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1

Dialectical theory for multi-agent assumption-based planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a dialectical theory for plan synthesis based on a multi-agent approach. This approach is a promising way to devise systems based on agent planners in which the production of a global shared plan is obtained ...

Damien Pellier; Humbert Fiorino

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Design assumptions and bases for small D-T-fueled spherical tokamak (ST) fusion core  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in defining the assumptions and clarifying the bases for a small D-T-fueled ST fusion core are presented. The paper covers several issues in the physics of ST plasmas, the technology of neutral beam injection, the engineering design configuration, and the center leg material under intense neutron irradiation. This progress was driven by the exciting data from pioneering ST experiments, a heightened interest in proof-of-principle experiments at the MA level in plasma current, and the initiation of the first conceptual design study of the small ST fusion core. The needs recently identified for a restructured fusion energy sciences program have provided a timely impetus for examining the subject of this paper. Our results, though preliminary in nature, strengthen the case for the potential realism and attractiveness of the ST approach.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Haines, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

AEO Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Heterogeneous Correlation Modeling Based on the Wavelet Diagonal Assumption and on the Diffusion Operator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article discusses several models for background error correlation matrices using the wavelet diagonal assumption and the diffusion operator. The most general properties of filtering local correlation functions, with wavelet formulations, are ...

Olivier Pannekoucke

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Base case and perturbation scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report describes fourteen energy factors that could affect electricity markets in the future (demand, process, source mix, etc.). These fourteen factors are believed to have the most influence on the State? s energy environment. A base case, or most probable, characterization is given for each of these fourteen factors over a twenty year time horizon. The base case characterization is derived from quantitative and qualitative information provided by State of California government agencies, where possible. Federal government databases are nsed where needed to supplement the California data. It is envisioned that a initial selection of issue areas will be based upon an evaluation of them under base case conditions. For most of the fourteen factors, the report identities possible perturbations from base case values or assumptions that may be used to construct additional scenarios. Only those perturbations that are plausible and would have a significant effect on energy markets are included in the table. The fourteen factors and potential perturbations of the factors are listed in Table 1.1. These perturbations can be combined to generate internally consist.ent. combinations of perturbations relative to the base case. For example, a low natural gas price perturbation should be combined with a high natural gas demand perturbation. The factor perturbations are based upon alternative quantitative forecasts provided by other institutions (the Department of Energy - Energy Information Administration in some cases), changes in assumptions that drive the quantitative forecasts, or changes in assumptions about the structure of the California energy markets. The perturbations are intended to be used for a qualitative reexamination of issue areas after an initial evaluation under the base case. The perturbation information would be used as a ?tiebreaker;? to make decisions regarding those issue areas that were marginally accepted or rejected under the base case. Hf a quantitative scoring system for issue areas were applied under the base case, a tractable quantitative decision model incorporating scenarios and their likelihoods could be developed and appli& in the decision process. LLNL has developed four perturbation scenarios that address the following issues: l} low economic growth, 2) high natural gas prices, 3) dysfunctional markets, and 4) a preference for green power. We have proposed a plausible scenario that addresses each issue for discussion and consideration by the CEC. In addition, we have provided an example application of the four perturbation scenarios in a qualitative framework for evaluation of issue areas developed for the PIEPC program. A description of each of the perturbation scenarios and a discussion of how they could effect decisions about today? s R&D funding is included. The scenarios attempt to cover a broad spectrum of plausible outcomes in a deregulated market environment. Nowever, Vhey are not a comprehensive and rigorously defined list of the most probable scenarios, but rather a qualitative inference based upon knowledge and expertise in the energy field.

Edmunds, T

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Base isolation case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of this thesis is the introduction of the current code, ASCE 7-05 into the base isolation design and the analysis of base isolation response due to seismic forces. An eight story irregular structure ...

Ching, Kenneth A. (Kenneth Apostol)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M068(2003) April 2003. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

11

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

12

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to the to the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Household Expenditures Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Oil and Gas Supply Module

13

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA- 7, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

14

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

15

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA- M068(2004). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

16

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

17

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M068(2008). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

18

Supporting use case based requirements engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use Cases that describe possible interactions involving a system and its environment are increasingly being accepted as effective means for functional requirements elicitation and analysis. In the current practice, informal definitions of use cases are used and the analysis process is manual. In this paper, we present an approach supported by a tool for use cases based requirements engineering. Our approach includes use cases formalization, a restricted form of natural language for use cases description, and the derivation of an executable specification as well as a simulation environment from use cases. Key words: Use cases, domain modeling, UML, requirements engineering, prototyping

Stphane S. Som

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Impact of Size Distribution Assumptions in a Bulk One-Moment Microphysics Scheme on Simulated Surface Precipitation and Storm Dynamics during a Low-Topped Supercell Case in Belgium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research the impact of modifying the size distribution assumptions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a bulk one-moment microphysics scheme on simulated surface precipitation and storm dynamics has been explored for long-lived low-topped ...

Kwinten Van Weverberg; Nicole P. M. van Lipzig; Laurent Delobbe

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Integrating both Wikis and XML with case bases to facilitate case base development and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-based reasoning (CBR), as a promising technology for problem solving and decision support, has drawn considerable attention during the last 20years. As CBR systems become more frequently deployed in real-world situations and as large-scale case-bases ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Integration, Open XML, Wikis

Wu He; Lida Xu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The disciplined use of simplifying assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplifying assumptions --- everyone uses them but no one's programming tool explicitly supports them. In programming, as in other kinds of engineering design, simplifying assumptions are an important method for dealing with complexity. Given a complex ...

Charles Rich; Richard C. Waters

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

23

Maintaining Footprint-Based Retrieval for Case Deletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness and efficiency of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems depend largely on the success of case-based retrieval. The case-base maintenance (CBM) issues become imperative and important especially for modern societies. This paper proposes ... Keywords: case-based maintenance, case-based reasoning, competence models, footprint-based retrieval

Ning Lu; Jie Lu; Guangquan Zhang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 August 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

25

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

26

A Comparison of the Free Ride and CISK Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent paper Fraedrich and McBride have studied the relation between the free ride and CISK (conditional instability of the second kind) assumptions in a well-known two-layer model. Here the comparison is extended to a more general case. ...

Torben Strunge Pedersen

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLIMATE ACTION PLANNING TOOL FORMULAS AND ASSUMPTIONS Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions The Climate Action Planning Tool calculations use the following formulas and assumptions to generate the business-as-usual scenario and the greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals for the technology options. Business-as-Usual Scenario All Scope 1 (gas, oil, coal, fleet, and electricity) and Scope 2 calculations increase at a rate equal to the building growth rate. Scope 3 calculations (commuters and business travel) increase at a rate equal to the population growth rate. Assumptions New buildings will consume energy at the same rate (energy use intensity) as existing campus buildings. Fleet operations will be proportional to total building area.

28

Hierarchy of Mesoscale Flow Assumptions and Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present research proposes a standard nomenclature for mesoscale meteorological concepts and integrates existing concepts of atmospheric space scales, flow assumptions, governing equations, and resulting motions into a hierarchy useful in ...

P. Thunis; R. Bornstein

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of AEO99 Cases Summary of AEO99 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.57 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $29.35 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated Residential: 1999 Technology

30

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

31

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to the Annual Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3

32

1980 Base case and feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a task of documenting a base case'' and performing a feasibility analysis for a national residential energy efficiency program for new homes, The principal objective of the task wasto estimate the energy consumption of typical homes built in 1980 and then to identify and assess the feasibility of methods to reduce that consumption by 50%. The goal of the program by the year 2000 is to reduce heating and cooling energy use in new homes built under the program to one-half of the energy use in typical new homes built in 1980. The task also calls for determining whether the program goal should be revised, based on the analysis.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

1980 Base case and feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a task of documenting a ``base case`` and performing a feasibility analysis for a national residential energy efficiency program for new homes, The principal objective of the task wasto estimate the energy consumption of typical homes built in 1980 and then to identify and assess the feasibility of methods to reduce that consumption by 50%. The goal of the program by the year 2000 is to reduce heating and cooling energy use in new homes built under the program to one-half of the energy use in typical new homes built in 1980. The task also calls for determining whether the program goal should be revised, based on the analysis.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in Three Cases, 1995-2035 Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2035 (2008 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

35

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

36

Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Using case-based tests to detect gray cygnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black Swans are surprising, exceptional, provocative cases that instigate major change. Gray Cygnets follow a Black Swan, are highly similar to it, are also exceptional in outcome, and continue to provoke change. We discuss experiments with a family ... Keywords: black swans, case similarity, case-based reasoning, classification tests, gray cygnets, supreme on-point case (sopc), surprising cases

Edwina L. Rissland; Xiaoxi Xu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Model for Personalized Web-Scale Case Base Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing use of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems on the Web has brought with it increased awareness of the Web-scale case base maintenance (CBM). While most existing CBM policies and approaches, which were designed for smaller case bases with sizes ...

Jingyu Sun; Xueli Yu; Ruizhi Wang; Ning Zhong

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fuzzy case-based reasoning for facial expression recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy logic (FL) and case-based reasoning (CBR) are two well-known techniques for the implementation of intelligent classification systems. Each technique has its own advantages and drawbacks. FL, for example, provides an intuitive user interface, simplifies ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Fuzzy case-based reasoning, Fuzzy logic, Human computer interaction, Intelligent systems

Aasia Khanum; Muid Mufti; M. Younus Javed; M. Zubair Shafiq

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Module Energy Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 21 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Module The LFMM International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the LFMM IEM computes BRENT and WTI prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, and generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail. The IEM also provides, for each year of the projection period, endogenous and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

42

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

43

Effects of internal gain assumptions in building energy calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of direct solar gains in buildings can be affected by operating profiles, such as schedules for internal gains, thermostat controls, and ventilation rates. Building energy analysis methods use various assumptions about these profiles. The effects of typical internal gain assumptions in energy calculations are described. Heating and cooling loads from simulations using the DOE 2.1 computer code are compared for various internal-gain inputs: typical hourly profiles, constant average profiles, and zero gain profiles. Prototype single-family-detached and multi-family-attached residential units are studied with various levels of insulation and infiltration. Small detached commercial buildings and attached zones in large commercial buildings are studied with various levels of internal gains. The results of this study indicate that calculations of annual heating and cooling loads are sensitive to internal gains, but in most cases are relatively insensitive to hourly variations in internal gains.

Christensen, C.; Perkins, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

45

Learning adaptation knowledge to improve case-based reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning systems retrieve and reuse solutions for previously solved problems that have been encountered and remembered as cases. In some domains, particularly where the problem solving is a classification task, the retrieved solution can ... Keywords: Adaptation knowledge, Case-based reasoning, Introspective learning, Knowledge acquisition, Machine learning

Susan Craw; Nirmalie Wiratunga; Ray C. Rowe

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administrati...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy...

47

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Table 41  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

> Forecasts >Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook> Download Report Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF...

48

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, and (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2003, DOE/EIA- M062(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003).

49

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20031 (AEO2003), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2003 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and International Affairs, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

50

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2030 (2006 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids

51

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 3. OPEC Oil Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Table 4. Worldwide Oil Reserves as of January 1, 2002 (Billion Barrels) Printer Friendly Version Region Proved Oil Reserves Western Hemisphere 313.6 Western‘Europe 18.1 Asia-Pacific 38.7

52

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

53

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.106

54

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

55

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

56

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

57

Combining Case-Based and Model-Based Reasoning for the Diagnosis of Complex Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to integrating case-based reasoning with model-based diagnosis is presented. This approach, called Experience Aided Diagnosis (EAD), uses the model of the device and the results of diagnostic tests to index and match cases representing past ... Keywords: case-based reasoning, hybrid problem-solving methods, model-based diagnosis

M. P. Fret; J. I. Glasgow

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000. Projections

59

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

60

Process Engineering Division Texaco Gasifier IGCC Base Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Division Engineering Division Texaco Gasifier IGCC Base Cases PED-IGCC-98-001 July 1998 Latest Revision June 2000 PREFACE This report presents the results of an analysis of three Texaco Gasifier IGCC Base Cases. The analyses were performed by W. Shelton and J. Lyons of EG&G. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Process Descriptions 1.1 Texaco Gasifier 1.2 Air Separation Plant (ASU) 1.3 Gas Cooling/Heat Recovery/Hydrolysis/Gas Saturation (Case 1 and Case 2) 1.4 Cold Gas Cleanup Unit (CGCU) (Case 1 and Case 2) 1.5 Fine Particulate Removal/ Chloride Guard Bed - Case 3 1.6 Transport Desulfurization HGCU - Case 3 1.7 Sulfuric Acid Plant - Case 3 1.8 Gas Turbine 1.9 Steam Cycle 1.10 Power Production 2. Simulation Development 3. Cost of Electricity Analysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7), 7), (Washington, DC, January 2007). Key Assumptions The output of the U.S. economy, measured by GDP, is expected to increase by 2.9 percent between 2005 and 2030 in the reference case. Two key factors help explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 3 indicates, for the Reference Case GDP growth slows down in each of the periods identified, from 3.0 percent between 2005 and 2010, to 2.9 percent between 2010 and 2020, to 2.8 percent in the between 2020 and 2030. In the near term from 2005 through 2010, the growth in nonfarm employment is low at 1.2 percent compared with 2.4 percent in the second half of the 1990s, while the economy is expected to experiencing relatively strong

62

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

63

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M060(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

64

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to 26.57 per barrel in the reference case Fully integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are 33.05 per barrel in 2025,compared to 26.57 per barrel in the reference...

65

Search and Adaptation in a Fuzzy Object Oriented Case Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose to represent a case using an object oriented model that enables the description of imprecise knowledge using possibility distributions. The proposed search process is based on this modeling and a fuzzy similarity measure is defined. ...

Magali Ruet; Laurent Geneste

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

67

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

68

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

69

Testing model assumptions in functional regression models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the functional regression model where the responses are curves, new tests for the functional form of the regression and the variance function are proposed, which are based on a stochastic process estimating L^2-distances. Our approach avoids the explicit ... Keywords: 62G10, Functional data, Goodness-of-fit tests, Parametric bootstrap, Tests for heteroscedasticity

Axel Bcher; Holger Dette; Gabriele Wieczorek

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Applying Case-Based Reasoning to Mechanical Bearing Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) provides a promising methodology for solving many complex engineering design problems. CBR is based on the idea that past problem-solving experiences can be reused and learned from in solving new problems. This paper presents an overview of a CBR design system to assist human engineers in performing mechanical bearing design. It retrieves previously designed cases from a case-base and uses adaptation techniques to adapt them to satisfy the current problem requirements. Our approach combines parametric adaptations and constraint satisfaction adaptations. The technique of parametric adaptation considers not only parameter substitution, but also the interrelationships between the problem definition and its solution. The technique of constraint satisfaction adaptation provides a method to globally check the design requirements to assess case adaptability. Currently, our system has been tested in the rolling bearing domain.

Xiaoli Qin; William C. Regli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Appendix G: Major Assumptions for the Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases/ Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Download Report - Entire AEO2001 (PDF) - AEO2001 by Chapters (PDF) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Acronyms bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts Related Links bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO2001 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 (Only available on the Web) - Regional and more detailed AEO 2001 Reference Case Results - 1998, 2000 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Forecast Homepage bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage Appendix G Major Assumptions for the Forecasts Component Modules Major Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2001

72

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).119 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

73

Ontology-Based Network Management: Study Cases and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontology based network management has recently evolved from a theoretical proposal to a more mature technology. As such, it is now being applied in many research projects in a number of different network management and security scenarios. This application ... Keywords: Autonomic management, Lessons learned, Network monitoring, Network security, OWL, Ontology-based network management, SWRL, Study case

Jorge E. Lpez De Vergara; Antonio Guerrero; Vctor A. Villagr; Julio Berrocal

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

75

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

76

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

77

WCOID-DG: An approach for case base maintenance based on Weighting, Clustering, Outliers, Internal Detection and Dbsan-Gmeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of the Case Based Reasoning system depends on the quality of the case data and the speed of the retrieval process that can be costly in time, especially when the number of cases gets bulky. To guarantee the system@?s quality, maintaining ... Keywords: Case base maintenance, Case based reasoning, Density based clustering, Gaussian-Means clustering, Outliers detection

Abir Smiti, Zied Elouedi

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

79

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Market...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs. The key assumptions underlying the coal production modeling are: As capacity...

80

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hybrid intelligent parameter estimation based on grey case-based reasoning for laminar cooling process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a hybrid intelligent parameter estimation algorithm is proposed for predicting the strip temperature during laminar cooling process. The algorithm combines a hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) with grey case-based reasoning (GCBR) in order ... Keywords: Grey case-based reasoning, Hybrid genetic algorithm, Laminar cooling process, Parameter estimation

Guishan Xing; Jinliang Ding; Tianyou Chai; Puya Afshar; Hong Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVoCS 2006 Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking Nick Moffat1 Systems Assurance using CSP. In our formulation, an assumption-commitment style property of a process SYS takes the form-Guarantee, CSP, Model Checking, Compositional Reasoning 1 Introduction The principle of compositional program

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Combining rough set and case based reasoning for process conditions selection in camshaft grinding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case Based Reasoning (CBR) is a novel paradigm that uses previous cases to solve new, unseen and different problems. However, redundant features may not only dramatically increase the case memory, but also make the case retrieval more time-consuming. ... Keywords: Camshaft grinding, Case based reasoning, Case evaluation, Case reclassify, Feature reduction, Genetic algorithm, Rough set

X. H. Zhang; Z. H. Deng; W. Liu; H. Cao

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Case-Based Reasoning View of Automated Collaborative Filtering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From some perspectives Automated Collaborative Filtering (ACF) appears quite similar to Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). It works on data organised around users and assets that might be considered case descriptions. In addition, in some versions of ACF, much of the induction is deferred to run time -- in the lazy learning spirit of CBR. On the other hand, because of its lack of semantic descriptions it seems to be the antithesis of case-based reasoning -- a learning approach based on case representations. This paper analyses the characteristics shared by ACF and CBR, it highlights the differences between the two approaches and attempts to answer the question "When is it useful or valid to consider ACF as CBR?". We argue that a CBR perspective on ACF can only be useful if it offers insights into the ACF process and supports a transfer of techniques. In conclusion we present a case retrieval net model of ACF and show how it allows for enhancements to the basic ACF idea.

Conor Hayes; Padraig Cunningham; Barry Smyth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 This report presents major assumptions of NEMS that are used to generate the projections in the AEO2006. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

86

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

87

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

88

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

89

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

90

Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system that applies a method of knowledge-intensive case-based reasoning, for repair and prevention of unwanted events in the domain of offshore oil well drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of "lost circulation", i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid into the geological formation, was picked out as a pilot problem. An extensive general knowledge model was developed for the domain of oil well drilling. About fifty different cases were created on the basis of information from one North Sea operator. When the completed CBR-system was tested against a new case, five cases with descending similarity were selected by the tool. In an informal evaluation, the two best fitting cases proved to give the operator valuable advise on how to go about solving the new case. Introduction Drilling of oil wells is an expensive operation, costing around 150 000 US $ pr. day, and any loss of time caused...

Paal Skalle; Jostein Sveen; Agnar Aamodt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Case-Based Design Support: A Case Study in Architectural Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archie, a small computer-based library of architectural design cases, is described. Archie helps architects in the high-level task of conceptual design as opposed to low-level tasks such as drawing and drafting, numerical calculations, and constraint ...

Michael Pearce; Ashok K. Goel; Janet L. Kolodner; Craig Zimring; Lucas Sentosa; Richard Billington

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

93

Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hill Air Force Base, Utah Hill Air Force Base, Utah Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah October 7, 2013 - 2:00pm Addthis Overview Energy savings performance contracting at Hill Air Force Base generated much interest during a recent training session on energy management that downlinked 12 Department of Defense sites. Energy systems in 940 buildings on the Base will be upgraded under an 18-year ESPC between the Government and the energy service company, CES/Way. Improvements are distributed over five task orders that will be completed in five years, with CES/Way providing $2.5 million in up-front costs for the first two task orders. Utah Power & Light will provide $8 million in rebates to help cover the contractor's initial investment, maintenance services, and interest costs.

94

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to AEO2013 Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual

95

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2012 Assumptions to AEO2012 Release Date: August 2, 2012 | Next Release Date: August 2013 | Full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 [1] (AEO2012), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in AEO2012 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA) of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the

96

Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental assumption in Lubrication Theory. Derivation of thin film flow equations from Navier-Stokes equations. Importance of fluid inertia effects in thin film flows. Some fluid physical properties

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Prognostic Evaluation of Assumptions Used by Cumulus Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a spectral-type cumulus parameterization that includes moist downdrafts within a three-dimensional mesoscale model, various disparate closure assumptions are systematically tested within the generalized framework of dynamic control, static ...

Georg A. Grell

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Computational soundness for standard assumptions of formal cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This implementation is conceptually simple, and relies only on general assumptions. Specifically, it can be thought of as a 'self-referential' variation on a well-known encryption scheme. 4. Lastly, we show how the ...

Herzog, Jonathan, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1 Francis X. Johnson, Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H. Sanstad and...

100

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Feedback link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Interactive Data Queries to the AEO99 bullet1.gif...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids supply and demand curves (1 curve per year; 2008-2030; approximated, isoelastic fit to previous NEMS results). These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2008 with IEO2007 and the STEO some functionality was removed from IEM while a new algorithm was implemented. Based on the difference between U.S. total petroleum liquids production (consumption) and the expected U.S. total liquids production (consumption) at the current WTI price, curves for global petroleum liquids consumption (production) were adjusted for each year. According to previous operations, a new WTI price path was generated. An exogenous oil supply module, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also used in IEM to provide annual regional (country) level production detail for conventional and unconventional liquids.

102

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap assumptions document. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel as a key element in the implementation of the Roadmap Methodology for the INEL Site. The development and identification of these assumptions in an important factor in planning basis development and establishes the planning baseline for all subsequent roadmap analysis at the INEL.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Case-based reasoning ensemble and business application: A computational approach from multiple case representations driven by randomness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-based reasoning (CBR) holds the unique capability of making predictions as well as suggestions to corporate executives and organizational decision-makers. How to improve its predictive performance is critical. This research aims to explore an ensemble ... Keywords: Business failure prediction, Case-based reasoning ensemble, Multiple case representations

Hui Li; Jie Sun

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000-Table 1. Summary of the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Cases 0 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated Residential: 2000 Technology

105

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 1. Summary of AEO2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Cases 1 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 3.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $15.10 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.42 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated Residential: 2001 Technology

106

Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20061 (AEO2006), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System

108

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

link.gif (1946 bytes) link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage introduction.gif (4117 bytes) This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 19991 (AEO99), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3

109

A Case Based System for Oil and Gas Well Design with Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case base system for a complex problem like oil field design needs to be richer than the usual case based reasoning system. Genesis, the system described in this paper contains large heterogeneous cases with metalevel knowledge. A multi-level indexing ... Keywords: case based systems, information extraction, knowledge sharing, oil well design, risk assessment

Simon Kravis; Rosemary Irrgang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States. States. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 93 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2007) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Primary inputs for the module are varied. One set of key assumptions concerns estimates of domestic technically recoverable oil and gas resources. Other factors affecting the projection include the assumed

111

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Petroleum Market Module

112

Science with the Square Kilometer Array: Motivation, Key Science Projects, Standards and Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) represents the next major, and natural, step in radio astronomical facilities, providing two orders of magnitude increase in collecting area over existing telescopes. In a series of meetings, starting in Groningen, the Netherlands (August 2002) and culminating in a `science retreat' in Leiden (November 2003), the SKA International Science Advisory Committee (ISAC), conceived of, and carried-out, a complete revision of the SKA science case (to appear in New Astronomy Reviews). This preface includes: (i) general introductory material, (ii) summaries of the key science programs, and (iii) a detailed listing of standards and assumptions used in the revised science case.

C. Carilli; S. Rawlings

2004-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

113

Case study data base companion report 3 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL-10571)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data base developed for selection and evaluation of geothermal subsidence case studies is presented. Data from this data base were used in case studies of Wairakei, The Geysers, and Austin Bayou Prospect (Report LBL 10571).

Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Unifying weighting and case reduction methods based on rough sets to improve retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning systems usually retrieve cases using a similarity function based on K-NN or some derivatives. These functions are sensitive to irrelevant or noisy features. Weighting methods are used to extract the most important information ...

Maria Salam; Elisabet Golobardes

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Case study: Improving debt collection processes using rule-based decision engines: A case study of Capital One  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case assesses the plethora of issues related to rule-based decision engine technology, and in particular, its role in complex and dynamic organizational processes. This paper argues rule-based engines can effectively be implemented for good organizational ... Keywords: Capital One, Debt collection, Project Edison, Rule-based decision, Rule-based engine

Amita Goyal Chin; Hiren Kotak

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Student Summer Project Speci cation -Session 2002 Case-Based Reasoning for Smart Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Techniques #15; Case-Based Reasoning #15; Machine Learning #15; Weka using Java or Recall shell using TCL/TK

Wiratunga, Nirmalie

117

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9., Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 11.1. Petroleum Product Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.2. Year Round Gasoline Specifications by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.3. Gasolline Sulfur Content Assumptions, by Region and Gasoline Type, Parts per Million (PPM). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version

118

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.9232544°, -91.09694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.9232544,"lon":-91.09694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

120

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

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121

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20021 (AEO2002), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2002 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of

122

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook2001 Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20011 (AEO2001), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2001 were produced with the National Energy

123

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 as of 4/4/2000 1. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 4-Speed Automatic" should be .045 instead of .030. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 5-Speed Automatic" should be .065 instead of .045. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 2. Table 28 should be labeled: "Alternative-Fuel Vehicle Attribute Inputs for Compact Cars for Two Stage Logit Model". (Change made on 3/6/2000) 3. The capital costs in Table 29 should read 1998 dollars not 1988 dollars. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 4. Table 37 changed the label "Year Available" to "First Year Completed." Changed the second sentence of Footnote 1 to read "these estimates are costs of new projects

124

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

125

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009),1 including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2009 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

126

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [1] (AEO2010), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2010 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

127

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20081 (AEO2008), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2008 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The AEO projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

128

CBM-Gen+: An Algorithm for Reducing Case Base Inconsistencies in Hierarchical and Incomplete Domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formulated case base maintenance (CBM) policies for reducing the size of the case base without losingCBM-Gen+: An Algorithm for Reducing Case Base Inconsistencies in Hierarchical and Incomplete Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015,USA {kex2,hem4}@ lehigh.edu Abstract. We propose an algorithm, CBM

Muñoz-Avila, Héctor

129

Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study - Hill Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts Assistance & Contacts Resources Laws & Regulations Energy Service Companies Awarded Projects

130

Agent-Based vs. Equation-based Epidemiological Models:A Model Selection Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This paper is motivated by the need to design model validation strategies for epidemiological disease-spread models. We consider both agent-based and equation-based models of pandemic disease spread and study the nuances and complexities one has to consider from the perspective of model validation. For this purpose, we instantiate an equation based model and an agent based model of the 1918 Spanish flu and we leverage data published in the literature for our case- study. We present our observations from the perspective of each implementation and discuss the application of model-selection criteria to compare the risk in choosing one modeling paradigm to another. We conclude with a discussion of our experience and document future ideas for a model validation framework.

Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources failed to find much realization in actual stocks data. The idea that stocks are still languishing at below-normal levels is particularly persuasive when one views current levels (for key consuming regions) relative to "normal" values which account for the long-term trend in OECD stocks. We believe that monthly average WTI prices will stay around $30 per barrel for the first part of 2001. This is a noticeable upward shift in our projected average prices from even a month ago. The shift reflects greater emphasis on the lack of stock builds and less emphasis on the assumption that supply from OPEC and non-OPEC suppliers may be exceeding demand by 1-2

132

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

133

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

134

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2000, DOE/EIA-M062(2000), January 2000.

135

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20001 (AEO2000), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2000 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

136

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by obtaining market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation Report: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO62/1, January 1999.

137

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA-M060(2004) (Washington, DC, 2004). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

138

GRI baseline projection: Methodology and assumptions 1996 edition. Topical report, January-December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report documents the methodology employed in producing the 1996 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection. DRI/McGraw-Hill`s Energy Group (DRI) maintains an energy modeling system for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that is used to produce an annual projection of the supply and demand for energy by regions in the United States. The 1996 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection is produced using several different models. The models analyze various pieces of the U.S. energy markets and their solutions are based on a framework of exogenous assumptions provided by GRI. The report describes the integration and solution procedures of the models and the assumptions used to produce the final projection results.

Rhodes, M.R.; Baxter, R.P.; Nottingham, R.P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

GRI baseline projection: Methodology and assumptions 1995 edition. Topical report, January-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the methodology employed in producing the 1995 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection. DRI/McGraw-Hill`s Energy Group (DRI) maintains an energy modeling system for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that is used to produce an annual projection of the supply and demand for energy by regions in the United States. The 1995 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection is produced using several different models. The models analyze various pieces of the U.S. energy markets and their solutions are based on a framework of exogeneous assumptions provided by GRI. The report describes the integration and solution procedures of the models and the assumptions used to produce the final projection results.

Baxter, R.P.; Silveira, T.S.; Harshbarger, S.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

142

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security systems, microwave ovens, set-top boxes, home audio equipment, rechargeable electronics, and VCR/DVDs. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric appliances. The module's output includes number Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central

143

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

144

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

145

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below. 75

146

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

147

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9),

148

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

149

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

150

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

151

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

152

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

153

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

154

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

155

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1 (AEO2007), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant to formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports. 2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 3 , which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2007 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and

156

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

157

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

158

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

159

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

160

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

162

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

163

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

164

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

165

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

166

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

167

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

168

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

169

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, 7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

170

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

171

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

172

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

174

Optimisation-based scheduling: A discrete manufacturing case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the development and implementation of a production scheduling system for an electrical appliance manufacturer. Based on recent advances in optimisation-based scheduling approaches, two different software architectures based on two ... Keywords: Discrete manufacturing, Electrical appliances, Mixed-integer linear programming, Optimization-based scheduling

Michael C. Georgiadis; Aaron A. Levis; Panagiotis Tsiakis; Ioannis Sanidiotis; Constantinos C. Pantelides; Lazaros G. Papageorgiou

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

177

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

178

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.100

179

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

180

Two case studies in grammar-based test generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grammar-based test generation (GBTG) has seen extensive study and practical use since the 1970s. GBTG was introduced to generate source code for testing compilers from context-free grammars specifying language syntax. More recently, GBTG has been applied ... Keywords: Automated testing, Covering array, Grammar-based test generation, Really Simple Syndication (RSS), TCP, eXtended Markup Language (XML)

Daniel Hoffman; Hong-Yi Wang; Mitch Chang; David Ly-Gagnon; Lewis Sobotkiewicz; Paul Strooper

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Case-based Reasoning Enabling Database Mining for Cryo-Preserving Algae Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-based Reasoning's (CBR) origins were stimulated by a desire to understand how people remember information and are in turn reminded of information, and that subsequently it was recognized that people commonly solve problems by remembering how they ... Keywords: Case-based Reasoning, algal, cryopreservation, COBRA, CBR

Jun Wang; Huiqin Ren

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Paraconsistent Case-Based Reasoning Applied to a Restoration of Electrical Power Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a connection of two techniques applied in Artificial Intelligence to solve problems of restoration of electrical power substations. The techniques are: Case-based Reasoning --- CBR and the Four-Valued Annotated Paraconsistent Logic ... Keywords: CBR, Case-based Reasoning, Decision Support System, Intelligent System, Paraconsistent Logic, Restoration of Electrical Power Substations

Helga Gonzaga Martins; Germano Lambert-Torres; Luiz Eduardo Borges Da Silva; Claudio Incio Almeida Costa; Maurilio Pereira Coutinho

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Supply chain trust diagnosis (SCTD) using inductive case-based reasoning ensemble (ICBRE): The case of general competence trust diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General competence trust among supply chain partners, referring to the trust that a partner holds the general ability of fulfilling contracts, is a critical factor to ensure effective cooperation in a supply chain, especially in the current financial ... Keywords: General competence trust, Inductive case-based reasoning ensemble (ICBRE), Supply chain trust diagnosis (SCTD) service

Hui Li; Jie Sun; Jian Wu; Xian-Jun Wu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Statistical Analysis of the Dependency of Closure Assumptions in Cumulus Parameterization on the Horizontal Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated data from the UCLA cumulus ensemble model are used to investigate the quasi-universal validity of closure assumptions used in existing cumulus parameterizations. A closure assumption is quasi-universally valid if it is sensitive neither ...

Kuan-Man Xu

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Usability evaluation of web-based GIS: case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dependency of the majority of mankind activities on information and communication technologies in general and on geographic information is increasing rapidly. This is one of the reasons why usability of specialized software tools (GIS) belongs today ... Keywords: computer-human interaction, usability, web-based GIS

Jitka Komarkova; Kamil Jakoubek; Miloslav Hub

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A case study: demands on component-based development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building software systems with reusable components brings many advantages. The development becomes more efficient, the realibility of the products is enhanced, and the maintenance requirement is significantly reduced. Designing, developing and maintaining ... Keywords: architecture, component-based development, development environment, reuse, standard components

Ivica Crnkovic; Magnus Larsson

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams, and results  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how an electric utility system is modeled by using load flow techniques to establish a validated power flow case suitable for simulating and evaluating alternative system scenarios. Details of the load flow model are supported by additional technical and descriptive information intended to correlate modeled electrical system parameters with the corresponding physical equipment that makes up the system. Pictures and technical specifications of system equipment from the utility, public, or vendor are provided to support this association for many system components. The report summarizes the load flow model construction, simulation, and validation and describes the general capabilities of an information query system designed to access load flow parameters and other electrical system information.

Portante, E.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ontology-supported case-based reasoning approach for intelligent m-Government emergency response services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a critical need to develop a mobile-based emergency response system (MERS) to help reduce risks in emergency situations. Existing systems only provide short message service (SMS) notifications, and the decision support is weak, especially in ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Emergency response systems, Information extraction, Mobile-based systems, Ontology, m-Government

Khaled Amailef, Jie Lu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

190

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province Speaker(s): Giuseppe Muliere Date: June 23, 2009 - 12:30pm Location: 90-3122 The aim of this work is to analyze...

191

FUTURA: Hybrid System for Electric Load Forecasting by Using Case-Based Reasoning and Expert System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of combining a numeric extrapolation of data with the methodology of case-based reasoning and expert systems in order to improve the electric load forecasting are presented in this contribution. Registers of power consumption are stored as ...

Ral Vilcahuamn; Joaquim Melndez; Josep Lluis de la Rosa

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Footnotes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

footnote.gif (3505 bytes) footnote.gif (3505 bytes) [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), DOE/EIA-0383(99), (Washington, DC, December 1998). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998, DOE/EIA-0581(98), (Washington, DC, February 1998). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use DRI/McGraw-Hill’s August 1998 T250898 and February TO250298 and TP250298. [5] EIA, International Energy Outlook 1998, DOE/EIA-0484(98) (Washington DC, April 1998).

193

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Footnotes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Feedback Feedback Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage FOOTNOTES [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), DOE/EIA-0383(2001), (Washington, DC, December 2000). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000, DOE/EIA-0581(2000), (Washington, DC, March 2000). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use Standard and Poor’s DRI February 2000 T250200 and February TO250299 and TP250299.

194

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 12 . Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost

195

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

196

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

197

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 and 27) including incremental fuel 6 and 27) including incremental fuel efficiency improvement, incremental cost, first year of introduction, and fractional horsepower change. These assumed technology characterizations are scaled up or down to approximate the differences in each attribute for 6 Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) size classes of cars and light trucks. The vehicle sales share module holds the share of vehicle sales by import and domestic manufacturers constant within a vehicle size class at 1999 levels based on National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration data. 32 EPA size class sales shares are projected as a function of income per capita, fuel prices, and average predicted vehicle prices based on endogenous calculations within the MTCM

198

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind108. Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind108. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

199

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Footnote  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

[1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), DOE/EIA-0383(2000), (Washington, DC, December 1999). [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), DOE/EIA-0383(2000), (Washington, DC, December 1999). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998, DOE/EIA-0581(98), (Washington, DC, February 1998). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use Standard and Poor’s DRI August 1999 T250899 and February TO250299 and TP250299. [5] PennWell Publishing Co., International Petroleum Encyclopedia, (Tulsa, OK, 1999). [6] EIA, EIA Model Documentation: World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model, “WORLD” Reference Manual, DOE/EIA-M058, (Washington, DC, March 1994).

200

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable.gif (4875 bytes) renewable.gif (4875 bytes) The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittence, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

202

Assessment of LWR spent fuel disposal options. Volume 3. Study bases and system design considerations (Appendices). Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 (Appendices) provides a tabulation of the bases and assumptions used in the study as well as preconceptual design description and cost estimates of the facilities and transportation systems necessary to implement the various study cases.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

204

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

205

Comparison of risk-dominant scenario assumptions for several TRU waste facilities in the DOE complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain a risk management perspective, the DOE Rocky Flats Field Office (RFFO) initiated a survey of other DOE sites regarding risks from potential accidents associated with transuranic (TRU) storage and/or processing facilities. Recently-approved authorization basis documents at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been based on the DOE Standard 3011 risk assessment methodology with three qualitative estimates of frequency of occurrence and quantitative estimates of radiological consequences to the collocated worker and the public binned into three severity levels. Risk Class 1 and 2 events after application of controls to prevent or mitigate the accident are designated as risk-dominant scenarios. Accident Evaluation Guidelines for selection of Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are based on the frequency and consequence bin assignments to identify controls that can be credited to reduce risk to Risk Class 3 or 4, or that are credited for Risk Class 1 and 2 scenarios that cannot be further reduced. This methodology resulted in several risk-dominant scenarios for either the collocated worker or the public that warranted consideration on whether additional controls should be implemented. RFFO requested the survey because of these high estimates of risks that are primarily due to design characteristics of RFETS TRU waste facilities (i.e., Butler-type buildings without a ventilation and filtration system, and a relatively short distance to the Site boundary). Accident analysis methodologies and key assumptions are being compared for the DOE sites responding to the survey. This includes type of accidents that are risk dominant (e.g., drum explosion, material handling breach, fires, natural phenomena, external events, etc.), source term evaluation (e.g., radionuclide material-at-risk, chemical and physical form, damage ratio, airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, leakpath factors), dispersion analysis (e.g., meteorological assumptions, distance to receptors, plume meander, deposition, and other factors affecting the calculated {chi}/Q), dose assessments (specific activities, inhalation dose conversion factors, breathing rates), designated frequency of occurrence, and risk assignment per the DOE Standard 3011 methodology. Information from the sites is being recorded on a spreadsheet to facilitate comparisons. The first response from Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions for the Savannah River Site (SRS) also provided a detailed analysis of the major differences in methods and assumptions between RFETS and SRS, which forms much of the basis for this paper. Other sites responding to the survey include the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Hanford, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Marx, D.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Developing an energy-saving and case-based reasoning information agent with Web service and ontology techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web service and ontology techniques are presented herein for supporting an energy-saving and case-based reasoning information agent. The proposed system is the first energy-saving and case-based reasoning information agent with Web service and ontology ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning agents, Energy-saving information systems, Ontology, Web services

Sheng-Yuan Yang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Cognitive Bias Approach to Feature Selection and Weighting for Case-Based Learners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in psychology, psycholinguistics, and cognitive science has discovered and examined numerous psychological constraints on human information processing. Short term memory limitations, a focus of attention bias, and a preference for the use of ... Keywords: case-based learning, feature set selection, feature weighting, instance-based learning, natural language learning

Claire Cardie

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Towards case-based parsing: are chunks reliable indicators for syntax trees?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to the question whether it is possible to construct a parser based on ideas from case-based reasoning. Such a parser would employ a partial analysis of the input sentence to select a (nearly) complete syntax tree and then ...

Sandra Kbler

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Free-Ridership in the Standards-Setting Process: The Case of 10BaseT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free-Ridership in the Standards-Setting Process: The Case of 10BaseT Martin B.H. Weiss Ronald T to their non-exclusionary nature, are subject to free riders. In this paper, we consider free ridership that free-ridership existed in the development of the 10BaseT standard and in the subsequent product market

210

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA- M068(2002) January 2002. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

211

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA- M068(2001) January 2001. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

212

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

acronyms.gif (3143 bytes) acronyms.gif (3143 bytes) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO98 Annual Energy Outlook 1998 AEO99 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 AFV AFV Alternative-Fuel Vehicle AGA American Gas Association ANGTS Alaskan Natural Gas Transportation System BEA Bureau of Economic Analysis BSC Boiler/Steam/Cogeneration BTU British Thermal Unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CBECS Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CDD Cooling Degree-Days CNG Compressed natural gas DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRB Demonstrated Reserve Base DRI Data Resources, Inc./McGraw Hill EER Energy Efficiency Ratio EIA Energy Information Administration EIS Environmental Impact Statement EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 EWG Exempt Wholesale Generator FAA Federal Aviation Administration

213

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

2.0 Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) 2.1 Problem Description One half of a 20-m, one-dimensional horizontal domain, discretized using uniformly spaced 1-m grid cells (optionally 0.1-m grid cells) is initialized with aqueous-hydrate conditions; whereas, the other half of the domain is initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. As with the Base Case problem, a closed horizontal domain is used to eliminate gravitational body forces and boundary condition effects. The initial conditions are specified to yield complete dissociation of the hydrate, via the thermal capacitance of the domain-half initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. To initialize the aqueous-hydrate half of the domain, temperature, pressure, and hydrate saturation are

215

Case-based techniques used for dialogue understanding and planning in a human-robot dialogue system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe an approach to the use of case-based techniques for natural language understanding and for action planning in a system for dialogue between a human and a robot, which in our case is a UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle). A single case base and ...

Karolina Eliasson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind.112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

217

This book adds an important nuance to the traditional historiographical assumption that trade in the Early Modern period was mostly conducted between family and those of the same  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book adds an important nuance to the traditional historiographical assumption that trade group. Rather, it is the assertion of this book, that there were very real and quite important trade relationships between merchants of different groups, and the book uses a case study of the Sephardim

van den Brink, Jeroen

218

The Iron Age & Coal-based Coke: A Neglected Case of Fossil-fuel Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Iron Age & Coal-based Coke: A Neglected Case of Fossil-fuel Dependence by Vaclav Smil September share of their primary energies from renewable sources. Steel & Coal-Derived Coke Here is another important: steel's fundamental dependence on coal-derived coke with no practical substitutes on any rational

Smil, Vaclav

219

Community-Based Incentives for Environmental Protection: The Case of Green Electricity*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Connecticut Clean Energy Communities (CCEC) program that provides mostly symbolic rewards in the formCommunity-Based Incentives for Environmental Protection: The Case of Green Electricity* Grant the period of initial qualification. We also find that a change in the marginal incentive created

Kotchen, Matthew J.

220

Knowledge representation and case-based reasoning in a knowledge management system for ambient intelligence products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the theoretical background and realization of a KM system for the technically advanced customer and product support in the Ambient Intelligence (AmI) domain. Current products include more and more elements of AmI. AmI area is still ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, case-based reasoning, customer support system, diagnostics system, knowledge management system, knowledge representation

Ljubisa Urosevic; Sandor Kopacsi; Dragan Stokic; Ana Rita Campos; Geza Bognar

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ONCO-i2b2: improve patients selection through case-based information retrieval techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Pavia (Italy) and the IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri hospital in Pavia have recently started an information technology initiative to support clinical research in oncology called ONCO-i2b2. This project aims at supporting translational ... Keywords: case-based reasoning, i2b2, oncology

Daniele Segagni; Matteo Gabetta; Valentina Tibollo; Alberto Zambelli; Silvia G. Priori; Riccardo Bellazzi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Building a case-based diet recommendation system without a knowledge engineer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to the effective development of menu construction systems that allow to automatically construct a menu that is strongly tailored to the individual requirements and food preferences of a client. In hospitals and other health ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Dietary menu construction, Knowledge acquisition, Ripple-down rules

Abdus Salam Khan; Achim Hoffmann

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microwave Properties of Ice-Phase Hydrometeors for Radar and Radiometers: Sensitivity to Model Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified framework is presented for assessing the qualitative sensitivities of computed microwave properties, satellite brightness temperatures, and radar reflectivities to assumptions concerning the physical properties of ice-phase ...

Benjamin T. Johnson; Grant W. Petty; Gail Skofronick-Jackson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document provides key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions related to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions were extracted from a number of NGNP Project sources such as licensing related white papers, previously issued requirement documents, and preapplication interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

Wayne Moe

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The HLW salt waste (salt cake and supernate) now stored at the SRS must be treated to remove insoluble sludge solids and reduce the soluble concentration of radioactive cesium radioactive strontium and transuranic contaminants (principally Pu and Np). These treatments will enable the salt solution to be processed for disposal as saltstone, a solid low-level waste.

Elder, H.H.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

HBDR: a case-based tool for organizing architectural information on historic building designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning about previous design projects is a very important part of the study of architecture as well as the process of design. Historic preservation, a branch of architecture, is not an exception to this rule. In the field of historic preservation, information regarding previous design projects is available in the form of historic photographs, measured drawings, details, descriptive text and notes. This information is currently available from different sources. It must be organized to enable effective use for the student community. Case-based representation and learning systems can be used to arrange and define the case study information. In this research, I have collected and categorized information about previous historic building designs. As a part of the research, I have developed software through which the information can be made available to students at one platform. The software also captures student's comments about each case, which may be beneficial to the student's learning experience. The software has been tested by graduate students in a historic presentation course. The tests show that the software aids students in obtaining answers more quickly and with greater accuracy than paper-based descriptions of cases.

Mulye, Leena

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Analysis of the Effects of Compositional and Configurational Assumptions on Product Costs for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Mixed Alcohols FY 2007 Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine alternative biomass-to-ethanol conversion process assumptions and configuration options to determine their relative effects on overall process economics. A process-flow-sheet computer model was used to determine the heat and material balance for each configuration that was studied. The heat and material balance was then fed to a costing spreadsheet to determine the impact on the ethanol selling price. By examining a number of operational and configuration alternatives and comparing the results to the base flow sheet, alternatives having the greatest impact the performance and cost of the overall system were identified and used to make decisions on research priorities. This report, which was originally published in December 2008, has been revised primarily to correct information presented in Appendix B -- Base Case Flow Sheets and Model Results. The corrections to Appendix B include replacement of several pages in Table B.1 that duplicated previous pages of the table. Other changes were made in Appendix B to correct inconsistencies between stream labels presented in the tables and the stream labels in the figures.

Zhu, Yunhua; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

229

On the use of the parabolic concentration profile assumption for a rotary desiccant dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

The current work describes a model for a desiccant dehumidifier which uses a parabolic concentration profile assumption to model the diffusion resistance inside the desiccant particle. The relative merits of the parabolic concentration profile model compared with widely utilized rotary desiccant wheel models are discussed. The periodic steady-state parabolic concentration profile model developed is efficient and can accommodate a variety of materials. These features make it an excellent tool for design studies requiring repetitive desiccant wheel simulations. A quartic concentration profile assumption was also investigated which yielded a 2.8 percent average improvement in prediction error over the parabolic model.

Chant, E.E. [Univ. of Turabo, Gurabo (Puerto Rico); Jeter, S.M. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions October 17, 2006 Simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants fuelled by natural gas are among the bulk-emission and efficient gas turbine technology made combined-cycle gas turbine power plants the "resource of choice

231

External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on orographic clouds and precipitation: a multi-sensor case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented from the 2012 AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation, an experiment conducted over the Sierra Madre in southern Wyoming to study the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on precipitation. In this case, on 21 ...

Binod Pokharel; Bart Geerts; Xiaoqin Jing

233

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part I: Estimating Worst-Case Weather-Related Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exigent analysis supplements an ensemble forecast of weather-related damage with a map of the worst-case scenario (WCS), a multivariate confidence bound of the damage. For multivariate Gaussian ensembles, ensemble-based exigent analysis uses a ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

235

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

Phillip Mills

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015 and resource assumptions through 2030. The GWOB model provides annual country level oil production detail for eight conventional and unconventional oils.

237

ANUDlSiTM-40 Load Flow Analysis: Base Cases, Data, Diagrams, and Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ANUDlSiTM-40 ANUDlSiTM-40 Load Flow Analysis: Base Cases, Data, Diagrams, and Results by E.C. Portante, J.A. Kavicky, J.C. VanKuiken, and J.P. Peerenboom Decision and Information Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 October 1997 Work sponsored by Navy Engineering Logistics Office This report is printed on recycled paper. @ DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness. or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

238

Agent-based simulation of pedestrian behaviour in closed spaces: a museum case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to analyse the behaviour of pedestrians at the very fine scale, while moving along the streets, in open spaces or inside a building, simulation modelling becomes an essential tool. In these spatial environments, in the presence of unusual demand flows, simulation requires the ability to model the local dynamics of individual decision making and behaviour, which is strongly affected by the geometry, randomness, social preferences, local and collective behaviour of other individuals. The dynamics of people visiting and evacuating a museum offers an excellent case study along this line. In this paper we realize an agent-based simulation of the Castello Ursino museum in Catania (Italy), evaluating its carrying capacity in terms of both satisfaction of the visitors in regime of normal fruition and their safety under alarm conditions.

Pluchino, Alessandro; Inturri, Giuseppe; Rapisarda, Andrea; Ignaccolo, Matteo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of national energy consumption by fuel typeenergy consumption in homes under differing assumptions, scenarios, and policies. At the national

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. Koomey. 1994. Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions andunits) Table A 3 : Number of Appliances in Existing Homes (sector, including appliances and heating, ventilation, and

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical analyses and hypothesis tests as a part of the validation step to provide feedback to analysts and modelers. Decisions on how to proceed in making model-based predictions are made based on these analyses together with the application requirements. Updating modifying and understanding the boundaries associated with the model are also assisted through this feedback. (4) We include a ''model supplement term'' when model problems are indicated. This term provides a (bias) correction to the model so that it will better match the experimental results and more accurately account for uncertainty. Presumably, as the models continue to develop and are used for future applications, the causes for these apparent biases will be identified and the need for this supplementary modeling will diminish. (5) We use a response-modeling approach for our predictions that allows for general types of prediction and for assessment of prediction uncertainty. This approach is demonstrated through a case study supporting the assessment of a weapons response when subjected to a hydrocarbon fuel fire. The foam decomposition model provides an important element of the response of a weapon system in this abnormal thermal environment. Rigid foam is used to encapsulate critical components in the weapon system providing the needed mechanical support as well as thermal isolation. Because the foam begins to decompose at temperatures above 250 C, modeling the decomposition is critical to assessing a weapons response. In the validation analysis it is indicated that the model tends to ''exaggerate'' the effect of temperature changes when compared to the experimental results. The data, however, are too few and to restricted in terms of experimental design to make confident statements regarding modeling problems. For illustration, we assume these indications are correct and compensate for this apparent bias by constructing a model supplement term for use in the model-based predictions. Several hypothetical prediction problems are created and addressed. Hypothetical problems are used because no guidance was provided concern

Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

SciTech Connect

There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting. DE-AC03-76SF00098 #12;i ABSTRACT This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

245

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M060(2008) (Washington, DC, 2008). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

246

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

247

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 3. Coal-Related  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia Eastern Interior Western Fraction of underground coal production at: Gassy mines 0.885 0.368 0.971 0.876 0.681 Nongassy mines 0.115 0.632 0.029 0.124 0.319 Production from mines with degasification systems (fraction of underground production) 0.541 0.074 0.810 0.067 0.056 Emission factors (kilograms methane per short ton of coal produced) Underground Mining Gassy mines 6.047 5.641 27.346 2.988 6.027 Nongassy mines 0.362 0.076 15.959 0.285 0.245 Degassified mines 4.085 37.724 22.025 0.310 0.000 Surface Mining 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 Post-Mining, underground-mined 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 Post-Mining, surface-mined 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 Methane recovery at active coal mines

248

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M060(2010) (Washington, DC, 2010). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs.

249

A hybrid approach using data envelopment analysis and case-based reasoning for housing refurbishment contractors selection and performance improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The refurbishment market has grown greatly in the last decade. Relevant projects are becoming increasingly more demanding in the construction industry due to the emphasis on sustainability. Most refurbishment works, however, involve a higher level of ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning (CBR), Contractors selection, Data envelopment analysis (DEA), Housing refurbishment, Performance improvement

Yi-Kai Juan

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Integrating gray system theory and logistic regression into case-based reasoning for safety assessment of thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety assessment of thermal power plants (TPPs) is one of the important means to guarantee the safety of production in thermal power production enterprises. Due to various technical limitations, existing assessment approaches, such as analytic hierarchy ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Gray system theory, Intelligent decision support system, Logistic regression, Management safety assessment, Thermal power plants

Changyong Liang; Dongxiao Gu; Isabelle Bichindaritz; Xingguo Li; Chunrong Zuo; Wenen Cheng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

252

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

253

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

254

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

255

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

256

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - National Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 National Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

257

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

258

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

259

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

260

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference 2008 Pledges: Methodology and Assumptions Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2008 Washington International Renewable Energy Conference (WIREC) was held in Washington, D.C., from March 4-6, 2008, and involved nearly 9,000 people from 125 countries. The event brought together worldwide leaders in renewable energy (RE) from governments, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to discuss the role that renewables can play in alleviating poverty, growing economies, and passing on a healthy planet to future generations. The conference concluded with more than 140 governments, international organizations, and private-sector representatives pledging to advance the uptake of renewable energy. The U.S. government authorized the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the carbon dioxide (CO2) savings that would result from the pledges made at the 2008 conference. This report describes the methodology and assumptions used by NREL in quantifying the potential CO2 reductions derived from those pledges.

Babiuch, B.; Bilello, D. E.; Cowlin, S. C.; Mann, M.; Wise, A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Measurements of aerosol properties from aircraft, satellite and ground-based remote sensing: a case-study from the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment (DABEX)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of aerosol properties from aircraft, satellite and ground-based remote sensing: A case study from the Dust and Biomass burning Experiment (DABEX)

Johnson, B. T.; Christopher, S.; Haywood, J.; Osborne, S. R.; McFarlane, Sally; Hsu, C.; Salustro, C.; Kahn, Ralph

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

A Malaysian Case Study on the Transmission Expansion/Investment Using Value-Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of Incentive Based Regulation as the tariff framework in Malaysia's Electricity Supply Industry calls for efficiency in the creation of a new asset while meeting the required reliability. In line with the new regulatory framework, Tenaga ... Keywords: asset management, incentive based regulation, life cycle cost, value-based approach, reliability

Joon Ibrahim, Nor Ziha Zainol Abidin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. 50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside July 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - Doctors have a new way of thinking about how to treat heart and skeletal muscle diseases. Body builders have a new way of

266

Standard assumptions and methods for solar heating and cooling systems analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of inputs, assumptions, analytical methods, and a reporting format is presented to help compare the results of residential and commercial solar system analyses being performed by different investigators. By the common use of load data, meteorological data, economic parameters, and reporting format, researchers examining, for example, two types of collectors may more easily compare their results. For residential heating and cooling systems, three locations were selected. The weather data chosen to characterize these cities are the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY). A house for each location was defined that is typical of new construction in that locale. Hourly loads for each location were calculated using a computerized load model that interacts with the system specified inputs characterizing each house. Four locations for commercial cooling analyses were selected from among the existing sites for which TMYs were available. A light commercial (nominal 25-ton cooling load) office building was defined and is used in all four locations. Hourly cooling and heating loads were computed for each city and are available on magnetic tape from the Solar Energy Research Insititute (SERI).

Leboeuf, C.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Business Practices for Environmental Excellence: Guidelines: Based on Case Studies of Other Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As competition unfolds, electric companies can leverage the experience of other industries that have developed successful environmental programs under similar market conditions. The case studies and guidelines in this report offer valuable pointers -- both specific business practices and general organizational approaches -- to utilities seeking to manage environmental performance as a corporate asset.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Developing Guidance and Tool Support for Rationale-based Use Case Specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology System), a prototype augmented reality application for nuclear powerplant technicians. Three weeks (Fig. 4.). The students were provided with a nuclear powerplant maintenance scenario illustrating case step has a number, and actor and system steps have to alternate. This way, we hope to avoid

Bruegge, Bernd

269

Risk-Based Maintenance Application Case Study: Risk Evaluation and Prioritization at a Fossil Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an application of the use of risk-based maintenance prioritization at a fossil power plant. In 2002, EPRI issued a report titled "Risk Based Maintenance Guideline" (product number 1004382) for fossil power plants. That guideline described several risk-based methods, which are being used in other industries primarily within the United States. Since then, a method called Risk Evaluation and Prioritization (REaP) has been evaluated for its use in decision making at fossil power plants ...

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of the Effects of Compositional and Configurational Assumptions on Product Costs for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Mixed Alcohols -- FY 2007 Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine alternative biomass-to-ethanol conversion process assumptions and configuration options to determine their relative effects on overall process economics. A process-flow-sheet computer model was used to determine the heat and material balance for each configuration that was studied. The heat and material balance was then fed to a costing spreadsheet to determine the impact on the ethanol selling price. By examining a number of operational and configuration alternatives and comparing the results to the base flow sheet, alternatives having the greatest impact the performance and cost of the overall system were identified and used to make decisions on research priorities.

Zhu, Yunhua; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

ReEDS Model Documentation: Base Case Data and Model Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ electricity generated Utility emissions rates based on eGRID 2007 V1.1 data from U.S. EPA New Jersey New

272

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been assigned specific terms related to extreme habitatsstudy based on free text terms for environmental metadatato- use (small) set of terms (Habitat-Lite) that captures

Hirschman, Lynette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Validation of PV performance models using satellite-based irradiance measurements : a case study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) system performance models are relied upon to provide accurate predictions of energy production for proposed and existing PV systems under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Ground based meteorological measurements are only available from a relatively small number of locations. In contrast, satellite-based radiation and weather data (e.g., SUNY database) are becoming increasingly available for most locations in North America, Europe, and Asia on a 10 x 10 km grid or better. This paper presents a study of how PV performance model results are affected when satellite-based weather data is used in place of ground-based measurements.

Stein, Joshua S.; Parkins, Andrew (Clean Power Research); Perez, Richard (University at Albany)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Information systems continuance intention of web-based applications customers: The case of online banking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proliferation of the Internet has not only allowed businesses to offer their products and services through web-based applications, but it has also undermined their ability to retain their customers. It has reduced search costs, opened up barriers ... Keywords: Commitment, Commitment-Trust theory, End-user relationship, Relationship marketing, Retention, Trust, Web-based application

Banphot Vatanasombut; Magid Igbaria; Antonis C. Stylianou; Waymond Rodgers

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Rights-based evaluation of government responses to a given 'natural' disaster : Katrina as case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster impacts human mobility and a rights-based approach to disaster response is needed to protect the human rights of those who seek migration as an adaptation strategy. This paper deals with returning to a place after ...

Haeffner, Melissa (Melissa Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

On the practice of artificial intelligence based predictive control scheme: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel artificial intelligence based predictive control scheme for the purpose of dealing with so many complicated systems. In the control scheme proposed here, the system has to be first represented through a multi-Takagi-Sugeno-Kang ... Keywords: Drum-type boiler-turbine system, GPC identifier, GPC scheme, Industrial tubular heat exchanger system, Linear model approximation, Multi-GPC scheme, Multi-TSK fuzzy-based model approach, NLGPC scheme, System operating points

A. H. Mazinan; M. Sheikhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

278

Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Bursting-Layer Modeling Based on the Assumption of the Averaged Sea Surface for Strong Wind-Driven Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the sea, which is affected by strong winds that cover the water surface with wind-wave breakers, the sea surface layer, called the bursting layer by authors, is generated immediately below the mean water level. For treatment of strong wind-...

Tomokazu Murakami; Takashi Yasuda

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Agent-based collaborative product design engineering: an industrial case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and rapid evolving of Internet and Web-based technologies have revolutionized the product development process. Engineering a product is a complex process involving the integration of distributed resources, such as human beings, engineering ... Keywords: collaboration, internet-aided design, product design engineering, software agents, workflow

Qi Hao; Weiming Shen; Zhan Zhang; Seong-Whan Park; Jai-Kyung Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Agent-based collaborative product design engineering: An industrial case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and rapid evolving of Internet and Web-based technologies have revolutionized the product development process. Engineering a product is a complex process involving the integration of distributed resources, such as human beings, engineering ... Keywords: Collaboration, Internet-aided design, Product design engineering, Software agents, Workflow

Qi Hao; Weiming Shen; Zhan Zhang; Seong-Whan Park; Jai-Kyung Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Judicial support systems: ideas for a privacy ontology-based case analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, ontology is applied as an integral part of many applications in several domains, especially in the world of law. The ontology based judicial support system is believed as a useful tool to support, for example, the legal argumentation assistant ... Keywords: privacy directives, privacy ontology, privacy ontology structure, privacy principles, woolf reforms

Yan Tang; Robert Meersman

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Computers & Geosciences 29 (2003) 351359 A case against Kd-based transport models: natural attenuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)-based transport model. The study site is a contaminated groundwater aquifer underneath a uranium mill tailings prediction of the fate and transport of regulated metals and radionuclides in the subsurface of abandoned mining sites is critical to the assessment of environmental impact and to the development of effective

Polly, David

284

Verification & validation by docking: a case study of agent-based models of Anopheles gambiae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, using the technique of docking, we perform verification & validation (V&V) of agent-based simulation models that simulate the life cycle of Anopheles gambiae, the primary vector for malaria transmission. Working with one ... Keywords: Anopheles gambiae, docking, malaria epidemiology, verification & validation

S. M. Niaz Arifin; Gregory J. Davis; Ying Zhou

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Evaluation of a flowchart-based EHR query system: A case study of RetroGuide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provision of query systems which are intuitive for non-experts has been recognized as an important informatics challenge. We developed a prototype of a flowchart-based analytical framework called RetroGuide that enables non-experts to formulate query ... Keywords: Biomedical informatics, Data warehouse, Evaluation, Informatics, Mixed-method, Query system, RetroGuide, SQL

Vojtech Huser; Scott P. Narus; Roberto A. Rocha

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

287

Preliminary Review of Models, Assumptions, and Key Data used in Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is in response to a request by Ming Zhu, DOE-EM to provide a preliminary review of existing models and data used in completed or soon to be completed Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses (PA/CA) documents, to identify codes, methodologies, main assumptions, and key data sets used.

Arthur S. Rood; Swen O. Magnuson

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Graphical Approach to Diagnosing the Validity of the Conditional Independence Assumptions of a Bayesian Network Given Data  

SciTech Connect

Bayesian networks have attained widespread use in data analysis and decision making. Well studied topics include: efficient inference, evidence propagation, parameter learning from data for complete and incomplete data scenarios, expert elicitation for calibrating Bayesian network probabilities, and structure learning. It is not uncommon for the researcher to assume the structure of the Bayesian network or to glean the structure from expert elicitation or domain knowledge. In this scenario, the model may be calibrated through learning the parameters from relevant data. There is a lack of work on model diagnostics for fitted Bayesian networks; this is the contribution of this paper. We key on the definition of (conditional) independence to develop a graphical diagnostic method which indicates if the conditional independence assumptions imposed when one assumes the structure of the Bayesian network are supported by the data. We develop the approach theoretically and describe a Monte Carlo method to generate uncertainty measures for the consistency of the data with conditional independence assumptions under the model structure. We describe how this theoretical information and the data are presented in a graphical diagnostic tool. We demonstrate the approach through data simulated from Bayesian networks under different conditional independence assumptions. We also apply the diagnostic to a real world data set. The results indicate that our approach is a reasonable way of visualizing and inspecting the conditional independence assumption of a Bayesian network given data.

Walsh, Stephen J.; Whitney, Paul D.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Single family heating and cooling requirements: Assumptions, methods, and summary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research has created a data base of hourly building loads using a state-of-the-art building simulation code (DOE-2.ID) for 8 prototypes, representing pre-1940s to 1990s building practices, in 16 US climates. The report describes the assumed modeling inputs and building operations, defines the building prototypes and selection of base cities, compares the simulation results to both surveyed and measured data sources, and discusses the results. The full data base with hourly space conditioning, water heating, and non-HVAC electricity consumption is available from GRI. In addition, the estimated loads on a per square foot basis are included as well as the peak heating and cooling loads.

Ritschard, R.L.; Hanford, J.W.; Sezgen, A.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ground-Based Remote Sensing of Cloud Particle Sizes during the 26 November 1991 FIRE II Cirrus Case: Comparisons with In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of retrieving characteristic particle sizes for the November 26 1991 FIRE II case using two methods that utilize ground-based remotes sensors. The size information for the complete vertical depth of the cloud was ...

S. Y. Matrosov; A. J. Heymsfield; J. M. Intrieri; B. W. Orr; J. B. Snider

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Flawed Assumptions, Models and Decision Making: Misconceptions Concerning Human Elements in Complex System  

SciTech Connect

The history of high consequence accidents is rich with events wherein the actions, or inaction, of humans was critical to the sequence of events preceding the accident. Moreover, it has been reported that human error may contribute to 80% of accidents, if not more (dougherty and Fragola, 1988). Within the safety community, this reality is widely recognized and there is a substantially greater awareness of the human contribution to system safety today than has ever existed in the past. Despite these facts, and some measurable reduction in accident rates, when accidents do occur, there is a common lament. No matter how hard we try, we continue to have accidents. Accompanying this lament, there is often bewilderment expressed in statements such as, ''There's no explanation for why he/she did what they did''. It is believed that these statements are a symptom of inadequacies in how they think about humans and their role within technological systems. In particular, while there has never been a greater awareness of human factors, conceptual models of human involvement in engineered systems are often incomplete and in some cases, inaccurate.

FORSYTHE,JAMES C.; WENNER,CAREN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Preliminary analysis of the induced structural radioactivity inventory of the base-case aqueous accelerator transmutation of waste reactor concept  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Transmutation of (Nuclear) Waste (ATW) project is the substantial reduction in volume of long-lived high-level radioactive waste of the US in a safe and energy-efficient manner. An evaluation of the ATW concept has four aspects: material balance, energy balance, performance, and cost. An evaluation of the material balance compares the amount of long-lived high-level waste transmuted with the amount and type, of waste created in the process. One component of the material balance is the activation of structural materials over the lifetime of the transmutation reactor. A preliminary radioactivity and radioactive mass balance analysis has been performed on four structure regions of the reaction chamber: the tungsten target, the lead annulus, six tubing materials carrying the actinide slurry, and five reaction vessel structural materials. The amount of radioactive material remaining after a 100-yr cooling period for the base-case ATW was found to be 338 kg of radionuclides. The bulk of this material (313 kg) was generated in the zirconium-niobium (Zr-Nb) actinide tubing material. Replacement of the Zr-Nb tubing material with one of the alternative tubing materials analyzed would significantly reduce the short- and long-term radioactive mass produced. The alternative vessel material Al-6061 alloys, Tenelon, HT-9, and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and the alternative actinide tubing materials Al-6061 alloy, carbon-carbon matrix, silicon carbide, and Ti-6 Al-4 V qualify for shallow land burial. Alternative disposal options for the base-case structural material Type 304L stainless steel and the actinide tubing material Zr-Nb will need to be considered as neither qualifies for shallow land burial.

Bezdecny, J.A.; Vance, K.M.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Comparative Analysis of Agent-Based and Population-Based Modelling in Epidemics and Economics. Multi-Agent and Grid Systems Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses comparative evaluation of population-based simulation in comparison to agent-based simulation for different numbers of agents. Population-based simulation, such as for example in the classical approaches to predator-prey modelling and modelling of epidemics, has computational advantages over agent-based modelling with large numbers of agents. Therefore the latter approaches can be considered useful only when the results are expected to deviate from the results of population-based simulation, and are considered more realistic. However, there is sometimes also a silent assumption that for larger numbers of agents, agent-based simulations approximate population-based simulations, which would indicate that agent-based simulation just can be replaced by population-based simulation. The paper evaluates such assumptions by two detailed comparative case studies: one in epidemics, and one in economical context. The former case study addresses the spread of an infectious disease over a population. The latter case study addresses the interplay between individual greed as a psychological concept and global economical concepts. It is shown that under certain conditions agent-based and population-based simulations may show similar results, but not always.

Tibor Bosse; S. Waqar Jaffry; Ghazanfar F. Siddiqui; Jan Treur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CCN predictions using simplified assumptions of organic aerosol composition and mixing state: A synthesis from six different locations  

SciTech Connect

An accurate but simple quantification of the fraction of aerosol particles that can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is needed for implementation in large-scale models. Data on aerosol size distribution, chemical composition, and CCN concentration from six different locations have been analyzed to explore the extent to which simple assumptions of composition and mixing state of the organic fraction can reproduce measured CCN number concentrations. Fresher pollution aerosol as encountered in Riverside, CA, and the ship channel in Houston, TX, cannot be represented without knowledge of more complex (size-resolved) composition. For aerosol that has experienced processing (Mexico City, Holme Moss (UK), Point Reyes (CA), and Chebogue Point (Canada)), CCN can be predicted within a factor of two assuming either externally or internally mixed soluble organics although these simplified compositions/mixing states might not represent the actual properties of ambient aerosol populations, in agreement with many previous CCN studies in the literature. Under typical conditions, a factor of two uncertainty in CCN concentration due to composition assumptions translates to an uncertainty of {approx}15% in cloud drop concentration, which might be adequate for large-scale models given the much larger uncertainty in cloudiness.

Ervens, B.; Wang, J.; Cubison, M. J.; Andrews, E.; Feingold, G.; Ogren, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Zhang, Q.; Coe, H.; Flynn, M.; Allan, J. D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Statistical Approaches and Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... during the PCR amplification process This is highly affected by DNA quantity and quality ... PCR inhibitors present in the sample may reduce PCR ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

Adapting a Beam-Based Rotordynamics Model to Accept a General Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Casing Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The subject of this thesis is an extension of a two-dimensional, axisymmetric, Timoshenko-beam finite-element rotordynamic code to include a three-dimensional non-axisymmetric solid-element casing model. Axisymmetric beams are sufficient to model rotors. Spring and damper forces provide the interface between the rotor and its casing and capture the dynamics of the full model. However, axisymmetric beams limit the modeling of real-case machine structures, where the casing is not axisymmetric. Axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric 3D finite element casing structures are modeled. These structures are then reduced using a technique called substructuring. Modal equations are developed for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric casing models. In a 3D non-axisymmetric model, structural dynamics modes can be modeled by lateral modes in two orthogonal planes. Modal information of the complex 3D casing structures are generated, and then incorporated into the 2D code after a series of pre-processing steps. A reduction method called Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) is used to reduce the large dimensionality involved in calculation of rotordynamic coefficients. The results from the casing structures are merged with the rotor model to create a combined rotor-casing model. The analysis of the combined structure shows that there is a difference in the natural frequencies and unbalance response between the model that uses symmetrical casing and the one that uses non-axisymmetric casing. XLTRC2 is used as an example of a two-dimensional axisymmetric beam-element code. ANSYS is used as a code to build three-dimensional non-axisymmetric solid-element casing models. The work done in this thesis opens the scope to incorporate complex non-axisymmetric casing models with XLTRC2.

James, Stephen M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part II: Using Ensemble Regression to Estimate Conditions Antecedent to Worst-Case Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this series on ensemble-based exigent analysis, a Lagrange multiplier minimization technique is used to estimate the exigent damage state (ExDS), the worst case with respect to a user-specified damage function and confidence level. ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the U.S. residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (McMenamin et al. 1992). In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70 % of electricity consumption and 30 % of natural gas consumption in the U.S. residential sector (EIA 1993). Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific

J. Hwang; Francis X. Johnson; Richard E. Brown; James W. Hanford; Jonathan G. Koomey

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Physically based modeling of rainfall-triggered landslides: a case study in the Luquillo forest, Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a rainfall-triggered landslide module within an existing physically based spatially distributed ecohydrologic model. The model, tRIBS-VEGGIE (Triangulated Irregular Networks-based ...

Arnone, E.

300

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Role Of Modeling Assumptions And Policy Instruments in Evaluating The Global Implications Of U.S. Biofuel Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of current U.S. biofuel law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) is to reduce dependence on imported oil, but the law also requires biofuels to meet carbon emission reduction thresholds relative to petroleum fuels. EISA created a renewable fuel standard with annual targets for U.S. biofuel use that climb gradually from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36 billion gallons (or about 136 billion liters) of biofuels per year by 2022. The most controversial aspects of the biofuel policy have centered on the global social and environmental implications of its potential land use effects. In particular, there is an ongoing debate about whether indirect land use change (ILUC) make biofuels a net source, rather sink, of carbon emissions. However, estimates of ILUC induced by biofuel production and use can only be inferred through modeling. This paper evaluates how model structure, underlying assumptions, and the representation of policy instruments influence the results of U.S. biofuel policy simulations. The analysis shows that differences in these factors can lead to divergent model estimates of land use and economic effects. Estimates of the net conversion of forests and grasslands induced by U.S. biofuel policy range from 0.09 ha/1000 gallons described in this paper to 0.73 ha/1000 gallons from early studies in the ILUC change debate. We note that several important factors governing LUC change remain to be examined. Challenges that must be addressed to improve global land use change modeling are highlighted.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Toward the regulation of ubiquitous mobile government: a case study on location-based emergency services in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile alerts, notifications and location-based emergency warning systems are now an established part of mobile government strategies in an increasing number of countries worldwide. In Australia the national emergency warning system (NEWS) was instituted ... Keywords: Emergency management, Location-based services, Mobile government, Regulation

Anas Aloudat; Katina Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Market-Based Valuation of New Coal-Fired Generation: Case Studies of Investment Risk and Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas turbine technology has dominated new generation capacity additions in the United States, yet several years of unexpectedly high natural gas prices are driving interest in alternatives. This report uses case studies of new coal-fired generation to address the question of whether coal can be a good choice for the private investor. The studies give great detail on possible coal plants in Texas and some guidance on possible projects in Virginia, Ohio, and Indiana. The studies provide a comprehens...

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mobility-supporting data management for location-based mobile systems: the special case of single category location repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-based mobile applications require timely generation of user-centric proximities from application-relevant repositories of business locations. The proximity generation requirement is poorly served by conventional query resolution methods which ...

James E. Wyse

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Bias Adjustment of Satellite Precipitation Estimation Using Ground-Based Measurement: A Case Study Evaluation over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable precipitation measurement is a crucial component in hydrologic studies. Although satellite-based observation is able to provide spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation, the measurements tend to show systematic bias. This paper ...

Farid Ishak Boushaki; Kuo-Lin Hsu; Soroosh Sorooshian; Gi-Hyeon Park; Shayesteh Mahani; Wei Shi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Experiences from near-real-time satellite-based volcano monitoring in Central America: case studies at Fuego, Guatemala  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, remote sensing has been used increasingly in the study of active volcanoes and their associated hazards. Ground-based remote sensing techniques, such as those aimed at the analysis of volcanic gases or fumarole temperatures, are ...

P. W. Webley; M. J. Wooster; W. Strauch; J. A. Saballos; K. Dill; P. Stephenson; J. Stephenson; R. Escobar Wolf; O. Matias

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radar-Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation for the Cool Season in Complex Terrain: Case Studies from the NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores error sources of the National Weather Service operational radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) during the cool season over the complex terrain of the western United States. A new, operationally geared radar ...

Jian Zhang; Youcun Qi; David Kingsmill; Kenneth Howard

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Feedback loops in educational environments using web-based survey tools : new technology development and three implementation case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents lessons from the development of an on-line, web-based feedback system and preliminary analysis of the socio-technical interactions associated with the specification, design and use of this system. The ...

Spead, Benjamin, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Domains of competence of fuzzy rule based classification systems with data complexity measures: A case of study using a fuzzy hybrid genetic based machine learning method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of data complexity is a proper framework to characterize the tackled classification problem and to identify domains of competence of classifiers. As a practical outcome of this framework, the proposed data complexity measures may facilitate ... Keywords: Classification, Data complexity, Fuzzy rule based systems, Genetic fuzzy systems

Julin Luengo; Francisco Herrera

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Internet-based 'social sharing' as a new form of global production: The case of SETI@home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benkler (Sharing nicely: on shareable goods and the emergence of sharing as a modality of economic production, Yale Law Journal, 2004, vol. 114, pp. 273-358) has argued that 'social sharing' via Internet-based distributed computing is a new, so far under-appreciated ... Keywords: Digital divide, Distributed computing, Economic production, SETI@home, Shareable goods, Social sharing

Hans-Jrgen Engelbrecht

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Extracting magnetic anomalies based on an improved BEMD method: A case study in the Pangxidong Area, South China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In bidimensional empirical mode decomposition, an appropriate stoppage criterion for the sifting process is important. To solve the problem of unstable convergence, a stepwise stop criterion was presented based on the Cauchy-type criterion. In one sifting ... Keywords: BEMD, Magnetic data, Mode mixing, Stepwise stop criterion

Weisheng Hou; Zhijun Yang; Yongzhang Zhou; Liping Zhang; Wenlong Wu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A type-based approach to separating protocol from application logic: a case study in hybrid computer programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous programming models have been introduced to allow programmers to utilize new accelerator-based architectures. While OpenCL and CUDA provide low-level access to accelerator programming, the task cries out for a higher-level abstraction. Of the ...

Geoffrey C. Hulette; Matthew J. Sottile; Allen D. Malony

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Creating a specific domain ontology for supporting R&D in the science-based sector - The case of biosensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In science-based and technology-intensive projects, knowledge management challenges require a tentative and cautious review of the technological domains, as well as, venues to monitor and assess the way those domains evolve, emerge, mature, and decline. ... Keywords: Biosensor, Domain ontology, Engineering knowledge, Meta-modeling

Fragiskos A. Batzias; Christina G. Siontorou

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Agent-based algorithms for collaborative price search in electronic commerce: a case study and performance evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an architecture based on mobile agents to search for admissible prices of a specific item among many merchant sites over the Internet. To make the search more efficient, mobile agents collaborate by exchanging information. In this ... Keywords: collaboration, data retrieval, e-commerce, mobile agents, price search

Ali Chamam; Samuel Pierre; Roch H. Glitho

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Using Adaptive Agent-Based Simulation Models to Assist Planners in Policy: The Case of Rent Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 2 Computer simulation modeling for policy development in planning has had difficulty gaining a consistent foothold. Reasons for this include bad experiences with large-scale, comprehensive models (e.g., Forrester, 1969) and the lack of theory that one can quantify (Batty, 1994). Batty (1994) has suggested that new types of computational models, based on the tenets of complexity theory (Bernard, under revision) may prove useful. One type of complexity theory model is an "adaptive agent based model" in which the actions, interactions, and adaptations of many autonomous, heterogeneous "agents" (households, firms, etc.) produce emergent, systemwide behavior. One can examine this emergent behavior using commonly employed metrics, but one can also garner a richer, more intuitive understanding of how the individual behavior of the agents self-organize to produce the entire system. Using this type of modeling for small-scale planning problems can both inform planning theorists and improve ...

Robert N. Bernard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H $2,000 hl S z % Reduction in Total Space Conditioning LoadAppliances and Space Conditioning Equipment. Arthur D.3.1 and 3.4. The space conditioning loads are based on the

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza and LITEC (CSIC), Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States Air Quality Analysis Based on AEO-2006 Assumptions for 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How would air quality and greenhouse gas emissions be affected if significant numbers of Americans drove cars that were fueled by the power grid? A recently completed assessment conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council made a detailed study of the question looking at a variety of scenarios involving the U.S. fleet of power generation and its fleet of light-duty and medium-duty cars and trucks. The study focused on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs...

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

NWCC Transmission Case Study III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Transmission System Improvements for Wind Energy Development in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains: Opportunities and Obstacles. This case study set out to ascertain the validity of three assumptions from the perspectives of stakeholders involved in wind energy and transmission issues in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains. The assumptions, and the stakeholders' reactions to each, are summarized below: Assumption 1--Transmission system improvements would provide significant benefits to the electricity network and its customers. Respondents acknowledge the potential for overall system benefits in the form of reduced line losses, improved grid stability and reliability, and enhanced ability to conduct spot market transactions. They also agree that these benefits relate to specific regional needs. However, there is disagreement over the extent of other benefits such as efficiency gains and cost savings from reduced line losses. Further, environmental and community interest groups point out that none of these benefits are realized without significant financial, environmental and social costs. Assumption 2--The benefits of transmission improvements would be helpful, but not confined, to wind power. All respondents agree that wind energy could benefit from transmission system improvements. But they also acknowledge, reluctantly, in the case of environmental stakeholders, that the benefits of an improved transmission system cannot be limited to environmentally preferable forms of generation. Some environmental and community advocate respondents also feel that transmission system improvement projects can be avoided altogether through energy conservation and efficiency measures, and by substituting wind energy for fossil generation. Assumption 3--Transmission alliances among stakeholders within and external to the wind community can provide benefits in the public interest. The fractured, multi-jurisdictional governance of the regional transmission system, and the distrust and diversity of perspectives among affected stakeholders, may make the formation of multi-stakeholder alliances necessary to accomplishing transmission goals. If the wind industry and utilities want to partner with environmental and community advocate groups in supporting a transmission project, they may have to convince these groups that the project would result in a net environmental benefit. The project proponents would have to make the case that the benefits of the additional wind energy will at least offset the emissions of any additional fossil generation made possible by the transmission project, as well as offset the environmental impact of the transmission project itself.

Terry Allison, Steve Wiese

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

323

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Determination of Effective Emittance and a Radiatively Equivalent Microphysical Model of Cirrus from Ground-Based and Satellite Observations during the International Cirrus Experiment: The 18 October 1989 Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based observations and satellite data have been compared for the 18 October 1989 case study of the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) field campaign. They correspond to thin cirrus clouds with infrared emittances in the range 00.3. ...

G. Brogniez; J. C. Buriez; V. Giraud; F. Parol; C. Vanbauce

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Case Study to Evaluate the Reliability Impact of Large-Scale Wind Generation: Incorporating Variable Generation and Loads into Rel iability-based Transmission Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a case study using a probabilistic framework to capture variations in output of variable generation connected to the transmission system along with system loads. The research in 2010, 2011, and some part of 2012 focused on developing the probabilistic model framework. The focus of the 2012 work was to use this model on a real-world (as opposed to a test system) transmission planning case along with data for all the variable generation and system loads modeled in the case to ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Crossing the Divide: A Case Study of Cross-Cultural Organizational Culture and Leadership Perceptions in a Faith-Based Non-Profit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For this qualitative research a single case study was conducted of a faith-based non-profit organization, Health Education and Literacy Providers (H.E.L.P.), which operates simultaneously in the United States and Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-cultural leadership phenomena occurring within H.E.L.P. and to provide evaluation services and research data to the American members of H.E.L.P. Participants included a sample of the American board members, Nigerian board members, and Nigerian employees. Three data collection methods were used to achieve triangulation including participant observations, interviews, and analysis of documents. The first research objective was to investigate the cross-cultural leadership context by analyzing the organizational culture of H.E.L.P. in Nigeria. Results revealed H.E.L.P. was designed by American board members to operate as a bureaucratic culture with an emphasis on a business-like structure, centralized authority, compartmentalization, and efficiency. The Nigerian board members and employees, however, expressed a desire for a supportive culture that focused on love and harmony uncovering a discrepancy between American and Nigerian preferences in organizational culture typology. The results from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) study were referenced to provide a cultural explanation for variations in organizational culture preferences. According to GLOBE study findings, the United States ranked higher on performance orientation meaning Americans are more likely to value results above people, ambition, and competitiveness, and explains the American?s desire for a bureaucratic organizational culture. Nigeria ranked behind the United States as a lower performance oriented society meaning individuals place high value on relationships and harmony, explaining their desire for a supportive culture. The second and third research objectives were to determine how H.E.L.P.'s Nigerian members perceive effective leadership within their culture, and determine how the Nigerians? definition of effective leadership supports or refutes the literature on prevalent Westernized leadership theories. Results indicated the overarching leadership theme perceived to be effective by the Nigerian members of H.E.L.P. was love. Several aspects of a loving leader were evident in the data and divided into five categories each with one subcategory. These findings supported both Transformational and Authentic leadership theories.

Muenich, Joelle 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Comparison of Ensemble Kalman FilterBased Forecasts to Traditional Ensemble and Deterministic Forecasts for a Case Study of Banded Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique is compared to other modeling approaches for a case study of banded snow. The forecasts include a 12- and 3-km grid-spaced deterministic forecast (D12 and D3), a 12-km 30-member ensemble (E12), and a 12-...

Astrid Suarez; Heather Dawn Reeves; Dustan Wheatley; Michael Coniglio

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Difficulties with Correcting Radar Rainfall Estimates Based on Rain Gauge Data: A Case Study of Severe Weather in Montana on 1617 June 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal source of information for operational flash flood monitoring and warning issuance is weather radarbased quantitative estimates of precipitation. Rain gauges are considered truth for the purposes of validating and calibrating real-...

Steven V. Vasiloff; Kenneth W. Howard; Jian Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Modified blame-based noise reduction for concept drift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Competence enhancement plays an important role in case-base editing. Traditional competence enhancement methods tend to omit the evolving nature of a case-based learner, but take the whole case-base as a static training set. This may seriously delay ... Keywords: case-base editing, case-base maintenance, case-based reasoning, competence enhancement, concept drift

Ning Lu; Guangquan Zhang; Jie Lu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Agent models II: search theory, agent-based simulation, and U-boats in the Bay of Biscay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, most search theory study has focused either on analytical models of specific situations requiring rigid assumptions, or, as in the case of search and rescue, operational experiments aimed at obtaining detection probabilities for a variety of ...

Lance Champagne; R. Greg Carl; Raymond Hill

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A MCDM-based expert system for climate-change impact assessment and adaptation planning - A case study for the Georgia Basin, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An MCDM-based expert system was developed to tackle the interrelationships between the climate change and the adaptation policies in terms of water resources management in the Georgia Basin, Canada. User interfaces of the developed expert system, named ... Keywords: Adaptation, Climate change, Georgia Basin, MCDM, Policy analysis, Water resources

X. S. Qin; G. H. Huang; A. Chakma; X. H. Nie; Q. G. Lin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

An assessment framework based on social perspectives and Analytic Hierarchy Process: A case study on sustainability in the Japanese concrete industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research introduces a framework for assessing concrete sustainability which is based upon the concept that technology is defined by stakeholders' perspectives and which applied Analytic Hierarchy Process to translate these perspectives into quantifiable ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process, Concrete, Construction, O31, O32, Sociology of technology, Sustainability

Michael Henry; Yoshitaka Kato

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The effect of oil revenues instability on the oil-based and labor-exporting economies: The case of the Arab region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes in the trend of the oil-export earnings in the oil-based economics not only affected the growth of the domestic economics not only affected the growth of the domestic economies but influenced the economic activities in the neighboring labor-exporting economies. This study investigates and tests the hypothesis that uncertainty associated with fluctuations in oil-export earnings affect adversely the economic growth in the oil-based economies of the Middle East. In addition, it seeks to examine the hypothesis that the impact of such fluctuations has been transmitted to the neighboring labor-exporting economies, during the period 1970-1986. Results show that oil-export instability does indeed create a wave of fluctuations in the domestic economic activity of the oil-based economies through the negative effect on investment, government spending, and domestic output. For the labor-exporting economies, results suggest that the flow of workers' remittances have had a positive impact on investment and income growth. Results also indicate that the rate of economic growth in the oil-based economies sets a broad limit on the range of feasible growth in the labor-exporting economies.

Al-Abbasi, M.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

(c) 2008-2011. Minh Ha-Duong. Rodica Loisel. CIRED Reproduction allowed. share alike. attribution. Blue cells: Numerical assumptions defining the scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructure such as injection wells and gathering systems, enabling more accurate assessment of CO2 storage MOUNTAINS PERMIAN BASIN JAF2010_031.XLS Source: Advanced Resources Int'l., based on Oil and Gas Journal

335

Determination of the Mean Wind Speed and Momentum Diffusivity Profiles above Tall Vegetation and Forest Canopies Using a Mass Conservation Assumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semianalytical method based on a mass conservation principle is presented for describing the transition- layer profiles of mean wind speed and momentum diffusivity and for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of forest and tall vegetation ...

N. M. Zoumakis

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Comparison between two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions have been considered; one be computed through the integration process (IRBF) and one be computed through the differentiation process (DRBF). We investigated the two approaches on natural convection heat transfer equations embedded in porous medium which are of great importance in the design of canisters for nuclear wastes disposal. Numerical results show that the IRBF be performed much better than the common DRBF, and show good accuracy and high rate of convergence of IRBF process.

K. Parand; S. Abbasbandy; S. Kazem; A. R. Rezaei

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Comparison between two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions have been considered; one be computed through the integration process (IRBF) and one be computed through the differentiation process (DRBF). We investigated the two approaches on natural convection heat transfer equations embedded in porous medium which are of great importance in the design of canisters for nuclear wastes disposal. Numerical results show that the IRBF be performed much better than the common DRBF, and show good accuracy and high rate of convergence of IRBF process.

Parand, K; Kazem, S; Rezaei, A R; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2010.07.011

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Enforcement Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cases Office of the General Counsel 1000 cases Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-586-5281 en AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624) http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/aerosys-order-2011-sce-1624 AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624)

340

Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study Case Study M2M Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 An irrigation pump connected to a web---to---wireless controller designed by M2M Communications. Agricultural Demand Response Program in California Helps Farmers Reduce Peak Electricity Usage, Operate More Efficiently Year---Round The development of a two---way, web---to---wireless controller for irrigation pumps is the foundation for an agricultural demand response program in California. Designed by M2M Communications of Boise, Idaho, the controller is part of an irrigation load control system that also includes sensors, smart meters, and other monitoring equipment. Partially funded with $2.2 million in Recovery Act stimulus funds awarded by the U.S. Department of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

342

FOIA Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

foia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 foia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en FIA-13-0077 - In the Matter of John F. Garrity http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/fia-13-0077-matter-john-f-garrity FIA-13-0077 - In the Matter of John F. Garrity

343

Security Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

security-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 security-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/psh-13-0103-matter-personnel-security PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security

344

Whistleblower Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

whistleblower-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals whistleblower-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en WBX-12-0004 - In the Matter of Denise Hunter http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/wbx-12-0004-matter-denise-hunter WBX-12-0004 - In the Matter of Denise Hunter

345

EIA Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/tee-0073-matter-cole-distributing-inc TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc.

346

NREL: Buildings Research - Building Physics Test Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cases, the model inputs that describe the house are fixed by the test specification. The energy usage for the base case and energy savings for a number of retrofit measures are...

347

An Adaptive Dealiasing Method Based on Variational Analysis for Radar Radial Velocities Scanned with Small Nyquist Velocities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous velocityazimuth display (VAD)-based methods of dealiasing folded radial velocities have relied heavily on the VAD uniform-wind assumption and, thus, can fail when the uniform-wind assumption becomes poor around azimuthal circles in a ...

Qin Xu; Kang Nai

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Aerosol properties computed from aircraft-based observations during the ACE-Asia campaign: 2. A case study of lidar ratio closure  

SciTech Connect

For a vertical profile with three distinct layers (marine boundary, pollution and dust layers), observed during the ACE-Asia campaign, we carried out a comparison between the modeled lidar ratio vertical profile and that obtained from co-located airborne NASA AATS-14 sunphotometer and shipborne Micro-Pulse Lidar (MPL) measurements. The vertically resolved lidar ratio was calculated from two size distribution vertical profiles one obtained by inversion of sunphotometer-derived extinction spectra, and one measured in-situ combined with the same refractive index model based on aerosol chemical composition. The aerosol model implies single scattering albedos of 0.78 0.81 and 0.93 0.96 at 0.523 ?m (the wavelength of the lidar measurements), in the pollution and dust layers, respectively. The lidar ratios calculated from the two size distribution profiles agree closely in the dust layer; they are however, significantly lower than the lidar ratios derived from combined lidar and sunphotometer measurements. Uncertainties in aerosol size distributions and refractive index only partly explain these differences, suggesting that particle nonsphericity in this layer is an additional explanation. In the pollution layer, the two size distribution profiles yield lidar ratios that agree within the estimated uncertainties. The retrieved size distributions result in a lidar ratio which is in closer agreement with that derived from lidar/sunphotometer measurements in this layer, with still large differences at certain altitudes (the largest relative difference was 46%). We explain these differences by non-uniqueness of the result of the size distribution retrieval, by a lack of information on the mixing state of particles, and the vertical variability of the particle refractive index.

Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, M. A.; Schmid, Beat; Box, G. P.; Wang, Jian; Russel, P. R.; Bates, D.; Jonsson, Haf; Welton, E. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Post-fire Tree Establishment Patterns at the Subalpine Forest-Alpine Tundra Ecotone: A Case Study in Mount Rainier National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic changes have induced striking altitudinal and latitudinal vegetation shifts throughout history. These shifts will almost certainly recur in the future; threatening other flora and fauna, and influencing climate feedback loops. Changes in the spatial distribution of vegetation are most conspicuous at physiognomically distinct ecotones, particularly between the subalpine forest and alpine tundra. Traditionally, ecological research has linked abiotic variables with the position of this ecotone (e.g., cold temperatures inhibit tree survival at high elevations). Thus, the prevailing assumption states that this ecotone is in equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium with the surrounding physical environment and that any dynamic shifts express direct linkages with the physical environment. This dissertation employs a landscape ecology approach to examine the abiotic and biotic ecological mechanisms most important in controlling tree establishment at this ecotone. The study site is on the western slopes of Mount Rainier, which was severely burned by a slash fire in 1930. Therefore, a crucial underlying assumption is that the ecological mechanisms controlling tree establishment are similar at disturbed and undisturbed sites. I exploited the use of 1970 CORONA satellite imagery and 2003 aerial photography to map 33 years of changes in arboreal vegetation. I created detailed maps of abiotic variables from a LIDAR-based DEM and biotic variables from classified remotely sensed data. I linked tree establishment patterns with abiotic and biotic variables in a GIS, and analyzed the correlations with standard logistic regression and logistic regression in the hierarchical partitioning framework at multiple spatial resolutions. A biotic factor (proximity to previously existing trees) was found to exert a strong influence on tree establishment patterns; equaling and in most cases exceeding the significance of the abiotic factors. The abiotic setting was more important at restricted spatial extents near the extreme upper limits of the ecotone and when analyzing coarse resolution data, but even in these cases proximity to existing trees remained significant. The strong overall influence of proximity to existing trees on patterns of tree establishment is unequivocal. If the underlying assumption of this dissertation is true, it challenges the long-held ecological assumption that vegetation in mountainous terrain is in equilibrium with and most strongly influenced by the surrounding physical environment.

Stueve, Kirk M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings, and how might we create energy policies to take these changes into account. The assumption here environment. #12;A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy 2 2. Methodology Forecasts for energy use

351

A Gaussian Plume Model of Atmospheric Dispersion Based on Second-Order Closure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical model of atmospheric dispersion of a passive tracer based on systematic reduction of the second-order closure transport equations using Gaussian shape assumptions is presented. The model is comparable with conventional Gaussian plume ...

R. I. Sykes; W. S. Lewellen; S. F. Parker

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Quantitative study of oilfield casing damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrying on the analysis to the cause of casing failure based on engineering factors and geological factors, and choosing the improved analytic hierarchy process to have a quantitative study for oilfield of the casing failure, improved the influence ... Keywords: analytical hierarchy process (AHP), casing damage, quantitative analysis

Deng Rui; Zhang Liang; Guo Haimin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Research Article: Effective sample size: Quick estimation of the effect of related samples in genetic case-control association analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affected relatives are essential for pedigree linkage analysis, however, they cause a violation of the independent sample assumption in case-control association studies. To avoid the correlation between samples, a common practice is to take only one ... Keywords: Correlation, Effective sample size, Genetic association, Variance inflation

Yaning Yang; Elaine F. Remmers; Chukwuma B. Ogunwole; Daniel L. Kastner; Peter K. Gregersen; Wentian Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

This algorithm performs variable propagation by instantiating values of the variables in the right-hand side of the assignments. In the case of variables that must be used before being reassigned a new value, second interpretation is adopted where `some d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many current safety certification standards are process-based, i.e. they prescribe a set of development techniques and methods. This is perhaps best exemplified by the use of Safety Integrity Levels (SILs), e.g. as defined by IEC 61508 and UK Defence Standard 00-55. SILs are defined according to the level of the risk posed by a system, and hence prescribe the tools, techniques and methods that should be adopted by the development and assessment lifecycle. Product-based certification relies on the generation and assurance of product-specific evidence that meets safety requirements derived from hazard analysis. This evidence can be used as the argument basis in a safety case. However, uncertainty about the provenance of evidence in such a safety case can undermine confidence. To address this problem, we argue that process arguments remain an essential element of any safety case. However, unlike the sweeping process-based integrity arguments of the past, we suggest instead that highly directed process arguments should be linked to the items of evidence used in the product case. Such arguments can address issues of tool integrity, competency of personnel, and configuration management. Much as deductive software safety arguments are desirable, there will always be inductive elements. Process-based arguments of the type we suggest address partly this problem by tackling the otherwise implicit assumptions underlying certification evidence.

Ibrahim Habli

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2003), (Washington, DC, January 2003).

357

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Analysis & Projections. Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, Congressional reports. Markets & ...

358

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 20). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data. The energy-intensive industries (food and kindred products, paper and allied products, bulk chemicals, glass and glass products, hydraulic cement, blast furnace and basic steel products, and aluminum) are modeled in considerable detail. Each industry is modeled as three separate but interrelated components consisting of the Process Assembly (PA) Component, the Buildings Component (BLD), and the Boiler/Steam/Cogenera- tion (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces byproducts that are consumed in the BSC Component. For the manufacturing industries, the PA Component is separated into the major production processes or end uses.

359

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

360

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Release date: March 2006 Next release date: March 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Coal Market Module

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Coal Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Renewable Fuels Module . . . . . . . . . . .

362

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2003), (Washington, DC, February 2003). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers.

363

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Household Expenditures Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Residential Demand Module Petroleum Market Module...

364

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs...

365

Operational Waste Stream Assumption for TSLCC Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the background and basis for the operational waste stream used in the 2000 Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). This document has been developed in accordance with its Development Plan (CRWMS M&O 2000a), and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''.

S. Gillespie

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonfarm labor productivity is expected to diminish from its current high level to a more sustainable level between 1.8 and 2.6 percent for the remainder of the forecast period...

367

Green enterprise computing data: Assumptions and realities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until now, green computing research has largely relied on few, short-term power measurements to characterize the energy use of enterprise computing. This paper brings new and comprehensive power datasets through Powernet, a hybrid sensor network that ...

Maria Kazandjieva; Brandon Heller; Omprakash Gnawali; Philip Levis; Christos Kozyrakis

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

density, housing values, income values, and availability of deepwater ports. The production costs reflect assumed market prices entering the liquefaction facility for...

369

Supply-side Resources & Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling 146/19/2013 #12;6/19/2013 8 Commercial w/Limited PNW availability Proposed resources: ­ Biogas technologies Raft River Geothermal (ID)Biogas technologies Landfill Wastewater treatment Animal, commercial

370

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

eleven building categories14 in each of the nine Census divisions. The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division...

371

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market...

372

Current Status and Future Assumptions INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies (coal bed methane, tight sands, oil shale), increased import capability through May 2005 2-9 #12

373

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, ...

374

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2003 PDF files require Adobe Acrobat Reader, the latest copy of which is available free Adobe Acrobat Logo Appendixes Available Formats Download Entire Report PDF, HTML...

375

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(EIEA2008), the biofuel provisions of the Food, ... and raw materials in each of 21 industries, subject to the delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic

376

Retail Market Based Pricing: Retail Market Based Pricing - Three Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Customers are not provided with incentives for efficient conservation and substitution of electricity away from peak periods if they do not face prices that reflect the real-time cost of purchasing wholesale electricity that is experienced by their retail energy provider. Recent events in California's restructured electricity market underscore the importance of developing products and structures that enable demand response to changes in prices in these markets. This report assembles three studies of cust...

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Table G1 - Summary of the AEO2000 Cases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2000 Cases AEO2000 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference in text Reference in Appendix G Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated — — Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully integrated p. 49 — High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully integrated p. 49 — Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated p. 50 — High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case.

378

NP Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BES) Biological and Environmental Science (BER) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) High Energy Physics (HEP) Nuclear Physics (NP) Agenda Hotel Case Studies Case Study Worksheets...

379

On a group schedule management system using preference-based distributed ATMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMS On a group schedule management system using preference-based distributed ATMS y y Takayuki Ito Science Abstract: In this paper, we propose a group schedule management system using a preference- based distributed ATMS (Assumption-based Truth Maintenance System). We can classify group schedules into three types

380

Case Engineering Group India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group India Group India Jump to: navigation, search Name Case Engineering Group India Place Uttar Pradesh, India Sector Services, Solar Product Faridabad-based coal gasifiers and pollution services firm. Through its joint venture with Norasco the firm is planning to venture into solar power generation sector. References Case Engineering Group India[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Case Engineering Group India is a company located in Uttar Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Case Engineering Group India" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Case_Engineering_Group_India&oldid=343278" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Speech pitch determination based on Hilbert-Huang transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pitch determination is an essential part of speech recognition and speech processing. In this paper, a new pitch determination method based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is presented. The assumption of linearity of the speech-production process and ... Keywords: Hilbert-Huang transform, pitch determination, speech analysis

Hai Huang; Jiaqiang Pan

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

updated offshore data and assumptions, pushing out start dates for several projects as a ... Natural gas, wind and other renewables account for the vast

383

Lattice-based Cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we describe some of the recent progress in lattice-based cryptography. Lattice-based cryptographic constructions hold a great promise for post-quantum cryptography, as they enjoy very strong security proofs based on worst-case hardness, relatively efficient implementations, as well as great simplicity. In addition, lattice-based cryptography is believed to be secure against quantum computers. Our focus here

Daniele Micciancio; Oded Regev

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

In Case of Emergency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Case of Emergency In Case of Emergency Print FirePolice Emergency: ext. 7911 Cell phone or off-site: 510-486-7911 When dialing from off-site, the following numbers need to be...

385

The Influence of a Steady Baroclinic Deep Ocean On the Shelf: The Vertically Well-Mixed Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many coastal regions in the world ocean are characterized by well-mixed conditions to shelf depth in the density field during the winter season. In these situations it is appropriate to construct a model based on the assumption that the shelf is ...

M. Ross Vennell; Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

Johnson, C.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, 186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies ..... 202 Microstructure Exploration of High Strength High Ductility Iron-Based Glassy

388

Case Study 2 - Ventilation, IAQ and Energy Impacts of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in ... building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and ...

389

A realism-based analysis of the OpenEHR entry model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a proposal of improvement for clinical models of the OpenEHR standard according to the realism-based assumptions. In order to reach such proposal, we analyze OpenEHR entry model and realism-based ontologies created specifically for Medicine. ... Keywords: clinical models, knowledge representation, ontologies

Andr Queiroz Andrade; Mauricio Barcellos Almeida

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Climate change vulnerability assessments as catalysts for social learning: four case studies in south-eastern Australia  

SciTech Connect

Technical assessments of vulnerability and/or risk are increasingly being undertaken to assess the impacts of climate change. Underlying this is the belief that they will bring clarity to questions regarding the scale of institutional investments required, plausible adaptation policies and measures, and the timing of their implementation. Despite the perceived importance of technical assessments in 'evidence-based' decision environments, assessments cannot be undertaken independent of values and politics, nor are they capable of eliminating the uncertainty that clouds decision-making on climate adaptation As such, assessments can trigger as many questions as they answer, leaving practitioners and stakeholders to question their value. This paper explores the value of vulnerability/risk assessments in climate change adaptation planning processes as a catalyst for learning in four case studies in Southeastern Australia. Data were collected using qualitative interviews with stakeholders involved in the assessments and analysed using a social learning framework. This analysis revealed that detailed and tangible strategies or actions often do not emerge directly from technical assessments. However, it also revealed that the assessments became important platforms for social learning. In providing these platforms, assessments present opportunities to question initial assumptions, explore multiple framings of an issue, generate new information, and galvanise support for collective actions. This study highlights the need for more explicit recognition and understanding of the important role social learning plays in climate change vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning more broadly.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a...

392

Standard Bullets and Casings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Figure 2. On the left, a NIST SRM 2461 ... Case mounted on a brass cylinder holder; right, optical micrograph ... the data are in ASCII tab delimited format ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

OSCARS Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback: info@es.net OSCARS Case Study OSCARS Virtual Circuits Extend JGI Network Capacity The Challenge In February 2010, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) at Lawrence Berkeley...

394

Sustainable Building Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Studies Case Studies Sustainable Building Case Studies October 4, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis These case studies feature examples of sustainably designed buildings and facilities from Federal agencies and industry. High Performance Federal Buildings Database The High Performance Federal Buildings database presents a sampling of sustainable buildings projects in the Federal Government. This database taps into the existing U.S. Department of Energy High Performance Buildings database, showcasing only Federal case study examples. Third-Party Certification ENERGY STAR for Federal Agencies: A site that provides access to the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, the Federal High Performance Sustainable Buildings Checklist, and ENERGY STAR qualified products, and much more. Green Globes: A Web-based program from the Green Building Initiative for

395

Sustainable Building Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Studies Case Studies Sustainable Building Case Studies October 4, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis These case studies feature examples of sustainably designed buildings and facilities from Federal agencies and industry. High Performance Federal Buildings Database The High Performance Federal Buildings database presents a sampling of sustainable buildings projects in the Federal Government. This database taps into the existing U.S. Department of Energy High Performance Buildings database, showcasing only Federal case study examples. Third-Party Certification ENERGY STAR for Federal Agencies: A site that provides access to the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, the Federal High Performance Sustainable Buildings Checklist, and ENERGY STAR qualified products, and much more. Green Globes: A Web-based program from the Green Building Initiative for

396

A Meta-Model for Textual Use Case Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Use Case is a specification of interactions involving a system and external actors of that system. The capability for use case modeling has been integrated to the Unified Modeling Language (UML) since its inception. However, use cases are only defined at an abstract level, as the UML Specification does not discuss use case description in text form. In this paper, we propose an abstract syntax for textual use case description as a meta-model extension of the UML Specification. This meta-model is based on elements commonly found in use case templates. The meta-model also includes OCL constraints for ensuring consistency with the UML specification.

Stphane S. Som

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The 2728 October 1986 FIRE Cirrus Case Study: Retrieval of Cloud Particle Sizes and Optical Depths from Comparative Analyses of Aircraft and Satellite-based Infrared Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared radiance measurements were acquired from a narrow-field nadir-viewing radiometer based on the NASA ER-2 aircraft during a coincident Landsat 5 overpass on 28 October 1986 as part of the FIRE Cirrus IFO in the vicinity of Lake Michigan. ...

Philip D. Hammer; Francisco P. J. Valero; Stefan Kinne

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Case No. VBU-0016  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 16 September 15, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner:Gary Roybal Date of Filing:June 23, 1999 Case Number:VBU-0016 On October 6, 1998, Gary Roybal (Roybal) filed a complaint under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The regulations governing the program were revised in a new interim final rule that took effect on April 14, 1999. Along with other procedural changes, the interim final rule reassigned the investigative function to the Office of Hearings and Appeals. All of the pending whistleblower cases in the investigative stage, including Roybal's case, were then transferred to OHA. The OHA investigator assigned to the case dismissed Roybal's complaint on June 11, 1999. On June 23,

399

Case No. VWZ-0009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Date of Filing: March 8, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0009 This decision...

400

Science DMZ Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Studies About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ Case Studies Developed by ESnet engineers, the Science DMZ model addresses common network performance problems encountered at any institution by creating an environment that is tailored to the needs of high performance science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nonrigid registration-based coronary artery motion correction for cardiac computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: X-ray computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the modality of choice to noninvasively monitor and diagnose heart disease with coronary artery health and stenosis detection being of particular interest. Reliable, clinically relevant coronary artery imaging mandates high spatiotemporal resolution. However, advances in intrinsic scanner spatial resolution (CT scanners are available which combine nearly 900 detector columns with focal spot oversampling) can be tempered by motion blurring, particularly in patients with unstable heartbeats. As a result, recently numerous methods have been devised to improve coronary CTA imaging. Solutions involving hardware, multisector algorithms, or {beta}-blockers are limited by cost, oversimplifying assumptions about cardiac motion, and populations showing contraindications to drugs, respectively. This work introduces an inexpensive algorithmic solution that retrospectively improves the temporal resolution of coronary CTA without significantly affecting spatial resolution. Methods: Given the goal of ruling out coronary stenosis, the method focuses on 'deblurring' the coronary arteries. The approach makes no assumptions about cardiac motion, can be used on exams acquired at high heart rates (even over 75 beats/min), and draws on a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) nonrigid bidirectional labeled point matching approach to estimate the trajectories of the coronary arteries during image acquisition. Motion compensation is achieved by employing a 3D warping of a series of partial reconstructions based on the estimated motion fields. Each of these partial reconstructions is created from data acquired over a short time interval. For brevity, the algorithm 'Subphasic Warp and Add' (SWA) reconstruction. Results: The performance of the new motion estimation-compensation approach was evaluated by a systematic observer study conducted using nine human cardiac CTA exams acquired over a range of average heart rates between 68 and 86 beats/min. Algorithm performance was based-lined against exams reconstructed using standard filtered-backprojection (FBP). The study was performed by three experienced reviewers using the American Heart Association's 15-segment model. All vessel segments were evaluated to quantify their viability to allow a clinical diagnosis before and after motion estimation-compensation using SWA. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first such observer study to show that an image processing-based software approach can improve the clinical diagnostic value of CTA for coronary artery evaluation. Conclusions: Results from the observer study show that the SWA method described here can dramatically reduce coronary artery motion and preserve real pathology, without affecting spatial resolution. In particular, the method successfully mitigated motion artifacts in 75% of all initially nondiagnostic coronary artery segments, and in over 45% of the cases this improvement was enough to make a previously nondiagnostic vessel segment clinically diagnostic.

Bhagalia, Roshni; Pack, Jed D.; Miller, James V.; Iatrou, Maria [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); GE Healthcare, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Detecting disease genes based on semi-supervised learning and protein-protein interaction networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Predicting or prioritizing the human genes that cause disease, or ''disease genes'', is one of the emerging tasks in biomedicine informatics. Research on network-based approach to this problem is carried out upon the key assumption of ''the ... Keywords: Disease gene neighbours, Disease-causing gene prediction, Multiple data resources integration, Protein-protein interaction network, Semi-supervised learning

Thanh-Phuong Nguyen; Tu-Bao Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A hybrid method for flowshops scheduling with condition-based maintenance constraint and machines breakdown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important assumptions in production scheduling is that the machines are permanently available without any breakdown. In the real world of scheduling, machines can be made unavailable due to various reasons such as preventive maintenance ... Keywords: Condition-based monitoring, Flowshop, Meta-heuristic, Preventive maintenance, Tauguchi

Ehram Safari; Seyed Jafar Sadjadi

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Case tool evaluation system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system that uses an analytical approach to evaluate Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools is currently being developed. this system is referred to as the CASE Tool Evaluation System. The following general criteria will be used: overall tool functionality; tool stability; cost; interfaces with other software; customization; ease of use; output produced; hardware and operating system needs; documentation; training and vendor support; repository interface; methodologies; and vendor stability. in Phase 1 CASE tools will be eliminated that do not meet certain must-have'' characteristics specified by the user. Phase 2 will further reduce the size of the tool list by retaining those tools that possess desirable, but not absolutely necessary'' characteristics, also specified by the user. Phase 3 will employ the Analytic Hierarchy Process, developed by Dr. Thomas L. Saaty, to rank the tools. Users will be able to supply tools of their own choosing, in addition to tools that are generated via normal use of the system. All three phases will interact with a database that stores objective information about CASE tools. The use of the Analytic Hierarchy process (AHP) distinguishes this method of CASE tool evaluation from others. As used in this system, the AHP is a method of breaking down the complex, unstructured problem of selecting a CASE tool into its component evaluation criteria and candidate tools. These criteria and tools are arranged into a hierarchical order. Each criterion and tool is assigned a subjective numerical value (by experts or users or both). These values are then synthesized to determine which have the highest priority. The result will be a ranked list of CASE tools tailored to the needs and desires of the user.

Green, P.L.; Andreae, P.V.; Pennewell, W.J.; Clinard, L.A.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Tarrant, P.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Web-based gis and public participation:an aid to widening female participation in revitalizing outdoor recreational facilities in saudi arabia. a case study in jeddah, saudi arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last decade, the Internet and Geographic Information System (GIS) have made changes in the relationship between governments and citizens in many developed countries. Citizens, in such countries, have been given more chances to participate in the decision making process of the spatial issues relevant to them. Such participation has helping to make urban planning more democratic and to make planners plan with the public rather than plan for the public. In Saudi Arabia (a developing country), participation of citizens in spatial decision making is very limited. Such limitation is more severe when considering women due to the circumstance of gender segregation in the Saudi society. While males may somehow muddle through ways to express their views about spatial issues to the planning authority, females have no ways unless they behave against the local norms. There is a persistent need for implementing distance participation for women in Saudi Arabia. This research examines whether developing and employing an Internet / GIS participatory approach can facilitate (without conflicting with the local conservative cultural norms) womens participation in the municipal decision making process of the neighborhoods outdoor recreational facilities. The goal was primarily to adapt the technology to serve the society instead of necessitating the society to change its inherited norms to be able to advance. The research involved an exploratory ethnographic case study carried out in a selected residential community in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The research was carried out in two phases where the current status of public participation in the Saudi community planning was investigated first, and then a prototype for an Internet/GIS system for female public participation was developed and evaluated. The research found that there is a legitimate enthusiasm amongst the public and officials of the research sample for adopting e-public participation. Such enthusiasm is supported by a number of political, economical, technological and religious reasons. However, the findings showed that adopting e-public participation is more promising in the near future than currently due to different reasons including the current relatively small number of Internet users in Saudi Arabia. Since such research is the first of its type to be conducted in the Saudi context, the findings can serve as a road map indicating that adopting e-public participation in Saudi Arabia is promising and worth researching.

Daghistani, Farouk

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Singular operators in multiwavelet bases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review some recent results on multiwavelet methods for solving integral and partial differential equations and present an efficient representation of operators using discontinuous multiwavelet bases, including the case for singular integral operators. ...

G. Fann; G. Beylkin; R. J. Harrison; K. E. Jordan

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Case No. VWX-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWX-0014 VWX-0014 November 29, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Supplemental Order Name of Case:Frank E. Isbill Date of Filing:November 4, 1999 Case Number: VWX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated September 27, 1999, issued by the undersigned Hearing Officer of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint filed by Frank E. Isbill (the complainant) under 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Frank E. Isbill, 27 DOE ¶ 87,529 (1999). In the Decision, I found that NCI Information Systems, Inc. (the contractor), a DOE contractor, had violated the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 708.5 by removing the complainant's supervisory duties in reprisal for his making protected disclosures related to a

408

Case No. VBZ-0057  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57 57 November 1, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motions to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Janet K. Benson Date of Filings: April 6, 2000 August 7, 2000 Case Numbers: VBZ-0057 VBZ-0058 This determination considers Motions to Dismiss(1) filed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Laboratory)(2) under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In these Motions, the Laboratory contends that the claims asserted by Janet Benson in OHA Case No. VWA-0044 are defective as a matter of law and should not be determined on the merits.(3) The Laboratory makes the following arguments in support of these Motions: (1) The Laboratory cannot be held liable for any acts of reprisal that occurred prior to September 23, 1994, the date it agreed to comply with Part 708 (OHA Case No. VBZ-0057);

409

Case No. VBZ-0028  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28 28 October 12, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Sandia Corporation Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0028 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by the Sandia Corporation (Sandia) on August 24, 1999. In its Motion, Sandia seeks judgment on the record of Complaint filed by Dr. Jiunn Yu (Yu) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Yu's Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0028. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VBZ-0028. The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

410

Case No. VWZ-0011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 May 19, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: May 18, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0011 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on May 18, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the partial dismissal of a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0033. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0011.

411

Case No. VBR-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBR-0002 VBR-0002 January 24, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner: Westinghouse Savannah River Company Date of Filing: November 12, 1999 Case Number: VBR-0002 This supplemental order concerns a Motion for Reconsideration (Case No. VBR-0002) filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on November 12, 1999. The reconsideration motion relates to an Initial Agency Decision issued by the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) on November 2, 1999 (Case No. VBH-0002). In the Initial Agency Decision, I granted relief to the Complainant on the whistleblower complaint he had filed against WSRC under 10 C.F.R. Part 708.(1) I found that WSRC had failed to prove by "clear and convincing" evidence

412

Case No. VWD-0004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 July 1, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Supplemental Order Names of Petitioners:Princeton University General Physics Corporation Date of Filing: June 10, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0004 This decision will consider a Motion for Discovery filed jointly by Princeton University (Princeton) and General Physics Corporation (GPC) on June 10, 1999 with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The discovery motion relates to a hearing requested by David Turner under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). The OHA has assigned Mr. Turner's hearing request Case No. VWA-0038, and the discovery request under consideration Case No. VWD-0004. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

413

Case No. VBH-0025  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 June 22, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Alizabeth Aramowicz Smith Date of Filing:July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0025 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Alizabeth Aramowicz Smith, a former contractor employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As explained below, Smith's complaint should be denied. This case arises under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the "whistleblower" regulations. The whistleblower regulations prohibit a contractor from retaliating against a contractor employee who engages in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals 1) a substantial violation of a law, rule, or

414

Case No. VWD-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 May 21, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner:Frank E. Isbill Date of Filing: May 4, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0002 This determination will consider two requests for discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) on May 4, 1999, by Frank E. Isbill (the complainant). These requests (which have been grouped together as one Motion for Discovery, Case No. VWD-0002) concern the hearing requested by the complainant under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). He requested this hearing on March 29, 1999 (Case No. VWA-0034) in connection with the Part 708 complaint he filed against NCI Communications, Inc. (the contractor). The DOE recently

415

Case No. VWZ-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 November 10, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: University of California Date of Filing: October 6, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0017 This decision considers a Motion to Dismiss filed by the University of California (the University) on October 6, 1999. In its Motion, the University seeks dismissal of the complaint filed against it by Charles Montaño under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Montaño's complaint under Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0042. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0017. The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

416

Case No. VWZ-0010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 May 12, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0010 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on April 27, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the dismissal of a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0033. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0010.

417

Case No. VBH-0023  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 March 31, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Stephanie A. Ashburn Date of Filing:July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0023 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Stephanie A. Ashburn, a former fellow of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). As explained below, Ashburn's complaint is denied. This case arises under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the "whistleblower" regulations. The whistleblower regulations prohibit a contractor from retaliating against a contractor employee who engages in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals 1) a substantial violation of a law, rule, or

418

Case No. VBZ-0047  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 August 30, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Summary Judgment Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: August 23, 2000 Case Number: VBZ-0047 This decision will consider a Motion for Summary Judgment that Contract Associates, Inc., ("the contractor") filed on August 23, 2000. The contractor moves to deny a complaint filed by Edward J. Seawalt ("Mr. Seawalt" or "the complainant") under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Seawalt's complaint has been set for a hearing under Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0047. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

419

Case No. VBX-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBX-0014 VBX-0014 April 25, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Supplemental Order Name of Case: Roy Leonard Moxley Date of Filing:January 10, 2000 Case Number: VBX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated December 29, 1999, that I issued as the Hearing Officer in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint. The complaint was filed by Roy Leonard Moxley under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Roy Leonard Moxley, 27 DOE ¶ 87,546 (1999) (the Initial Agency Decision). In that Decision, I found that Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE contractor, had violated the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 708.5 by reducing Mr. Moxley's salary grade level (SGL) from SGL 31 to SGL

420

Project Finance Case Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finance Case Finance Case Studies FUPWG Meeting October 21, 2010 RENEWABLE ENERGY * Solar, wind, biomass and geothermal power resources show great promise to positively impact both the environment and energy security. * While these technologies are coming down in cost, there is often no price associated with carbon content, causing renewable energy to remain more expensive than fossil fuels in most markets. * Utilizing Treasury Cash Grant, Investment and Production Tax Credits, Renewable Energy Credits and state rebates is essential to a project's viability. WATER and WASTEWATER * With operating budgets stretched, many public-sector utilities are struggling to upgrade critical water treatment facilities to comply with changing environmental regulations or to maintain system efficiencies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Several additional studies were conducted to explore the sensitivity of sedimentary geothermal system costs to key assumptions in the base case model. 1. Decreased Drilling Costs...

423

A transport based one-dimensional perturbation code for reactivity calculations in metal systems  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional reactivity calculation code is developed using first order perturbation theory. The reactivity equation is based on the multi-group transport equation using the discrete ordinates method for angular dependence. In addition to the first order perturbation approximations, the reactivity code uses only the isotropic scattering data, but cross section libraries with higher order scattering data can still be used with this code. The reactivity code obtains all the flux, cross section, and geometry data from the standard interface files created by ONEDANT, a discrete ordinates transport code. Comparisons between calculated and experimental reactivities were done with the central reactivity worth data for Lady Godiva, a bare uranium metal assembly. Good agreement is found for isotopes that do not violate the assumptions in the first order approximation. In general for cases where there are large discrepancies, the discretized cross section data is not accurately representing certain resonance regions that coincide with dominant flux groups in the Godiva assembly. Comparing reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and a straight {Delta}k/k calculation shows agreement within 10% indicating the perturbation of the calculated fluxes is small enough for first order perturbation theory to be applicable in the modeled system. Computation time comparisons between reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and straight {Delta}k/k calculations indicate considerable time can be saved performing a calculation with a perturbation code particularly as the complexity of the modeled problems increase.

Wenz, T.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A TECHNICAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF AMINE-BASED CO2 CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY FOR POWER PLANT GREENHOUSE GAS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel power plants is gaining widespread interest as a potential method of controlling greenhouse gas emissions. Performance and cost models of an amine (MEA)-based CO{sub 2} absorption system for post-combustion flue gas applications have been developed, and integrated with an existing power plant modeling framework that includes multi-pollutant control technologies for other regulated emissions. The integrated model has been applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing coal-burning power plants. The cost of carbon avoidance was shown to depend strongly on assumptions about the reference plant design, details of the CO{sub 2} capture system design, interactions with other pollution control systems, and method of CO{sub 2} storage. The CO{sub 2} avoidance cost for retrofit systems was found to be generally higher than for new plants, mainly because of the higher energy penalty resulting from less efficient heat integration, as well as site-specific difficulties typically encountered in retrofit applications. For all cases, a small reduction in CO{sub 2} capture cost was afforded by the SO{sub 2} emission trading credits generated by amine-based capture systems. Efforts are underway to model a broader suite of carbon capture and sequestration technologies for more comprehensive assessments in the context of multi-pollutant environmental management.

Edward S. Rubin; Anand B. Rao

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Retrospective Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, Retrospective Case Studies (RCS) operates directly under DGE's Resource Exploration and Assessment program. The overall objectives of this project are: (1) to improve the general and specific level of understanding of geothermal systems, and (2) to improve tools and technology for geothermal exploration and assessment.

Wright, Phillip M.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study: Selection Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based "safety case" to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The present report documents (in Appendix A) a case study, carrying out key steps of the Reference 1 process, using an actual plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) model. In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional

427

Security Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 31, 2012 July 31, 2012 PSH-12-0042 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing This case involves an Individual who failed to meet his financial obligations during the final years of his first marriage. The Individual reported the repossession of his motor vehicle and a home foreclosure to the Local Security Office (LSO) in 2008. The LSO subsequently conducted a series of three Personal Security Interviews (PSI) of the Individual, the most recent on February 1, 2012. July 27, 2012 PSH-12-0050 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing The individual's present employer, a DOE contractor, has requested a DOE access authorization for the individual. The individual completed and submitted an Electronic Questionnaire for Investigations Processing (QNSP) in November 2011. DOE Exhibit 8. Based on issues contained in the

428

Case No. VWZ-0020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 February 3, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: October 14, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0020 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on October 14, 1999. WSRC seeks dismissal of three allegations of retaliation by reason of failure to rehire submitted by Lucy B. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In a submission dated December 6, 1999, WSRC further requests dismissal of a discovery request made by Ms. Smith regarding hiring by subcontractors of WSRC. I. Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah

429

Case No. VWD-0006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 August 10, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: August 2, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0006 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Lucy B. Smith. This Motion, dated July 20, 1999, concerns the hearing requested by Ms. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). She requested this hearing on May 5, 1999 (Case No. VWA-0041) in connection with the Part 708 complaint she filed against Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). I. Factual Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah

430

Case No. VBD-0059  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59 59 June 8, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Case: Janet L. Westbrook Date of Filing: June 5, 2001 Case Number: VBD-0059 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by UT-Battelle, LLC, the company that manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Motion relates to a hearing soon to be held on a complaint that Janet L. Westbrook filed under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). For the reasons stated below, the motion is denied. Ms. Westbrook worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a radiological engineer. She claims that she has persistently disclosed various safety-related concerns and as a result experienced hostility and

431

Case No. VBD-0063  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63 63 August 14, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Bruce R. Field Date of Filing: August 2, 2001 Case Number: VBD-0063 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Bruce R. Field (Field). This Motion, dated August 2, 2001, concerns the hearing requested by Field under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). Field requested this hearing on April 24, 2001 (Case No. VBH-0063) in connection with the Part 708 complaint he filed against the management and operating contractor, Midwest Research Institute (MRI) for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).(1) I. Background Field's complaint arises from his employment at NREL as a Project Manager. During the period 1994 to

432

Case No. VWZ-0016  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 November 8, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Charles Montaño Date of Filing: October 4, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0016 This decision considers a Motion to Dismiss filed by Charles Montaño (Montaño) on October 4, 1999. In his Motion, Montaño seeks dismissal of the hearing scheduled to begin on November 16, 1999 and judgment on the existing record for the Whistleblower Complaint that he filed against the University of California (the University) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. His Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0042. The present Motion has been

433

Case No. VBU-0050  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 50 June 15, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Darryl H. Shadel Date of Filing: May 30, 2000 Case Number: VBU-0050 Darryl H. Shadel (the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his whistleblower complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. As explained below, I have determined that the complaint was improperly dismissed, and that further processing should be accorded. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program Part 708 prohibits contractors from retaliating against contractor employees who engage in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals a substantial and specific danger to employees (a protected disclosure). If a contractor retaliates against an employee

434

Case No. VBH-0034  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 September 29, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Jennifer S. Gentry Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0034 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Jennifer S. Gentry, a former employee (hereinafter the employee) of Golder Federal Services Incorporated, formerly Golder Associates, Inc. (Golder). Golder was a subcontractor for EG&G, then the managing and operating contractor at DOE's Rocky Flats site (hereinafter the term "contractors" refers to both Golder and EG&G). The employee alleges that she made protected disclosures concerning health and safety matters, and as a result, the contractors took retaliatory actions against her. For the reasons explained below, I have

435

Case No. VBI-0045  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBI-0045 VBI-0045 June 22, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision and Order Name of Case: Joseph P. Carson Date of Filing: March 14, 2000 Case Number: VBI-0045 On March 14, 2000, Joseph P. Carson (Carson) filed a "Whistleblower Reprisal Complaint per section 3164 of the NNSA Authorization Act for FY 2000." Carson is employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a Safety Engineer, nominally assigned to the Office of Oversight, Planning and Analysis, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH), but he is currently stationed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the March 14, 2000 complaint, Carson alleges that in 1999 he made a number of protected disclosures about Glenn Podonsky, a senior

436

Case No. VBU-0039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 39 November 30, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: November 2, 1999 Case Number: VBU-0039 Edward J. Seawalt (the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his complaint against Contract Associates, Inc. (the Contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The program prohibits a DOE contractor from retaliating against an employee for disclosing certain information (a protected disclosure). As explained below, I have determined that Mr. Seawalt's appeal should be granted in part and his complaint remanded for further processing. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program is set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The DOE recently

437

Case No. VWZ-0012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 August 6, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: June 30, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0012 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on June 30, 1999. WSRC seeks dismissal of the underlying complaint filed by Lucy B. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah River Site. Ms. Smith alleges that she made three protected disclosures involving health and safety concerns to WSRC officials during the last half of 1996. Subsequently, on January 20, 1997, Ms. Smith received a Reduction in Force notice from WSRC. Ms. Smith then filed a complaint with the United

438

EDO: Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EDO Case Studies EDO Case Studies Technology Transfer / Technology Assistance Technology identifies anomalies in complex financial data Identifying atypical information in financial data early could help determine problematic financial trends such as the systemic risk that recently put the U.S. and global financial systems in a downward fall. Recognizing such anomalous information can also help regulators understand markets, and identify the potential need of new rules and regulations. Additionally, it can help investors and advisors better manage their investment and savings portfolios. The AnomalatorTM software, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses advanced mathematical algorithms to identify unusual trends in complex financial data and graphically show how it compares with

439

Case No. VWA-0040  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 December 13, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Rosie L. Beckham Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0040 Rosie L. Beckham (hereinafter the complainant) filed a complaint against her former employer, KENROB and Associates, Inc. (hereinafter the contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The program prohibits a DOE contractor from retaliating against an employee for disclosing certain information (a protected disclosure). A DOE office investigated the complaint and issued a report, which concluded that the complainant was not entitled to relief. The complainant requested a hearing, and I was appointed to conduct the hearing and issue an

440

Case No. VBH-0021  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 21 February 7, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Eugene J. Dreger Date of Filing: July 14, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0021 This Initial Agency Decision addresses a whistleblower complaint filed by Eugene J. Dreger (the complainant) against his former employer, Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At the time of the incidents described below, Dreger worked at the DOE's Nevada Test Site as a safety inspector. REECO was a primary contractor at the Test Site until December 31, 1995. Beginning January 1, 1996, Bechtel Nevada assumed this responsibility, and it has also assumed responsibility for litigation relating to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Case No. VBZ-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 October 4, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Fluor Daniel Fernald Date of Filing: September 7, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0005 This decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF) filed on September 7, 1999. FDF moves to dismiss a Complaint filed by Thomas W. Dwyer under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dwyer's Complaint has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0005. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[] fraud, mismanagement, waste, and abuse" at DOE's Government-owned or -leased facilities.

442

Case No. VWA-0039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 February 25, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Luis P. Silva Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0039 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Luis P. Silva, a former employee of the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) and its successor firm, GTS Duratek (GTS).(1) SEG, and then GTS, were subcontractors to Sandia Corporation at the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF) where Silva worked before he was laid off by GTS in August 1997. Sandia is a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, the management and operating contractor at DOE's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In March 1998, Roy F. Weston, Inc. replaced GTS as Sandia's subcontractor at the RMWMF. Silva alleges that he made protected disclosures

443

WSH Case Studies 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health Case Summaries and Health Case Summaries Enforcement Workshop, March 2012 1. Unescorted Entry into Active Laser Area A Facilities electrician received a work order from his work lead to install a switch box and a power cord on a vacuum pump in a Class 4 laser room. He arrived escorted by a laser lab scientist to review the scope of work. After reviewing the work to be performed and inspecting the equipment, the electrician alerted the laser lab scientist that he needed additional tools and materials to complete the task. The scientist informed the electrician that he should not work in a laser lab without an escort. The electrician then informed his work lead that he needed to re- schedule the job. The work lead did not discuss or address the work area hazards and controls

444

Case No. VBA-0055  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

<BR> Case No. VBA-0055 October 2, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Lucy Smith Date of Filing: July 20, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0055 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on July 11, 2000, involving a Complaint filed by Lucy Smith (Smith or the Complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her Complaint, Smith claims that her former employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE contractor, terminated her employment during a reduction in force (RIF), and then failed to rehire her, in retaliation for making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that

445

Case No. VBH-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 September 27, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Salvatore Gionfriddo Date of Filing: June 23, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0007 On December 28, 1998, Salvatore Gionfriddo (Complainant) filed a Complaint of Reprisal with the Director of the Federal Energy Technology Center of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. The Complainant alleged that he made a protected disclosure under Part 708 and his employer, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) retaliated against him by terminating his employment. (1) On July 19, 1999, ERC filed a Motion to Dismiss the complaint. The firm claims that its agreement with the DOE is not covered by Part 708 and that it is not obligated to participate in proceedings

446

Case No. VBH-0035  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 September 22, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Theresa G. Joyner Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0035 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Theresa G. Joyner, a former employee (hereinafter the employee) of NCI Information Systems, Inc. (NCI) (hereinafter the contractor). As explained below, the employee's request for relief is denied. I. Background The Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program governs this matter. The DOE recently revised the regulations governing this program. See 64 Fed. Reg. 12862 (March 15, 1999) (amending 10 C.F.R. pt. 708) (the whistleblower regulations). Under the regulations, the DOE's Office of

447

Case No. VWJ-0001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWJ-0001 VWJ-0001 June 29, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Protective Order Name of Petitioner:Nicholas Dominguez Date of Filing: June 25, 1999 Case Number:VWJ-0001 On April 20, 1999, Nicholas Dominguez filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Case No. LWA- 0006). Dominguez alleges that his former employer, Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Lockheed Martin), retaliated against him for disclosing information concerning possible safety issues. Dominguez seeks discovery of Lockheed Martin documents that the firm claims are confidential business documents. Lockheed Martin has agreed to provide these documents pursuant to the attached Protective Order that has been agreed to by counsel for Dominguez. The parties ask that the attached Agreed

448

Product Efficiency Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/exc-13-0004-matter-liebherr-canada-ltd EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd.

449

Case No. VBU-0047  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 April 17, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: March 20, 2000 Case Number: VBU-0047 Edward J. Seawalt (the Complainant) appeals the second dismissal of his whistleblower complaint. In a prior decision, I remanded the first dismissal for consideration of whether good reason existed for the Complainant's late filing of his complaint. Edward J. Seawalt, 27 DOE ¶ ____ (1999) (Seawalt). As explained below, I have determined that the Complainant has shown good reason for the late filing of his complaint and, therefore, that the complaint should be remanded for further processing. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program is set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The DOE's new Part

450

Case No. VWD-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 August 24, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Linda D. Gass Date of Filing: August 11, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0007 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Linda D. Gass. This Motion, dated August 10, 1999, concerns the hearing requested by Ms. Gass under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). She requested this hearing on January 12, 1999 (Case No. VWA- 0041) in connection with the Part 708 complaint she filed against Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES). I. Background Ms. Gass began working for LMES in March 1982. In her Complaint, Ms. Gass alleged that in 1991 she

451

Heat Balance in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer during CASES-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique set of nocturnal longwave radiative and sensible heat flux divergences was obtained during the 1999 Cooperative AtmosphereSurface Exchange Study (CASES-99). These divergences are based on upward and downward longwave radiation ...

Jielun Sun; Sean P. Burns; Anthony C. Delany; Steven P. Oncley; Thomas W. Horst; Donald H. Lenschow

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

UESC Case Study: Philadelphia Navy Yard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study Case Study Philadelphia Navy Yard Presented by M. Richard Boyette and Beverly C. Wade 26 October 2011 UESC Financed Energy Projects - Basics Aligning NAVFAC Business Practices with Federal Energy Management Program Processes NAVFAC BMS 5.1.3 UESC Process FEMP UESC Process 2 Sometimes things are difficult, but hard work overcomes obstacles !!!!! Financed Energy Projects - Challenges * Financed Energy Project Challenges * General Issues * Financed projects are designed to save energy costs but overarching goals are set up to reduce energy usage and energy intensity. * Financed projects favor regions or bases with higher utility rates. * Financed projects cannot be utilized in cases where energy consumption is reduced substantially but energy cost savings is

453

Casing design for trapped annular pressure buildup  

SciTech Connect

Conventional single-string analysis for casing design with annular-fluid expansion can underpredict or overpredict pressures between strings because multistring effects are neglected. Multiple-string systems with multiple sealed annuli behave as composite interactive systems. This paper presents a constitutive-based multistring analysis method for composite string effects and complex fluid behavior. The composite stiffness of cemented casings is determined from elastic stress/strain relationships, and the nonlinear fluid behavior is modeled by direct use of fluid PVT relations in the formulation and solution. The method is incorporated in a computer model linking comprehensive stress calculations to accurate temperature and pressure predictions. Sensitivity studies of the system response to various key parameters and operating conditions are presented, and comparisons are made with single-string analyses to demonstrate the strong interaction between casing strings.

Halal, A.S.; Mitchell, R.F. (Enertech Engineering Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

VIVACE context based search platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key challenges of knowledge management is to provide the right knowledge to the right person at the right time. To face this challenge, a context based search platform was developed in the frame of the European Integrated Project VIVACE. This ... Keywords: analogy and case based reasoning, context aware systems and applications, context modelling, knowledge management

Romaric Redon; Andreas Larsson; Richard Leblond; Barthelemy Longueville

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

457

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

458

A SCIENCE-BASED CASE FOR LARGE-SCALE SIMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Engineering Materials for nuclear energy system, fission reactors, nuclear fuels, energy policy solidification; microgravity processing. Xudong Wang Assistant Professor, Materials Sci & Eng Nanomaterials and photoelectrochemical devices; nanomaterials for energy storage; nanoelectronics; nano-biomaterials. Jay Samuel Senior

Gropp, Bill

459

Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spot prices at the Henry Hub traded at a midpoint of $6.91 per MMBtu on Wednesday. This is the first time the price has been below $7.00 since December 1, ...

460

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "base case assumptions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

WTI Crude Oil Price: Potential for Volatility Around Base Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

462

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, ...

463

Hill Air Force Base as a case study for linking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANACONDA ("MORTARVILLE") near Balad Iraq, April 2004 ­ March 2005. #12;Great Salt Lake WASATCHMOUNTAINRANGE

464

A Case Study of Solar Powered Cellular Base Stations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Green power, environment protection and emission reduction are key factors nowadays in the telecom industry. Balancing of these modes while reducing the capital and (more)

PANDE, GEETHA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

An Ontology For Agent-Based Modeling And Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontologies are a formal methodology for establishing a common vocabulary, for defining the concepts and relationships between those concepts of a particular domain, and for reasoning about the objects, behaviors, and knowledge that comprises the domain. In this paper, we present an ontology for agent-based modeling and simulation. Agent-based modeling and simulation has become an important and popular paradigm for the computational social and natural sciences; however, the application of this paradigm tends to be performed in an ad-hoc fashion leading to questions about underlying assumptions in an agent-based model, verification of the software implementation as a representation of that model, and validation of hypothesized conclusions inferred from data produced by computer simulation experiments. An ontology provides a formal, logical knowledge representation that supports automated reasoning. Such reasoning capability provides for consistency checking of the concepts and relationships in an agent-based model, can infer the assumptions inherent in a model, can infer the assumptions and the parameters inherent in a simulation or software representation of a model, and can enforce adherence to formal methods or best practices for verification and validation testing. These reasoning tasks direct, or at least inform, the modeler about relevant techniques and methods in the agent-based paradigm. The reasoning capability also provides a framework for automated generation of software code, automated design and execution of simulation experiments as well as automated generation and execution of validation tests for those experiments. Using the standard Ontology Web Language (OWL), we provide a complete, detailed ontology of agent-based modeling and simulation, and we show ho...

Scott Christley Xiaorong; Xiaorong Xiang; Greg Madey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

467

Case No. VBH-0036  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 September 23, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Complainant: XXXXXXX Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0036 XXXXXXX (the complainant) filed a complaint against his employer, Fluor Daniel, Inc. (FDI), and two other DOE contractors, Duke Engineering & Services (DE&S) and TRW Environmental Safety Systems (TRW), pursuant to the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In that complaint, the complainant alleges that he suffered reprisals because he had made a disclosure that is protected by Part 708. I. Background The Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to encourage contractor employees to

468

Green Circuits: Distribution Efficiency Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Green Circuits project was a collaborative effort of 22 utilities. The main goal of the project was to evaluate ways to improve distribution efficiency. Modeling, economic evaluations, and field trials formed the core of the research effort. To evaluate efficiency improvements, 66 circuit case studies were modeled and fine-tuned, based on field data. Field trials of voltage optimization were implemented on nine circuits. Detailed advanced metering infrastructu...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

NCCoE - Use Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health IT: Mobile Devices Use Case. Energy. ... system for mobile devices server* Mobile device management server* Auditing mobile device ...

470

Case Western Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University Address 2061 Cornell Rd Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44106-3808 Website http://case.edu/advancedmateri References The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University [1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Case Western Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials is a research institution based in Cleveland, Ohio. References ↑ "The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Case_Western_Reserve_University%27s_Institute_for_Advanced_Materials&oldid=367381"

471

Case No. VBA-0044  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 April 10, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Rosie L. Beckham Date of Filing: December 28, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0044 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on December 13, 1999, involving a complaint filed by Rosie L. Beckham filed against her former employer, KENROB and Associates, Inc. (KENROB) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Rosie L. Beckham, 27 DOE ¶ 87,543 (1999). In her complaint, Ms. Beckham alleges that KENROB, among other things, terminated her employment after she questioned the legality of the company's procurement practices. A Hearing Officer denied relief to Ms. Beckham, finding in the Initial Agency Decision that she had failed to make any disclosures protected under the Part 708 regulations. As set forth in this Decision, I

472

Case No. VBA-0032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 November 26, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Roger H. Hardwick Date of Filing: July 26, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0032 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on July 6, 1999, on a complaint filed by Roger H. Hardwick (Hardwick or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Hardwick seeks compensation for alleged retaliatory actions taken against him by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), a DOE contractor, and by KenRob and Associates, Inc. (KenRob), his former employer under a subcontract with SAIC, as a result of making an alleged protected disclosure to DOE. In the Initial Agency Decision, however, the Hearing Officer determined that the complainant had failed to

473

Case No. VWA-0032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 July 6, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Roger W. Hardwick Date of Filing: March 8, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0032 This Decision involves a complaint of reprisal filed by Roger W. Hardwick (also referred to as the Complainant) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Hardwick was employed by KenRob and Associates, Inc. and worked as a subcontractor on a contract that the DOE awarded to Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Mr. Hardwick contends that in January 1994, he made a protected disclosure to the DOE concerning the manner in which SAIC was performing its DOE contract. Hardwick states that he was terminated from the subcontract two weeks after the disclosure and that KenRob terminated his

474

Case No. VBH-0059  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 December 21, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Janet L. Westbrook Date of Filing: March 20, 2001 Case Number: VBH-0059 This Decision involves a complaint that Janet L. Westbrook (Westbrook) filed under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program against UT-Batelle, LLC, the contractor that manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (the Laboratory). That program is codified at Part 708 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Westbrook maintains that she was retaliated against and ultimately discharged for making a series of disclosures about radiation safety at the Laboratory. I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

475

Case No. VBA-0011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 July 28, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Names of Petitioner:Diane E. Meier Date of Filing:January 11, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0011 On January 11, 2000, Diane E. Meier (Meier) filed a Notice of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Decision denied the relief which Meier seeks in her complaint against Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Diane E. Meier, 27 DOE ¶ 87,545 (1999) (Meier). In her Appeal, Meier challenges several aspects of the Initial Agency Decision and requests that her complaint be granted. As set forth in this decision, I have

476

Case No. VBA-0038  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 March 28, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Ann Johndro-Collins Date of Filing: October 29, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0038 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on September 27, 1999, on a complaint filed by Ann Johndro-Collins (Johndro-Collins or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Johndro- Collins seeks compensation for alleged retaliatory actions taken against her by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH), a DOE contractor, as a result of making an alleged protected disclosure to DOE. As set forth in this decision, I have determined that Johndro-Collins's Appeal must be denied. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

477

Case No. VBH-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 December 29, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Roy Leonard Moxley Date of Filing:November 7, 1996 Case Number: VBH-0014 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Roy Leonard Moxley against his employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, WSRC was the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. Mr. Moxley alleges that during a period of at least two years, he made several disclosures to WSRC that its personnel practices were in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). According

478

Case No. VWA-0031  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 August 6, 1999 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Barbara Nabb Date of Filing: February 25, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0031 I. Introduction This Decision involves a complaint filed by Mrs. Barbara Nabb under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Mrs. Nabb contends that reprisals were taken against her after she made certain disclosures concerning possible health and safety violations and mismanagement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). These reprisals allegedly were taken by EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G) and by Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser Hill). EG&G was the managing and operating contractor of Rocky Flats beginning in December

479

Case No. VWR-0003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWR-0003 VWR-0003 September 20, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Reconsideration Name of Petitioner: Linda D. Gass Date of Filing: September 3, 1999 Case Number: VWR-0003 This decision will consider a "Motion to Revive Disclosures Dismissed Prior to the Enactment of Revisions to Part 708" Linda D. Gass filed on March 8, 1999. In her Motion, Ms. Gass requests that I reconsider an order issued on March 12, 1999, in which I dismissed in part her Complaint filed under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, 27 DOE ¶ 87,510 (1999). I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

480

Case No. VBH-0042  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42 42 March 1, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Richard R. Sena Date of Filin