National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for barbuda aruba bahamas

  1. Caribbean-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    internatio Country Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Saint...

  2. Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    enpraxis95 Country Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Puerto...

  3. Assessing Pathways in Aruba

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    environmental, and economic resilience of Aruba through an efficient use of natural resources and an implementation of ... research report, Smart Growth Pathways: Building a Green ...

  4. Aruba: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aruba is a country in the Caribbean. External Links Aruba Renewable Energy Data from IEA Aruba Contacts from Climate-Eval LowCarbonWorld Profile for Aruba Retrieved from...

  5. Antigua and Barbuda-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Antigua and Barbuda-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Antigua and Barbuda-Caribbean Community (CARICOM)...

  6. Assessing Pathways in Aruba | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The teams also pinpointed possible actions and opportunities that Aruba might take in the near term to realize its vision, which allowed the island to open new channels for ...

  7. Antigua and Barbuda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Antigua and Barbuda Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AG 3-letter ISO code ATG Numeric ISO code...

  8. Antigua and Barbuda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Antigua and Barbuda Population 81,799 GDP 1,176,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AG 3-letter ISO code ATG Numeric ISO...

  9. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Aruba (Fact Sheet); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Aruba, an autonomous member of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela.

  10. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Antigua and Barbuda; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Antigua and Barbuda, an independent nation in the Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Antigua and Barbuda’s utility rates are approximately $0.37 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), which is above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  11. Bahamas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ), created in order to serve as the primary governing body for electronic communications in the Bahamas. The URCA is to assume responsibility for the electricity...

  12. Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and...

  13. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The

  14. International Services | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The

  15. Bahamas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name The Bahamas Population 254,685 GDP 8,043,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BS 3-letter ISO code BHS Numeric ISO code...

  16. Property:NumberOfPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 5 + Albania + 5 + Algeria + 6 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 1 + Antigua and Barbuda + 6 + Argentina + 12 + Armenia + 6 + Aruba +...

  17. Property:NumberOfDOELabPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 3 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 1 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 1...

  18. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 1 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 2 + Argentina + 5 + Armenia + 2 + Aruba + 0...

  19. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 1 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 1 + Aruba + 0...

  20. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsLand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  1. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  2. Property:NumberOfCLEANPrograms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  3. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 4 + Armenia + 2 + Aruba + 0...

  4. Property:NumberOfSolarResources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25) A Afghanistan + 1 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  5. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Bahamas (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to the Commonwealth of the Bahamas - a country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays, and islets - of which only 30 are actually inhabited. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  6. Sandia Energy - SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana...

  7. Market Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Bahamas-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change...

  8. Deposition of carbonate mud beds within high-energy subtidal sand Dunes, Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, R.F.; Steinen, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Laminated, carbonate mud beds are being deposited in the interisland channels of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. They are associated with stromatolites and interbedded with ooid sands that form large migrating subtidal dunes on flood tidal deltas and bars. Currents up to 3 knots sweep in and out of the 4-8 m deep channels 3 hours out of every 6 hours, creating a high-energy bank margin environment not usually considered to be the site of mud-sized particle deposition. Mud deposits reach thicknesses of 1 m and have individual beds 2-5 cm thick. When exposed to flowing seawater, bed surfaces become encrusted with carbonate cement and algal mats. The white interior of mud beds between the crusts appears homogeneous, is soft, and has the consistency of ''tooth paste.'' Loose uncemented ooid sand is found above and below the mud beds, showing that both are occupying the same depositional environment. Rip-up clasts of the crusted mud beds, formed by scour of underlying sands, are carried throughout the channels and accumulate as a lag deposit within the troughs of migrating dunes. Some clasts are colonized by algal mats that trap ooid and skeletal sands forming stromatolite structures that can grow up to 2 m high.

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of ooid sand shoals: Comparison of Mississippian of Kentucky and Quaternary of Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA))

    1989-08-01

    An examination of the lithology and topography of Andros Island, Bahamas, reveals it is a Pleistocene ooid sand shoal. A comparison with Joulters Cays (a modern ooid sand shoal directly to the north) shows that much of the original depositional topography is preserved through at least one cycle of sea level highstand and lowstand. Both the Pleistocene and the Holocene ooid sand bodies are a few kilometers to tens of kilometers wide. The total vertical relief of a single episode of Quaternary ooid sand deposition is more than 10 m and includes accumulation in tidal channels, shallow flat areas, and eolian dunes. Today, much of Andros Island is within 2 m of present sea level and is the site of a belt several kilometers wide consisting of muddy tidal flat sediments overlying an exposure surface. The site of ooid sand deposition and shoal complex formation is not continuous along shorelines, especially windward margins, but shifts abruptly along the margins of platforms as a result of minor fluctuations of sea level. Thus, it should be expected that ooid sand shoals (ancient and modern) should be in direct lateral and vertical contact with lagoons, tidal flats, and reefs. The Mississippian Slade Formation contains many of the features of Quaternary ooid sand accumulation: abrupt vertical and lateral gradations between oolitic grainstones, packstones, and lime mudstones, vertical relief of individual oolitic sedimentary packages up to 30 m (perhaps with eolian dunes) and numerous exposure surfaces of varying intensities. These characteristics suggest that this formation represents a time of rapid fluctuations of relative sea level and abrupt shifts in the sites of ooid sand shoal complexes.

  10. Eia.gov BETA - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia

  11. Electric Power Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia

  12. Stromatolites, ooid dunes, hardgrounds, and crusted mud beds, all products of marine cementation and microbial mats in subtidal oceanic mixing zone on eastern margin of Great Bahama Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, R.F.; Kendall, C.S.C.G.; Steinen, R.P.

    1989-03-01

    The interisland channels along the eastern margin of the Great Bahamas Bank contain lithified structures that owe their origin to recent marine cementation. This cementation appears to be commonly associated with a complex microbial community of plants and microorganisms living within a bank-margin oceanographic mixing zone. In this region, reversing tidal and wind-driven currents flow up to 3 knots (150 cm/sec) three hours out of each six-hour tidal period. Here, marine-cement crusted, carbonate mud beds are found interbedded within migrating ooid sand bars and dunes and are associated with growing, lithified stromatolites up to 2 m in height. These laminated mud beds are found with thicknesses of up to 1 m in subtidal depths of 4 to 8 m (12 to 25 ft). The muds appear to be homogeneous, but closer examination by SEM and under a microscope reveals they are composed of pelletoid aggregates of needle-shaped aragonite crystals with diameters of up to 50 ..mu... The size of these soft pellets is similar to the smaller grains of ooid sands that are abundant in the area. This size similarity could explain why both the mud beds are found in similar high-energy hydraulic regimes as the ooid sands, but does not suggest how or why the aggregates of pure aragonite needles form. A high production of ooid sand within this bank margin environment permits the formation of natural levees along the margins of tidal channels. The back sides of these levees are being lithified by marine cements to form hardgrounds. Skeletal and ooid sand dunes stabilized by Thallasia in channel bottoms also are becoming lithified. Grapestones form at the distributaries of flood tidal deltas of ooid sand. All of these features have a common attribute: they are continually in contact with the turbulent mixing-zone waters.

  13. Stump the Scientist Question Form | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Please Help Us Stump the Scientist Ask Your Question *Required fields Name* Email* School/Company* Twitter Handle Country* Select Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad

  14. East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia

  15. Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total All Countries 146,514 143,463 144,525 163,526 151,212 143,480 1981-2016 Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2016 Albania 116 0 0 1998-2016 Algeria 237 1 0 305 611 914 1996-2016 Andora 0 2005-2015 Angola 0 0 0 0 264 1 1995-2016 Anguilla 0 0 0 1 0 0 2005-2016 Antigua and Barbuda 156 208 0 365 61 145 1995-2016 Argentina 846 1,408 1,871 2,235 1,309 1,878 1993-2016 Armenia 2005-2015 Aruba 1,582 900 851 1,089 1,758 1,415 2005-2016 Australia 218 289

  16. U.S. Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total All Countries 146,514 143,463 144,525 163,526 151,212 143,480 1981-2016 Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2016 Albania 116 0 0 1998-2016 Algeria 237 1 0 305 611 914 1996-2016 Andora 0 2005-2015 Angola 0 0 0 0 264 1 1995-2016 Anguilla 0 0 0 1 0 0 2005-2016 Antigua and Barbuda 156 208 0 365 61 145 1995-2016 Argentina 846 1,408 1,871 2,235 1,309 1,878 1993-2016 Armenia 2005-2015 Aruba 1,582 900 851 1,089 1,758 1,415 2005-2016 Australia 218 289

  17. Pfutzner_1987.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 195,868 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,477 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004

  18. Petroleum Coke Exports by Destination

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 195,868 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,477 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004 Belgium 3,295 3,337 2,463 2,098 2,572 2,161 1993-2015 Belize 4 2

  19. Property:Iso3166Alpha2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Afghanistan + AF + Albania + AL + Algeria + DZ + American Samoa + AS + Andorra + AD + Angola + AO + Anguilla + AI + Antigua and Barbuda + AG + Argentina + AR + Armenia + AM +...

  20. Property:Iso3166Numeric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 004 + Albania + 008 + Algeria + 012 + American Samoa + 016 + Andorra + 020 + Angola + 024 + Anguilla + 660 + Antigua and Barbuda + 028 + Argentina + 032 + Armenia + 051 +...

  1. Property:AdvancedEconomy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    false + Albania + false + Algeria + false + American Samoa + false + Andorra + false + Angola + false + Anguilla + false + Antigua and Barbuda + false + Argentina + false + Armenia...

  2. Property:Iso3166Alpha3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + AFG + Albania + ALB + Algeria + DZA + American Samoa + ASM + Andorra + AND + Angola + AGO + Anguilla + AIA + Antigua and Barbuda + ATG + Argentina + ARG + Armenia + ARM +...

  3. Property:StartYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2012 + Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework + 2009 + Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin...

  4. Property:EndYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2012 + Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework + 2015 + Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme...

  5. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

    2009-09-17

    ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

  6. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-07

    Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) a material that effectively and affordably removes high concentrations of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate?bottom ash from coal fired power plants?is a waste material readily available in South Asia. During fieldwork in four sub-districts ofBangladesh, ARUBA reduced groundwater arsenic concentrations as high as 680 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Key results from three trips in Bangladesh and one trip to Cambodia include (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from contaminated water within the first five minutes of contact, andcontinues removing arsenic for 2-3 days; (2) ARUBA?s arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through fractionated dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well; and (4) the amount of arsenic removed per gram of ARUBA is linearly related to the initial arsenic concentrationof the water. Through analysis of existing studies, observations, and informal interviews in Bangladesh, eight design strategies have been developed and used in the design of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analyzed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than $2 per day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  7. Lessons Learned/Best Practices during the Department of Energy's Implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, OAS-RA-12-03

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Transition Initiative » Lessons Learned in Islands Lessons Learned in Islands Hawai'i, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and other island communities have successfully implemented renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies to decrease their reliance on fossil fuels and achieve sustainability, economic development, and other goals. Read how in these lessons learned, which are also featured in the Islands Energy Playbook. Assessing Pathways in Aruba Learn how Aruba developed an actionable

  8. Lessons Learned in Islands | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Transition Initiative » Lessons Learned in Islands Lessons Learned in Islands Hawai'i, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and other island communities have successfully implemented renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies to decrease their reliance on fossil fuels and achieve sustainability, economic development, and other goals. Read how in these lessons learned, which are also featured in the Islands Energy Playbook. Assessing Pathways in Aruba Learn how Aruba developed an actionable

  9. U.S. and Bahamian Governments to Cooperate on Detecting Illicit Shipments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Nuclear Material | Department of Energy Bahamian Governments to Cooperate on Detecting Illicit Shipments of Nuclear Material U.S. and Bahamian Governments to Cooperate on Detecting Illicit Shipments of Nuclear Material January 11, 2005 - 9:46am Addthis Bahamas to Become First Caribbean Country to Use Detection Equipment NASSAU, BAHAMAS -- In an effort to work together in the war on terrorism, the United States and the Commonwealth of the Bahamas recently signed an agreement to install

  10. Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages - U.S. Energy Information Administratio...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) ...

  11. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) ...

  12. Eia.gov BETA - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) ...

  13. Cape Systems Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cape Systems Limited Place: Rock Sound, Bahamas Sector: Services Product: Offers installation and site surveying services for clean...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    government. However, both projects await final approval from the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission for their environmental impact statements. Planning for a...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    government. However, both projects await final approval from the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission for their environmental impact statements. Planning for a...

  16. 2008 Feature Stories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Golden sand, swaying palms, turquoise waters - it's a traveler's dream. But paradise has a price. Developed islands such as Hawaii, the Bahamas, New Zealand and Iceland rely almost ...

  17. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,042 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 38,164 55 4,512 0 0 94 94 Angola 950 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  18. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    32,182 276 57 993 905 708 1,613 Non OPEC 146,826 378 6,754 20,047 7,776 10,220 17,996 Angola 13,518 0 0 374 0 0 0 Argentina 1,437 0 0 202 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 3,914 0 0 0 Australia...

  19. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,098 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 36,529 43 2,659 0 0 22 22 Angola 479 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  20. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    36,670 267 595 1,098 240 942 1,182 Non OPEC 163,069 81 8,967 13,895 5,736 9,208 14,944 Angola 13,189 0 0 300 0 0 0 Argentina 1,101 0 91 0 0 165 165 Aruba 0 0 0 3,407 0 0 0...

  1. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 33,726 267 595 724 0 0 0 Non OPEC 76,663 0 1,458 10,669 0 710 710 Angola 7,241 0 0 300 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 91 0 0 3 3 Aruba 0 0 0 2,659 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0...

  2. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 25,725 276 0 993 0 0 0 Non OPEC 59,194 322 2,858 14,288 60 540 600 Angola 5,113 0 0 374 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 1,846 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0...

  3. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 10,326 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 319,072 328 25,168 627 0 316 316 Angola 12,287 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

  4. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Venezuela 5,359 0 57 0 905 708 1,613 Non OPEC 24,214 0 822 2,623 7,716 8,966 16,682 Angola 6,120 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 181 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 882 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0...

  5. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 13,880 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 435,408 483 39,774 627 0 877 877 Angola 14,731 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

  6. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 13,730 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 428,008 483 36,692 627 0 877 877 Angola 14,726 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

  7. Notices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    918 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 30, 2013 / Notices The countries which are scheduled to be discussed are Antigua and Barbuda, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Granada, Hungary, Philippines, and Sint Maarten. The meeting agenda, as well as the staff analyses pertaining to the meeting will be posted on the Department of Education's Web site prior to the meeting at http://www2.ed.gov/about/ bdscomm/list/ncfmea.html. Reasonable Accommodations: The meeting site is accessible to

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on weekly cruises originating from Miami Florida with port calls in the Bahamas, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and St. Thomas. The repeat track of the cruise provides for long-term...

  9. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Qazi, Shefah; Agogino, Alice M.

    2009-09-14

    Researchers have invented a material called ARUBA -- Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash -- that effectively and affordably removes arsenic from Bangladesh groundwater. Through analysis of studies across a range of disciplines, observations, and informal interviews conducted over three trips to Bangladesh, we have applied mechanical engineering design methodology to develop eight key design strategies, which were used in the development of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to removearsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analysed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than US$2/day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  10. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    949 6,731 1,029 508 1,537 Non OPEC 926,975 3,672 21,367 123,756 710 10,270 10,980 Angola 79,399 10 1,979 1,426 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,703 167 0 248 248 Aruba 0 0 0 23,145 0...

  11. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,039 6,921 14,960 Non OPEC 1,932,132 4,376 78,202 165,474 79,551 123,093 202,644 Angola 164,183 10 1,979 1,526 0 0 0 Argentina 20,608 1 2,831 788 0 2,955 2,955 Aruba 0 0 0...

  12. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Venezuela 1,902 0 0 374 240 942 1,182 Non OPEC 19,630 0 2,479 1,958 5,736 8,371 14,107 Angola 4,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 162 162 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 57 0 5,851 5,134 10,985 Non OPEC 197,938 0 10,786 17,578 59,937 74,447 134,384 Angola 35,359 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 553 0 2,213 2,213 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

  14. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4,528 5,851 5,134 10,985 Non OPEC 1,444,745 3,761 54,586 121,039 60,051 87,331 147,382 Angola 116,243 6 347 1,126 0 0 0 Argentina 16,136 1 2,740 574 0 2,213 2,213 Aruba 0 0 0...

  15. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 175 374 7,010 6,413 13,423 Non OPEC 258,924 0 16,230 23,572 78,841 103,992 182,833 Angola 53,254 0 0 100 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 621 0 2,707 2,707 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

  16. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4,395 949 6,731 1,029 744 1,773 Non OPEC 928,991 3,672 19,941 130,776 874 9,600 10,474 Angola 81,615 10 1,979 1,923 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,703 167 0 646 646 Aruba 0 0 0 23,145 0...

  17. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 175 374 7,010 6,188 13,198 Non OPEC 259,980 0 17,385 23,792 78,059 104,593 182,652 Angola 53,254 0 0 100 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 621 0 2,707 2,707 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

  18. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    297,683 3,346 243 4,528 0 0 0 Non OPEC 696,402 3,302 16,063 89,085 114 5,161 5,275 Angola 55,477 6 347 1,126 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,612 21 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 16,193 0 0 0...

  19. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,039 6,932 14,971 Non OPEC 1,938,257 4,376 81,256 172,714 78,933 123,273 202,206 Angola 166,404 10 1,979 2,023 0 0 0 Argentina 20,608 1 2,831 788 0 3,353 3,353 Aruba 0 0 0...

  20. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.PDF Table 32. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 0 - 3 - 349 349 - - - Australia .............................. - 0 575 0 - 0 0 - - - Bahamas ............................ - 0 4 - - 179 179

  1. TABLE28.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, (Thousand Barrels) Destination Liquefied Finished Crude Pentanes Petroleum Motor Distillate Fuel Residual Oil a Plus Gases Gasoline Jet Fuel Kerosene Oil Fuel Oil January 1998 Argentina .............................................. 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 Australia ............................................... 0 0 (s) (s) 0 0 1 0 Bahama Islands ................................... 0 0 21 1 1 (s) 54 (s) Bahrain

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 January 2016 Table 51. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, February 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 0 0 98 - 175 175 - - - Australia .............................. - 0 0 0 - - - - - - Bahamas ............................ - 0 26

  3. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Turks & Caicos (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile presents a snapshot of the electricity generation and reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to Turks and Caicos - a British overseas territory consisting of two groups of islands located southeast of the Bahamas. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  4. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  5. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 January 2016 Table 52. Year-to-Date Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, January-February 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 0 0 98 - 279 279 - 0 0 Australia .............................. - 3 1 0 - - - - - - Bahamas

  6. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Destination Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Argentina ............................ - 3 249 381 - 2,403 2,403 - 0 0 Australia .............................. - 0 1,712 15 - 2 2 0 0 0 Bahamas ............................ - 2 735 537 - 3,131 3,131 1

  7. Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy? | Department of Energy Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? September 1, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell Hurricane Earl has the East Coast of the United States in his sights. Earl is moving northward from the Bahamas, and is expected to skirt the U.S. Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to New England, before making landfall in Nova Scotia over the

  8. U.S. and New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Further the Development of Clean Energy on Island Nations | Department of Energy New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership to Further the Development of Clean Energy on Island Nations U.S. and New Zealand Take Steps to Launch International Partnership to Further the Development of Clean Energy on Island Nations July 24, 2008 - 2:14pm Addthis U.S. to Work with New Zealand to Encourage Utilization of Natural Renewable Energy Resources NASSAU, BAHAMAS - The U.S. Department of

  9. Hybrid Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy? | Department of Energy Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? September 1, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell Hurricane Earl has the East Coast of the United States in his sights. Earl is moving northward from the Bahamas, and is expected to skirt the U.S. Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to New England, before making landfall in Nova Scotia over the

  10. Multiple dolomitization events in Triassic Latemar buildup, the Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.N.

    1988-01-01

    Partially dolomitized grainstones of the Middle Triassic Latemar buildup (Dolomites, northern Italy) exhibit a range of texturally distinct dolomite types. Petrographic and field observations of spatial associations and cross-cutting relationships among dolomites allow unravelling of the paragenesis of dolomitization events. Three generations of dolomite are preserved in the Latemar. Microdolomite, the earliest generation, occurs as replacement of allochems and as cement in thin (5-15 cm) exposure caps of meter-scale subtidal cycles. These dolomite crusts are texturally and chemically analogous to the Holocene supratidal crusts of Florida and the Bahamas. Saddle dolomite cements, the second generation, fill or line pores and fractures through the platform. The final generation is massive replacement of limestone by coarse, crystalline dolomite, which occupies a 2-3 km/sup 3/ mushroom-shaped zone in the center of the buildup and includes a wide array of fabrics. Here, subtidal limestones are altered to porous sucrosic dolomite, while microdolomite caps are altered to dense dolomite mosaics. Saddle dolomite cements remain as relics surrounded by replacement rhombs. Two important conclusions are (1) early dolomite is preserved as poorly ordered microdolomite (unless overprinted by a later dolomitization event) and accounts for an insignificant volume of the Latemar dolomite, and (2) saddle dolomite cements, often regarded as late-stage burial, occur before massive replacement.

  11. Multiple dolomitization events in Triassic latemar buildup, the dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.N.

    1988-02-01

    Partially dolomitized grainstones of the Middle Triassic Latemar buildup (Dolomites, northern Italy) exhibit a range of texturally distinct dolomite types. Petrographic and field observations of spatial associations and cross-cutting relationships among dolomites allow unravelling of the paragenesis of dolomitization events. Three generations of dolomite are preserved in the Latemar. Microdolomite, the earliest generation, occurs as replacement of allochems and as cement in thin (5-15 cm) exposure caps of meter-scale subtidal cycles. These dolomite crusts are texturally and chemically analogous to the Holocene supratidal crusts of Florida and the Bahamas. Saddle dolomite cements, the second generation, fill or line pores and fractures through the platform. The final generation is massive replacement of limestone by coarse, crystalline dolomite, which occupies a 2-3 km/sup 3/ mushroom-shaped zone in the center of the buildup and includes a wide array of fabrics. Here, subtidal limestones are altered to porous sucrosic dolomite, while microdolomite caps are altered to dense dolomite mosaics. Saddle dolomite cements remain as relics surrounded by replacement rhombs. Two important conclusions are (1) early dolomite is preserved as poorly ordered microdolomite (unless overprinted by a later dolomitization event) and accounts for an insignificant volume of the Latemar dolomite, and (2) saddle dolomite cements, often regarded as late-stage burial, occur before massive replacement. Standard textural classification of Latemar dolomites hindered the resolution of the timing of dolomitization events. Instead, paragenetic relationships provided a powerful tool for grouping dolomites into generations representing specific diagenetic events in specific dolomitizing environments.

  12. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  13. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  14. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  15. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90°C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group – Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 ± 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs’ Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  16. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially-viable fashion presents a variety of challenges. Beyond the technology itself (and, especially, the effects on the technology of the harsh oceanic environment), it is important to consider the possible environmental impacts of commercial-scale implementation of oceanic energy extraction. Further, because such implementation represents a completely new undertaking, the human resources required do not exist, so education and training programs are critical to eventual success. This project, establishing a national open-ocean energy laboratory, was designed to address each of these three challenges in a flexible framework allowing for adaptive management as the project proceeded. In particular:  the technology challenge, including resource assessment, evolved during the project to recognize and address the need for a national testing facility in the ocean for small-scale prototype MRE systems developed by industry;  the environmental challenge became formalized and expanded during the permitting process for such a testing facility; and  the human resources/societal challenges, both in terms of the need for education and training and in terms of public acceptance of MRE, stimulated a robust outreach program far beyond that originally envisioned at SNMREC. While all of these activities at SNMREC are ongoing, a number of significant milestones (in addition to the contributions listed in the appendices) were achieved under the auspices of this award. These include:  Planning and site selection for the first-phase test facility, offshore of Dania Beach, FL, including some equipment for the facility, submission of an Interim Policy Lease Application to the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and completion of an Environmental Assessment by BOEM and a positive Consistency Determination by the State of Florida;  Measurements using acoustic profilers of the current structure and variability in the vicinity of the site under a variety of weather conditions, seasons and time durations;  Design and implementation of instrumentation for the first phase of the offshore testing facility, the wet- and top-side data acquisition systems, and shore-based analysis systems;  Implementation of a laboratory-scale dynamometer system to test generators of up to 25 kW capacity using real-world (simulated) forcing;  Completion of 24 months of (airborne) marine vertebrate surveys and associated analysis of sea turtle offshore activity, marine mammal vocalization research, and ocean current turbine hydrodynamic noise characterization;  Development of a secondary-school (nominally grade 10) curriculum about hydrokinetic MRE, “Energy from the Oceans: The New Renewable”, and training of over 200 high-school teachers in its use and in how to educate their colleagues in application of the material in the classroom;  Presentations to over 50 interested civic groups in the region on various aspects of MRE in SE Florida  A series of public lectures to over 600 residents of south Florida to provide broader education on MRE.  Development of an interactive kiosk for installation in local science museums. These, and other accomplishments detailed in this report contribute to a comprehensive ongoing program at the SNMREC to support the affordable, responsible, and achievable commercialization of MRE. Many of the tasks of this award are continued or will be verified with follow-on funding DE-EE0004200, and its goal: the installation of the world’s first offshore ocean current turbine testing and validation capability.