbent with MgO and TiO{sub 2} additive in hot coal gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sulfidation behaviors of iron-based sorbent with MgO and MgO-TiO{sub 2} are studied under different isothermal conditions from 623 to 873 K in a fixed bed reactor. The results of sorbents sulfidation experiments indicate that the sorbents with MgO and TiO{sub 2} additives are more attractive than those without additives for desulfurization of hot coal gas. The sulfur capacity (16.17, 18.45, and 19.68 g S/100 g sorbent) of M1F, M3F, and M5F sorbent containing 1, 3, and 5% MgO, respectively, is obviously bigger than that (15.02 g S/100 g sorbent) of M0F without additive. The feasible sulfidation temperature range for M3F sorbent is 773-873 K. The M3F sorbent is optimally regenerated at the temperature of 873 K, under the gas containing 2% oxygen, 15% steam and N{sub 2}, in the space velocity of 2500 h{sup -1}. The sorbent regenerated is also well performed in the second sulfidation (the effective sulfur capacities of 17.98 g S/100 g sorbents and the efficiency of removal sulfur of 99%). The capacity to remove sulfur decreases with steam content increasing in feeding gas from 0 to 10%, but it can restrain the formation of carbon and iron carbide. The addition of TiO{sub 2} in sorbent can shift the optimal sulfidation temperature lower. The iron-based sorbent with 3% MgO and 10% TiO{sub 2} (MFT) is active to the deep removal of H{sub 2}S and COS, especially in the temperature range of 673-723 K. The sulfur removal capacity of MFT sorbent is 21.60 g S/100 g sorbent. 16 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Weiren Bao; Zong-you Zhang; Xiu-rong Ren; Fan Li; Li-ping Chang [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Exergetic optimization of a refrigeration cycle for natural gas liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Natural gas is widely use in many industries as fuel and also as raw material. Although gas pipelines present less transportation losses they become impracticable when distances are too long or when demands are highly variable. The liquefaction of natural gas is then necessary to allow its transportation in great volumes, with little loss of material. This also enables its storage in a more stable way. Natural gas consumption is continuously growing worldwide and consequently, the number of exporter terminals (liquefaction industries) and importer terminals (regasification plants) will increase. The natural gas liquefaction process is based on a sequence of refrigeration cycles, which need to work in an optimized way. The exergetic analysis is a very useful thermodynamic tool to evaluate the efficiency of these cycles. This work aims at an exergetic analysis of a multistage cascade refrigeration cycle applied to a natural gas liquefaction process. Firstly, the process was simulated using commercial software and the results obtained from the simulations were validated with literature data, showing a good agreement. After that, different operational conditions, according to a complete factorial design of experiments, were studied, in order to verify the influence of pressure in six specific points of the cycle. The response variable analyzed is the rate of total exergy destroyed in the cycle. The results showed a new set of operational condition to the refrigeration cycle in which the destroyed exergy rate was reduced by approximately 48% in comparison with literature data.

Liza Cipolato; Maria C.A. Lirani; Thiago V. Costa; Francine M. Fábrega; José V.H. d'Angelo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Overview Intrastate natural gas pipelines operate within State borders and link natural gas producers to local markets and to the interstate pipeline network. Approximately 29 percent of the total miles of natural gas pipeline in the U.S. are intrastate pipelines. Although an intrastate pipeline system is defined as one that operates totally within a State, an intrastate pipeline company may have operations in more than one State. As long as these operations are separate, that is, they do not physically interconnect, they are considered intrastate, and are not jurisdictional to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). More than 90 intrastate natural gas pipelines operate in the lower-48 States.

456

Setup of precise camera based solar tracker systems and greenhouse gas measurements using a modified portable spectrometer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Methods for correcting errors in solar absorption FTIR spectroscopy using the Sun as the light source were developed. A novel camera-based solar tracker is presented,… (more)

Gisi, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A new perspective on usability: Towards a usable gas-desulphurization agent-based model at Shell P&T:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While agent-based models (ABM) are increasingly used to study overall system behaviour of various systems, they can also be hard to use by people and… (more)

Boonstra, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Techno-economic assessment of substituting natural gas based heater with thermal energy storage system in parabolic trough concentrated solar power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Parabolic-trough (PT) concentrated solar power (CSP) plants are very vulnerable to daily fluctuations in solar radiation. This dependence can be mitigated through a hybridization of solar energy with natural gas based heaters that supply thermal energy during the night or whenever solar irradiance level is dimmed. However, there is more sustainable way for CSP plants to avoid power-generation-outages caused by transient weather conditions, i.e. installation of thermal energy storage (TES). Such a system stores surplus thermal energy provided by solar field during sunny hours and discharges it when the sun is not available. Shams-1 PT plant in Madinat-Zayed, United-Arab-Emirates (UAE) has two natural gas based components, i.e. steam-booster heater and heat transfer fluid (HTF) heater. In the current study, model of Shams-1 was developed and analyzed in the System Advisor Model (SAM) software. It has been attempted to replace the HTF heater with TES. A parametric study has been conducted to determine the size of the TES as well as the solar field such that the specified power target demand would be satisfied. The results of the parametric analysis showed that TES can't completely replace the HTF heater, within reasonable sizes. Nevertheless, consequent simulations depicts that TES increases the capacity factor on one hand and decreases fuel consumption on the other hand.

V. Poghosyan; Mohamed I. Hassan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

460

Numerical investigation of gas flow rate in shale gas reservoirs with nanoporous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Theoretical analysis of transport mechanism of gas flow in shale gas reservoirs with nanoporous media was carried out on the basis of molecular kinetic theory. The motion equation and mathematical model of shale gas transport in multi-scale medium are established in this article. The pressure distribution equation of radial flow was derived, and the computing method of the control area of gas well was presented. Additionally, the volume flow rate equations of vertical and horizontal fractured wells were obtained. Through Newton iterative method, volume flow rate was analyzed, considering various factors such as production pressure drawdown, fracture half-length, fracture conductivity, fracture spacing and diffusion coefficient. According to the numerical results, the volume flow rate of the gas well increases when the diffusion coefficient grows. Consequently diffusion in shale gas reservoirs with nanoporous media plays an important role. With increase of fracture half-length, the volume flow rate increases first and then tends towards stability. Moreover, for certain length of the horizontal wellbore, when fracture spacing increases and the number of the fractures lessens, the control area and the volume flow rate of the gas well decreases. Therefore, there is an optimum allocation among these factors to achieve maximum volume flow.

Hongqing Song; Mingxu Yu; Weiyao Zhu; Peng Wu; Yu Lou; Yuhe Wang; John Killough

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base gas volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gas concentration measurement instrument based on the effects of a wave-mixing interference on stimulated emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring partial pressures of gaseous components within a mixture. The apparatus comprises generally at least one tunable laser source, a beam splitter, mirrors, optical filter, an optical spectrometer, and a data recorder. Measured in the forward direction along the path of the laser, the intensity of the emission spectra of the gaseous component, at wavelengths characteristic of the gas component being measured, are suppressed. Measured in the backward direction, the peak intensities characteristic of a given gaseous component will be wavelength shifted. These effects on peak intensity wavelengths are linearly dependent on the partial pressure of the compound being measured, but independent of the partial pressures of other gases which are present within the sample. The method and apparatus allow for efficient measurement of gaseous components. 9 figs.

Garrett, W.R.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Gas concentration measurement instrument based on the effects of a wave-mixing interference on stimulated emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring partial pressures of gaseous components within a mixture. The apparatus comprises generally at least one tunable laser source, a beam splitter, mirrors, optical filter, an optical spectrometer, and a data recorder. Measured in the forward direction along the path of the laser, the intensity of the emission spectra of the gaseous component, at wavelengths characteristic of the gas component being measured, are suppressed. Measured in the backward direction, the peak intensities characteristic of a given gaseous component will be wavelength shifted. These effects on peak intensity wavelengths are linearly dependent on the partial pressure of the compound being measured, but independent of the partial pressures of other gases which are present within the sample. The method and apparatus allow for efficient measurement of gaseous components.

Garrett, W. Ray (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030CO2","N5010CO2","N5020CO2","N5070CO2","N5050CO2","N5060CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Colorado Natural Gas