National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for base case assumptions

  1. Design assumptions and bases for small D-T-fueled Sperical Tokamak (ST) fusion core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Galambos, J.D.; Fogarty, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Recent progress in defining the assumptions and clarifying the bases for a small D-T-fueled ST fusion core are presented. The paper covers several issues in the physics of ST plasmas, the technology of neutral beam injection, the engineering design configuration, and the center leg material under intense neutron irradiation. This progress was driven by the exciting data from pioneering ST experiments, a heightened interest in proof-of-principle experiments at the MA level in plasma current, and the initiation of the first conceptual design study of the small ST fusion core. The needs recently identified for a restructured fusion energy sciences program have provided a timely impetus for examining the subject of this paper. Our results, though preliminary in nature, strengthen the case for the potential realism and attractiveness of the ST approach.

  2. Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

    2001-03-26

    The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

  3. What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

    2012-12-01

    A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

  4. Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

    2008-11-01

    Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

  5. Section 25: Future State Assumptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future State Assumptions (40 CFR § 194.25) United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Future State Assumptions (40 CFR § 194.25) Table of Contents 25.0 Future State Assumptions (40 CFR § 194.25) 25.1 Requirements 25.2 Background 25.3 1998 Certification Decision 25.4 Changes in the CRA-2004 25.5 EPA's Evaluation of Compliance for the 2004 Recertification 25.5.1 40 CFR § 194.25(a) 25.5.2

  6. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) | Department of Energy Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) This paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie California's residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the state's ambitious greenhouse gas

  7. The impact of size distribution assumptions in a bulk one-moment microphysics scheme on simulated surface precipitation and storm dynamics during a low-topped supercell case in Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg, K.; VanLipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-04-01

    In this research the impact of modifying the size distribution assumptions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a bulk one-moment microphysics scheme on simulated surface precipitation and storm dynamics has been explored for long-lived low-topped supercells in Belgium. It was shown that weighting the largest precipitating ice species of the microphysics scheme to small graupel results in an increase of surface precipitation because of counteracting effects. On the one hand, the precipitation formation process slowed down, resulting in lower precipitation efficiency. On the other hand, latent heat release associated with freezing favored more intense storms. In contrast to previous studies finding decreased surface precipitation when graupel was present in the microphysics parameterization, storms were rather shallow in the authors simulations. This left little time for graupel sublimation. The impact of size distribution assumptions of snow was found to be small, but more realistic size distribution assumptions of rain led to the strongest effect on surface precipitation. Cold pools shrunk because of weaker rain evaporation at the cold pool boundaries, leading to a decreased surface rain area.

  8. Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Assumption Parish, Louisiana Belle Rose, Louisiana Labadieville, Louisiana Napoleonville, Louisiana Paincourtville, Louisiana...

  9. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie California's residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the state's ...

  10. Analyzing the impact of modeling choices and assumptions in compartmental epidemiological models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nutaro, James J.; Pullum, Laura L.; Ramanathan, Arvind; Ozmen, Ozgur

    2016-05-01

    In this study, computational models have become increasingly used as part of modeling, predicting, and understanding how infectious diseases spread within large populations. These models can be broadly classified into differential equation-based models (EBM) and agent-based models (ABM). Both types of models are central in aiding public health officials design intervention strategies in case of large epidemic outbreaks. We examine these models in the context of illuminating their hidden assumptions and the impact these may have on the model outcomes. Very few ABM/EBMs are evaluated for their suitability to address a particular public health concern, and drawing relevant conclusions aboutmore » their suitability requires reliable and relevant information regarding the different modeling strategies and associated assumptions. Hence, there is a need to determine how the different modeling strategies, choices of various parameters, and the resolution of information for EBMs and ABMs affect outcomes, including predictions of disease spread. In this study, we present a quantitative analysis of how the selection of model types (i.e., EBM vs. ABM), the underlying assumptions that are enforced by model types to model the disease propagation process, and the choice of time advance (continuous vs. discrete) affect the overall outcomes of modeling disease spread. Our study reveals that the magnitude and velocity of the simulated epidemic depends critically on the selection of modeling principles, various assumptions of disease process, and the choice of time advance.« less

  11. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 September 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or

  12. 1980 Base case and feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-03-01

    This report describes a task of documenting a ``base case`` and performing a feasibility analysis for a national residential energy efficiency program for new homes, The principal objective of the task wasto estimate the energy consumption of typical homes built in 1980 and then to identify and assess the feasibility of methods to reduce that consumption by 50%. The goal of the program by the year 2000 is to reduce heating and cooling energy use in new homes built under the program to one-half of the energy use in typical new homes built in 1980. The task also calls for determining whether the program goal should be revised, based on the analysis.

  13. 1980 Base case and feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report describes a task of documenting a base case'' and performing a feasibility analysis for a national residential energy efficiency program for new homes, The principal objective of the task wasto estimate the energy consumption of typical homes built in 1980 and then to identify and assess the feasibility of methods to reduce that consumption by 50%. The goal of the program by the year 2000 is to reduce heating and cooling energy use in new homes built under the program to one-half of the energy use in typical new homes built in 1980. The task also calls for determining whether the program goal should be revised, based on the analysis.

  14. Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

  15. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Energy Module The National Energy Modeling System International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the IEM computes Brent and WTI prices, provides a supply curve of world

  16. Appendix MASS: Performance Assessment Modeling Assumptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appendix MASS-2014 Performance Assessment Modeling Assumptions United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix MASS Table of Contents MASS-1.0 Introduction MASS-2.0 Summary of Changes in Performance Assessment MASS-2.1 FEPs Assessment MASS-2.2 Monitoring MASS-2.3 Experimental Activities MASS-2.3.1 Steel Corrosion Investigations MASS-2.3.2 Waste Shear Strength Investigations MASS-2.3.3

  17. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Definitions of parameters and table of assumptions for the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Methodology Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Methodology Widget Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and

  20. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint ... More Documents & Publications Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, ...

  1. 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions and Assumptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 13-page document provides definitions and assumptions used in the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010)

  2. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... be carefully controlled in terms of treatment delivery ... Knowledge gaps exist before we enter a market and they need ... provides for a broad-based search for relevant articles, as ...

  3. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    57 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of liquid fuels supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of liquid fuels supply include petroleum-based fuels, such as crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, and unfinished oil imports. It also includes non-petroleum-based inputs, including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, natural gas, and coal. In addition, liquid fuels supply

  4. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per

  5. Assumptions and ambiguities in nonplanar acoustic soliton theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verheest, Frank; School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 ; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2014-02-15

    There have been many recent theoretical investigations of the nonlinear evolution of electrostatic modes with cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Through a reductive perturbation analysis based on a quasiplanar stretching, a modified form of the Korteweg-de Vries or related equation is derived, containing an additional term which is linear in the electrostatic potential and singular at time t = 0. Unfortunately, these analyses contain several restrictive assumptions and ambiguities which are normally neither properly explained nor discussed, and severely limit the applicability of the technique. Most glaring are the use of plane-wave stretchings, the assumption that shape-preserving cylindrical modes can exist and that, although time is homogeneous, the origin of time (which can be chosen arbitrarily) needs to be avoided. Hence, only in the domain where the nonlinear modes are quasiplanar, far from the axis of cylindrical or from the origin of spherical symmetry can acceptable but unexciting results be obtained. Nonplanar nonlinear modes are clearly an interesting topic of research, as some of these phenomena have been observed in experiments. However, it is argued that a proper study of such modes needs numerical simulations rather than ill-suited analytical approximations.

  6. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Definitions and Assumptions A number of key terms are used to interpret the manufacturing energy and carbon footprints. The terms associated with the energy footprint analysis are defined below, in the order they generally appear in the footprint energy flow, starting from offsite energy and then continuing to onsite energy end uses and loss assumptions. Key definitions and assumptions associated with the carbon footprint analysis are shown on pages 7 and 8. Energy Footprint Analysis Definitions

  7. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015:...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    changes. (early work of a two year project) * Revise assumptions pertaining to price ... barrels per day January 2015 STEO forecast of U.S. oil production generally within ...

  8. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Justin

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  9. Monitored Geologic Repository Life Cycle Cost Estimate Assumptions Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sweeney

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA), License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

  10. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Sweeney

    2001-02-08

    The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

  11. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - International...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3.2. The GDP growth rate assumptions for non-U.S. countriesregions are taken from Oxford Economic Model (October, 2012). The values for growth in total liquids demand in the...

  12. 2014 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions and Assumptions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Definitions and Assumptions A number of key terms are used to interpret the manufacturing energy and carbon footprints. The terms associated with the energy footprint analysis are defined below in alphabetical order. Key definitions and assumptions associated with the greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint analysis are shown on pages 12 and 13. Energy Footprint Analysis Definitions CHP/Cogeneration - The production of electrical energy and another form of useful energy (such as heat or steam) through

  13. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  14. Definition of the base analysis case of the interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1995-12-01

    The base analysis case for the ``Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment`` is defined. Also given are brief description of the sensitivity cases.

  15. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Ernest

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  16. Chiller condition monitoring using topological case-based modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Kamimura, Kazuyuki

    1996-11-01

    To increase energy efficiency and economy, commercial building projects now often utilize centralized, shared sources of heat such as district heating and cooling (DHC) systems. To maintain efficiency, precise monitoring and scheduling of maintenance for chillers and heat pumps is essential. Low-performance operation results in energy loss, while unnecessary maintenance is expensive and wasteful. Plant supervisors are responsible for scheduling and supervising maintenance. Modeling systems that assist in analyzing system deterioration are of great benefit for these tasks. Topological case-based modeling (TCBM) (Tsutsui et al. 1993; Tsutsui 1995) is an effective tool for chiller performance deterioration monitoring. This paper describes TCBM and its application to this task using recorded historical performance data.

  17. The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prime, Michael B; Kastengren, Alan L

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

  18. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, Rick; Bluestein, Joel; Rodriguez, Nick; Knoke, Stu

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  19. Experimental assessment of unvalidated assumptions in classical plasticity theory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Burghardt, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Bronowski, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This report investigates the validity of several key assumptions in classical plasticity theory regarding material response to changes in the loading direction. Three metals, two rock types, and one ceramic were subjected to non-standard loading directions, and the resulting strain response increments were displayed in Gudehus diagrams to illustrate the approximation error of classical plasticity theories. A rigorous mathematical framework for fitting classical theories to the data, thus quantifying the error, is provided. Further data analysis techniques are presented that allow testing for the effect of changes in loading direction without having to use a new sample and for inferring the yield normal and flow directions without having to measure the yield surface. Though the data are inconclusive, there is indication that classical, incrementally linear, plasticity theory may be inadequate over a certain range of loading directions. This range of loading directions also coincides with loading directions that are known to produce a physically inadmissible instability for any nonassociative plasticity model.

  20. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the m{sub χ}−σ{sub n} plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the v{sub min}−g-tilde plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from v{sub min} to nuclear recoil momentum (p{sub R}), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call h-til-tilde(p{sub R}). The entire family of conventional halo-independent g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single h-tilde(p{sub R}) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in h-tilde(p{sub R}) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  1. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR),more » the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.« less

  2. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  3. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D.

    2010-03-09

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  4. The following data/assumptions will better address the LLW differences between t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data/assumptions will better address the LLW differences between the LEU option and the LEU/Th option of Alternative 1. 1. There is 397 kg fissile ( 233 U and 235 U) in the HTGR fuel. 2. Based on past experience of LLW to Nevada National Security Site, it is expected that the maximum quantity of fissile in a Type B shipping container (CASTOR cask) will be restricted to 1 kg. To protect a 1 kg maximum, it is assumed that 900 grams would be the maximum in a CASTOR cask. Therefore, from a fissile

  5. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015: Oil and Gas Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2016: Oil and Gas Working Group AEO2016 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis December 1, 2015| Washington, DC http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/workinggroup/ WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE We welcome feedback on our assumptions and documentation * The AEO Assumptions report http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/assumptions/

  6. Summary of Findings: Peer Review of the FY2001 GPRA Assumptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of Findings: Peer Review of the FY2001 GPRA Assumptions, Report to National Renewable Energy Laboratory, February 29, 2000.

  7. Summary of Findings: Peer Review of the FY2000 GPRA Assumptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of Findings: Peer Review of the FY2000 GPRA Assumptions, Report to National Renewable Energy Laboratory, March 1999.

  8. Summary of Findings: Peer Review of the FY2003 GPRA Assumptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of Findings: Peer Review of the FY ‘03 GPRA Assumptions, Report to National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Washington, D.C., April 3, 2002.

  9. A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

  10. Washington International Renewable Energy Conference (WIREC) 2008 Pledges. Methodology and Assumptions Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babiuch, Bill; Bilello, Daniel E.; Cowlin, Shannon C.; Mann, Margaret; Wise, Alison

    2008-08-01

    This report describes the methodology and assumptions used by NREL in quantifying the potential CO2 reductions resulting from more than 140 governments, international organizations, and private-sector representatives pledging to advance the uptake of renewable energy.

  11. NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2013-05-01

    This document provides key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions related to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions were extracted from a number of NGNP Project sources such as licensing related white papers, previously issued requirement documents, and preapplication interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  12. Analysis of the Effects of Compositional and Configurational Assumptions on Product Costs for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Mixed Alcohols – FY 2007 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine alternative biomass-to-ethanol conversion process assumptions and configuration options to determine their relative effects on overall process economics. A process-flow-sheet computer model was used to determine the heat and material balance for each configuration that was studied. The heat and material balance was then fed to a costing spreadsheet to determine the impact on the ethanol selling price. By examining a number of operational and configuration alternatives and comparing the results to the base flow sheet, alternatives having the greatest impact the performance and cost of the overall system were identified and used to make decisions on research priorities. This report, which was originally published in December 2008, has been revised primarily to correct information presented in Appendix B -- Base Case Flow Sheets and Model Results. The corrections to Appendix B include replacement of several pages in Table B.1 that duplicated previous pages of the table. Other changes were made in Appendix B to correct inconsistencies between stream labels presented in the tables and the stream labels in the figures.

  13. Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H.H.

    2001-07-11

    The HLW salt waste (salt cake and supernate) now stored at the SRS must be treated to remove insoluble sludge solids and reduce the soluble concentration of radioactive cesium radioactive strontium and transuranic contaminants (principally Pu and Np). These treatments will enable the salt solution to be processed for disposal as saltstone, a solid low-level waste.

  14. Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

    2009-12-03

    The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They

  15. Knowledge representation and the application of case-based reasoning in engineering design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhangal, J.S.; Esat, I.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is an assessment of the requirements in the application of Case-based Reasoning to Engineering Design. The methods in which a CBR system will assist a designer when he/she is presented with a problem specification and the various methods which need to be understood before attempting to build an such expert system are discussed here. The problem is two fold, firstly the methods of utilizing CBR are varied and secondly the method of representing the knowledge in design also needs to be established. How a design represented basically differs for each application and this is a decision which needs to be made when setting up the case memory but the methods used are discussed here. CBR itself can also be utilized in various ways and it has been seen from previous applications that a hybrid approach can produce the best results.

  16. Summary Of Findings Peer Review of the FY2001 GPRA Assumptions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Findings - Peer Review of the FY2001 GPRA Assumptions Report to National Renewable Energy Laboratory February 29, 2000 In response to TOA Number KDC-9-18631-00 Arthur D. Little, Inc. Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Reference 69393-01 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................................................................2

  17. External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N.

    1996-08-01

    This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

  18. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  19. Analysis of Modeling Assumptions used in Production Cost Models for Renewable Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoll, Brady; Brinkman, Gregory; Townsend, Aaron; Bloom, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Renewable energy integration studies have been published for many different regions exploring the question of how higher penetration of renewable energy will impact the electric grid. These studies each make assumptions about the systems they are analyzing; however the effect of many of these assumptions has not been yet been examined and published. In this paper we analyze the impact of modeling assumptions in renewable integration studies, including the optimization method used (linear or mixed-integer programming) and the temporal resolution of the dispatch stage (hourly or sub-hourly). We analyze each of these assumptions on a large and a small system and determine the impact of each assumption on key metrics including the total production cost, curtailment of renewables, CO2 emissions, and generator starts and ramps. Additionally, we identified the impact on these metrics if a four-hour ahead commitment step is included before the dispatch step and the impact of retiring generators to reduce the degree to which the system is overbuilt. We find that the largest effect of these assumptions is at the unit level on starts and ramps, particularly for the temporal resolution, and saw a smaller impact at the aggregate level on system costs and emissions. For each fossil fuel generator type we measured the average capacity started, average run-time per start, and average number of ramps. Linear programming results saw up to a 20% difference in number of starts and average run time of traditional generators, and up to a 4% difference in the number of ramps, when compared to mixed-integer programming. Utilizing hourly dispatch instead of sub-hourly dispatch saw no difference in coal or gas CC units for either start metric, while gas CT units had a 5% increase in the number of starts and 2% increase in the average on-time per start. The number of ramps decreased up to 44%. The smallest effect seen was on the CO2 emissions and total production cost, with a 0.8% and 0

  20. NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip Mills

    2012-02-01

    This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

  1. Microbes Disprove Long-Held Assumption that All Organisms Share a Common

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vocabulary | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Microbes Disprove Long-Held Assumption that All Organisms Share a Common Vocabulary Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy

  2. Analysis of Modeling Assumptions used in Production Cost Models for Renewable Integration Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Modeling Assumptions used in Production Cost Models for Renewable Integration Studies Brady Stoll, Gregory Brinkman, Aaron Townsend, and Aaron Bloom National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-65383 January 2016 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  3. Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

    2013-04-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

  4. An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2003-07-01

    Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical analyses and

  5. Model-based performance monitoring: Review of diagnostic methods and chiller case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haves, Phil; Khalsa, Sat Kartar

    2000-05-01

    The paper commences by reviewing the variety of technical approaches to the problem of detecting and diagnosing faulty operation in order to improve the actual performance of buildings. The review covers manual and automated methods, active testing and passive monitoring, the different classes of models used in fault detection, and methods of diagnosis. The process of model-based fault detection is then illustrated by describing the use of relatively simple empirical models of chiller energy performance to monitor equipment degradation and control problems. The CoolTools(trademark) chiller model identification package is used to fit the DOE-2 chiller model to on-site measurements from a building instrumented with high quality sensors. The need for simple algorithms to reject transient data, detect power surges and identify control problems is discussed, as is the use of energy balance checks to detect sensor problems. The accuracy with which the chiller model can be expected! to predict performance is assessed from the goodness of fit obtained and the implications for fault detection sensitivity and sensor accuracy requirements are discussed. A case study is described in which the model was applied retroactively to high-quality data collected in a San Francisco office building as part of a related project (Piette et al. 1999).

  6. Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

    2008-04-01

    There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

  7. Washington International Renewable Energy Conference 2008 Pledges: Methodology and Assumptions Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babiuch, B.; Bilello, D. E.; Cowlin, S. C.; Mann, M.; Wise, A.

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Washington International Renewable Energy Conference (WIREC) was held in Washington, D.C., from March 4-6, 2008, and involved nearly 9,000 people from 125 countries. The event brought together worldwide leaders in renewable energy (RE) from governments, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to discuss the role that renewables can play in alleviating poverty, growing economies, and passing on a healthy planet to future generations. The conference concluded with more than 140 governments, international organizations, and private-sector representatives pledging to advance the uptake of renewable energy. The U.S. government authorized the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the carbon dioxide (CO2) savings that would result from the pledges made at the 2008 conference. This report describes the methodology and assumptions used by NREL in quantifying the potential CO2 reductions derived from those pledges.

  8. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  9. Code cases for implementing risk-based inservice testing in the ASME OM code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Historically inservice testing has been reasonably effective, but quite costly. Recent applications of plant PRAs to the scope of the IST program have demonstrated that of the 30 pumps and 500 valves in the typical plant IST program, less than half of the pumps and ten percent of the valves are risk significant. The way the ASME plans to tackle this overly-conservative scope for IST components is to use the PRA and plant expert panels to create a two tier IST component categorization scheme. The PRA provides the quantitative risk information and the plant expert panel blends the quantitative and deterministic information to place the IST component into one of two categories: More Safety Significant Component (MSSC) or Less Safety Significant Component (LSSC). With all the pumps and valves in the IST program placed in MSSC or LSSC categories, two different testing strategies will be applied. The testing strategies will be unique for the type of component, such as centrifugal pump, positive displacement pump, MOV, AOV, SOV, SRV, PORV, HOV, CV, and MV. A series of OM Code Cases are being developed to capture this process for a plant to use. One Code Case will be for Component Importance Ranking. The remaining Code Cases will develop the MSSC and LSSC testing strategy for type of component. These Code Cases are planned for publication in early 1997. Later, after some industry application of the Code Cases, the alternative Code Case requirements will gravitate to the ASME OM Code as appendices.

  10. Technical considerations related to interim source-term assumptions for emergency planning and equipment qualification. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemczyk, S.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1982-09-01

    The source terms recommended in the current regulatory guidance for many considerations of light water reactor (LWR) accidents were developed a number of years ago when understandings of many of the phenomena pertinent to source term estimation were relatively primitive. The purpose of the work presented here was to develop more realistic source term assumptions which could be used for interim regulatory purposes for two specific considerations, namely, equipment qualification and emergency planning. The overall approach taken was to adopt assumptions and models previously proposed for various aspects of source term estimation and to modify those assumptions and models to reflect recently gained insights into, and data describing, the release and transport of radionuclides during and after LWR accidents. To obtain illustrative estimates of the magnitudes of the source terms, the results of previous calculations employing the adopted assumptions and models were utilized and were modified to account for the effects of the recent insights and data.

  11. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission key enabling assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1998-01-09

    An overall systems approach has been applied to develop action plans to support the retrieval and immobilization waste disposal mission. The review concluded that the systems and infrastructure required to support the mission are known. Required systems are either in place or plans have been developed. An analysis of the programmatic, management and technical activities necessary to declare Readiness to Proceed with execution of the mission demonstrates that the system, people, and hardware will be on line and ready to support the private contractors. The systems approach included defining the retrieval and immobilized waste disposal mission requirements and evaluating the readiness of the TWRS contractor to supply waste feed to the private contractors in June 2002. The Phase 1 feed delivery requirements from the Private Contractor Request for Proposals were reviewed, transfer piping routes were mapped on it, existing systems were evaluated, and upgrade requirements were defined. Technical Basis Reviews were completed to define work scope in greater detail, cost estimates and associated year by year financial analyses were completed. Personnel training, qualifications, management systems and procedures were reviewed and shown to be in place and ready to support the Phase 1B mission. Key assumptions and risks that could negatively impact mission success were evaluated and appropriate mitigative actions plans were planned and scheduled.

  12. Estimating Alarm Thresholds for Process Monitoring Data under Different Assumptions about the Data Generating Mechanism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Howell, John; Skurikhin, Misha; Ticknor, Larry; Weaver, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Process monitoring (PM) for nuclear safeguards sometimes requires estimation of thresholds corresponding to small false alarm rates. Threshold estimation dates to the 1920s with the Shewhart control chart; however, because possible new roles for PM are being evaluated in nuclear safeguards, it is timely to consider modern model selection options in the context of threshold estimation. One of the possible new PM roles involves PM residuals, where a residual is defined as residual = data − prediction. This paper reviews alarm threshold estimation, introduces model selection options, and considers a range of assumptions regarding the data-generating mechanism for PM residuals.more » Two PM examples from nuclear safeguards are included to motivate the need for alarm threshold estimation. The first example involves mixtures of probability distributions that arise in solution monitoring, which is a common type of PM. The second example involves periodic partial cleanout of in-process inventory, leading to challenging structure in the time series of PM residuals.« less

  13. Analysis of the Effects of Compositional and Configurational Assumptions on Product Costs for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Mixed Alcohols -- FY 2007 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

    2008-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine alternative biomass-to-ethanol conversion process assumptions and configuration options to determine their relative effects on overall process economics. A process-flow-sheet computer model was used to determine the heat and material balance for each configuration that was studied. The heat and material balance was then fed to a costing spreadsheet to determine the impact on the ethanol selling price. By examining a number of operational and configuration alternatives and comparing the results to the base flow sheet, alternatives having the greatest impact the performance and cost of the overall system were identified and used to make decisions on research priorities.

  14. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Setzer, R. Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in doseresponse assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the hybrid method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous doseresponse datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates. - Highlights: We investigate to what extent the distribution assumption can affect BMD estimates. Both real data analysis and simulation study are conducted. BMDs estimated using hybrid method are more sensitive to

  15. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission key enabling assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1998-01-05

    An overall systems approach has been applied to develop action plans to support the retrieval and immobilization waste disposal mission. The review concluded that the systems and infrastructure required to support the mission are known. Required systems are either in place or plans have been developed to ensure they exist when needed. The review showed that since October 1996 a robust system engineering approach to establishing integrated Technical Baselines, work breakdown structures, tank farm structure and configurations and work scope and costs has been established itself as part of the culture within TWRS. An analysis of the programmatic, management and technical activities necessary to declare readiness to proceed with execution of the mission demonstrates that the system, people and hardware will be on line and ready to support the private contractors. The systems approach included defining the retrieval and immobilized waste disposal mission requirements and evaluating the readiness of the TWRS contractor to supply waste feed to the private contractors in June 2OO2. The Phase 1 feed delivery requirements from the Private Contractor Request for Proposals were reviewed. Transfer piping routes were mapped out, existing systems were evaluated, and upgrade requirements were defined. Technical Basis Reviews were completed to define work scope in greater detail, cost estimates and associated year by year financial analyses were completed. TWRS personnel training, qualifications, management systems and procedures were reviewed and shown to be in place and ready to support the Phase 1B mission. Key assumptions and risks that could negatively impact mission success were evaluated and appropriate mitigative actions plans were planned and scheduled.

  16. Technical assumption for Mo-99 production in the MARIA reactor. Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroszewicz, J.; Pytel, K.; Dabkowski, L.; Krzysztoszek, G. [Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2008-07-15

    The main objective of U-235 irradiation is to obtain the Tc-99m isotope which is widely used in the domain of medical diagnostics. The decisive factor determining its availability, despite its short life time, is a reaction of radioactive decay of Mo-99 into Tc- 99m. One of the possible sources of molybdenum can be achieved in course of the U-235 fission reaction. The paper presents activities and the calculations results obtained upon the feasibility study on irradiation of U-235 targets for production of molybdenum in the MARIA reactor. The activities including technical assumption were focused on performing calculation for modelling of the target and irradiation device as well as adequate equipment and tools for processing in reactor. It has been assumed that the basic component of fuel charge is an aluminium cladded plate with dimensions of 40x230x1.45 containing 4.7 g U-235. The presumed mode of the heat removal generated in the fuel charge of the reactor primary cooling circuit influences the construction of installation to be used for irradiation and the technological instrumentation. The outer channel construction for irradiation has to be identical as the standard fuel channel construction of the MARIA reactor. It enables to use the existing slab and reactor mounting sockets for the fastening of the molybdenum channel as well as the cooling water delivery system. The measurement of water temperature cooling a fuel charge and control of water flow rate in the channel can also be carried out be means of the standard instrumentation of the reactor. (author)

  17. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  18. Electroproduction and gluonic production of J/{psi} mesons under the assumption of quark-hadron duality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhnoy, A. V. Likhoded, A. K.

    2008-02-15

    On the basis of the assumption of quark-hadron duality, it is shown that the color-singlet contribution to the cross sections for the processes e + g {sup {yields}} e + J/{psi} + g and gg {sup {yields}} J/{psi}g increases upon taking into account the relative motion of quarks in the J/{psi} meson.

  19. Electroproduction and gluonic production of J/{psi} mesons under the assumption of quark-hadron duality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhnoy, A. V.; Likhoded, A. K.

    2008-02-15

    On the basis of the assumption of quark-hadron duality, it is shown that the color-singlet contribution to the cross sections for the processes e + g {yields} e + J/{psi} + g and gg {yields} J/{psi}g increases upon taking into account the relative motion of quarks in the J/{psi} meson.

  20. Preliminary Review of Models, Assumptions, and Key Data used in Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur S. Rood; Swen O. Magnuson

    2009-07-01

    This document is in response to a request by Ming Zhu, DOE-EM to provide a preliminary review of existing models and data used in completed or soon to be completed Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses (PA/CA) documents, to identify codes, methodologies, main assumptions, and key data sets used.

  1. UXO detection and identification based on intrinsic target polarizabilities: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, E.; Smith, J.T.; Morrison, H.F.; Becker, A.; Kappler, K.

    2008-07-15

    Electromagnetic induction data parameterized in time dependent object intrinsic polarizabilities allow discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO) from false targets (scrap metal). Data from a cart-mounted system designed for discrimination of UXO with 20 mm to 155 mm diameters are used. Discrimination of UXO from irregular scrap metal is based on the principal dipole polarizabilities of a target. A near-intact UXO displays a single major polarizability coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal smaller transverse polarizabilities, whereas metal scraps have distinct polarizability signatures that rarely mimic those of elongated symmetric bodies. Based on a training data set of known targets, object identification was made by estimating the probability that an object is a single UXO. Our test survey took place on a military base where both 4.2-inch mortar shells and scrap metal were present. The results show that we detected and discriminated correctly all 4.2-inch mortars, and in that process we added 7%, and 17%, respectively, of dry holes (digging scrap) to the total number of excavations in two different survey modes. We also demonstrated a mode of operation that might be more cost effective than the current practice.

  2. Aminoindazole PDK1 Inhibitors: A Case Study in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Jesus R.; Blackledge, Charles W.; Heerding, Dirk A.; Campobasso, Nino; Ward, Paris; Briand, Jacques; Wright, Lois; Axten, Jeffrey M.

    2012-05-29

    Fragment screening of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) in a biochemical kinase assay afforded hits that were characterized and prioritized based on ligand efficiency and binding interactions with PDK1 as determined by NMR. Subsequent crystallography and follow-up screening led to the discovery of aminoindazole 19, a potent leadlike PDK1 inhibitor with high ligand efficiency. Well-defined structure-activity relationships and protein crystallography provide a basis for further elaboration and optimization of 19 as a PDK1 inhibitor.

  3. Lipid-Based Nanodiscs as Models for Studying Mesoscale Coalescence A Transport Limited Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Katsaras, John; Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-based nanodiscs (bicelles) are able to form in mixtures of long- and short-chain lipids. Initially, they are of uniform size but grow upon dilution. Previously, nanodisc growth kinetics have been studied using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering (SANS), a technique which is not well suited for probing their change in size immediately after dilution. To address this, we have used dynamic light scattering (DLS), a technique which permits the collection of useful data in a short span of time after dilution of the system. The DLS data indicate that the negatively charged lipids in nanodiscs play a significant role in disc stability and growth. Specifically, the charged lipids are most likely drawn out from the nanodiscs into solution, thereby reducing interparticle repulsion and enabling the discs to grow. We describe a population balance model, which takes into account Coulombic interactions and adequately predicts the initial growth of nanodiscs with a single parameter i.e., surface potential. The results presented here strongly support the notion that the disc coalescence rate strongly depends on nanoparticle charge density. The present system containing low-polydispersity lipid nanodiscs serves as a good model for understanding how charged discoidal micelles coalesce.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  5. A reevaluation of cancer incidence near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: The collision of evidence and assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wing, S.; Richardson, D.; Armstrong, D.; Crawford-Brown, D.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies concluded that there was no evidence that the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) affected cancer incidence in the surrounding area; however, there were logical and methodological problems in earlier reports that led us to reconsider data previously collected. A 10-mile area around TMI was divided into 69 study tracts, which were assigned radiation dose estimates based on radiation readings and models of atmospheric dispersion. Incident cancers from 1975 to 1985 were ascertained from hospital records and assigned to study tracts. Associations between accident doses and incidence rates of leukemia, lung cancer, and all cancer were assessed using relative dose estimates calculated by the earlier investigators. Adjustments were made for age, sex, socioeconomic characteristics, and preaccident variation in incidence. Considering a 2-year latency, the estimated percent increase per dose unit {plus_minus} standard error was 0.020 {plus_minus} 0.012 for all cancer, 0.082 {plus_minus} 0.032 for lung cancer, and 0.116 {plus_minus} 0.067 for leukemia. Adjustment for socioeconomic variables increased the estimates to 0.034 {plus_minus} 0.013, 0.103 {plus_minus} 0.035, and 0.139 {plus_minus} 0.073 for all cancer, lung cancer, and leukemia, respectively. Associations were generally larger considering a 5-year latency, but were based on smaller numbers of cases. Results support the hypothesis that radiation doses are related to increased cancer incidence around TMI. The analysis avoids medical detection bias, but suffers from inaccurate dose classification; therefore, results may underestimate the magnitude of the association between radiation and cancer incidence. These associations would not be expected, based on previous estimates of near-background levels of radiation exposure following the accident. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Intercomparison of Large-eddy Simulations of Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds: Importance of Ice Size Distribution Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alex; Cheng, Anning; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Ghan, Steven J.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Korolev, Alexei; McFarquhar, Greg; Morrison, H.; Paukert, Marco; Savre, Julien; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Solomon, Amy; Sulia, Kara

    2014-03-14

    Large-eddy simulations of mixed-phase Arctic clouds by 11 different models are analyzed with the goal of improving understanding and model representation of processes controlling the evolution of these clouds. In a case based on observations from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), it is found that ice number concentration, Ni, exerts significant influence on the cloud structure. Increasing Ni leads to a substantial reduction in liquid water path (LWP) and potential cloud dissipation, in agreement with earlier studies. By comparing simulations with the same microphysics coupled to different dynamical cores as well as the same dynamics coupled to different microphysics schemes, it is found that the ice water path (IWP) is mainly controlled by ice microphysics, while the inter-model differences in LWP are largely driven by physics and numerics of the dynamical cores. In contrast to previous intercomparisons, all models here use the same ice particle properties (i.e., mass-size, mass-fall speed, and mass-capacitance relationships) and a common radiation parameterization. The constrained setup exposes the importance of ice particle size distributions (PSD) in influencing cloud evolution. A clear separation in LWP and IWP predicted by models with bin and bulk microphysical treatments is documented and attributed primarily to the assumed shape of ice PSD used in bulk schemes. Compared to the bin schemes that explicitly predict the PSD, schemes assuming exponential ice PSD underestimate ice growth by vapor deposition and overestimate mass-weighted fall speed leading to an underprediction of IWP by a factor of two in the considered case.

  7. Optimized periodic verification testing blended risk and performance-based MOV inservice test program an application of ASME code case OMN-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellers, C.; Fleming, K.; Bidwell, D.; Forbes, P.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents an application of ASME Code Case OMN-1 to the GL 89-10 Program at the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS). Code Case OMN-1 provides guidance for a performance-based MOV inservice test program that can be used for periodic verification testing and allows consideration of risk insights. Blended probabilistic and deterministic evaluation techniques were used to establish inservice test strategies including both test methods and test frequency. Described in the paper are the methods and criteria for establishing MOV safety significance based on the STPEGS probabilistic safety assessment, deterministic considerations of MOV performance characteristics and performance margins, the expert panel evaluation process, and the development of inservice test strategies. Test strategies include a mix of dynamic and static testing as well as MOV exercising.

  8. The Milling Assistant, Case-Based Reasoning, and machining strategy: A report on the development of automated numerical control programming systems at New Mexico State University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burd, W.; Culler, D.; Eskridge, T.; Cox, L.; Slater, T.

    1993-08-01

    The Milling Assistant (MA) programming system demonstrates the automated development of tool paths for Numerical Control (NC) machine tools. By integrating a Case-Based Reasoning decision processor with a commercial CAD/CAM software, intelligent tool path files for milled and point-to-point features can be created. The operational system is capable of reducing the time required to program a variety of parts and improving product quality by collecting and utilizing ``best of practice`` machining strategies.

  9. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. The Role Of Modeling Assumptions And Policy Instruments in Evaluating The Global Implications Of U.S. Biofuel Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Kline, Keith L

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of current U.S. biofuel law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) is to reduce dependence on imported oil, but the law also requires biofuels to meet carbon emission reduction thresholds relative to petroleum fuels. EISA created a renewable fuel standard with annual targets for U.S. biofuel use that climb gradually from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36 billion gallons (or about 136 billion liters) of biofuels per year by 2022. The most controversial aspects of the biofuel policy have centered on the global social and environmental implications of its potential land use effects. In particular, there is an ongoing debate about whether indirect land use change (ILUC) make biofuels a net source, rather sink, of carbon emissions. However, estimates of ILUC induced by biofuel production and use can only be inferred through modeling. This paper evaluates how model structure, underlying assumptions, and the representation of policy instruments influence the results of U.S. biofuel policy simulations. The analysis shows that differences in these factors can lead to divergent model estimates of land use and economic effects. Estimates of the net conversion of forests and grasslands induced by U.S. biofuel policy range from 0.09 ha/1000 gallons described in this paper to 0.73 ha/1000 gallons from early studies in the ILUC change debate. We note that several important factors governing LUC change remain to be examined. Challenges that must be addressed to improve global land use change modeling are highlighted.

  11. Analyzing simulation-based PRA data through traditional and topological clustering: A BWR station blackout case study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maljovec, D.; Liu, S.; Wang, B.; Mandelli, D.; Bremer, P. -T.; Pascucci, V.; Smith, C.

    2015-07-14

    Here, dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP and MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN and ADAPT). Whereas system simulator codes model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic and operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures and parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by sampling values of a set of parameters and simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values. For complex systems, a major challenge in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large number of scenarios generated,more » where clustering techniques are typically employed to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of two nuclear simulation datasets that are part of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) boiling water reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We provide the domain experts a software tool that encodes traditional and topological clustering techniques within an interactive analysis and visualization environment, for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other for enhanced structural understanding of the data.« less

  12. Analyzing simulation-based PRA data through traditional and topological clustering: A BWR station blackout case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maljovec, D.; Liu, S.; Wang, B.; Mandelli, D.; Bremer, P. -T.; Pascucci, V.; Smith, C.

    2015-07-14

    Here, dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP and MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN and ADAPT). Whereas system simulator codes model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic and operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures and parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by sampling values of a set of parameters and simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values. For complex systems, a major challenge in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large number of scenarios generated, where clustering techniques are typically employed to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of two nuclear simulation datasets that are part of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) boiling water reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We provide the domain experts a software tool that encodes traditional and topological clustering techniques within an interactive analysis and visualization environment, for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other for enhanced structural understanding of the data.

  13. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-end NGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomicsmore » system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.« less

  14. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-end NGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomics system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.

  15. Emulating a System Dynamics Model with Agent-Based Models: A Methodological Case Study in Simulation of Diabetes Progression

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schryver, Jack; Nutaro, James; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2015-10-30

    An agent-based simulation model hierarchy emulating disease states and behaviors critical to progression of diabetes type 2 was designed and implemented in the DEVS framework. The models are translations of basic elements of an established system dynamics model of diabetes. In this model hierarchy, which mimics diabetes progression over an aggregated U.S. population, was dis-aggregated and reconstructed bottom-up at the individual (agent) level. Four levels of model complexity were defined in order to systematically evaluate which parameters are needed to mimic outputs of the system dynamics model. Moreover, the four estimated models attempted to replicate stock counts representing disease statesmore » in the system dynamics model, while estimating impacts of an elderliness factor, obesity factor and health-related behavioral parameters. Health-related behavior was modeled as a simple realization of the Theory of Planned Behavior, a joint function of individual attitude and diffusion of social norms that spread over each agent s social network. Although the most complex agent-based simulation model contained 31 adjustable parameters, all models were considerably less complex than the system dynamics model which required numerous time series inputs to make its predictions. In all three elaborations of the baseline model provided significantly improved fits to the output of the system dynamics model. The performances of the baseline agent-based model and its extensions illustrate a promising approach to translate complex system dynamics models into agent-based model alternatives that are both conceptually simpler and capable of capturing main effects of complex local agent-agent interactions.« less

  16. Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Multi-facility Workflow Case Study News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Case Studies Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Multi-facility Workflow Case Study Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638

  17. Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto

    2011-01-15

    The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

  18. Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-18

    This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a `snapshot` or `base case` look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future.

  19. Dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces: Tests of dynamical assumptions using quantum models and ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Bret; Nattino, Francesco; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2014-08-07

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces is of great practical and fundamental importance. Not only is it the rate-limiting step in the steam reforming of natural gas, the reaction exhibits interesting mode-selective behavior and a strong dependence on the temperature of the metal. We present a quantum model for this reaction on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces based on the reaction path Hamiltonian. The dissociative sticking probabilities computed using this model agree well with available experimental data with regard to variation with incident energy, substrate temperature, and the vibrational state of the incident molecule. We significantly expand the vibrational basis set relative to earlier studies, which allows reaction probabilities to be calculated for doubly excited initial vibrational states, though it does not lead to appreciable changes in the reaction probabilities for singly excited initial states. Sudden models used to treat the center of mass motion parallel to the surface are compared with results from ab initio molecular dynamics and found to be reasonable. Similar comparisons for molecular rotation suggest that our rotationally adiabatic model is incorrect, and that sudden behavior is closer to reality. Such a model is proposed and tested. A model for predicting mode-selective behavior is tested, with mixed results, though we find it is consistent with experimental studies of normal vs. total (kinetic) energy scaling. Models for energy transfer into lattice vibrations are also examined.

  20. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  1. Development of a tool dedicated to the evaluation of hydrogen term source for technological Wastes: assumptions, physical models, and validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamouroux, C.

    2013-07-01

    In radioactive waste packages hydrogen is generated, in one hand, from the radiolysis of wastes (mainly organic materials) and, in the other hand, from the radiolysis of water content in the cement matrix. In order to assess hydrogen generation 2 tools based on operational models have been developed. One is dedicated to the determination of the hydrogen source term issues from the radiolysis of the wastes: the STORAGE tool (Simulation Tool Of Emission Radiolysis Gas), the other deals with the hydrogen source term gas, produced by radiolysis of the cement matrices (the Damar tool). The approach used by the STORAGE tool for assessing the production rate of radiolysis gases is divided into five steps: 1) Specification of the data packages, in particular, inventories and radiological materials defined for a package medium; 2) Determination of radiochemical yields for the different constituents and the laws of behavior associated, this determination of radiochemical yields is made from the PRELOG database in which radiochemical yields in different irradiation conditions have been compiled; 3) Definition of hypothesis concerning the composition and the distribution of contamination inside the package to allow assessment of the power absorbed by the constituents; 4) Sum-up of all the contributions; And finally, 5) validation calculations by comparison with a reduced sampling of packages. Comparisons with measured values confirm the conservative character of the methodology and give confidence in the safety margins for safety analysis report.

  2. Validation of the materials-process-product model (coal SNG). [Estimating method for comparing processes, changing assumptions and technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albanese, A.; Bhagat, N.; Friend, L.; Lamontagne, J.; Pouder, R.; Vinjamuri, G.

    1980-03-01

    The use of coal as a source of high Btu gas is currently viewed as one possible means of supplementing dwindling natural gas supplies. While certain coal gasification processes have demonstrated technical feasibility, much uncertainty and inconsistency remains regarding the capital and operating costs of large scale coal conversion facilities; cost estimates may vary by as much as 50%. Studies conducted for the American Gas Association (AGA) and US Energy Research and Development Administration by C.F. Braun and Co. have defined technical specifications and cost guidelines for estimating costs of coal gasification technologies (AGA Guidelines). Based on the AGA Guidelines, Braun has also prepared cost estimates for selected coal gasification processes. Recent efforts by International Research and Technology Inc. (IR and T) have led to development of the Materials-Process-Product Model (MPPM), a comprehensive anaytic tool for evaluation of processes and costs for coal gasification and other coal conversion technologies. This validation of the MPPM presents a comparison of engineering and cost computation methodologies employed in the MPPM to those employed by Braun and comparison of MPPM results to Braun cost estimates. These comparisons indicate that the MPPM has the potential to be a valuable tool for assisting in the evaluation of coal gasification technologies.

  3. Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following case studies are examples of integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction and major renovation projects. Additional renewable energy case studies are also available.

  4. BBRN Factsheet: Case Study: Community Engagement | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Case Study: Community Engagement, on the Community Home Energy Retrofit Project (CHERP), based in Claremont, California. Case Study: Community Engagement (197.35 KB) More Documents ...

  5. Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Case Studies Case Studies The following case studies will be included in the HEP report. Final case studies are due January 7, 2013. Lattice Gauge Theories - Lead: Doug Toussaint Simulations for Cosmic Frontier Experiments - Leads: Peter Nugent & Andrew Connelly Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis - Lead: Julian Borrill Cosmological Simulations - Lead: Salman Habib Plasma Accelerator Simulation Using Laser and Particle Beam Drivers - Leads: Cameron Geddes & Frank Tsung Community

  6. Application Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies Application Case Studies NERSC staff along with engineers have worked with NESAP applications to prepare for the Cori-Phase 2 system based on the Xeon Phi "Knights Landing" processor. We document the several optimization case studies below. Our presentations at ISC 16 IXPUG Workshop can all be found: https://www.ixpug.org/events/ixpug-isc-2016 Other pages of interest for those wishing to learn optimization strategies of Cori Phase 2 (Knights Landing): Getting Started Measuring

  7. DOE BiomassDevelopment and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header RDD Review Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header March 25, 2015 Terrestrial Feedstocks Timothy A. Volk SUNY ESF This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement * Develop, test and deploy a single pass cut and chip harvester combined with a handling, transportation and storage system that is effective and efficient in a range of

  8. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanh, Vo Hong; Priami, Corrado

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  9. SU-E-T-129: Dosimetric Evaluation of the Impact of Density Correction On Dose Calculation of Breast Cancer Treatment: A Study Based On RTOG 1005 Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J; Yu, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: RTOG 1005 requires density correction in the dose calculation of breast cancer radiation treatment. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of density correction on the dose calculation. Methods: Eight cases were studied, which were planned on an XiO treatment planning system with pixel-by-pixel density correction using a superposition algorithm, following RTOG 1005 protocol requirements. Four were protocol Arm 1 (standard whole breast irradiation with sequential boost) cases and four were Arm 2 (hypofractionated whole breast irradiation with concurrent boost) cases. The plans were recalculated with the same monitor units without density correction. Dose calculations with and without density correction were compared. Results: Results of Arm 1 and Arm 2 cases showed similar trends in the comparison. The average differences between the calculations with and without density correction (difference = Without - With) among all the cases were: -0.82 Gy (range: -2.65??0.18 Gy) in breast PTV Eval D95, ?0.75 Gy (range: ?1.23?0.26 Gy) in breast PTV Eval D90, ?1.00 Gy (range: ?2.46??0.29 Gy) in lumpectomy PTV Eval D95, ?0.78 Gy (range: ?1.30?0.11 Gy) in lumpectomy PTV Eval D90, ?0.43% (range: ?0.95??0.14%) in ipsilateral lung V20, ?0.81% (range: ?1.62??0.26%) in V16, ?1.95% (range: ?4.13??0.84%) in V10, ?2.64% (?5.55??1.04%) in V8, ?4.19% (range: ?6.92??1.81%) in V5, and ?4.95% (range: ?7.49??2.01%) in V4, respectively. The differences in other normal tissues were minimal. Conclusion: The effect of density correction was observed in breast target doses (an average increase of ?1 Gy in D95 and D90, compared to the calculation without density correction) and exposed ipsilateral lung volumes in low dose region (average increases of ?4% and ?5% in V5 and V4, respectively)

  10. Building America Case Study: Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology, Clovis, California (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology Clovis, California PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Field Trial of an Aerosol- Based Enclosure Sealing Technology Location: Clovis, CA Partners: De Young Properties deyoungproperties.com Building America Team: Alliance for Residential Building Innovation; Western Cooling Efficiency Center, University of California-Davis arbi.davisenergy.com wcec.ucdavis.edu Building Component: Building envelope Application: New, single-family Year Tested:

  11. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Colon, Carlos Jové; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-08

    Radioactive waste disposal in a deep subsurface repository hosted in clay/shale/argillite is a subject of widespread interest given the desirable isolation properties, geochemically reduced conditions, and widespread geologic occurrence of this rock type (Hansen 2010; Bianchi et al. 2013). Bianchi et al. (2013) provides a description of diffusion in a clay-hosted repository based on single-phase flow and full saturation using parametric data from documented studies in Europe (e.g., ANDRA 2005). The predominance of diffusive transport and sorption phenomena in this clay media are key attributes to impede radionuclide mobility making clay rock formations target sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The reports by Hansen et al. (2010) and those from numerous studies in clay-hosted underground research laboratories (URLs) in Belgium, France and Switzerland outline the extensive scientific knowledge obtained to assess long-term clay/shale/argillite repository isolation performance of nuclear waste. In the past several years under the UFDC, various kinds of models have been developed for argillite repository to demonstrate the model capability, understand the spatial and temporal alteration of the repository, and evaluate different scenarios. These models include the coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models (e.g. Liu et al. 2013; Rutqvist et al. 2014a, Zheng et al. 2014a) that focus on THMC processes in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) bentonite and argillite host hock, the large scale hydrogeologic model (Bianchi et al. 2014) that investigates the hydraulic connection between an emplacement drift and surrounding hydrogeological units, and Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) models (Greenberg et al. 2013) that evaluate thermal evolution in the host rock approximated as a thermal conduction process to facilitate the analysis of design options. However, the assumptions and the

  12. Evaluation of moist processes during intense precipitation in km-scale NWP models using remote sensing and in-situ data: Impact of microphysics size distribution assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanWeverberg, K.; vanLipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of moist processes and surface precipitation during three extreme precipitation events over Belgium to the representation of rain, snow and hail size distributions in a bulk one-moment microphysics parameterisation scheme. Sensitivities included the use of empirically derived relations to calculate the slope parameter and diagnose the intercept parameter of the exponential snow and rain size distributions and sensitivities to the treatment of hail/graupel. A detailed evaluation of the experiments against various high temporal resolution and spatially distributed observational data was performed to understand how moist processes responded to the implemented size distribution modifications. Net vapor consumption by microphysical processes was found to be unaffected by snow or rain size distribution modifications, while it was reduced replacing formulations for hail by those typical for graupel, mainly due to intense sublimation of graupel. Cloud optical thickness was overestimated in all experiments and all cases, likely due to overestimated snow amounts. The overestimation slightly deteriorated by modifying the rain and snow size distributions due to increased snow depositional growth, while it was reduced by including graupel. The latter was mainly due to enhanced cloud water collection by graupel and reduced snow depositional growth. Radar reflectivity and cloud optical thickness could only be realistically represented by inclusion of graupel during a stratiform case, while hail was found indispensable to simulate the vertical reflectivity profile and the surface precipitation structure. Precipitation amount was not much altered by any of the modifications made and the general overestimation was only decreased slightly during a supercell convective case.

  13. NORASCO Case Engineering Group JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NORASCO Case Engineering Group JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: NORASCO & Case Engineering Group JV Place: India Sector: Solar Product: India-based JV developer of small solar...

  14. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  15. Recirculating industrial air: The impact on air compliance and workers. Safety case study: Hill Air Force Base C-130 painting operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaPuma, P.T.

    1998-06-29

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment resulted in new environmental regulations called the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Industries such as painting facilities may have to treat large volumes of air, which drives the cost of an air control system. Recirculating a portion of the air back into the facility is an option to reduce the amount of air to be treated. A guided computer model written in Microsoft Excel 97% is developed to analyze worker safety and compliance costs with a focus on recirculation. The model has a chemical database containing over 1300 chemicals and requires inputs such as tasks performed, hazardous products used, and chemical make-up of the products. The model will predict indoor air concentrations in relation to occupational exposure limits (OELs). A case study is performed on a C-130 aircraft painting facility at Hill AFB, UT. The Aerospace NESHAP requires air pollution reductions in aircraft painting operations. The model predicts strontium chromate concentrations found in primer paints will reach 1000 times the OEL. Strontium chromate and other solid particulates are nearly unaffected by recirculation because the air is filtered prior to recirculation. The next highest chemical, hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), increases from 2.6 to 10.5 times the OEL at 0% and 75% recirculation, respectively. Due to the level of respiratory protection required for the strontium chromate, workers are well protected from the modest increases in concentrations caused by recirculating 75%. The initial cost of a VOC control system with no recirculation is $4.5 million and $1.8 million at 75% recirculation. To decide the best operating conditions for a facility, all options such as product substitution, operational changes or recirculation should be explored. The model is an excellent tool to evaluate these options.

  16. How do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jethva, Hiren T.; Torres, Omar; Waquet, Fabien; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yong X.

    2014-01-15

    We inter-compare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, and OMI. These sensors have shown independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds--a kind of situation often found over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532-nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is largely underestimated; however, it’s 1064-nm AOD when converted to 500 nm shows closer agreement to the passive sensors. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, the close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to lack of adequate direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD retrievals remains an open challenge. The inter-satellite comparison, however, can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check.

  17. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  18. A GIS-based Adaptive Management Decision Support System to Develop a Multi-Objective Framework: A case study utilizing GIS technologies and physically-based models to archieve improved decision making for site management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Lane, Leonard J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Roberts, Damon

    2008-06-26

    The notion of Adaptive Management (AM) allows for the realization and adjustment of management practices in response to elements of uncertainty. In terms of natural resource management, this will typically integrate monitoring, databases, simulation modeling, decision theory, and expert judgment to evaluate management alternatives and adapt them as necessary to continually improve the natural resource condition as defined by the stakeholders. Natural resource management scenarios can often be expressed, viewed, and understood as a spatial and temporal problem. The integration of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies and physically-based models provide an effective state-of-the-art solution for deriving, understanding, and applying AM scenarios for land use and remediation. A recently developed GIS-based adaptive management decision support system is presented for the U.S. Department of Defense Yakima Training Center near Yakima, Washington.

  19. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy

    2014-10-03

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  20. On the applicability of surrogate-based MCMC-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at Flux tower sites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Ren, Huiying; Liu, Ying; Swiler, Laura

    2016-06-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesianmore » model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically-average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. Lastly, analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.« less

  1. Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985 and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands are forecast as well as the impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration using a set of energy technology assumptions. (DMC)

  2. Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions. (DMC)

  3. Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions.

  4. Thermo-hydraulic Simulation of Pressurizer in Transient Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardeshir, A.T.; Nematollahi, M.; Sepanloo, K.; Daneshvari, F.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a simulation of the pressure adjustment in the primary loop of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). A mathematical model is developed for the thermo-hydraulic behavior of pressurizer in transient cases (surge in or out) on the basis of concept of conservation of mass and energy in two phases. No restrictive assumptions have been made. A comparison with RELAP5/Mod3.2 data indicates good overall agreement. The model can be used as a good design verification tool for pressurizer vessels and associated pressure control devices. (authors)

  5. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    for many years as utilities make investments to replace aging or failing equipment. Smart grid technologies also have the potential to reduce peak demand through the...

  6. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    00 Appendix A: Handling of federal and selected state legislation and regulations in the AEO Residential sector Legislation Brief description AEO handling Basis A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (NAECA87) Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for various appliance categories with periodic updates Include categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast Public Law 100-12 a. Room air conditioners Sets standards for room air conditioners

  7. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Demand Module (CDM) generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation, manufacturing, or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining, or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within

  8. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    47 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing

  9. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. How fast the economy grows, as measured by either growth in gross domestic product or industrial shipments, is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets

  10. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    47 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through a regional interstate representative pipeline network, for both a peak (December through March) and off-peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the

  11. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule [93], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Oil and Gas

  12. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has six submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, and wind [115]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid

  13. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    72 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 pounds gross

  14. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Little or no coal-fired capacity exists for the EMM plant types with mercury and carbon control configurations; therefore, estimates were not developed for those plant types. These ...

  15. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... for imported coal-fired generation from the Four Corners, Navajo, Reid Gardner, San Juan, and Boardman plants and the retirement of the Intermountain plant in 2025. September ...

  16. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... when evaluating investments in new coal-fired power plants, new coal-to-liquids (CTL) ...kilowatthour (kWh) for electricity produced in the first 10 years of plant operation. ...

  17. Technology Deployment Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find technology deployment case studies below. Click on each individual project link to see the full case study. You can also view a map of technology deployment case studies.

  18. Science DMZ Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU Science DMZ @ Penn & VTTI Science DMZ @ NOAA Science DMZ @ NERSC Science DMZ @ ALS Multi-facility Workflow Case Study News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Case Studies » Science DMZ Case Studies Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science

  19. Before a Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

  20. Rate Case Elements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceeding Rate Information Residential Exchange Program Surplus Power Sales Reports Rate Case Elements BPA's rate cases are decided "on the record." That is, in making a decision...

  1. BP-12 Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  2. BP-16 Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  3. OSCARS Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS & JGI Science DMZ Case Studies Multi-facility Workflow Case Study News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet...

  4. BBRN Factsheet: Case Study: Community Engagement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BBRN Factsheet: Case Study: Community Engagement BBRN Factsheet: Case Study: Community Engagement Case Study: Community Engagement, on the Community Home Energy Retrofit Project (CHERP), based in Claremont, California. Case Study: Community Engagement (197.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | December 2015 Better Buildings Training Toolkit Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2015

  5. On the Impact of Execution Models: A Case Study in Computational Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2015-05-25

    Efficient utilization of high-performance computing (HPC) platforms is an important and complex problem. Execution models, abstract descriptions of the dynamic runtime behavior of the execution stack, have significant impact on the utilization of HPC systems. Using a computational chemistry kernel as a case study and a wide variety of execution models combined with load balancing techniques, we explore the impact of execution models on the utilization of an HPC system. We demonstrate a 50 percent improvement in performance by using work stealing relative to a more traditional static scheduling approach. We also use a novel semi-matching technique for load balancing that has comparable performance to a traditional hypergraph-based partitioning implementation, which is computationally expensive. Using this study, we found that execution model design choices and assumptions can limit critical optimizations such as global, dynamic load balancing and finding the correct balance between available work units and different system and runtime overheads. With the emergence of multi- and many-core architectures and the consequent growth in the complexity of HPC platforms, we believe that these lessons will be beneficial to researchers tuning diverse applications on modern HPC platforms, especially on emerging dynamic platforms with energy-induced performance variability.

  6. Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-07-27

    Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

  7. Comparison of horizontal load transfer curves for laterally loaded piles from strain gages and slope inclinometer: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, P.L.; Anderson, B.; Townsend, F.C.

    1999-07-01

    Laterally loaded deep foundations are commonly analyzed using the Winkler model with the soil-pile interaction modeled through nonlinear springs in the form of p-y curves. Computer programs such as FloridaPier and COM624P use default p-y curves when performing lateral analyses. These curves are based on input soil properties such as subgrade modulus, friction angle, undrained shear strength, etc. Soil properties must be deduced by laboratory testing or correlation to in situ test results. This is a source of uncertainty. In a few cases, lateral load tests are performed on instrumented piles, and the validity of such assumptions can be assessed. Test piles are commonly instrumented with strain gages and/or inclinometers. P-y curves can be back computed from these data, and the curves obtained with the two methods should agree closely. Results from a field test on a concrete pile are presented and the critical factors for the analysis are discussed. One added difficulty with concrete is its nonlinear behavior particularly near structural failure. The curves obtained are also compared with those developed from the Dilatometer/Cone Pressuremeter Test and the Standard Penetration Test.

  8. Upper Subcritical Calculations Based on Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobes, Vladimir; Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don; Marshall, William BJ J; Scaglione, John M; Dunn, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute and American Nuclear Society standard for Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations defines the upper subcritical limit (USL) as “a limit on the calculated k-effective value established to ensure that conditions calculated to be subcritical will actually be subcritical.” Often, USL calculations are based on statistical techniques that infer information about a nuclear system of interest from a set of known/well-characterized similar systems. The work in this paper is part of an active area of research to investigate the way traditional trending analysis is used in the nuclear industry, and in particular, the research is assessing the impact of the underlying assumption that the experimental data being analyzed for USL calculations are statistically independent. In contrast, the multiple experiments typically used for USL calculations can be correlated because they are often performed at the same facilities using the same materials and measurement techniques. This paper addresses this issue by providing a set of statistical inference methods to calculate the bias and bias uncertainty based on the underlying assumption that the experimental data are correlated. Methods to quantify these correlations are the subject of a companion paper and will not be discussed here. The newly proposed USL methodology is based on the assumption that the integral experiments selected for use in the establishment of the USL are sufficiently applicable and that experimental correlations are known. Under the assumption of uncorrelated data, the new methods collapse directly to familiar USL equations currently used. We will demonstrate our proposed methods on real data and compare them to calculations of currently used methods such as USLSTATS and NUREG/CR-6698. Lastly, we will also demonstrate the effect experiment correlations can have on USL calculations.

  9. EMGEO Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EMGEO Case Study EMGEO Case Study June 20, 2016 Background EMGeo is composed of two geophysical imaging applications: one for subsurface imaging using electromagnetic data and another using seismic data. Although the applications model different physics (Maxwell's equations in one case, the elastic wave equation in another) they have much in common. We focus on the more involved part for solving the forward pass of the inverse scattering for the seismic part. The code takes advantage of

  10. OSCARS Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Read More... OSCARS Case Study...

  11. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014...

  12. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu) Sector and source...

  13. Fuel Cell Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Leader, Sustainable Engineering, Maintenance & Energy Management Whole Foods Market, Inc. Fuel Cell Case Study 2 Holistic Approach from Development to Operation WFM Energy ...

  14. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G.; MacDonald, M.

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  15. The Business Case for SEP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Business Case for SEP The Business Case for SEP Superior Energy Performance logo Facilities pursue certification to Superior Energy Performance® (SEP(tm)) to achieve an attractive return on investment while enhancing sustainability. The business case for SEP is based on detailed accounts from facilities that have implemented ISO 50001 and SEP. Gain an insider's view from these pioneers. Read the cost-benefit analysis and case studies, and view videos and presentations. Cost-Benefit Analysis

  16. Better Buildings Case Competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and Investment Authority, the nation's first green bank, where I'm helping apply insights from our team's case proposals." -John D'Agostino Yale Team, 2013 9 2014 Closing ...

  17. EMGeo Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods (QMR in one case, and IDR in the other), both solvers are dominated by memory bandwidth intensive operations like sparse matrix-vector multiply (SpMV), dot...

  18. Early application case studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early application case studies Early application case studies The Babbage test system was used to study representative applications and kernels in various scientific fields to gain experience with the challenges and strategies needed to optimize code performance on the MIC architecture. Below we highlight a few examples: BerkeleyGW The BerkeleyGW package is a materials science application that calculates electronic and optical properties with quantitative accuracy, a critical need in materials

  19. VASP Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VASP Case Study VASP Case Study Code description and computational problem The Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) [1-2] is a widely used materials science application for performing ab-initio electronic structure calculations and quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using pseudopotentials or the projector-augmented wave method and a plane wave basis set. VASP computes an approximate solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation, either within the Density Functional

  20. WARP Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WARP Case Study WARP Case Study Background WARP is an accelerator code that is used to conduct detailed simulations of particle accelerators, among other high energy physics applications. It is a so-called Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code that solves for the motion of charged particles acted upon by electric and magnetic forces. The particle motion is computed in a Lagrangian sense, following individual particles. The electric and magnetic fields acting on the particle are considered to be Eulerian

  1. CESM Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CESM Case Study CESM Case Study CESM MG2 Kernel Code Description The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a coupled multi-physics code which consists of multiple model components: Atmosphere, Ocean, Sea-ice, Land-ice, Land, River Runoff, and Coupler. During the course of a CESM run, the model components integrate forward in time, periodically stopping to exchange information with the coupler. The active (dynamical) components are generally fully prognostic, and they are state-of-the-art

  2. Single casing reheat turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsushima, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Shigeo

    1999-07-01

    For conventional power plants, regenerative reheat steam turbines have been accepted as the most practical method to meet the demand for efficient and economical power generation. Recently the application of reheat steam turbines for combined cycle power plant began according to the development of large-capacity high temperature gas turbine. The two casing double flow turbine has been applied for this size of reheat steam turbine. The single casing reheat turbine can offer economical and compact power plant. Through development of HP-LP combined rotor and long LP blading series, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. had developed a single casing reheat steam turbine series and began to use it in actual plants. Six units are already in operation and another seven units are under manufacturing. Multiple benefits of single casing reheat turbine are smaller space requirements, shorter construction and erection period, equally good performance, easier operation and maintenance, shorter overhaul period, smaller initial investment, lower transportation expense and so on. Furthermore, single exhaust steam turbine makes possible to apply axial exhaust type, which will lower the height of T/G foundation and T/G housing. The single casing reheat turbine has not only compact and economical configuration itself but also it can reduce the cost of civil construction. In this paper, major developments and design features of the single casing reheat turbine are briefly discussed and operating experience, line-up and technical consideration for performance improvement are presented.

  3. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release: Annotated Summary of Two Cases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Early Release: Annotated Summary of Two Cases May 17, 2016 The Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) Early Release features two cases: the Reference case and a case excluding implementation of the Clean Power Plan (CPP) Reference case: A business-as-usual trend estimate, given known technology and technological and demographic trends. The Reference case assumes CPP compliance through mass-based standards that establish caps on CO2 emissions from fossil-fired generators covered by the CPP. The

  4. A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TOOL Name: A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector:...

  5. MFDn Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MFDn Case Study MFDn Case Study Description of MFDn Many-Fermion Dynamics---nuclear, or MFDn, is a configuration interaction (CI) code for nuclear structure calculations. It is a platform independent Fortran 90 code using a hybrid MPI/ OpenMP programming model,and is being used on current supercomputers, such as Edison at NERSC, for ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleons and three-nucleon forces. A calculation consists of generating a many-body basis space,

  6. In Case of Emergency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Case of Emergency In Case of Emergency Print Fire/Police Emergency: ext. 7911 Cell phone or off-site: 510-486-7911 When dialing from off-site, the following numbers need to be proceeded by 486-. the area code for the LBNL is (510). Fire Department (non-emergency): ext. 6015 Police Department (non-emergency): ext. 5472 Non-Emergency Reporting: ext. 6999 Additional information about emergency procedures at Berkeley Lab can be found on the red Emergency Response Guides posted around the lab and

  7. Nonrigid registration-based coronary artery motion correction for cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Pack, Jed D.; Miller, James V.; Iatrou, Maria

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the modality of choice to noninvasively monitor and diagnose heart disease with coronary artery health and stenosis detection being of particular interest. Reliable, clinically relevant coronary artery imaging mandates high spatiotemporal resolution. However, advances in intrinsic scanner spatial resolution (CT scanners are available which combine nearly 900 detector columns with focal spot oversampling) can be tempered by motion blurring, particularly in patients with unstable heartbeats. As a result, recently numerous methods have been devised to improve coronary CTA imaging. Solutions involving hardware, multisector algorithms, or {beta}-blockers are limited by cost, oversimplifying assumptions about cardiac motion, and populations showing contraindications to drugs, respectively. This work introduces an inexpensive algorithmic solution that retrospectively improves the temporal resolution of coronary CTA without significantly affecting spatial resolution. Methods: Given the goal of ruling out coronary stenosis, the method focuses on 'deblurring' the coronary arteries. The approach makes no assumptions about cardiac motion, can be used on exams acquired at high heart rates (even over 75 beats/min), and draws on a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) nonrigid bidirectional labeled point matching approach to estimate the trajectories of the coronary arteries during image acquisition. Motion compensation is achieved by employing a 3D warping of a series of partial reconstructions based on the estimated motion fields. Each of these partial reconstructions is created from data acquired over a short time interval. For brevity, the algorithm 'Subphasic Warp and Add' (SWA) reconstruction. Results: The performance of the new motion estimation-compensation approach was evaluated by a systematic observer study conducted using nine human cardiac CTA exams acquired over a range of average heart rates between 68 and

  8. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Information Administration, 2014). This is the EIA base case scenario, and this outlook could be a low estimate depending on the many assumptions involved in making such...

  9. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  10. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Young, Katherine

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  11. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification | Department of Energy Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based "safety case" to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The

  12. FES Case Study Worksheets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Worksheets FES Case Study Worksheets This workshop is closed, and the worksheets can no longer be edited. If you have questions, please report any problems or suggestions for improvement to Richard Gerber (ragerber@lbl.gov). Please choose your worksheet template: Lee Berry, Paul Bonoli, David Green [Read] Jeff Candy [Read] CS Chang [Read] Stephane Ethier [Read] Alex Friedman [Read] Kai Germaschewski [Read] Martin Greenwald [Read] Stephen Jardin [Read] Charlson Kim [Read] Scott Kruger [Read]

  13. A TECHNICAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF AMINE-BASED CO2 CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY FOR POWER PLANT GREENHOUSE GAS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward S. Rubin; Anand B. Rao

    2002-10-01

    Capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel power plants is gaining widespread interest as a potential method of controlling greenhouse gas emissions. Performance and cost models of an amine (MEA)-based CO{sub 2} absorption system for post-combustion flue gas applications have been developed, and integrated with an existing power plant modeling framework that includes multi-pollutant control technologies for other regulated emissions. The integrated model has been applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing coal-burning power plants. The cost of carbon avoidance was shown to depend strongly on assumptions about the reference plant design, details of the CO{sub 2} capture system design, interactions with other pollution control systems, and method of CO{sub 2} storage. The CO{sub 2} avoidance cost for retrofit systems was found to be generally higher than for new plants, mainly because of the higher energy penalty resulting from less efficient heat integration, as well as site-specific difficulties typically encountered in retrofit applications. For all cases, a small reduction in CO{sub 2} capture cost was afforded by the SO{sub 2} emission trading credits generated by amine-based capture systems. Efforts are underway to model a broader suite of carbon capture and sequestration technologies for more comprehensive assessments in the context of multi-pollutant environmental management.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM Case study of a New Mexico-based home builder who has built more DOE Zero Energy Ready certified homes than ...

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Albuquerque, NM DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM Case study of a New Mexico-based home builder who has built more DOE Zero Energy Ready ...

  16. Methodology and assumptions for evaluating heating and cooling energy requirements in new single-family residential buildings: Technical support document for the PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) microcomputer program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Byrne, S.; Turiel, I.; Wilson, D.; Hsui, C.; Foley, D.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides technical documentation for a software package called PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) developed by LBL. PEAR offers an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy savings associated with various energy conservation measures used in site-built, single-family homes. This program was designed for use by non-technical groups such as home builders, home buyers or others in the buildings industry, and developed as an integral part of a set of voluntary guidelines entitled Affordable Housing Through Energy Conservation: A Guide to Designing and Constructing Energy Efficient Homes. These guidelines provide a method for selecting and evaluating cost-effective energy conservation measures based on the energy savings estimated by PEAR. This work is part of a Department of Energy program aimed at conducting research that will improve the energy efficiency of the nation's stock of conventionally-built and manufactured homes, and presenting the results to the public in a simplified format.

  17. SEP CASE STUDY WEBINAR: MEDIMMUNE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Measurement and Verification Case Study webinar is the first in a series of case study webinars to highlight the successes of facilities that have achieved Superior Energy Performance (SEP)...

  18. Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

  19. 20th International Conference on Case Based Reasoning | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency of Scientific Data Analysis: Scientific ... other traditional Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms out there. ... Basically, the big take away is that while most AI ...

  20. Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams, and results ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The report summarizes the load flow model construction, simulation, and validation and describes the general capabilities of an information query system designed to access load ...

  1. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2014: Powering the Bottom Line...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    These include wastewater treatment plants, government buildings, universities, military bases, hospitals, and other sites. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2014: Powering the ...

  2. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    12.92 12.90 13.09 -0.2% 1 Commercial trucks 8,501 to 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating. 2 CAFE standard based on projected new vehicle sales. 3 Includes CAFE credits for...

  3. Patrick Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  4. Larry Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  5. Blake Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice...

  6. Technology Deployment Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deployment Technology Deployment Case Studies Technology Deployment Case Studies These case studies describe evaluations of energy-efficient technologies being used in federal...

  7. Water Efficiency Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Efficiency Case Studies Water Efficiency Case Studies These case studies offer examples of water efficiency projects implemented by federal agencies. They are organized by ...

  8. Explosively separable casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

  9. Non-ferromagnetic overburden casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Harris, Christopher Kelvin; Mason, Stanley Leroy

    2010-09-14

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one system for electrically insulating an overburden portion of a heater wellbore is described. The system may include a heater wellbore located in a subsurface formation and an electrically insulating casing located in the overburden portion of the heater wellbore. The casing may include at least one non-ferromagnetic material such that ferromagnetic effects are inhibited in the casing.

  10. FAQ for Case Study Authors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviews » FAQ for Case Study Authors Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials FAQ for Case Study Authors BER Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems:

  11. FAQ for Case Study Authors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviews FAQ for Case Study Authors Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background...

  12. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Coal Market Module

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AEO2014 includes a representation of California Assembly Bill 32 (AB32), the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, which authorized the California Air Resources Board...

  13. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Electricity Market...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    - Hydraulic Turbine Reversible Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass - Fluidized Bed Solar Thermal - Central Tower Solar Photovoltaic - Fixed Tilt Wind Wind Offshore 1 The EMM...

  14. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Renewable Fuels...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind 1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas...

  15. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Residential Demand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    oil, liquefied petroleum gas, natural gas, kerosene, electricity, wood, geothermal, and solar energy. The module's output includes number of households, equipment stock, average...

  16. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 16 Figure 6. Overnight capital costs-coal ......22 Figure 8. Overnight capital costs-combustion turbine ......

  17. Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly short-term forecasts to 2016 Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related Congressional & other requests International Energy Outlook related Presentations Recurring Short-Term Outlook Related Special outlooks Testimony All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud ‹ Analysis &

  18. AEO2012 Preliminary Assumptions: Oil and Gas Supply

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis ... for Annual Energy Outlook 2013: Oil and Gas Working Group Overview 2 Office of ...

  19. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015:...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5: Oil and Gas Working Group AEO2015 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis August 7, 2014 | Washington, DC http:www.eia.gov...

  20. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Macroeconomic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy...

  1. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Natural Gas Transmissi...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Transmission and Distribution Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module...

  2. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Industrial Demand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AEO2014. Pollutants covered by Boiler MACT include the hazardous air pollutants (HAP), hydrogen chloride (HCI), mercury (HG), dioxinfuran, carbon monoxide (CO),and particulate...

  3. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Transportation...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    vehicle technology, hybrid vehicles will be sold to meet the AT-PZEV allowances, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles will be sold to meet the pure ZEV requirements under the...

  4. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Abbreviations

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AEO: Annual Energy Outlook AEO2012: Annual Energy Outlook 2012 AFUE: Average Fuel Use Efficiency ANWR: Artic National Wildlife Refuge ARRA2009: American Recovery and...

  5. Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administrati...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    also are evaluated for convergence. Each NEMS component represents the effects and costs of legislation and environmental regulations that affect that sector. NEMS accounts...

  6. Impact Conclusions are a Restatement of Assumptions with Literature...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles Find in Google Scholar Find in Google Scholar Search WorldCat Search WorldCat to find libraries that may hold ...

  7. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Commercial Demand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    chosen to meet the projected service demands for the seven major end uses. Once technologies are chosen, the energy consumed by the equipment stock (both existing and purchased...

  8. RELAXATION OF WARPED DISKS: THE CASE OF PURE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-05-10

    Orbiting disks may exhibit bends due to a misalignment between the angular momentum of the inner and outer regions of the disk. We begin a systematic simulational inquiry into the physics of warped disks with the simplest case: the relaxation of an unforced warp under pure fluid dynamics, i.e., with no internal stresses other than Reynolds stress. We focus on the nonlinear regime in which the bend rate is large compared to the disk aspect ratio. When warps are nonlinear, strong radial pressure gradients drive transonic radial motions along the disk's top and bottom surfaces that efficiently mix angular momentum. The resulting nonlinear decay rate of the warp increases with the warp rate and the warp width, but, at least in the parameter regime studied here, is independent of the sound speed. The characteristic magnitude of the associated angular momentum fluxes likewise increases with both the local warp rate and the radial range over which the warp extends; it also increases with increasing sound speed, but more slowly than linearly. The angular momentum fluxes respond to the warp rate after a delay that scales with the square root of the time for sound waves to cross the radial extent of the warp. These behaviors are at variance with a number of the assumptions commonly used in analytic models to describe linear warp dynamics.

  9. Documentation and control over economic regulatory adminstration field cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This review was performed to evaluate the Economic Regulatory Administrations's (ERA) documentation of and control over cases involving alleged petroleum pricing violations. In response to the oil embargo and price increase, the Congress passed the Emergency Petroleum Allocation Act of 1973 (Act). The Government assured compliance by investigating petroleum pricing violations, recovering overcharges, and making restitution to injured parties. Between August 1973 and January 1981, ERA and predecessor Federal agencies established and enforced regulations controlling the allocation and pricing of crude oil and refined petroleum products. The purpose of this review was to determine whether adequate internal controls were in place to assure that overcharge cases were being resolved in accordance with established guidelines. Specific objectives were to determine whether ERA's internal controls assured that (1) the bases for resolving cases were documented, (2) case settlements were approved by more than one person, and (3) cases were tracked until all overcharge issues were resolved.

  10. Elizabeth Case | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case About Us Elizabeth Case - Guest Blogger, Cycle for Science Most Recent Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science July 2 Mountains, and Teachers, and a Bear, Oh My! June 2 Sol-Cycle: Biking Across America for Science Education May 1

  11. Analysis of Restricted Natural Gas Supply Cases

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    The four cases examined in this study have progressively greater impacts on overall natural gas consumption, prices, and supply. Compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case, the no Alaska pipeline case has the least impact; the low liquefied natural gas case has more impact; the low unconventional gas recovery case has even more impact; and the combined case has the most impact.

  12. Federal Utility Energy Service Contract Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Utility Energy Service Contract Case Studies Federal Utility Energy Service Contract Case Studies These case studies feature examples of federal projects made possible by the use of utility energy service contracts (UESCs). Photo of the Coast Guard's Multi-Site UESC project. U.S. Coast Guard: This 12-site project with 21 energy-conservation measures reduced electricity consumption by 19.1%, water consumption by 64.2%, and natural gas consumption by 21.1%. Photo of Patrick Air Force Base.

  13. Interactive savings calculations for RCS measures, six case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    Many Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audits are based, in whole or in part, on the RCS Model Audit. This audit calculates the savings for each measure independently, that is, as if no other conservation actions were taken. This method overestimates the total savings due to a group of measures, and an explanatory warning is given to the customer. Presenting interactive results to consumers would increase the perceived credibility of the audit results by eliminating the need for the warning about uncalculated interactive effects. An increased level of credibility would hopefully lead to an increased level of conservation actions based on the audit results. Because many of the existing RCS audits are based on the RCS Model Audit, six case studies were produced to show that the Model Audit algorithms can be used to produce interactive savings estimates. These six Model Audit case studies, as well as two Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit cases, are presented along with a discussion of the calculation methods used.

  14. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases Preliminary Year 1 Techno-Economic Study Results and Methodology for Gas Pressurized Stripping Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2013-03-01

    Under the DOE’s Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) is developing a novel gas pressurized stripping (GPS) process to enable efficient post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) from coal-fired power plants. A technology and economic feasibility study is required as a deliverable in the project Statement of Project Objectives. This study analyzes a fully integrated pulverized coal power plant equipped with GPS technology for PCC, and is carried out, to the maximum extent possible, in accordance to the methodology and data provided in ATTACHMENT 3 – Basis for Technology Feasibility Study of DOE Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL report on “Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity (Original Issue Date, May 2007), NETL Report No. DOE/NETL-2007/1281, Revision 1, August 2007” was used as the main source of reference to be followed, as per the guidelines of ATTACHMENT 3 of DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL-2007/1281 study compared the feasibility of various combinations of power plant/CO2 capture process arrangements. The report contained a comprehensive set of design basis and economic evaluation assumptions and criteria, which are used as the main reference points for the purpose of this study. Specifically, Nexant adopted the design and economic evaluation basis from Case 12 of the above-mentioned DOE/NETL report. This case corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe (net), supercritical greenfield PC plant that utilizes an advanced MEAbased absorption system for CO2 capture and compression. For this techno-economic study, CCS’ GPS process replaces the MEA-based CO2 absorption system used in the original case. The objective of this study is to assess the performance of a full-scale GPS-based PCC design that is integrated with a supercritical PC plant similar to Case 12 of the DOE/NETL report, such that it corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C Low Economic Growth case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 47 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 123.3 123.9 124.7 126.3 128.8 0.3 United States a 96.8 94.4 98.7

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    D High Oil Price case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.3 127.9 130.8 135.5 142.1 0.7 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.2 103.3

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 121 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 31.8 35.7 38.6 42.1 44.6 47.3 1.4 United States a 24.0 28.7

  18. A life cycle approach to the management of household food waste - A Swedish full-scale case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A.; Cour Jansen, J. la

    2011-08-15

    Research Highlights: > The comparison of three different methods for management of household food waste show that anaerobic digestion provides greater environmental benefits in relation to global warming potential, acidification and ozone depilation compared to incineration and composting of food waste. Use of produced biogas as car fuel provides larger environmental benefits compared to a use of biogas for heat and power production. > The use of produced digestate from the anaerobic digestion as substitution for chemical fertilizer on farmland provides avoidance of environmental burdens in the same ratio as the substitution of fossil fuels with produced biogas. > Sensitivity analyses show that results are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding the environmental burdens connected to heat and energy supposedly substituted by the waste treatment. - Abstract: Environmental impacts from incineration, decentralised composting and centralised anaerobic digestion of solid organic household waste are compared using the EASEWASTE LCA-tool. The comparison is based on a full scale case study in southern Sweden and used input-data related to aspects such as source-separation behaviour, transport distances, etc. are site-specific. Results show that biological treatment methods - both anaerobic and aerobic, result in net avoidance of GHG-emissions, but give a larger contribution both to nutrient enrichment and acidification when compared to incineration. Results are to a high degree dependent on energy substitution and emissions during biological processes. It was seen that if it is assumed that produced biogas substitute electricity based on Danish coal power, this is preferable before use of biogas as car fuel. Use of biogas for Danish electricity substitution was also determined to be more beneficial compared to incineration of organic household waste. This is a result mainly of the use of plastic bags in the incineration alternative (compared to paper bags in the

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Case Studies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data

  20. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030...

  1. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by region and end-use sector, High Oil Price case, 2010-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD...

  2. OHA Misc Cases Archive File

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a archive file of our Misc decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

  3. OHA Whistleblower Cases Archive File

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a archive file of our Whistleblower decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark...

  4. OHA Security Cases Archive File

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a archive file of our Security decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of...

  5. OHA EIA CASES ARCHIVE FILE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a archive file of our EIA decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

  6. OHA FOIA Cases Archive File

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a archive file of our FOIA decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

  7. BerkeleyGW Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BerkeleyGW Case Study BerkeleyGW Case Study Code Description and Science Problem BerkeleyGW is a Materials Science application for calculating the excited state properties of materials such as band gaps, band structures, absoprtion spectroscopy, photoemission spectroscopy and more. It requires as input the Kohn-Sham orbitals and energies from a DFT code like Quantum ESPRESSO, PARATEC, PARSEC etc. Like such DFT codes, it is heavily depedent on FFTs, Dense Linear algebra and tensor contraction

  8. EIA Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIA Cases EIA Cases RSS February 14, 2011 TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. On December 13, 2010, Cole Distributing, Inc. (Cole) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be permanently relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As

  9. Comprehensive Energy Program at Patrick Air Force Base Set to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Download the Patrick Air Force Base case study. (709.94 KB) More Documents & Publications FPL Energy Services ESCO Qualification Sheet UESC Project Overview: NASA Ames Research ...

  10. EPICS BASE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002230MLTPL00 Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System BASE http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics

  11. Technology Deployment Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Deployment Case Studies Technology Deployment Case Studies Technology Deployment Case Studies Find efficient technologies and products for federal applications on the Federal Energy Management Program website. View All Maps Addthis

  12. Y-12 and the Jack Case Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 21, 2014, Patrick Case, Jack Case's youngest son, called me. He was at the New Hope Center and wanted to visit the Jack Case Center. I explained that it would have to wait...

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E Low Oil Price case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 57 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-s40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 126.5 129.2 131.8 135.0 138.9 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 101.2 102.7 103.6 104.6

  14. Case Western University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name Case Western University Facility Case Western University Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  15. Renewable Energy Case Studies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Case Studies AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector:...

  16. CASE Design/Remodeling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DesignRemodeling Jump to: navigation, search Name: CASE DesignRemodeling Place: Bethesda, MD Website: www.casedesignremodeling.com References: CASE DesignRemodeling1...

  17. Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration Systems Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration Systems This case study documents one year of ...

  18. Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy ...

  19. QPhiX Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    QPhiX Case Study QPhiX Case Study June 20, 2016 Background QPhiX [1,2,3] is a library optimized for Intel(R) manycore architectures and provides sparse solvers and slash kernels for Lattice QCD calculations. It supports the Wilson dslash operator with and without clover term as well as Conjugate Gradient [4] and BiCGStab [5] solvers. The main task for QPhiX is to solve the sparse linear system dirac equation where the Dslash kernel is defined by wilson dslash Here, U are complex, special

  20. Whistleblower Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whistleblower Cases Whistleblower Cases RSS July 14, 2016 WBU-16-0006 - In the Matter Dr. Shou-Yuan Zhang On July 14, 2016, OHA granted an Appeal involving a Complaint filed by Dr. Shou-Yuan Zhang against Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 CFR Part 708. In his Complaint, Dr. Zhang alleged that in an email to a BSA official, he reported research misconduct and that, in response, BSA transferred him to a new position. The DOE's Brookhaven

  1. FOIA Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FOIA Cases FOIA Cases RSS July 28, 2016 FIA-16-0039 - In the Matter of Michael Ravnitzky On July 28, 2016, OHA granted in part a FOIA Appeal filed by Michael Ravinitzky from a determination issued by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) of the Department of Energy. In the Appeal, the Appellant challenged OSTI's decision to withhold responsive records under Exemptions 3 and 4 of the FOIA. Reviewing only the unclassified portion of the responsive records, OHA found that OSTI's

  2. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G1. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 39.2 41.4 44.6 48.7 52.2 1.2 Middle East 26.2 26.6 29.8

  3. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G3. International other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.2 5.6 1.3 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G7. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 43.2 45.6 49.9 54.7 59.4 1.7 Middle East 26.2 26.6 31.1

  5. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G9. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.9 4.8 0.8 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7 4.0

  6. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 484 489 523 544 564 581 597 0.7 United States a 312 315 334 347 359 370 380 0.7 Canada 34 35 38 39 41 43 44 0.8 Mexico and Chile 137 139 151 158 164 169 173 0.8 OECD Europe 548 550 565 571 576 579 581

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 888 867 902 891 901 900 924 0.2 United States a 790 769 804 808 808 812 833 0.3 Canada 88 89 86 72 72 67 62 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 9 8 12 12 20 20 29 4.5 OECD Europe 861 837

  8. An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boesch, Michael E.; Vadenbo, Carl; Saner, Dominik; Huter, Christoph; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • An enhanced process-based LCA model for MSWI is featured and applied in case study. • LCA modeling of recent technological developments for metal recovery from fly ash. • Net release from Swiss MSWI 133 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste from attributional LCA perspective. • Net savings from a consequential LCA perspective reach up to 303 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste. • Impacts according to ReCiPe and CExD show similar pattern to climate change. - Abstract: A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total

  9. Integrating knowledge-based techniques into well-test interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, I.W.; Fraser, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of the Spirit Project was to develop a prototype of next-generation well-test-interpretation (WTI) software that would include knowledge-based decision support for the WTI model selection task. This paper describes how Spirit makes use of several different types of information (pressure, seismic, petrophysical, geological, and engineering) to support the user in identifying the most appropriate WTI model. Spirit`s knowledge-based approach to type-curve matching is to generate several different feasible interpretations by making assumptions about the possible presence of both wellbore storage and late-time boundary effects. Spirit fuses information from type-curve matching and other data sources by use of a knowledge-based decision model developed in collaboration with a WTI expert. The sponsors of the work have judged the resulting prototype system a success.

  10. Integrating Nuclear Energy to Oilfield Operations – Two Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Lee O. Nelson; Michael G. McKellar; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Mike W. Patterson

    2011-11-01

    Fossil fuel resources that require large energy inputs for extraction, such as the Canadian oil sands and the Green River oil shale resource in the western USA, could benefit from the use of nuclear power instead of power generated by natural gas combustion. This paper discusses the technical and economic aspects of integrating nuclear energy with oil sands operations and the development of oil shale resources. A high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) that produces heat in the form of high pressure steam (no electricity production) was selected as the nuclear power source for both fossil fuel resources. Both cases were based on 50,000 bbl/day output. The oil sands case was a steam-assisted, gravity-drainage (SAGD) operation located in the Canadian oil sands belt. The oil shale development was an in-situ oil shale retorting operation located in western Colorado, USA. The technical feasibility of the integrating nuclear power was assessed. The economic feasibility of each case was evaluated using a discounted cash flow, rate of return analysis. Integrating an HTGR to both the SAGD oil sands operation and the oil shale development was found to be technically feasible for both cases. In the oil sands case, integrating an HTGR eliminated natural gas combustion and associated CO2 emissions, although there were still some emissions associated with imported electrical power. In the in situ oil shale case, integrating an HTGR reduced CO2 emissions by 88% and increased natural gas production by 100%. Economic viabilities of both nuclear integrated cases were poorer than the non-nuclear-integrated cases when CO2 emissions were not taxed. However, taxing the CO2 emissions had a significant effect on the economics of the non-nuclear base cases, bringing them in line with the economics of the nuclear-integrated cases. As we move toward limiting CO2 emissions, integrating non-CO2-emitting energy sources to the development of energy-intense fossil fuel resources is becoming