Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We investigate the health consequences of changes in the supply of fast food using the exact geographical location of fast food restaurants. Specifically, we ask how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. We find that among 9 th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. There is no discernable effect at.25 miles and at.5 miles. Among pregnant women, models with mother fixed effects indicate that a fast food restaurant within a half mile of her residence results in a 2.5 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The effect is larger, but less precisely estimated at.1 miles. In contrast, the presence of non-fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with obesity and weight gain. Moreover, proximity to future fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with current obesity and weight gain, conditional on current proximity to fast food. The implied effects of fast-food on caloric intake are at least one order of magnitude smaller for mothers, which suggests that they are less constrained by travel costs than school children. Our results imply that policies restricting access to fast food near schools could

Janet Currie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fast food in a Chinese provincial city: a comparative analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than a decade ago American fast food entered the Chinese market. Since then the number of fast food and organized chain restaurants in China has multiplied. Chinese consumers, especially those who live in large urban areas, have accepted Western-style fast food restaurants that serve French fries and other popular dishes as a way of life. Inspired by the success of the symbolism of McDonald's and KFC, many Chinese restaurants have tried to use traditional Chinese culture to lure customers into what is advertised as indigenous, modern fast food outlets. Recently some Chinese fast food entrepreneurs have successfully developed local versions of the Western fast food system. Based on my three months� ethnographic research in Huai�an, I address the competitive situation between American fast food restaurants and local Chinese restaurants by examining service, price, management, food, and customer expectations. Specifically, this case analysis includes one of the largest American fast food chains and one of the largest Chinese fast food restaurant chains. The data are based on participant observation, informal and formal interviews, a sample survey, and historical documents. The study finds that in Huai�an, one local Chinese fast food restaurant, after improving décor, hygiene and service, has experienced increasing success in the local market. I show that the globalization process has experienced two types of localization in Huai�an. First, Western chains have striven to adapt to the consumers in Huai�an, by insisting on a high degree of local ownership and by modestly tailoring their products to local taste. Second, the mere presence of these Western chains has encouraged Chinese entrepreneurs to develop decidedly local versions of modern fast food enterprises.

Zhu, Haiying

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Minimum Energy Ventilation for Fast Food Restaurant Kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking equipment exhaust systems have a significant impact on the energy consumption of fast food restaurants. This research investigated issues that relate to the energy performance of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and demonstrated that significant energy and cost savings can be achieved by reducing ventilation rates.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Solar demonstration project in a fast-food restaurant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of a two-phase program in which the first phase included the successful use of heat reclamation equipment and energy conservation techniques at a typical fast-food restaurant. The project's second phase involved the engineering, designing, installation and interfacing of a solar collector system at the facility. The report will help to serve as a guide for other restaurants around the state, and possibly the nation, which wish to install energy saving systems, or adopt energy-saving techniques, geared to their special needs and equipment.

McClenahan, D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Body Mass Index, Neighborhood Fast Food and Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VW. Weight status and restaurant availability: a multilevelL, MacIntyre S. McDonald's restaurants and neighborhoodprevalence of fast food restaurants: state- level analysis.

Inagami, Sanae; Cohen, Deborah A.; Brown, Arleen F.; Asch, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The e¤ect of fast food restaurants on obesity and weight gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how changes in the supply of fast food restaurants affect weight outcomes of 3 million children and 3 million pregnant women. Among ninth graders, a fast food restaurant within 0.1 miles of a school results in a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. Among pregnant women, a fast-food restaurant within 0.5 miles of residence results in a 1.6 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The implied effects on caloric intake are one order of magnitude larger for children than for mothers, consistent with smaller travel cost for adults. Non-fast food restaurants and future fast-food restaurants are uncorrelated with weight outcomes. (JEL I12, J13, J16, L83) In the public debate over obesity it is often assumed the widespread availability of fast food restaurants is an important determinant of obesity rates. Policy makers in several cities have responded by restricting the availability or content of fast food, or by requiring posting of the caloric content of the meals (Julie Samia Mair, Matthew

Janet Currie; Stefano Dellavigna; Enrico Moretti; Vikram Pathania

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fried Food Away From Home With Body Mass Index and DietJuly 2011 Food Environments Near Home and School Related toof the food environment near home with diet healthier food

Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis for a Fast Food Restaurant: Comparison of Three Fuel Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity consumes 75 percent or more of the energy dollar of a typical fast food restaurant. This report describes the results of a computer simulation comparing energy costs for four fast food restaurants in Phoenix, Arizona, with differences only in the fuel used for certain end uses. The all-electric restaurant with high-efficiency equipment proved a cost-competitive alternative to the fossil-fuel-based restaurant in this area.

1996-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

FAST  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002363MLTPL00 FAST - A Framework for Agile Software Testing v. 2.0  https://software.sandia.gov/trac/fast 

10

Evaluation of Opportunities for Load Shifting With Fast Charging at Del Monte Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast charging of forklift batteries in warehouse facilities may allow companies to benefit from the load-leveling initiatives of electric suppliers.

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Look at Food Service Buildings - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Service Food Service Home: A Look at CBECS Building Activities How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? How do they use energy and how much does it cost? How do they use electricity? How do they use natural gas? What types of equipment do they use? How do they measure up on conservation efforts? Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) FOOD SERVICE BUILDINGS There were an estimated 285,000 food service buildings in the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), food service buildings are those used for the preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption; they include buildings such as fast food establishments, full service restaurants, caterers, cafeterias, diners, and bars.

12

Linguistic Acculturation and Food Behaviors among Mexican-Origin Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that  sell  food.   Restaurant  spending  includes  dine-­?of  Eating  Fast  Food  or   Restaurant  Food  within  the  Food  or  Sit-­?Down  Restaurants  in  the  Previous  Two  

Langellier, Brent Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

14

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

15

Food Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Sub Categories fast food, restaurant or cafeteria References EIA CBECS Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS...

16

L-Bar.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County approximately 47 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 10 miles north of Laguna Pueblo. The disposal site is located on part of the former L-Bar ranch and is about 4 miles east-southeast of the village of Seboyeta. The site was previously owned and operated by SOHIO Western Mining Company . Mining and milling at L-Bar began in 1977 and continued until 1981, when the mine closed because of economic conditions of the uranium industry. About 2.1 million tons of ore was processed at the mill. The milling operation created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. Tailings and liquid wastes were pumped in slurry form into an onsite tailings impoundment for disposal. All aboveground structures, including the mine and

17

$\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses for $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states are systematically studied in QCD sum rules. The interpolating currents representing the related molecular states are proposed. Technically, contributions of the operators up to dimension six are included in operator product expansion (OPE). Mass spectra for molecular states with $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ configurations are obtained.

Zhang, Jian-Rong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar #12;Malay Archipelago · During Islam era: Malay) · Dutch and Portuguese traders arrived during the 15th century · Indonesia became a Dutch colony · Indonesia independent - 1945 #12;#12;Indonesian · Formed ­ 15th

Dershowitz, Nachum

19

BaBar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Kollaboration gebaut. Er dient dazu, Paare von elektrisch neutralen B und anti-B Mesonen zu erzeugen. Das neutrale B enthält ein anti-b Quark und ein d Quark, während das neutrale anti-B ein b Quark und ein anti-d Quark enthält. Die Teilchenstrahlen werden so eingestellt, dass bei ihrer Kollision gerade die richtige Menge an Energie frei wird, um diese zwei Mesonen zu erzeugen. Weil Elektronen und Positronen mit verschiedenen Energien umlaufen, werden die so entstandenen B und anti-B Mesonen mit grosser Geschwindigkeit in derselben Richtung laufen. Dabei bewegen sie sich in gleicher Richtung wie die schneller laufenden Elektronen. Das macht es möglich, ihre Lebensdauer durch die Wegstrecke, die sie bis zu ihrem

20

List of Property Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Store with Gas Station Convenience Store without Gas Station BarNightclub Fast Food Restaurant Restaurant Other - RestaurantBar Food Sales Food Service Hospital (General Medical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FAST LAB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of the entrance to the FAST Lab building. FAST LAB Located on the campus of Aiken Technical College (see map 28k) in Aiken, South Carolina, the FAST Lab is a partnership of...

22

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Microsoft Word - BAR 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar, New Mexico L-Bar, New Mexico Page 3-1 3.0 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 3.1 Compliance Summary The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 22, 2012. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicate that no erosion is occurring, and foliar cover of the vegetation has increased since the 2011 inspection. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 3.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the L-Bar site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy L-Bar, New Mexico, (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site, Seboyeta, New Mexico (DOE-LM/GJ709-2004,

24

P{bar P} collider physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

Demarteau, M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

26

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/?\\to N \\bar{N} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} ?$ decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$, $p \\bar p \\eta$, $p \\bar p \\eta^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} \\omega$ decays are re-studied. Different contributions due to PS-PS and PS-PV couplings in the $\\pi$-N interaction and the effects of $NN\\pi$ form factors are investigated in the $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$ decay channel. It is found that when the ratio of $|F_0| /|F_M|$ takes small value, without considering the $NN\\pi$ form factor, the difference between PS-PS and PS-PV couplings are negligible. However, when the $NN\\pi$ form factor is included, this difference is greatly enlarged. The resultant decay widths are sensitive to the form factors. As a conclusion, the nucleon-pole contribution as a background is important in the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\pi$ decay and must be accounted. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\eta$ and $N\\bar{N}\\eta'$ decays, its contribution is less than 0.1% of the data. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\omega$ decay, it provides rather important contribution without considering form factors. But the contribution is suppressed greatly when adding the off-shell form factors. Comparing these results with data would help us to select a proper form factor for such kind of decay.

Wei-Hong Liang; Peng-Nian Shen; Bing-Song Zou; Amand Faessler

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Bar Gadda LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Bar-Gadda LLC Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94306 Sector Geothermal energy, Hydro, Hydrogen Product Has developed a new technology to produce hydrogen from...

28

New Corrosion Resistance Bar in Sandwich Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandwich masonry wall is an energy-saving composite wall with good mechanical properties and durability. But the adhesion strength to its tie bar affects its permanence. In order to simple the traditional production processes, a new method was proposed. ... Keywords: energy-saving, durability, steel bar, insulation

Li Yancang; Ge Xiaohua; Wang Fengxin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cam-controlled boring bar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...

31

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing from ...

32

Fast valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

Van Dyke, W.J.

1992-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fast valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

Van Dyke, William J. (Grafton, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Spontaneous formation of double bars in dark matter dominated galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although nearly one-third of barred galaxies host an inner, secondary bar, the formation and evolution of double barred galaxies remain unclear. We show here an example model of a galaxy, dominated by a live dark matter halo, in which double bars form naturally, without requiring gas, and we follow its evolution for a Hubble time. The inner bar in our model galaxy rotates almost as slowly as the outer bar, and it can reach up to half of its length. The route to the formation of a double bar may be different from that of a single strong bar. Massive dark matter halo or dynamically hot stellar disc may play an important role in the formation of double bars and their subsequent evolution.

Saha, Kanak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The BaBar Drift Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central drift chamber for the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory at SLAC is a cylindrical chamber with a length of 280 cm and outer radius of 81 cm. It consists of 40 layers of small hexagonal cells arranged in 10 axial and stereo super-layers. In order to minimize multiple scattering, light materials are used for the mechanical structure, and the gas mixture is Helium based. The pulse-height and timing electronics are mounted directly on the chamber rear end-plate. A full length prototype of the BaBar drift chamber has been built. The analysis of cosmic ray events measures the spatial resolution averaged in the cell to be 130 m and the dE/dx resolution to be 6.8%, meeting the performance goals for the BaBar central tracker. The mechanical assembly and stringing of the chamber was completed in December 1997 and the detector will be integrated into BaBar during summer 1998. 1

G. Sciolla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Preserved in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to keep the BaBar virtual world safe and unchanging, isolated not only from the SLAC network, but from the rest of the World Wide Web. BaBar collaboration members can...

38

Bar-code automated waste tracking system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bar-Code Automated Waste Tracking System was designed to be a site-Specific program with a general purpose application for transportability to other facilities. The system is user-friendly, totally automated, and incorporates the use of a drive-up window that is close to the areas dealing in container preparation, delivery, pickup, and disposal. The system features ``stop-and-go`` operation rather than a long, tedious, error-prone manual entry. The system is designed for automation but allows operators to concentrate on proper handling of waste while maintaining manual entry of data as a backup. A large wall plaque filled with bar-code labels is used to input specific details about any movement of waste.

Hull, T.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Association Section on Environment Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name American Bar Association Section on Environment Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60610 Product The Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources is the premier forum for lawyers working in areas related to environment law, natural resources law, and energy law. References American Bar Association Section on Environment[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Bar Association Section on Environment is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "American Bar Association Section on Environment" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Bar_Association_Section_on_Environment&oldid=342108

40

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow?_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}?^{+}?^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sigma_{c}(2455)$ or $\\Sigma_{c}(2520)$ resonances, we measure ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{non-\\Sigma_{c}}}=(79 \\pm 4 \\pm 4 \\pm 20)\\times10^{-5}$. The total branching fraction is determined to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{total}}=(123 \\pm 5 \\pm 7 \\pm 32)\\times10^{-5}$. We examine multibody mass combinations in the resonant three-particle $\\Sigma_{c}\\bar{p}\\pi$ final states and in the four-particle $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state, and observe different characteristics for the $\\bar{p}\\pi$ combination in neutral versus doubly-charged $\\Sigma_{c}$ decays.

The Babar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; M. Morii; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bünger; O. Grünberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schröder; C. Voß; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Y\\`; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a dramatic decrease in the bar size, decrease in the overall bar strength and a mild increase in its pattern speed, but is not expected to lead to a complete bar dissolution. The buckling instability appears primarily responsible for shortening the secular diffusion timescale to a dynamical one when building the boxy isophotes. The sufficiently long timescale of described evolution, ~1 Gyr, can affect the observed bar fraction in local universe and at higher redshifts, both through reduced bar strength and the absence of dust offset lanes in the bar.

Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Isaac Shlosman

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Minimally flavored colored scalar in $\\bar B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a colored scalar that is a weak doublet with fractional electric charges of $|Q|=2/3$ and $|Q|=5/3$ with mass below 1\\,TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in $B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \

Dorsner, Ilja; Kosnik, Nejc; Nisandzic, Ivan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a generalised El Farol Bar Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

Chakrabarti, Bikas K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Preheating Collector Bars and Cathode Blocks Prior to Rodding with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrically heating collector bar/cathode block assemblies uses less than 15% of the energy required for propane gas burner heating. The method is quiet, ...

45

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

SciTech Connect

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

Functional Foods Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains five (5) titles regarding functional foods. Functional Foods Package Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages Nutrition Health Food Science Biochemistry This Value Package includes: ...

47

Moose Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

48

ORKPROCESSINSELECTIVNEURON BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81 CATEGORIZ Figure 5: A sketch of the AIR system 3D interactive animation. Communications of the ACM 39.56{71. Rose, Daniel E., & Richard K. Belew of the 16th Annual Inter- national ACM/SIGIR Conference, 49{58, Pittsburgh, PA. ||, & Chris Buckley. 1992

Hearst, Marti

49

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a...

Martinez-Valpuesta, I

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

BARS REJUVENATING BULGES? EVIDENCE FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in 2009 by Gadotti and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age versus metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than {approx}4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M{sub Sun }, while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulge age distribution for barred galaxies only, corresponding to two normal distributions with mean ages of 10.4 and 4.7 Gyr. We also find twice as much active galactic nuclei among barred galaxies, as compared to unbarred galaxies, for low-mass bulges. By combining a large sample of high-quality data with sophisticated image and spectral analysis, we are able to find evidence that the presence of bars affects the mean stellar ages of bulges. This lends strong support to models in which bars trigger star formation activity in the centers of galaxies.

Coelho, P. [Nucleo de Astrofisica Teorica, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, R. Galvao Bueno 868, Liberdade 01506-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gadotti, D. A., E-mail: paula.coelho@cruzeirodosul.edu.br, E-mail: dgadotti@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Study of $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Production of htt_bar and htT_bar in littlest Higgs model with T-parity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which predicts a pair of T-even and T-odd partners for the top quark, the top quark interactions are altered with respect to the Standard Model predictions and deviation will manifest in various top quark processes. In this work we examine the effects in htt_bar productions at the ILC and LHC. We find that in the allowed parameter space, the cross sections can be significantly deviated from the Standard Model predictions and thus provide a good test for the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. We also examine the new production channel, the htT_bar or hTt_bar production, at the LHC, which give the same final states as htt_bar production due to the dominant decay T->Wb. We find that, compared with htt_bar production, this new production channel can have a sizable production rate for a T-quark below TeV scale. Such a production will be counted into htt_bar events or possibly extracted from htt_bar events, depending on if we can distinguish the T-quark from the top quark from mass reconstructions.

Lei Wang; Wenyu Wang; Jin Min Yang; Huanjun Zhang

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

53

A quark model of {bar {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions  

SciTech Connect

A quark model which includes both scalar and vector contributions to the reaction mechanism (SV quark model) is used in a DWBA calculation of {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions. Total and differential cross-sections, polarizations, depolarizations, and spin-correlation coefficients are computed for laboratory momenta from threshold to 1695 MeV/c. The free parameters of the calculation are the scalar and vector strengths, a quark cluster size parameter, and the parameters of the unknown {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials. Good agreement with experiment is found for constructive interference of the scalar and vector terms, and for {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials which differ from those suggested by several authors on the basis of SU(3) arguments. The fit to the data is better than that obtained by other quark models, which use only scalar or vector annihilation terms. The agreement with experiment is also better than that found in meson-exchange models. The recent suggestion [1] that measurement of the depolarization parameter D{sub nn} can be used to discriminate between meson-exchange and quark models is examined in detail. We conclude that a measurement of D{sub nn} will provide a test of which of these models, as presently constructed, is the more appropriate description of strangeness production in the {bar p}p {yields} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} reaction.

Alberg, M.A. [Seattle Univ., WA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Henley, E.M.; Wilets, L. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kunz, P.D. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose to consume; therefore, by assessing the home food environment a better understanding of what people are eating can be obtained. Methods of measuring home food availability have been developed and tested in recent years; however most of these methods assess food availability on one occasion only. This study aimed to capture "usual" availability by using multiple assessments. After the development and pre-testing of the 171-item home observation guide to determine the presence and amount of food items in the home (refrigerator, freezer, pantry, elsewhere), two trained researchers recruited a convenience sample of 9 households (44.4% minority), administered a baseline questionnaire (personal info, shopping habits, food resources, and food security), and conducted 5 in-home assessments (5-7 day interval) over a 30-day period. Each in-home assessment included shopping and fast food activities since the last assessment and an observational survey of types and amounts of foods present. The final in-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery purchases (place, amount, and purpose) use (frequency) varied from once (n=1) to every week (n=5); 4 used fast food 2-3 times/wk for 4 weeks. Quantity and types of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables varied by week and by family. The feasibility of conducting multiple in-home assessments was confirmed with 100% retention from all participants. This methodology is important in that it provided detailed information on intra-monthly variation in food availability. The findings suggest the inadequacy of a single measure to assess food availability in the home.

Sisk, Cheree L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Error Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate studies often involve comparisons between estimates of some parameter derived from different observed and/or model-generated datasets. It is common practice to present estimates of two or more statistical quantities with error bars about ...

John R. Lanzante

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The distribution of stellar population age in galactic bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of stellar populations in barred galaxies have focused on the spatial distribution of stellar population ages and metallicities. However, barred galaxies are complex objects where dynamical instabilities play a leading role in shaping any spatial distribution. The age distribution of stellar populations should thus be analyzed from the two points of view of stellar population evolution and dynamical secular evolution. Chemodynamical simulations of single barred galaxies with simple but realistic star formation and feedback recipes are used to produce face-on mass-weighted maps of stellar population ages. Luminosity-weighted maps in V-band are also displayed after calibrating the simulation with mass-to-light ratios provided by a synthesis population model. It is shown that inside a stellar bar two persistent diametrically opposed regions display a mean age lower than the surrounding average. These two low-age regions are due to the accumulation of young stellar populations trapped on elliptica...

Wozniak, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Searches for New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2013 Scientists analyzing data from the BaBar experiment, which operated at SLAC between 1999 and 2008, recently published the results of a search for signs of...

59

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

60

Gender, IFIs and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haiti, the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, suffers from chronic food insecurity (World Food Program, 2010). One third of the population is food insecure, the most vulnerable of whom are women and children. International Financial

Elizabeth Arend; Lisa Vitale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Global Food Security | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Food Security Global Food Security aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence data management platform enables integration of complex agricultural, environmental and public health data into local, actionable insight. Application URL: http://www.awhere.com/en-us Read more about aWhere 0 comment(s) | Food Frequency Method Online A fast, low cost, effective method to assess micro-nutrient deficiencies in a developing country on a household basis, while also allowing for an aggregation to a community or regional basis quickly and effectively. Application URL: http://www.foodfrequencyonline.org/index Read more about Food Frequency Method Online 0 comment(s) | e-Afghan AG e-Afghan Ag provides credible relevant information to those helping farmers

62

Exclusive initial-state-radiation production of the DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar] , and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript * ] systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a study of the exclusive production of DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar], and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript *] in initial-state-radiation events, from e[superscript +]e[superscript -] annihilations ...

Zhao, M.

63

Broken Bar Detection in Synchronous Machines Based Wind Energy Conversion System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical machines are subject to different types of failures. Early detection of the incipient faults and fast maintenance may prevent costly consequences. Fault diagnosis of wind turbine is especially important because they are situated at extremely high towers and therefore inaccessible. For offshore plants, bad weather can prevent any repair actions for several weeks. In some of the new wind turbines synchronous generators are used and directly connected to the grid without the need of power converters. Despite intensive research efforts directed at rotor fault diagnosis in induction machines, the research work pertinent to damper winding failure of synchronous machines is very limited. This dissertation is concerned with the in-depth study of damper winding failure and its traceable symptoms in different machine signals and parameters. First, a model of a synchronous machine with damper winding based on the winding function approach is presented. Next, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed. A specially designed inside-out synchronous machine with a damper winding is employed for the experimental setup. Finally, a novel analytical method is developed to predict the behavior of the left sideband amplitude for different numbers and locations of the broken bars. This analysis is based on the magnetic field theory and the unbalanced multiphase circuits. It is found that due to the asymmetrical structure of damper winding, the left sideband component in the stator current spectrum of the synchronous machine during steady state asynchronous operation is not similar to that of the induction machine with broken bars. As a result, the motor current signature analysis (MCSA) for detection rotor failures in the induction machine is usable to detect broken damper bars in synchronous machines. However, a novel intelligent-systems based approach is developed that can identify the severity of the damper winding failure. This approach potentially can be used in a non-invasive condition monitoring system to monitor the deterioration of a synchronous motor damper winding as the number of broken bars increase over time. Some other informative features such as speed spectrum, transient time, torque-speed curve and rotor slip are also found for damper winding diagnosis.

Rahimian, Mina Mashhadi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fast Breeder Reactor studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students January 7, 2010 - 2:58pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For 13 years, Tony Grahame has inspired students to pursue careers building sustainable, energy-efficient houses or to find other niches in the green-building industry. His Residential Building Technology program at Yavapai College in Prescott, Ariz., gets students out of the classroom and constructing real homes in a nearby subdivision. On the jobsite, they learn the skills and knowledge essential to launch their careers as the next generation of energy-efficient builders. Tony's expertise draws from technologies and strategies in residential efficiency and renewable energy developed through

66

Holiday Food Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

67

~~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I --------------------------------------- NAME: 333 Iv. Mkhi qr) Aw. thka o ~~~---~~~--~~~_-----__ C I TV : 8 Morim 'Love 82 10 bhh &Q Ir -+----------- STATE- fL I - ------ l OWNER(S) -__----_ past: Current: I --------------------____ Owner contacted q yes p no; _____--_____-____------~~~l if yes, data contacted -_--------__- TYPE OF OPERATION ---_------------- 0 Research & Development q Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis Facility Type p Manufacturing I ! fJ University 0 Research Organization ! 0 Government Sponsored F+ci li ty 0 Other ----~~-~~~----~------ 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CUNTRKT ----~---~__----_ / w Prime

68

The Fueling of Nuclear Activity: II. The Bar Properties of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a recent near-infrared imaging survey of samples of Seyfert and normal galaxies to study the role of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity. The active galaxy sample includes Seyfert galaxies in the Revised Shapely-Ames (RSA) and Sandage & Tammann's (1987) extension to this catalog. The normal galaxies were selected to match the Seyfert sample in Hubble type, redshift, inclination and blue luminosity. All the galaxies in both samples classified as barred in the RSA catalog are also barred in the near-infrared. In addition, ~55% of the galaxies classified as non-barred in the RSA show evidence for bars at 2.1 microns. Overall, ~70% of the galaxies observed show evidence for bar structures. The incidence of bars in the Seyfert and normal galaxies is similar, suggesting Seyfert nuclei do not occur preferentially in barred systems. Furthermore, a slightly higher percentage of normal galaxies have multiple-bar structures.

John S. Mulchaey; Michael W. Regan

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Solving the Fast Clock Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study troubleshoots then solves the problem of digital clocks running fast.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

little book of fast facts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The little book of fast facts #12;The Big Picture little book of fast facts Big Picture own sprinkling of `fast facts', fascinating snippets of information on the topic. In this book, we@wellcome.ac.uk. Find out more at www.wellcome.ac.uk/bigpicture. #12;LITTLE BOOK OF FAST FACTS Contents 2 The brain 16

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

71

Antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}})$ and muonic antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu})$ formation in low energy three-charge-particle collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few-body formalism is applied for computation of two different three-charge-particle systems. The first system is a collision of a slow antiproton, $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$, with a positronium atom: Ps$=(e^+e^-)$ $-$ a bound state of an electron and a positron. The second problem is a collision of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ with a muonic muonium atom, i.e. true muonium $-$ a bound state of two muons one positive and one negative: Ps$_{\\mu}=(\\mu^+\\mu^-)$. The total cross section of the following two reactions: $\\bar{\\rm p}+(e^+e^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}} + e^-$ and $\\bar{\\rm p}+(\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu} + \\mu^-$, where $\\bar{\\rm{H}}=(\\bar{\\rm p}e^+)$ is antihydrogen and $\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu}=(\\bar{\\rm p}\\mu^+)$ is a muonic antihydrogen atom, i.e. a bound state of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ and $\\mu^+$, are computed in the framework of a set of coupled two-component Faddeev-Hahn-type (FH-type) equations. Unlike the original Faddeev approach the FH-type equations are formulated in terms of only two but relevant components: $\\...

Sultanov, Renat A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Some aspects of $?^+$ parity determination in the reaction $? N\\to ?^+ \\bar{K}\\to N K \\bar{K}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the problem of how to determine the parity of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark in the reaction $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta\\to NK\\bar{K}$, where $N=n,p$. Our model calculations indicate that the contribution of the non-resonant background of the reaction $\\gamma N\\to NK\\bar{K}$ cannot be neglected, and that suggestions to determine the parity based solely on the initial-stage process $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta$ cannot be implemented cleanly. We discuss the various mechanisms that contribute to the background, and we identify some spin observables which are sensitive.

A. I. Titov; H. Ejiri; H. Haberzettl; K. Nakayama

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

Interactive SIGHT: textual access to simple bar charts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information graphics, such as bar charts and line graphs, are an important component of many articles from popular media. The majority of such graphics have an intention (a high-level message) to communicate to the graph viewer. Since the intended message ... Keywords: Accessibility, Assistive technology, Graph summarization, Information graphics, Visual impairments

Seniz Demir; David Oliver; Edward Schwartz; Stephanie Elzer; Sandra Carberry; Kathleen F. Mccoy; Daniel Chester

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF BARRED GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Barred galaxies are known to possess magnetic fields that may affect the properties of bar substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. We use two-dimensional high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of such substructures, as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center. The gaseous medium is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, non-self-gravitating, and threaded by initially uniform, azimuthal magnetic fields. We find that there exists an outermost x{sub 1}-orbit relative to which gaseous responses to an imposed stellar bar potential are completely different between inside and outside. Inside this orbit, gas is shocked into dust lanes and infalls to form a nuclear ring. Magnetic fields are compressed in dust lanes, reducing their peak density. Magnetic stress removes further angular momentum of the gas at the shocks, temporarily causing the dust lanes to bend into an 'L' shape and eventually leading to a smaller and more centrally distributed ring than in unmagnetized models. The mass inflow rates in magnetized models correspondingly become larger, by more than two orders of magnitude when the initial fields have an equipartition value with thermal energy, than in the unmagnetized counterparts. Outside the outermost x{sub 1}-orbit, on the other hand, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates near the corotation and bar-end regions, efficiently amplifying magnetic fields. The amplified fields shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms has a thin layer in which magnetic fields with opposite polarity reconnect via a tearing-mode instability. This produces numerous magnetic islands with large density that propagate along the arms to turn the outer disk into a highly chaotic state.

Kim, Woong-Tae [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Stone, James M., E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Food Sales | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sales Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Food Sales Definition Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. Sub Categories grocery store or food market, gas station with...

76

Fast Turbulent Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconnection is the process by which magnetic fields in a conducting fluid change their topology. This process is essential for understanding a wide variety of astrophysical processes, including stellar and galactic dynamos and astrophysical turbulence. To account for solar flares, solar cycles and the structure of the galactic magnetic field reconnection must be fast, propagating with a speed close to the Alfven speed. We show that the presence of a random magnetic field component substantially enhances the reconnection rate and enables fast reconnection, i.e. reconnection that does not depend on fluid resistivity. The enhancement of the reconnection rate is achieved via a combination of two effects. First of all, only small segments of magnetic field lines are subject to direct Ohmic annihilation. Thus the fraction of magnetic energy that goes directly into fluid heating goes to zero as fluid resistivity vanishes. However, the most important enhancement comes from the fact that unlike the laminar fluid case where reconnection is constrained to proceed line by line, the presence of turbulence enables many magnetic field lines to enter the reconnection zone simultaneously. A significant fraction of magnetic energy goes into MHD turbulence and this enhances reconnection rates through an increase in the field stochasticity. In this way magnetic reconnection becomes fast when field stochasticity is accounted for. As a consequence solar and galactic dynamos are also fast, i.e. do not depend on fluid resistivity.

A. Lazarian; E. Vishniac

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Integral Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lineberry, M.J. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

79

Assessing the Exposure and Health Risks of Secondhand Smoke in Restaurants and Bars by Workers and Patrons & Evaluating the Efficacy of Different Smoking Policies in Beijing Restaurants and Bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ban in Minnesota Bars and Restaurants." American Journal ofof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five citiesof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five cities

Liu, Ruiling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Hint at Cracks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release Archive BaBar Data Hint at Cracks in the Standard Model June 18, 2012 Menlo Park, Calif. - Recently analyzed data from the BaBar experiment may suggest possible flaws...

82

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation

83

Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stores (including gas stations with convenience stores),including those in gas stations), liquor stores, dollarstores (including gas stations with convenience stores),

Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Field Bend Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8967,"lon":-89.6897,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

86

Analysis of B ? ?l? Decays With BaBar  

SciTech Connect

As part of the BaBar project at SLAC to study the properties of B mesons, we have carried out a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decay mode B ? ?l?, which can be used to determine the magnitude of the Cabbibo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vub. Using simulated event samples, this study focuses on determining criteria on variables for selection of B ? ?l? signal and suppression of background from other types of BB events and continuum processes. In addition, we determine optimal cuts on variables to ensure a good neutrino reconstruction. With these selection cuts, we were able to achieve a signal-to-background ratio of 0.68 and a signal efficiency of the order of 1%. Applying these cuts to a sample of 83 million BB events recorded by BaBar in e+e– collisions at the (4S) resonance, we obtain a yield of 115 ± 19 B ? ?l? decays.

Chu, Y.; Littlejohn, B.; Binfelder, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar, California: Energy Resources Bar, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0286226°, -117.8103367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0286226,"lon":-117.8103367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Timed fast charger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a charger for rechargeable electrochemical cells, a transformer charging circuit supplies a charging current to the battery at a fast charge rate for a predetermined time followed by a continuous slow charge rate. A normally closed automatic reset thermostat in series with the rectifier diodes in the charging circuit, and thermally coupled to them, opens after a period of time, dependent upon the heat generated by the rectifier diodes and upon the thermal mass of the thermostat and diodes, and terminates the fast charge current. A resistor, shunted across the thermostat and thermally coupled to it, establishes a slow charge rate current path when the thermostat opens. Heat generated in the resistor causes the thermostat to remain open as long as the battery is connected and ac power is supplied to the transformer primary winding.

Mullersman, F.H.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (?,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar?,?\\bar?)$ in the perturbative QCD approach beyond the leading order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we make a systematic study of the semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (\\eta,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar{\

Wen-Fei Wang; Ying-Ying Fan; Min Liu; Zhen-Jun Xiao

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and $|V_{us}|$ using Tau Lepton Decays to $e^- \\bar{\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using 467 $fb^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ annihilation data collected with the BaBar detector, we measure $\\frac{{\\cal{B}}(\\tau^- \\to \\mu^- \\bar{\

Aubert, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fast Simulation and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Fast Simulation and Modeling" (FSM) project of the IntelliGrid Consortium is developing a high-performance "look-ahead" capability for a self-healing grid8212one capable of automatically anticipating and responding to power system disturbances while continually optimizing its own performance. This project's roadmap assesses individual software solutions and equipment components that vendors will provide during the next 5 to 15 years and that electric power companies will adopt to realize FSM's self-...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

A. Cieply

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Innovative design of uranium startup fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium Fast Reactors are one of the three candidates of GEN-IV fast reactors. Fast reactors play an important role in saving uranium resources and reducing nuclear wastes. Conventional fast reactors rely on transuranic ...

Fei, Tingzhou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fast neutron dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

Snell, A.H.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fast quench reactor method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Berry, Ray A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

2012 Food for Thought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as Safeway and Whole Foods, department stores like JC Penney and Sears, apparel companies Gap and VF Corporation, and DIY and big ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fast Fourier transform telescope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an all-digital telescope for 21 cm tomography, which combines key advantages of both single dishes and interferometers. The electric field is digitized by antennas on a rectangular grid, after which a series of fast Fourier transforms recovers simultaneous multifrequency images of up to half the sky. Thanks to Moore's law, the bandwidth up to which this is feasible has now reached about 1 GHz, and will likely continue doubling every couple of years. The main advantages over a single dish telescope are cost and orders of magnitude larger field-of-view, translating into dramatically better sensitivity for large-area surveys. The key advantages over traditional interferometers are cost (the correlator computational cost for an N-element array scales as Nlog{sub 2}N rather than N{sup 2}) and a compact synthesized beam. We argue that 21 cm tomography could be an ideal first application of a very large fast Fourier transform telescope, which would provide both massive sensitivity improvements per dollar and mitigate the off-beam point source foreground problem with its clean beam. Another potentially interesting application is cosmic microwave background polarization.

Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias [Department of Physics and MIT Kavli Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum newsletter. Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum Division division divisions food materials food structure Food Structure & Functional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

102

Summer Food Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMMER FOOD SAFETY SUMMER FOOD SAFETY Year after year, we hear and read the same advice: Handle food carefully in the summer because foodborne illness -- also known as "food poisoning" -- is more prevalent in warmer weather. Do foodborne illnesses increase during the summer months? If so, why? Yes, foodborne illnesses do increase during the summer, and the answer appears to be twofold. First, there are the natural causes. Bacteria are present throughout the environment in soil, air, water, and in the bodies of people and animals. These microorganisms grow faster in the warm summer months. Most foodborne bacteria grow fastest at temperatures from 90 to 110 °F. Bacteria also need moisture to flourish, and summer weather is often hot and humid. Given the right circumstances, harmful bacteria can quickly multiply on food to large numbers.

103

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fast Track Special Project Proposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast track special project is defined as a one-time Division directed endeavor that creates ... project will not result in future operating expenses. ... Cost Analysis

106

Product characterization of fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pyrolysis is an important step in the thermal conversion of biomass. During this study, the influence of temperature, heating rate and holding time on fast… (more)

Gout, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fast calculation of HELAS amplitudes using graphics processing unit (GPU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast calculations of helicity amplitudes of physics processes. As our first attempt, we compute $u\\bar{u}\\to n\\gamma$ ($n=2$ to 8) processes in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 14$TeV by transferring the MadGraph generated HELAS amplitudes (FORTRAN) into newly developed HEGET ({\\bf H}ELAS {\\bf E}valuation with {\\bf G}PU {\\bf E}nhanced {\\bf T}echnology) codes written in CUDA, a C-platform developed by NVIDIA for general purpose computing on the GPU. Compared with the usual CPU programs, we obtain 40-150 times better performance on the GPU.

K. Hagiwara; J. Kanzaki; N. Okamura; D. Rainwater; T. Stelzer

2009-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermal and environmental effects on fiber-reinforced polymer reinforcing bars and reinforced concrete elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel reinforcement in bridge decks results in high repair costs, unwanted traffic disruption, and unsafe structures. To help alleviate this problem, non-metallic fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars are being studied as an alternate type of reinforcement in bridge decks. In order to determine the suitability of the use of FRP bars, a number of tests have been performed on FRP bars to evaluate their long-term performance. These tests include uniaxial tension tests under a variety of environmental conditions and thermal expansion of the bars embedded in concrete. In an effort to characterize the FRP bars and to gain insight into their long-term performance, batteries of tests have been carried out. Samples from three different manufacturers were exposed under different environmental conditions and tested in uniaxial tension. For one of the bar types, the strength increased, while the other two bar types lost strength. In all cases, the modulus of the bars increased with exposure time. In addition, FRP reinforced concrete specimens were evaluated for thermal expansion. The results indicate that thermal cracking of the concrete by FRP bar expansion is not a significant problem.

Schaefer, Benjamin Carl

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Food science-based instruction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The food industry faces a shortage of graduates needed to fill scientific and technical positions available in the coming years, and university food science programs… (more)

Peacock, Amy Rowley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Measurement of \\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-}\\-->\\bar{K^{0}}\\pi^{-}\  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 384.6 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. From this they measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.840 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst))%. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

Wren, A

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

X-ray nuclear activity in S4G barred galaxies: No link between bar strength and co-occurrent supermassive black hole fueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d nuclear 2--10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6um imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q_b, taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing th...

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H; Kim, Taehyun; Díaz-García, Simón; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; González-Martín, Omaira; Ho, Luis C; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; De Paz, Armando Gil; Hinz, Joannah L; Holwerda, Benne W; Laine, Jarkko; Meidt, Sharon; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Mizusawa, Trisha; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Regan, Michael; Seibert, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Graduate Study Food Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Graduate Study Field of Food Science and Technology Cornell University #12;Field of Food Science and Technology DE P A R T M E N T O F FO O D SC I E N C E A N D TE C H N O L O G Y Mission Science represents the application of the basic sciences, biotechnology, and engineering to the production

Walter, M.Todd

114

Search for low-mass Higgs and dark bosons at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present BaBar latest results for the direct search of a light CP-odd Higgs boson using radiative decays of the Y(nS) (n=1,2,3) resonances in different final states. I also present the results for the search of a hidden sector gauge and Higgs bosons using the full BaBar datasample.

Oberhof, Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Using Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Nuclear Dust Morphology to Rule Out Bars Fueling Seyfert Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If AGN are powered by the accretion of matter onto massive black holes, how does the gas in the host galaxy lose the required angular momentum to approach the black hole? Gas easily transfers angular momentum to stars in strong bars, making them likely candidates. Although ground-based searches for bars in active galaxies using both optical and near infrared surface brightness have not found any excess of bars relative to quiescent galaxies, the searches have not been able to rule out small-scale nuclear bars. To look for these nuclear bars we use HST WFPC2-NICMOS color maps to search for the straight dust lane signature of strong bars. Of the twelve Seyfert galaxies in our sample, only three have dust lanes consistent with a strong nuclear bar. Therefore, strong nuclear bars cannot be the primary fueling mechanism for Seyfert nuclei. We do find that a majority of the galaxies show an spiral morphology in their dust lanes. These spiral arms may be a possible fueling mechanism.

Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

FM DANTE fast imaging and variations: emerging rf-based ultrafast imaging techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: DANTE fast imaging, NMR, burst imaging, fast chemical shift imaging, fast imaging, fast spectroscopic imaging, fast susceptibility imaging

Z. H. Cho; Y. M. Ro; I. K. Hong

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

119

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

120

Observation of ?_{cJ} decaying into the p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-} final state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First measurements of the decays of the three $\\chi_{cJ}$ states to $p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-}$ final states are presented. Intermediate $\\phi\\to K^{+}K^{-}$ and $\\Lambda(1520)\\to pK^{-}$ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\bar{p}K^{+}\\Lambda(1520)$, $\\Lambda(1520) \\bar{\\Lambda}(1520)$, and $\\phi p\\bar{p}$ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{p} K^{+}K^{-}$ decays. These are first observations of $\\chi_{cJ}$ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the $\\chi_{cJ}$ states. The experiment uses samples of $\\chi_{cJ}$ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106 million $\\psi^{\\prime}$ mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider.

BESIII Collaboration

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evidence for Spin Correlation in t(t)over-bar Production  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and {bar t} spins to the total number of t{bar t} events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 t{bar t} candidate events with a single lepton {ell} (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed p{bar p} collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in t{bar t} events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; la Cruz, I. Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Manhattan Project: Fast Neutron Experiment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

An experiment to determine the cross section of uranium-235 for fast neutrons. The target is the small pile of cubes of uranium hydride. The uranium target is surrounded by larger...

123

Green food through green food: a human centered design approach to green food technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Real sustainability will only be possible by consuming less." A ubiquitous computing path to consume less while improving health is to help us consume less processed food (60-70% of US/UK diet) in favor of whole food. The paper shows both the ... Keywords: design, food, health, processed food

m.c. schraefel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

SQA(TM): Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar Program  

SciTech Connect

OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT) has led this SQA (Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar) program to solve the major surface quality problems plaguing the US special quality steel bars and rods industry and their customers, based on crosscutting sensors and controls technologies. Surface defects in steel formed in a hot rolling process are one of the most common quality issues faced by the American steel industry, accounting for roughly 50% of the rejects or 2.5% of the total shipment. Unlike other problems such as the mechanical properties of the steel product, most surface defects are sporadic and cannot be addressed based on sampling techniques. This issue hurts the rolling industry and their customers in their process efficiency and operational costs. The goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate an SQA prototype, with synergy of HotEye® and other innovations, that enables effective rolling process control and efficient quality control. HotEye®, OGT’s invention, delivers high definition images of workpieces at or exceeding 1,450?C while the workpieces travel at 100 m/s. The elimination of surface defect rejects will be achieved through the integration of imaging-based quality assessment, advanced signal processing, predictive process controls and the integration with other quality control tools. The SQA program team, composed of entities capable of and experienced in (1) research, (2) technology manufacturing, (3) technology sales and marketing, and (4) technology end users, is very strong. There were 5 core participants: OGT, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), University of Wisconsin (UW), Charter Steel (Charter) and ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor (Inland). OGT served as the project coordinator. OGT participated in both research and commercialization. GIT and UW provided significant technical inputs to this SQA project. The steel mills provided access to their rolling lines for data collection, design of experiments, host of technology test and verification, and first-hand knowledge of the most advanced rolling line operation in the US. This project lasted 5 years with 5 major tasks. The team successfully worked through the tasks with deliverables in detection, data analysis and process control. Technologies developed in this project were commercialized as soon as they were ready. For instance, the advanced surface defect detection algorithms were integrated into OGT’s HotEye® RSB systems late 2005, resulting in a more matured product serving the steel industry. In addition to the commercialization results, the SQA team delivered 7 papers and 1 patent. OGT was also recognized by two prestigious awards, including the R&D100 Award in 2006. To date, this SQA project has started to make an impact in the special bar quality industry. The resulted product, HotEye® RSB systems have been accepted by quality steel mills worldwide. Over 16 installations were completed, including 1 in Argentina, 2 in Canada, 2 in China, 2 in Germany, 2 in Japan, and 7 in the U.S. Documented savings in reduced internal rejects, improved customer satisfaction and simplified processes were reported from various mills. In one case, the mill reported over 50% reduction in its scrap, reflecting a significant saving in energy and reduction in emission. There exist additional applications in the steel industry where the developed technologies can be used. OGT is working toward bringing the developed technologies to more applications. Examples are: in-line inspection and process control for continuous casting, steel rails, and seamless tube manufacturing.

Tzyy-Shuh Chang; Jianjun Shi; Shiyu Zhou

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

126

Nonlinear Development of the Secular Bar-mode Instability in Rotating Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have modelled the nonlinear development of the secular bar-mode instability that is driven by gravitational radiation-reaction (GRR) forces in rotating neutron stars. In the absence of any competing viscous effects, an initially uniformly rotating, axisymmetric $n=1/2$ polytropic star with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy $T/|W| = 0.181$ is driven by GRR forces to a bar-like structure, as predicted by linear theory. The pattern frequency of the bar slows to nearly zero, that is, the bar becomes almost stationary as viewed from an inertial frame of reference as GRR removes energy and angular momentum from the star. In this ``Dedekind-like'' state, rotational energy is stored as motion of the fluid in highly noncircular orbits inside the bar. However, in less than 10 dynamical times after its formation, the bar loses its initially coherent structure as the ordered flow inside the bar is disrupted by what appears to be a purely hydrodynamical, short-wavelength, ``shearing'' type instability. The gravitational waveforms generated by such an event are determined, and an estimate of the detectability of these waves is presented.

Shangli Ou; Joel E. Tohline; Lee Lindblom

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Bar-Halo Interaction - II. Secular evolution and the religion of N-body simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores resonance-driven secular evolution between a bar and dark-matter halo using N-body simulations. We make direct comparisons to our analytic theory (Weinberg & Katz 2005) to demonstrate the great difficulty that an N-body simulation has representing these dynamics for realistic astronomical interactions. In a dark-matter halo, the bar's angular momentum is coupled to the central density cusp (if present) by the Inner Lindblad Resonance. Owing to this angular momentum transfer and self-consistent re-equilibration, strong realistic bars WILL modify the cusp profile, lowering the central densities within about 30% of the bar radius in a few bar orbits. Past results to the contrary (Sellwood 2006, McMillan & Dehnen 2005) may be the result of weak bars or numerical artifacts. The magnitude depends on many factors and we illustrate the sensitivity of the response to the dark-matter profile, the bar shape and mass, and the galaxy's evolutionary history. For example, if the bar length is comparable to the size of a central dark-matter core, the bar may exchange angular momentum without changing its pattern speed significantly. We emphasise that this apparently simple example of secular evolution is remarkably subtle in detail and conclude that an N-body exploration of any astronomical scenario requires a deep investigation into the underlying dynamical mechanisms for that particular problem to set the necessary requirements for the simulation parameters and method (e.g. particle number and Poisson solver). Simply put, N-body simulations do not divinely reveal truth and hence their results are not infallible. They are unlikely to provide useful insight on their own, particularly for the study of even more complex secular processes such as the production of pseudo-bulges and disk heating.

Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Michelle Springfield Food Insecurity: The prospects for Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................44 4 Kenya and Ethiopia as examples of food insecure countries ..........................................................................................................................................148 Food aid from developing countries Countries. IASSTD The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology IATP

Sheldon, Nathan D.

129

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dressing and modeling food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food and the kitchen that it is made in are key components of our film Ratatouille. We treated them almost as if they were characters that grew and changed along with the story line. It was extremely important to create a kitchen that becomes ...

Han Cho

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

BaBar Results on E+ E- ---> P Anti-P By Means of ISR  

SciTech Connect

BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} cross section from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and negative steps. Evidence for a ratio |G{sub E}/G{sub M}| > 1 has also been found as well as a sudden variation in |G{sub M}| just above the threshold.

Ferroli, Rinaldo Baldini; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /Frascati

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Food Movements Unite! Strategies to Transform Our Food Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ac- tivists and practitioners from organizations such as Via Campesina, the Slow Food Movement, and the World

McLean, Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

134

Overview of tritium fast-fission yields  

SciTech Connect

Tritium production rates are very important to the development of fast reactors because tritium may be produced at a greater rate in fast reactors than in light water reactors. This report focuses on tritium production and does not evaluate the transport and eventual release of the tritium in a fast reactor system. However, if an order-of-magnitude increase in fast fission yields for tritium is confirmed, fission will become the dominant production source of tritium in fast reactors.

Tanner, J.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

EU approves food labeling rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New food-labeling regulations are in place in the European Union after the European Parliament (EP) approved rules aimed at helping consumers make “better informed, healthier [sic] choices.” EU approves food labeling rules Inform Magazine Inform Archives

136

FAST Program Computer Based Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FAST CBT is a computer based training module that allows users to access training when desired and review it at their own pace. It provides graphics and interactive features to enhance learning. This computer based training module was created to help instruct users on an existing EPRI engineering computer program Product ID# 1004565 (FAST 1.0 Flow Path Analysis for Steam Turbines, Version 1.0). Users of this training will consist mainly of steam turbine performance engineers and outage managers. A subjec...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

FastJet user manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FastJet is a C++ package that provides a broad range of jet finding and analysis tools. It includes efficient native implementations of all widely used 2-to-1 sequential recombination jet algorithms for pp and e+e- collisions, as well as access to 3rd party jet algorithms through a plugin mechanism, including all currently used cone algorithms. FastJet also provides means to facilitate the manipulation of jet substructure, including some common boosted heavy-object taggers, as well as tools for estimation of pileup and underlying-event noise levels, determination of jet areas and subtraction or suppression of noise in jets.

Matteo Cacciari; Gavin P. Salam; Gregory Soyez

2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Adams, Oregon Coordinates 45.767354°, -118.5624734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

139

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

140

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by Congress, applies only to government procurements. It does not apply to financial assistance programs or loan guarantee programs. The Act, as passed by Congress, also applies only to the investments of the actual offerors (or contractors) for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Clayton, Idaho Coordinates 44.2593623°, -114.4017296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

142

Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel, with subsequent decay of the $W^+W^-$ pair into $\\ell \

Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Zurita, José

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High strain rate mechanical characterization of trabecular bone utilizing the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique has been in use in one form or another for more than fifty years and has recently gained a great deal of attention for its ability to characterize materials such as metals, ...

Johnson, Timothy Paul Mahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Experimental Use as a Potential Bar to Patentability in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a number of activities that, by statute, prevent an inventor from obtaining a valid U.S. patent on an invention. Two of the most common statutory bars to ...

145

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 5 Chemistry

146

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Food Safety and Nutrition in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Material Measurement Laboratory's program area in Food Safety and Nutrition. MML Program Area: Food Safety and Nutrition. ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fast and informative flow simulation in a building by using fast...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and informative flow simulation in a building by using fast fluid dynamics model on graphics processing unit Title Fast and informative flow simulation in a building by using...

149

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

FAST Simulation of Seismic Wind Turbine Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent additions to the computer simulation code FAST that allow a user to consider seismic loads.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fast Reactor Curriculum Workshop - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast Reactor Curriculum Workshop Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear...

153

Fast quench reactor and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fast quench reactor and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Food and Agriculture Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about onethird of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the

David Dawe; Of The United Nations; David Dawe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF GRAVEL BARS IN A RIVER CHANNEL FROM AIRBORNE LIDAR-DERIVED DTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne Laser Scanning or LiDAR data are widely used nowadays in river valleys for topography and hydro-morphology. However, the large data sets of unprocessed 3D point clouds require some challenging treatment and end-users may prefer to deal with DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) derived from LiDAR surveys. Without any complementary data (such as field survey or photographs) detecting position and shape of gravel bars in a river is a demanding task, especially if done manually. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of a river channel into distinct hydro- morphological entities: water, gravel bars, banks,... This method is based on image processing algorithms (region growing segmentation combined with morphological closing and altitude thresholding) in order to separate water from other elements present in the channel, based on the altitude information. This method is applied to a reach of the Arcen-Maurienne River, France, with alternate gravel bars. The only data source is the 0.25 m resolution DTM, derived from an airborne LiDAR survey. Results show that the developed method succeeds in automatically delimiting the main channel and in detecting gravel bars. It is then possible to get global information on the gravel bars such as location along the river or emerged surface area and topography.

Lionel Pénard; Maxime Morel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass — CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE, VOLUME 57 , NUMBER 4 and therefore the food supplyand biomass in many aquatic systems. A low nutrient supply

Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Müller-Solger, Anke B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

New approach to timing: the fast--fast system  

SciTech Connect

A dual channel constant fraction timing discriminator incorporating multiple energy windows and coincidence logic has been developed. Incorporation of energy discrimination and fast coincidence logic into the timing channel has distinct advantages in terms of system simplicity, stability and data rates. A prototype applying the F$sup 2$ approach has been constructed and tested. The system gives a $sup 60$Co FWHM of approximately 210 psec at a singles rate of greater than 7.5 x 10$sup 5$ sec$sup -1$ (approximately 1200 coincidences/sec). (auth)

Hardy, W.H. II; Lynn, K.G.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Available Technologies: Fast, Low Cost Method for ...  

Fuel cell or catalyst deposition supports; ... Filtration or reactive filtration structures for hot gas and liquid, water, air, food, chemicals;

162

Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Search for D0 - D0bar Mixing and Rare Charm Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a dataset acquired by the BaBar experiment running on and near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance from 1999-2002, limits are set on the rate of $D^0$-- $\\kern 0.2em\\bar{\\kern -0.2em D}{}^0$ mixing using the decay mode $D^{*+} \\to D^0 \\pi^{+}$, followed by a semi-leptonic decay of the $D^0$. Results are compared to previous BaBar analysis using hadronic decays. We also report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decays $D^0 \\to e^{+} e^{-}$ ($\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$) and the lepton-flavor violation decays $D^0 \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$.

U. Egede; for the BABAR Collaboration

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy Calibration of the BaBar EMC Using the Pi0 Invariant Mass Method  

SciTech Connect

The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter energy calibration method was compared with the local and global peak iteration procedures, of Crystal Barrel and CLEO-II. An investigation was made of the possibility of {Upsilon}(4S) background reduction which could lead to increased statistics over a shorter time interval, for efficient calibration runs. The BaBar software package was used with unreconstructed data to study the energy response of the calorimeter, by utilizing the {pi}{sup 0} mass constraint on pairs of photon clusters.

Tanner, David J.; /Manchester U.

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion U.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

J.R. Delayen, S.U. De Silva

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Regularization of singular terms in $N\\bar{N}$ potential model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a method of singular terms regularization in potential model of $N\\bar{N}$ interaction. This method is free from any uncertainties, related to the usual cut-off procedure and based on the fact, that in the presence of sufficiently strong short-range annihilation $N$ and $\\bar{N}$ never approach close enough to each other. The effect of mentioned singular terms of OBE potential, modified by annihilation is shown to be repulsive. The obtained results for S- and P-wave scattering lengths are in agreement with existing theoretical models.

O. D. Dalkarov A. Yu. Voronin

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

3D Hopkinson bar: new experiments for dynamic testing on soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct analysis of the dynamic response of materials is possible using Split Hopkinson pressure bar method. For soils, it has to be adapted since the specimen has generally poor mechanical properties. An original experimental arrangement called "Three-Dimensional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar" (3D SHPB) is proposed. It allows the measurement of the complete three-dimensional dynamic response of soils. Different types of confinement systems are used. The results on different loading paths are compared with other works on sand and clay. The analysis at grain-size level gives further elements on the comminution process.

Semblat, J F; Gary, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Free 3-MCPD in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference list for Free 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )in Foods. Free 3-MCPD in Foods 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants detergents esters fat

170

IMPACTS OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON FOOD SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for a healthy and active life”. This definition was adopted at the World Food Summit in 1996 (FAO, 1996) when references to food safety,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients is written to serve as a reference for food product developers, food technologists, nutritionists, plant breeders, academic and government professionals, college graduates, and anyone who is interested in learni

172

Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid oxidation in food systems is one of the most important factors which affect food quality, nutrition, safety, color and consumers’ acceptance. Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol con

173

Fast Start Financing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fast Start Financing Fast Start Financing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fast Start Financing Agency/Company /Organization: Government of the Netherlands Partner: United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, World Bank Topics: Finance, Market analysis Resource Type: Maps Website: www.faststartfinance.org/home Fast Start Financing Screenshot References: Fast Start Financing [1] Overview "www.faststartfinance.org aims to provide transparency about the amount, direction and use of fast start climate finance, in turn building trust in its delivery and impact. Development of the website was initiated by the government of the Netherlands, with support from the governments of Costa Rica, Colombia,

174

The Visibility of Galactic Bars and Spiral Structure At High Redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the visibility of galactic bars and spiral structure in the distant Universe by artificially redshifting 101 B-band CCD images of local spiral galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. Our artificially redshifted images correspond to Hubble Space Telescope I-band observations of the local galaxy sample seen at z=0.7, with integration times matching those of both the very deep Northern Hubble Deep Field data, and the much shallower Flanking Field observations. The expected visibility of galactic bars is probed in two ways: (1) using traditional visual classification, and (2) by charting the changing shape of the galaxy distribution in "Hubble space", a quantitative two-parameter description of galactic structure that maps closely on to Hubble's original tuning fork. Both analyses suggest that over 2/3 of strongly barred luminous local spirals i.e. objects classified as SB in the Third Reference Catalog) would still be classified as strongly barred at z=0.7 in the Hubbl...

Van den Bergh, S; Whyte, L F; Merrifield, M R; Eskridge, P B; Frogel, J A; Pogge, R W; Bergh, Sidney van den; Abraham, Roberto G.; Whyte, Laura F.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Eskridge, Paul; Frogel, Jay A.; Pogge, Richard

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS Press 31AE8E3D42D3E14DDBA41DE5FCD66625 AOCS Press

176

Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at BaBar and Belle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results on the search for new physics at BaBar and Belle B-factories are presented. The search for a light Higgs boson produced in the decay of different Y resonances is shown. In addition, recent measurements aimed to discover invisible final states produced by new physics mechanisms beyond the standard model are presented.

Calderini, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Bar-driven fueling of galactic nuclei: a 2D view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss evidences for bar-driven gas fueling in the central regions of galaxies, focusing on scales down to about 10 pc. I thus mention the building of inner disks, and the link with resonances, as well as the corresponding kinematic signatures such as sigma-drops and counter-rotating nuclear disks as probed via integral-field spectroscopy.

Emsellem, E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Improved grating and bar cell models in cortical area V1 and texture coding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents improved models of cortical neurons in V1 that act like grating and bar detectors. Both models use the same frontend, which consists of a contrast normalisation in combination with isotropic DOG filtering, followed by anisotropic ... Keywords: Computational models, Cortical cells, Diatoms, Groupings, Symmetry order, Texture analysis

J. M. H. du Buf

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A fast directional continuous spherical wavelet transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fast algorithm for Antoine and Vandergheynst's (1998) directional continuous spherical wavelet transform (CSWT) is presented. Computational requirements are reduced by a factor of O(\\sqrt{N}), when N is the number of pixels on the sphere. The spherical Mexican hat wavelet Gaussianity analysis of the WMAP 1-year data performed by Vielva et al. (2003) is reproduced and confirmed using the fast CSWT. The proposed extension to directional analysis is inherently afforded by the fast CSWT algorithm.

J. D. McEwen; M. P. Hobson; A. N. Lasenby; D. J. Mortlock

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF FAST NEUTRON BEAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental techniques are described for the spectral measurement of a collimated fast-neutron beam. A H/sub 2-/ filled cloud chamber, proton-recording nuclear plates, and threshold fission foils were used as neutron detectors in the measurements. As an application of these techniques, the energy distribution and absolute flux of the fast neutron beam emerging from the Los Alamos fast reactor was measured from 0.1 to 18 Mev. (D.E.B.)

Nereson, N.; Allison, E.; Carlson, J.; Norwood, P.; Squires, D.

1951-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

THE TWO-PHASE FORMATION HISTORY OF SPIRAL GALAXIES TRACED BY THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE BAR FRACTION  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of galactic bars and the link with disk and spheroid formation in a sample of zoom-in cosmological simulations. Our simulation sample focuses on galaxies with present-day stellar masses in the 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} range, in field and loose group environments, with a broad variety of mass growth histories. In our models, bars are almost absent from the progenitors of present-day spirals at z > 1.5, and they remain rare and generally too weak to be observable down to z Almost-Equal-To 1. After this characteristic epoch, the fractions of observable and strong bars rise rapidly, bars being present in 80% of spiral galaxies and easily observable in two thirds of these at z {<=} 0.5. This is quantitatively consistent with the redshift evolution of the observed bar fraction, although the latter is presently known up to z Almost-Equal-To 0.8 because of band-shifting and resolution effects. Our models hence predict that the decrease in the bar fraction with increasing redshift should continue with a fraction of observable bars not larger than 10%-15% in disk galaxies at z > 1. Our models also predict later bar formation in lower-mass galaxies, in agreement with existing data. We find that the characteristic epoch of bar formation, namely redshift z Almost-Equal-To 0.8-1 in the studied mass range, corresponds to the epoch at which today's spirals acquire their disk-dominated morphology. At higher redshift, disks tend to be rapidly destroyed by mergers and gravitational instabilities and rarely develop significant bars. We hence suggest that the bar formation epoch corresponds to the transition between an early 'violent' phase of spiral galaxy formation at z {>=} 1 and a late 'secular' phase at z {<=} 0.8. In the secular phase, the presence of bars substantially contributes to the growth of the (pseudo-)bulge, but the bulge mass budget remains statistically dominated by the contribution of mergers, interactions, and disk instabilities at high redshift. Early bars at z > 1 are often short-lived, while most of the bars formed at z {<=} 1 persist down to z = 0, late cosmological gas infall being necessary to maintain some of them.

Kraljic, Katarina; Bournaud, Frederic [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Martig, Marie [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Food Industry 2000: Food Processing Opportunities, Challenges, New Technology Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of some of the major factors affecting the food processing industry, i. e., economic pressures, consumer concerns and pressures, regulatory restrictions, and general conservatism. The food industry must be responsive to the growing consumer interest in the relationship between diet and general health, to the changes in consumer demographics and desires, and to the opportunities offered by new technology, especially electrotechnologies.

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

FOAM:The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models Performance User Resources Publications History Developer's Page FOAM The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model cup2.jpeg (48474 bytes) Image made by Johan Kellum with Vis5D...

186

Fast Corn Grading System Verification and Modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fast corn grading system can replace the traditional method in unofficial corn grading locations. The initial design of the system proved that it can… (more)

Smith, Leanna Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fast Conversion Algorithms for Orthogonal Polynomials - Computer ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 13, 2008 ... a known conversion algorithm from an arbitrary orthogonal basis to the ... Fast algorithms, transposed algorithms, basis conversion, orthogonal.

188

Turning Big Data into fast data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

magazine Latest Issue:April 2013 All Issues submit Turning Big Data into fast data for nuclear weapons simulations at the exascale Solving the roadblock for tomorrow's exascale...

189

THE MATERIALS OF FAST BREEDER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet aircraft engines, and nuclear reactor fuel elements. Ancomponents of a nuclear reactor core are susceptible tothe nuclear physics of the thermal and fast neutron reactors

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

Lee, N.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

Lee, Norman E. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

On fast reactor kinetics studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A. [Nuclear Safety Inst. of the Russian Academy of Sciences IBRAE (Russian Federation); Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Food Apps | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 next Global Food Security Showing 1 - 4 of 22 results. aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence...

194

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

FAST User's Guide - Updated August 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence) Code is a comprehensive aeroelastic simulator capable of predicting both the extreme and fatigue loads of two- and three-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). This document covers the features of FAST and outlines its operating procedures.

Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L. Jr.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Body Mass Index, Neighborhood Fast Food and Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership Sanae Inagami,body mass index and whether car ownership might moderateRESTAURANT CONCENTRATION, AND CAR OWNERSHIP Quiznos, Little

Inagami, Sanae; Cohen, Deborah A.; Brown, Arleen F.; Asch, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection, in some foods and vegetable oils, of fatty acid esters of the contaminant known as 3-MCPD is an emerging issue for food and vegetable oil processors Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue Inform Magazine Inform Archives 3-MCPD Food Sci

198

Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

NREL: News Feature - NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use December 7, 2009 Photo of a truck delivering materials to an office building under construction. Enlarge image Designers met NREL's aggressive energy use requirement for the Research Support Facility by taking advantage Colorado's sunny climate. Large windows for daylighting and thermally sophisticated wall systems for solar heating are crucial to the net-zero energy design. Credit: Pat Corkery Technology - from sophisticated computer modeling to advanced windows that actually open! - will help the newest building at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory be one of the world's most energy efficient offices. But making NREL's new Research Support Facility into a showcase for engineering net zero energy office design didn't begin with rooftop solar

200

Fundamental and HOM Coupler Design for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered as a deflecting system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and as a crabbing cavity for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. Currently the designs are optimized to achieve lower surface fields within the dimensional constraints for the above applications. A detailed analysis of the fundamental input power coupler design for the parallel-bar cavity is performed considering beam loading and the effects of microphonics. For higher beam loading the damping of the HOMs is vital to reduce beam instabilities generated due to the wake fields. An analysis of threshold impedances for each application and impedances of the modes that requires damping are presented in this paper with the design of HOM couplers.

S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Polarization Observables in $?N\\to K\\bar{K}N$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore some of the rich structure of the polarization observables recently developed for processes like $\\gamma N\\to\\pi\\pi N$ and $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$ in the framework of a specific model for the latter process. Emphasis is placed on observables that may be accesible at existing facilities in the near future. The sensitivity of the observables to the details of the model indicate that they will be a very useful tool in differentiating between different models for reactions like these. In the framework of a model for $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$, we examine the sensitivity of the observables to coupling constants of the $\\phi$, to the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, and to the existence of the $\\Theta^+$.

W. Roberts

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Liverpool, New York Site Description Commercial-Restaurant Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Aisin Seiki G60 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer ECO Technical Solutions System Enclosure Outdoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 6 kW0.006 MW 6,000 W 6,000,000 mW 6.0e-6 GW 6.0e-9 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 240 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 46105 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2005/07/10 Monitoring Termination Date 2005/07/21

203

Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Results on Charmonium(?like) and Bottomonium(?like) States from Belle and BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopy results for Belle and BaBar are reported. A particular focus is put on new results of the X(3872) state with its radiative decays to J/?? and ??? its decay into J/?3? and the search for production in radiative Upsilon decays. Another focus is L?=?2 mesons in particlar a possible D?wave assignment to the X(3872) and the confirmation of an Upsilon D?wave state.

Jens Sören; The Belle Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear Bar, Star Formation and Gas Fueling in the Active Galaxy NGC 4303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS images are used to investigate the gas/dust and stellar structure inside the central 300 pc of the nearby active galaxy NGC 4303. The NICMOS H-band (F160W) image reveals a bright core and a nuclear elongated bar-like structure of 250 pc in diameter. The bar is centered on the bright core, and its major axis is oriented in proyection along the spin axis of the nuclear gaseous rotating disk recently detected (Colina & Arribas 1999). The V-H (F606W - F160W) image reveals a complex gas/dust distribution with a two-arm spiral structure of about 225 pc in radius. The southwestern arm is traced by young star-forming knots while the northeastern arm is detected by the presence of dust lanes. These spirals do not have a smooth structure but rather they are made of smaller flocculent spirals or filament-like structures. The magnitudes and colors of the star-forming knots are typical of clusters of young stars with masses of 0.5 to 1 x $10^5 M_{solar}, and ages of 5 to 25 million years. The overall structure of the nuclear spirals as well as the size, number and masses of the star-forming knots are explained in the context of a massive gaseous nuclear disk subject to self-gravitational instabilities and to the gravitational field created by the nuclear bar. According to the model, the gaseous disk has a mass of about 5 x 10^7 M_{solar} inside a radius of 400 pc, the bar has a radius of 150 pc and a pattern speed of about 0.5 Myr^{-1}, and the average mass accretion rate into the core (R < 8 pc) is about 0.01 M_{solar}$ yr^{-1} for about 80 Myr.

L. Colina; K. Wada

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Food Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Services Food Services Food Services The Department offers many food services for employees within the Headquarters' buildings. Forrestal Forrestal Cafeteria (2nd floor, West Building). See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 6:45 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., and a "Happy Hour" is featured from 2:00-2:30 p.m. offering 30% off all hot and cold buffet items. Other Places to Eat, Forrestal Food services available inside the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Places to eat near the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Germantown Germantown Cafeteria - See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m.

208

Mesquite pods into nutritious foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesquite trees produce bean pods that a new process can turn into nutrient-rich foods. A simple, automated procedure converts the dried mesquite pods into a high-protein, sweet-tasting flour and a gum that can be used as a natural thickening additive in foods. Standard food-processing equipment can be used. For flour, whole pods are ground with a disk mill, which produces a mixture of seeds and flour. The mixture is then sifted to separate the two components. Its the seeds that contain the gum - a thin, white film that lines the inside of the hard, brown seed coat. To extract gum, seeds are split and soaked in an alkali solution. The solution, after being neutralized, is sprayed through a fine-mist nozzle into a heated chamber, where it dries as a fine powder of edible gum. This spray-drying is the same process that converts fresh milk into powdered. Analyses showed that the natural gum in mesquite pods is better than the guar gum US food processors now import to use as a natural thickener in ice cream; salad dressings, puddings, and other foods.

Wood, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

STAR FORMATION HISTORY IN TWO FIELDS OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD BAR  

SciTech Connect

The Bar is the most productive region of the Small Magellanic Cloud in terms of star formation but also the least studied one. In this paper, we investigate the star formation history of two fields located in the SW and in the NE portion of the Bar using two independent and well-tested procedures applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of their stellar populations resolved by means of deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We find that the Bar experienced a negligible star formation activity in the first few Gyr, followed by a dramatic enhancement from 6 to 4 Gyr ago and a nearly constant activity since then. The two examined fields differ both in the rate of star formation and in the ratio of recent over past activity, but share the very low level of initial activity and its sudden increase around 5 Gyr ago. The striking similarity between the timing of the enhancement and the timing of the major episode in the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of a close encounter triggering star formation.

Cignoni, M. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Cole, A. A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Tosi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gallagher, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Nota, A. [STScI, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grebel, E. K., E-mail: michele.cignoni@unibo.it [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio [Laboratorio MUSP-via Turotti 9, 29122 Piacenza (Italy); Strano, Matteo [Politecnico di Milano-Dipartimento di Meccanica, via La Masa 1, 20156, Milan (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

HERSCHEL SEARCH FOR O{sub 2} TOWARD THE ORION BAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the H II region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O{sub 2} N{sub J} = 3{sub 3}-1{sub 2} transition at 487 GHz and the 5{sub 4}-3{sub 4} transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3{sigma} upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O{sub 2} column density <1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30 K and 250 K, or <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} if the O{sub 2} emitting region is primarily at a temperature of {approx}<100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O{sub 2} column density is less than 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} exposed to a far-ultraviolet flux 10{sup 4} times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on A{sub V} of the Bar is less than required for O{sub 2} to reach peak abundance; (3) the O{sub 2} emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O{sub 2} reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.

Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Black, John H.; Hjalmarson, Ake; Liseau, Rene [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Encrenaz, Pierre; Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Li, Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neufeld, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Snell, Ronald L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Van der Tak, Floris [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, and Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRS Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank AIKEN, S.C. - (June 7, 2012) Today, the Savannah River Site (SRS) donated $22,000 and 18,000 pounds of food during its annual food drive for the Golden Harvest Food Bank. Several SRS organizations participated in this food drive-Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Remediation, U.S. Forest Service-Savannah River, URS and WSI- Savannah River. The SRS food drive is one of Golden Harvest Food Bank's largest, local fund-raisers. According to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC President and CEO Dwayne Wilson, the Site's past food drives have collec- tively yielded over 262,475 pounds of food for Golden Harvest. "We're pleased to support Golden Harvest in their highly effective efforts as they strive

213

Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

Cameron, Caitlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Sensitivity of LHC experiments to the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state, with $H \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$, at center of mass energy of 14 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle in 2012, attention has now turned to measuring its properties, e.g., coupling to various bosonic and fermionic final states, its spin and parity, etc. In this note, we study the sensitivity of experiments at the LHC to its coupling to the top quark, by searching for the process pp $\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}H$, where the primary decay mode of the $H$ is $\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$. In this paper, the $t\\bar{t}$ system is detected in the dilepton final state. This study is performed assuming a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosities of 300 fb$^{-1}$ (with an average pileup ($\\mu$) of 50 additional collisions per bunch crossing) and 3000 fb$^{-1}$ (with $\\mu=140$). We include systematic uncertainties in production cross-sections as well as the more important experimental uncertainties. Preliminary studies indicate that we will observe the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state with a significance of 2.4 and $\\ge 5.3$ for the two luminosity scenarios, respectively; addition of other $t\\bar{t}$ final states should increase the overall significance for observing $t\\bar{t}H$.

Ricardo Goncalo; Stefan Guindon; Vivek Jain

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

216

16th International Conference in Quantum ChromoDynamics: Charmonium-like states at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results on charmonium-like states from the BaBar experiment located at the PEP-II asymmetric energy $e^+e^-$ collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Elisa Fioravanti

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Search for New Bottomlike Quark Pair Decays Q Q-Bar to (T W- ) (T-Bar W -) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events  

SciTech Connect

We report the most restrictive direct limits on masses of fourth-generation down-type quarks b{prime}, and quark-like composite fermions (B or T{sub 5/3}), decaying promptly to tW{sup {-+}}. We search for a significant excess of events with two same-charge leptons (e, {mu}), several hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy. An analysis of data from p{bar p} collisions with an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab yields no evidence for such a signal, setting mass limits m{sub b{prime}}, m{sub B} > 338 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub T{sub 5/3}} > 365 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR; Asaadi, J.; /Texas A-M; Ashmanskas, W.; /Fermilab; Attal, A.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Aurisano, A.; /Texas A-M; Azfar, F.; /Oxford U.; Badgett, W.; /Fermilab; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Barnes, V.E.; /Purdue U.; Barnett, B.A.; /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Comenius U. /MIT /TRIUMF /INFN, Pisa /University Coll. London /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Wisconsin U., Madison /Duke U. /Fermilab /CERN /Rockefeller U. /Fermilab /INFN, Padua /University Coll. London /Argonne, HEP /Brandeis U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Duke U. /Rochester U. /Rochester U. /Purdue U. /Pittsburgh U. /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Barbara /Illinois U., Urbana /INFN, Bologna /Michigan State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR; /more authors..

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Fast Physics Project, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Forum Report Problems FAQ Contact Us Other Links Can't View PDFs? FASTER (FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research) Project Brookhaven Climate Consortium The FASTER project...

219

Fast Encryption Algorithm Spectr-H64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a fast hardware-oriented 64-bit block cipher SPECTR-H64 based on combination of the data-dependent permutations and data-dependent transformation of subkeys.

Nick D. Goots; Alexander A. Moldovyan; Nick A. Moldovyan

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments: Fast Facts  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE R&D Accomplishments: Fast Facts (also on YouTube) Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site. U.S. Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

FastBit: Interactively Searching Massive Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As scientific instruments and computer simulations produce more and more data, the task of locating the essential information to gain insight becomes increasingly difficult. FastBit is an efficient software tool to address this challenge. In this article, we present a summary of the key underlying technologies, namely bitmap compression, encoding, and binning. Together these techniques enable FastBit to answer structured (SQL) queries orders of magnitude faster than popular database systems. To illustrate how FastBit is used in applications, we present three examples involving a high-energy physics experiment, a combustion simulation, and an accelerator simulation. In each case, FastBit significantly reduces the response time and enables interactive exploration on terabytes of data.

Wu, Kesheng; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Chen, Jacqueline; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, Cameron; Gu, Junmin; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Koegler, Wendy; Lauret, Jerome; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Otoo, Ekow; Perevoztchikov, Victor; Poskanzer, Arthur; Prabhat,; Rubel, Oliver; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alexander; Stockinger, Kurt; Weber, Gunther; Zhang, Wei-Ming

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Fast and Accurate Thermistor String  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A “fast thermistor string” has been built to accommodate the scientific need to accurately monitor internal wave activity in shelf seas and above sloping bottoms in the ocean. The performance of the thermistors and their custom-designed ...

H. van Haren; R. Groenewegen; M. Laan; B. Koster

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radial power flattening in sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to improve a new design for a uranium startup sodium cooled fast reactor which was proposed at MIT, this thesis evaluated radial power flattening by varying the fuel volume fraction at a fixed U-235 enrichment of ...

Krentz-Wee, Rebecca (Rebecca Elizabeth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Relevance: The Fast Lane: Accelerator Kiosk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relevance of the DVD "The Fast Lane: Accelerators at Fermilab" This DVD was published in early 2006. In mid-November 2009 the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland...

225

Fast library for number theory: an introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss FLINT (Fast Library for Number Theory), a library to support computations in number theory, including highly optimised routines for polynomial arithmetic and linear algebra in exact rings.

William B. Hart

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Structural mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores A fast reactor core is composed of a closely packed hexagonal arrangement of fuel, control, blanket , and shielding assemblies....

227

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources Title Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources Publication...

228

Characterization of Fast Reactor Irradiated Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the overall effort to understand the role of different material and environmental variables on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in light water reactor (LWR) components, the Cooperative IASCC Research (CIR-II) Program has conducted irradiation experiments in the BOR-60 fast reactor near Dimitrovgrad, Russia. This project was a continuation of research on characterization of microstructure and microchemistry of stainless steel heats irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor, do...

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

World Food Crisis: Imperfect Markets Starving Development, A Decomposition of Recent Food Price Increases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The recent decade has experienced two rather substantial food price spikes. This thesis sets out to provide an in-depth look at the recent food price… (more)

Costello, Christine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Name: Christopher Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is genetically engineered food safe to eat? Replies: Well, I hope so, since I and you and all of us have been eating it for centuries. All common foodstuffs have been seriously engineered since they were discovered. The modern tomato plant, apple tree, wheat stalk, and corn plant bear only a general resemblance to their ancestors, as farmers have engineered them to increase their yield, shelf life, resistance to disease, etc. It is, however, true that up until recently changes to the genetic code of foodstuffs could only be made via natural mutation (which occurs via naturally-occuring ionizing radiation and mutagenic chemicals), and the food engineer's job was limited to selecting those changes he wanted to preserve, and those he wanted to weed out. Now you can induce mutations directly, with intention and forethought, and avoid much of the waiting around for natural mutation that was heretofore necessary in plant breeding.

231

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by: The University of Tennessee, Materials Research Society (MRS growing populations and energy needs forever. Batteries have evolved a great deal and when you compare the bulky, heavy, toxic car lead batteries to the novel and outstanding lithium-ion batteries, you can

Tennessee, University of

232

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

233

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of omega-3 fatty acids from both plant and marine sources in food supplements and pharmaceuticals. Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary

234

Effect of couple-stress on the pure bending of a prismatic bar  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the applicability of the couple-stress theory to the stress analysis of graphite structures is performed by solving a pure bending problem. The differences between solutions from the couple-stress theory and from the classical theory of elasticity are compared. It is found that the differences are sufficient to account for the inconsistencies which have often been observed between the classical elasticity theory and actual behavior of graphite under bend and tensile loadings. An experimental procedure to measure the material constants in the couple-stress theory is also suggested. The linear couple-stress theory, the origins of which go back to the turn of the last century, adds linear relations between couple-stresses and rotation gradients to the classical stress-strain law. By adopting the classical assumption that the plane cross section remains plane after deformation, the pure-bending problem is reduced to a plane couple-stress problem with traction-free boundary conditions. A general solution for an isotropic elastic prismatic bar under pure bending is then obtained using the Airy stress function and another stress function wich accounts for the couple-stresss. For a cylindrical bar, it reduces to a simple series solution. The moment-curvature and stress-curvature relations derived for a cylindrical bar from the general solution are used to examine the effect of couple-stresses. Numerical compilation of relations indicates that the couple stress parameters can be practically determined by measuring the moment-curvature ratio of various diametered specimens under bending. Although there is not sufficient data for such evaluation at present, it appears that the theory is consistent with the limited bend and tensile strength data of cylindrical specimens for H-451 graphite.

Tzung, F.; Kao, B.; Ho, F.; Tang, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Secular Bar-Mode Instability in Rapidly Rotating Stars Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uniformly rotating, homogeneous, incompressible Maclaurin spheroids that spin sufficiently rapidly are secularly unstable to nonaxisymmetric, bar-mode perturbations when viscosity is present. The intuitive explanation is that energy dissipation by viscosity can drive an unstable spheroid to a stable, triaxial configuration of lower energy - a Jacobi ellipsoid. But what about rapidly rotating compressible stars? Unlike incompressible stars, which contain no internal energy and therefore immediately liberate all the energy dissipated by viscosity, compressible stars have internal energy and can retain the dissipated energy as internal heat. Now compressible stars that rotate sufficiently rapidly and also manage to liberate this dissipated energy very quickly are known to be unstable to bar-mode perturbations, like their incompressible counterparts. But what is the situation for rapidly rotating compressible stars that have very long cooling timescales, so that all the energy dissipated by viscosity is retained as heat, whereby the total energy of the star remains constant on a secular (viscous) evolution timescale? Are such stars also unstable to the nonlinear growth of bar modes, or is the viscous heating sufficient to cause them to expand, drive down the ratio of rotational kinetic to gravitational potential energy T/|W| ~ 1/R, where R is the equatorial radius, and turn off the instability before it gets underway? If the instability still arises in such stars, at what rotation rate do they become unstable, and to what final state do they evolve? We provide answers to these questions in the context of the compressible ellipsoid model for rotating stars. The results should serve as useful guides for numerical simulations in 3+1 dimensions for rotating stars containing viscosity.

Stuart L. Shapiro

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

237

Stochastic Gravitational Wave Measurements with Bar Detectors: Dependence of Response on Detector Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of a cross-correlation measurement to an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background depends on the observing geometry via the overlap reduction function. If one of the detectors being correlated is a resonant bar whose orientation can be changed, the response to stochastic gravitational waves can be modulated. I derive the general form of this modulation as a function of azimuth, both in the zero-frequency limit and at arbitrary frequencies. Comparisons are made between pairs of nearby detectors, such as LIGO Livingston-ALLEGRO, Virgo-AURIGA, Virgo-NAUTILUS, and EXPLORER-AURIGA, with which stochastic cross-correlation measurements are currently being performed, planned, or considered.

John T Whelan

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Food Security in the Western US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Security in the Western US and Pacific Territories 23 Rural Connections Nov. 2009 By PeteR BaRcinas ADAP is tackling the food security implications of climate change, rising sea levels, and fuel costs Pacific (aDaP) Regional Food security and Sufficiency Project brings together community, local, state

243

Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

244

A Fast Feedback System for CEBAF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fast feedback system based on concepts of modern control theory has been implemented in the CEBAF Control System to stabilize various machine parameters. The continuous wave operation of CEBAF requires that parameters such as beam energy and position are stabilized against fast fluctuations. The beam energy must be stabilized against fast gradient and phase fluctuations in the RF accelerating system. This fast feedback system currently operates at 60 Hz rate and is integrated with EPICS. The mathematical model of the system for various feedback loops is expressed in state space formalism. The design of control law and simulation of closed-loop system response is performed using Matlab ™ and Simulink ™. This paper describes the process of designing control algorithms, implementation of the fast feedback system and operational experience with this system at CEBAF. The performance of this feedback system, while operating at much higher rates with high closed loop gain, can be enhanced by continually performing on-line identification of the system from the input and output data. System identification is the process of developing or improving an analytically derived mathematical representation of a physical system using experimental data. The current status of this feature is presented. I.

M. P. Chowdhary; G. A. Krafft; H. Shoaee; W. A. Watson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vision - Food | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision - Food Vision - Food Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture This website is supported by the Interagency Council on Agricultural and Rural Statistics (ICARS). ICARS is the effort of the US federal government's statistical agencies in support of the "Global Strategy to Improve Agriculture and Rural Statistics" which was developed under the United Nations Statistical Commission. The impetus for the Global Strategy was the recognition that agriculture and rural statistics are declining across the globe at the same time as new data requirements are emerging. ICARS brings together experts from economic, demographic, environmental and agricultural statistical agencies and from natural resource agencies to

246

Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kulkarni, N; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; N. Kulkarni; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

Near-threshold production of a0(980) mesons in the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an effective Lagrangian approach as well as the Quark-Gluon Strings Model we analyze near-threshold production of a0(980)-mesons in the reaction NN -> d K \\bar{K} as well as the background of non-resonant K\\bar{K}-pair production. We argue that the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0 at an energy release Qproduction of the a0(980)-resonance. At larger energies the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K}^0-pair production - where the kaons are produced in a relative P-wave - becomes important. Then effects of final-state interactions are evaluated in a unitarized scattering-length approach and found to be in the order of a 20% suppression close to threshold. Thus in present experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-J\\"ulich for Q<=107 MeV the a_0^+ signal can reliably be separated from the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K^0} background.

V. Yu. Grishina; L. A. Kondratyuk; M. Buescher; W. Cassing

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA): IX. The decoupled bars and gas inflow in NGC 2782  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) maps of the starburst/Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 2782, obtained with the IRAM interferometer. The CO emission is aligned along the stellar nuclear bar of radius 1 kpc, configured in an elongated structure with two spiral arms at high pitch angle. At the extremity of the nuclear bar, the CO changes direction to trace two more extended spiral features at a lower pitch angle. These are the beginning of two straight dust lanes, which are aligned parallel to an oval distortion, reminiscent of a primary bar, almost perpendicular to the nuclear one. The two embedded bars appear in Spitzer IRAC near-infrared images, and HST color images, although highly obscured by dust in the latter. We compute the torques exerted by the stellar bars on the gas, and find systematically negative average torques down to the resolution limit of the images, providing evidence of gas inflow tantalizingly close to the nucleus of NGC 2782. The observations are well reproduced by numerical simulations, including gas...

Hunt, L K; García-Burillo, S; Schinnerer, E; Krips, M; Baker, A J; Boone, F; Eckart, A; Léon, S; Neri, R; Tacconi, L J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Observation of the Baryonic B decay B0bar to Lambda_c^+ anti-Lambda K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the observation of the baryonic B decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. They measure the branching fraction for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} to be (3.8 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys} {+-} 1.0 {sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. They find that the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} invariant mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Sassari U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

Dark Matter Halos and Evolution of Bars in Disk Galaxies: Varying Gas Fraction and Gas Spatial Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct numerical experiments by evolving gaseous/stellar disks embedded in live dark matter halos aiming at quantifying the effect of gas spatial resolution and gas content on the bar evolution. Model sequences have been constructed using different resolution, and gas fraction has been varied along each sequence within fgas=0%-50%, keeping the disk and halo properties unchanged. We find that the spatial resolution becomes important with an increase in `fgas'. For the higher resolution model sequences, we observe a bimodal behavior in the bar evolution with respect to the gas fraction, especially during the secular phase of this evolution. The switch from the gas-poor to gas-rich behavior is abrupt and depends on the resolution used. The diverging evolution has been observed in nearly all basic parameters characterizing bars, such as the bar strength, central mass concentration, vertical buckling amplitude, size, etc. We find that the presence of the gas component severely limits the bar growth and affects...

Villa-Vargas, Jorge; Heller, Clayton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Data - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data - Food Community Data - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Search Terms Category -Any- Agriculture Investment and Engineering Animals and Animal Systems Agriculture Fire Hazard Food/Non-Food Agricultural Products Geography and Environment Human Health and Nutrition International Trade Local and Regional Food Systems Markets, Prices, and Economics Natural Resources and Environment Plants and Plant Systems Agriculture Rural Development Science and Technology Water Quality Watershed Protection Items per page 25 50 100 Apply Name Downloads Rating Pesticide Data Program 1994 The USDA Pesticide Data Program (PDP) database provides national data on pesticide residues in food and water, with an emphasis on foods consumed by infants and children. PDP data are used primarily...

254

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

255

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

256

Measurement of $e^+ e^- \\to ??^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ near 10.6 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data samples of 89 fb$^{-1}$, 703 fb$^{-1}$, and 121 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider at center-of-mass energies 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, we study the exclusive reactions $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ (Charge-conjugate modes are included implicitly). Significant signals of $\\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar{K}^0$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+$ are observed for the first time at these energies, and the energy dependencies of the cross sections are presented. On the other hand, no significant excesses for $K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0 \\bar{K}^0$ are found, and we set limits on the cross section ratios $R_{\\rm VP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+)}>$ 4.3, 20.0, and 5.4, and $R_{\\rm TP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+)}<$ 1.1, 0.4, and 0.6, for center-of-mass energies of 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, at the 90% C.L.

Belle Collaboration; C. P. Shen; C. Z. Yuan; A. Sibidanov; P. Wang; K. Hayasaka; X. L. Wang; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; M. -C. Chang; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; Y. Onuki; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

Measurement of the top quark mass in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions using events with two leptons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top quark mass (m{sub t}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using t{bar t} events with two leptons (ee, e{mu} or {mu}{mu}) in the final state in 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We analyze the kinematically underconstrained dilepton events by integrating over the neutrino rapidity distributions. We reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration using a correction obtained from t{bar t} {yields} {ell} + jets events. We also correct jets in simulated events to replicate the quark flavor dependence of the jet response in data. In combination with our previous analysis, we measure m{sub t} = 174.0 {+-} 2.4(stat) {+-} 1.4(syst) GeV.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Making Fast Start Finance Work | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Making Fast Start Finance Work Making Fast Start Finance Work Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Making Fast Start Finance Work Agency/Company /Organization: European Climate Foundation Sector: Energy Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.project-catalyst.info/images/publications/2010-06-07_project_catal Making Fast Start Finance Work Screenshot References: Making Fast Start Finance Work[1] Logo: Making Fast Start Finance Work This paper aims to provide a fact base on the current sources of Fast Start Finance,including size, composition, and intended use, as well as analysis on the Fast Start Finance priorities and the institutional mechanisms needed to ensure that it delivers real impact. "...This paper aims to provide a fact base on the current sources of Fast

259

FAWN: a fast array of wimpy nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fast array of wimpy nodes---FAWN---an approach for achieving low-power data-intensive data-center computing. FAWN couples low-power processors to small amounts of local flash storage, balancing computation and I/O capabilities. ...

David G. Andersen; Jason Franklin; Michael Kaminsky; Amar Phanishayee; Lawrence Tan; Vijay Vasudevan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

Deibele, Craig E [Knoxville, TN

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High power fast ramping power supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fast Molecular Solvation Energetics and Forces Computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total free energy of a molecule includes the classical molecular mechanical energy (which is understood as the free energy in vacuum) and the solvation energy, which is caused by the change of the environment of the molecule (solute) from vacuum ... Keywords: error analysis, fast summation, generalized Born, molecular surface

Chandrajit Bajaj; Wenqi Zhao

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

FastForward 2.2: FastForward, Version 2.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FastForward, Version 2.2 (FastForward 2.2) software provides estimation of electricity forward prices, volatilities, and correlations with fuel prices and loads based on a multi-region structural model of the power system. FastForward 2.2 is a multi-region structural model that forecasts both spot and forward prices for electric power, on an hourly basis. The software can forecast prices for very long time horizons, exceeding 20 years as needed. The forecasting approach is to develop a detailed set o...

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Freque...

Maino, D; Baccigalupi, C; Perrotta, F; Banday, A J; Bedini, L; Burigana, C; Zotti, G D; Górski, K M; Salerno, E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development of a Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector (Fast TRAC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

off-line analyses * Good for cloud microstructures * And plumes Size of new Fast-TRAC Hi def video Folded microscope Xiao-Ying Yu, James Cowin PNNL Future Work * Make it...

266

The d-bar approach to approximate inverse scattering at fixed energy in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop the d-bar approach to inverse scattering at fixed energy in dimensions $d\\ge 3$ of [Beals, Coifman 1985] and [Henkin, Novikov 1987]. As a result we propose a stable method for nonlinear approximate finding a potential $v$ from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E>0$ in dimension $d=3$. In particular, in three dimensions we stably reconstruct n-times smooth potential $v$ with sufficient decay at infinity, $n>3$, from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E$ up to $O(E^{-(n-3-\\epsilon)/2})$ in the uniform norm as $E\\to +\\infty$ for any fixed arbitrary small $\\epsilon >0$ (that is with almost the same decay rate of the error for $E\\to +\\infty$ as in the linearized case near zero potential).

Roman Novikov

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

269

Energy Efficiency in Food-Service Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Food-service facilities have high energy intensities compared to other commercial buildings due to their energy use for cooking and refrigeration. Assessing the energy performance… (more)

Paillat, Etienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Cat under Food and Water Stress Name: Nitin Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside...

271

The Future of Food in Suburbia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses resilience for the future of Canadian suburbs, through the lens of buildings and food, particularly against the backdrop of peak oil and… (more)

Khalid, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Food Industry - Motor Contactors Burning Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of motor contactors that have burnt up several times in the last year at a food manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

274

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

275

NREL: Wind Research - New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool January 3, 2014 The old and new versions of the FAST wind turbine modeling tool are represented in this illustration by boxes. The earlier version of FAST is represented by three boxes aligned in a column on the left side of the illustration. They contain the words AeroDyn, FAST, and Hydrodyn and represent the three modules that worked together to model aerodynamics, hydrodynamics and servo-elastics. Double ended arrows between the boxes indicate interaction between these modules. A large red arrow pointed from the three boxes to a large rectangle in the middle shows how this earlier software evolved into the new FAST Framework. The large rectangular box in the middle contains the words FAST Driver. Seven smaller boxes to the right of the FAST driver represent the new modules that feed into the driver.

276

Food service establishment wastewater characterization and management practice evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food service establishments that use onsite wastewater treatment systems are experiencing hydraulic and organic overloading of pretreatment systems and/or drain fields. Design guidelines for these systems are typically provided in State regulations and based on residential hydraulic applications. For the purposes of this research, hydraulic loading indicates the daily flow of water directed to the wastewater system. Organic loading refers to the composition of the wastewater as quantified by five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total fats, oils and greases (FOG), and total suspended solids (TSS). The first part of this study included an analysis of the central tendencies of analytical data of four wastewater parameters from 28 restaurants representing a broad spectrum of restaurant types. Field sampling consisted of two sets of grab samples collected from each restaurant for six consecutive days at approximately the same time each day. These sets were collected approximately two weeks apart. The numerical data included BOD5, FOG, and TSS. The fourth parameter evaluated was daily flow. Data exploration and statistical analyses of the numerical data from the 28 restaurants was performed with the standard gamma probability distribution model in ExcelTM and used to determine inferences of the analytical data. The analysis shows higher hydraulic and organic values for restaurant wastewater than residential wastewater. The second part of the study included a statistical analysis of restaurant management practices and primary cuisine types and their influence on BOD5, FOG, TSS, and daily flow to determine if management practices and/or cuisine types may be influencing wastewater composition and flow. A self-reporting survey was utilized to collect management practice and cuisine type information. Survey response information and analytical data were entered into an ExcelTM spreadsheet and subsequently incorporated into SASTM statistical software for statistical analysis. Analysis indicated that the number of seats in a restaurant, use of self-serve salad bars, and primary cuisine types are statistically significant indicators of wastewater characteristics.

Garza, Octavio Armando

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Compact fast analyzer of rotary cuvette type  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type is provided for simultaneously determining concentrations in a multiplicity of discrete samples using either absorbance or fluorescence measurement techniques. A rigid, generally rectangular frame defines optical passageways for the absorbance and fluorescence measurement systems. The frame also serves as a mounting structure for various optical components as well as for the cuvette rotor mount and drive system. A single light source and photodetector are used in making both absorbance and fluorescence measurements. Rotor removal and insertion are facilitated by a swing-out drive motor and rotor mount. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to concentration measuring instruments and more specifically to a compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type which is suitable for making either absorbance or fluorescence measurements. It was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ultra-fast framing camera tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

Kalibjian, Ralph (1051 Batavia Ave., Livermore, CA 94550)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing  

SciTech Connect

Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

2274 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 9, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2013 Rotor Bar Fault Monitoring Method Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizes the data analysis of the air-gap torque profile in conjunction with a Bayesian classifier, and abrupt load changes, which can produce bearing faults and rotor bar breakages. Meanwhile, electrical Monitoring Method Based on Analysis of Air-Gap Torques of Induction Motors Aderiano M. da Silva, Member, IEEE

Povinelli, Richard J.

282

Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

Van Steenbergen, A.

1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fission energy: The integral fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements.

Chang, Yoon I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

van Steenbergen, Arie (Shoreham, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Development of the foods grasping mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this mechanism, and shows performance. Key Words: Remote shopping, Mobile Manipulator, Foods handling 1. 1·1 1) 1Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­Development of the foods grasping mechanism­ Tetsuo) Abstract-- Our purpose is developing the remote shopping system as a concrete application. A human uses

Ohya, Akihisa

287

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

Ohya, Akihisa

288

Food practices as situated action: exploring and designing for everyday food practices with households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Household food practices are complex. Many people are unable to effectively respond to challenges in their food environment to maintain diets considered to be in line with national and international standards for healthy eating. We argue that recognizing ... Keywords: everyday practice, food, health, situated action

Rob Comber; Jettie Hoonhout; Aart van Halteren; Paula Moynihan; Patrick Olivier

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Circumnuclear Dust in Nearby Active and Inactive Galaxies. II. Bars, Nuclear Spirals, and the Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We present a detailed study of the relation between circumnuclear dust morphology, host galaxy properties, and nuclear activity in nearby galaxies. We use our sample of 123 nearby galaxies with visible--near-infrared colormaps from the Hubble Space Telescope to create well-matched, "paired" samples of 28 active and 28 inactive galaxies, as well as 19 barred and 19 unbarred galaxies, that have the same host galaxy properties. Comparison of the barred and unbarred galaxies shows that grand design nuclear dust spirals are only found in galaxies with a large-scale bar. Tightly wound nuclear dust spirals, in contrast, show a strong tendency to avoid galaxies with large-scale bars. Comparison of the AGN and inactive samples shows that nuclear dust spirals, which may trace shocks and angular momentum dissipation in the ISM, occur with comparable frequency in both active and inactive galaxies. The only difference between the active and inactive galaxies is that several inactive galaxies appear to completely lack dust structure in their circumnuclear region, while none of the AGN lack this structure. The comparable frequency of nuclear spirals in active and inactive galaxies, combined with previous work that finds no significant differences in the frequency of bars or interactions between well-matched active and inactive galaxies, suggests that no universal fueling mechanism for low-luminosity AGN operates at spatial scales greater than ~100 pc radius from the galactic nuclei. The similarities instead suggest that the lifetime of nuclear activity is less than the characteristic inflow time from these spatial scales. An order-of-magnitude estimate of this inflow time is the dynamical timescale. This sets an upper limit of several million years to the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear activity.

Paul Martini; Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey; Richard W. Pogge

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asimikas Asimikas Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: N/A Question: How long can a domestic cat live without food, and drink water only? Replies: Asimikas, If at all possible, attempt to coax food into the cat by mixing wet cat food with water until 'soupy', and use a syringe to inject food into the back of the cat's mouth. The cat probably won't like this, but if you try repeatedly and with gentle firmness, you may successfully get food into the feline. From observing a case as a veterinary assistant, a cat refusing solid food can go several days on water alone. Then, the cat generally begins to refuse water as well and there is a noticeable gauntness about the body shape of the cat. The skin on the back, for example, when gently pinched will not quickly spring back to laying flat as it should --- this indicates serious dehydration on a subcutaneous level, indicating the cat needs an IV to get fluids in quickly before organ failure etc. Again, this is the general series of events I observed in a vet's office when a cat was brought in, having refused food for more than a few days. A vet should definitely be contacted if a feline has refused food for two consecutive days or more.

291

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and Al-Hf alloy heat sink system is capable of maintaining all system components below their maximum temperature limits. The maximum temperature of this conduction cooling system, 224.2°C (435.6 °F) occurs in a small, localized region in the heat sink structure near the core mid-plane. The total coolant flow rate requirement for this configuration is 207 L/min (54.7 gpm). The calculated Flow Instability Ratio and Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio for this configuration under nominal conditions are 6.5 and 8.0, respectively, which safely exceed the minimum values of 2.0. Materials and fabrication issues inspection revealed that the neutron absorber would probably best be made from powdered Al3Hf mixed with aluminum powder and extruded or hot isostatically pressed. Although Al3Hf has not been specifically studied extensively, its mechanical and chemical properties should be very much like Al3Zr, which has been studied. Its behavior under irradiation should be very satisfactory, and resistance to corrosion will be investigated to a limited extent in planned miniplate irradiation tests in ATR. Pressurized water systems needed to effect heat removal are already available in the ATR complex, and mixed gas temperature control systems needed to trim experiment temperatures have been engineered and need only be fabricated and installed. In sum, it appears the alternately cooled configuration arrived at can be very successful. The cost estimate for this configuration indicates to

Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

FastTrack Generic Data Link 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FastTrack Generic Data Link version 1.0 software system utilizes EPRI's Data Transfer Tool to allow users to transfer waste processing data from plant or corporate databases into a holding database that can be queried, on demand, by FastTrack users over a corporate intranet. This software system consists of four required software elements: the Data Transfer Tool 3.1, FastTrack 2.0 (provided separately as EPRI product 1009563), the FastTrack Data Link databases, and the FastTrack Data Link web service...

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Frequency scalings and normalization have been recovered with better than percent precision for all the components at frequencies and in sky regions where their signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 1.5; the error increases at ten percent level for signal-to-noise ratios about 1. Runs have been performed on a Pentium III 600 MHz computer; FastICA typically took a time of the order of 10 minutes for all-sky simulations with 3.5 arcminutes pixel size. We conclude that FastICA is an extremly promising technique for analyzing the maps that will be obtained by the forthcoming high resolution CMB experiments.

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; A. J. Banday; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; K. M. Gorski; E. Salerno

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

High-oleic canola oils and their food applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-oleic canola oils are among the major healthful oils replacing trans fat in food processing and foodservices in North America. High-oleic canola oils and their food applications Inform Magazine Edible Applications Food Structure and Functionality

296

Benchmarking the Bayesian reconstruction of the non-perturbative heavy $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of the finite temperature heavy quark potential from lattice QCD relies on a spectral analysis of the real-time Wilson loop. Through its position and shape, the lowest lying spectral peak encodes the real and imaginary part of this complex potential. We benchmark this extraction strategy using leading order hard-thermal loop (HTL) calculations. I.e. we analytically calculate the Wilson loop and determine the corresponding spectrum. By fitting its lowest lying peak we obtain the real- and imaginary part and confirm that the knowledge of the lowest peak alone is sufficient for obtaining the potential. We deploy a novel Bayesian approach to the reconstruction of spectral functions to HTL correlators in Euclidean time and observe how well the known spectral function and values for the real and imaginary part are reproduced. Finally we apply the method to quenched lattice QCD data and perform an improved estimate of both real and imaginary part of the non-perturbative heavy $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential.

Yannis Burnier; Alexander Rothkopf

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Observation of the bottomonium ground state, eta_b, at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state eta_b(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of 109+/-1 million of Upsilon(3S) events recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E_gamma = 921.2 {+2.1}{-2.8}(stat) +/- 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpretated as being due to the radiative transition Upsilon(3S) -> gamma eta_b(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an eta_b(1S) mass of 9388.9 {+3.1}{-2.3}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-eta_b(1S) mass splitting is 71.4 {+2.3}{-3.1}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative \\Upsilon(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 +/- 0.5(stat) +/- 1.2 (syst)) x 10^(-4).

Grenier, Philippe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Observation of the Bottomonium Ground State, eta_b, at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state {eta}{sub b}(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of (109 {+-} 1) million of {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded at the {Upsilon}(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E{sub {gamma}} = 921.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.1}(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpreted as being due to the radiative transition {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} {eta}{sub b}(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9388.9{sub -2.3}{sup +3.1}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The hyperfine {Upsilon}(1S)-{eta}{sub b}(1S) mass splitting is 71.4{sub -3.1}{sup +2.3}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for this radiative {Upsilon}(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.2(syst)) x 10{sup -4}.

Grenier, Philippe; Collaboration, for the BABAR

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

Observation of the bottomonium ground state, eta_b, at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state eta_b(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of 109+/-1 million of Upsilon(3S) events recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E_gamma = 921.2 {+2.1}{-2.8}(stat) +/- 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpretated as being due to the radiative transition Upsilon(3S) -> gamma eta_b(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an eta_b(1S) mass of 9388.9 {+3.1}{-2.3}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-eta_b(1S) mass splitting is 71.4 {+2.3}{-3.1}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative \\Upsilon(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 +/- 0.5(stat) +/- 1.2 (syst)) x 10^(-4).

Philippe Grenier; for the BABAR Collaboration

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemical analysis of biomass fast pyrolysis oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the development of the field of chemical analysis of biomass fast pyrolysis oils. The techniques applied to pyrolysis oil analysis are reviewed including proximate and ultimate analysis, water (moisture) analysis, and chemical component analysis by various forms of chromatography, solvent separations, and spectrophotometric analyses, like infrared and ultraviolet. Advanced analytical techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular beam -- mass spectrometry are also discussed. This paper reviews and compares the methods and the results of the analyses. The advantages and shortcomings of the various methods applied are identified. Comparisons derived from the IEA Round Robin are incorporated.

Elliott, D.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept  

SciTech Connect

In addition to maintaining the viability of its present commercial nuclear technology, a principal challenge in the US in the 1990s and beyond will be to regain and maintain a position among the world leadership in advanced reactor research and development. In this paper we'll discuss factors which we believe should today provide the rationale and focus for advanced reactor R and D, and we will then review the status of the major US effort, the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fast-acting valve and uses thereof  

SciTech Connect

A very fast acting valve capable of producing a very well-defined plug of gas suitable for filling a theta pinch vacuum vessel is given. The valve requires no springs, instead being stopped mainly by a nonlinear force. Thus, the valve is not subject to bouncing; and the ratio of the size of the valve housing to the size of the valve stem is smaller than it would be if springs were needed to stop the valve stem. Furthermore, the valve can be used for thousands of valve firings with no apparent valve damage.

Meyer, James A. (Espanola, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Bi-Directional Fast Charging Study Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the hardware and software infrastructure needed to demonstrate the possibility of utilizing battery power in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) with a bi directional fast charger to support/offset peak building loads. This document fulfills deliverable requirements for Tasks 1.2.1.2, 1.2.1.3, and 1.2.1.4 of Statement of Work (SOW) No.5799 for Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, now ECOtality North America (NA) support for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

Tyler Gray

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to an improved fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter that does not require separation of materials before it can be read out, that utilizes materials that do not melt or otherwise degrade at about 300$sup 0$C readout temperature, that provides a more efficient dosimeter, and that can be reused. The dosimeters are fabricated by intimately mixing a TL material, such as CaSO$sub 4$:Dy, with a powdered polyphenyl, such as p-sexiphenyl, and hot- pressing the mixture to form pellets, followed by out-gassing in a vacuum furnace at 150$sup 0$C prior to first use dosimeters. (auth)

Kecker, K.H.; Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Thorngate, J.H.

1975-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

An explosively driven, fast shock tube  

SciTech Connect

A simple, cylindrically configured fast shock tube (FST) has been employed as a tool to investigate the hydrodynamics of plate drive under a very high impulse-loading condition. The shock tube has a high-explosive outer shell and a low-density foam core. The implosion produces a well-defined Mach disk that is then subsequently used to drive a metallic plate. A thin stainless steel (SS) plate has been successfully launched to 9 km/s with this device. The experimental results from the study of material flow will be presented and compared with numerical calculation. Various interesting measurement techniques will also be discussed.

Tan, T.H.; Marsh, S.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An explosively driven, fast shock tube  

SciTech Connect

A simple, cylindrically configured fast shock tube (FST) has been employed as a tool to investigate the hydrodynamics of plate drive under a very high impulse-loading condition. The shock tube has a high-explosive outer shell and a low-density foam core. The implosion produces a well-defined Mach disk that is then subsequently used to drive a metallic plate. A thin stainless steel (SS) plate has been successfully launched to 9 km/s with this device. The experimental results from the study of material flow will be presented and compared with numerical calculation. Various interesting measurement techniques will also be discussed.

Tan, T.H.; Marsh, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Human exposure through food chains:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using information collected under the community right to know'' provision of the Superfund reauthorization act, the US Environmental Protection Agency has revealed that some two to three billion pounds of toxic chemicals are released annually to the atmosphere from industries in the US. Human populations can contact these environmental pollutants through food, water, and air in varying amounts each day throughout a lifetime. A realistic strategy for managing the potential health risks of industrial emissions requires a comprehensive approach with adequate attention to uncertainties. Using contaminant transfers from air to milk and as a case study, I consider here two important issues in exposure assessment --- (1) estimation of and (2) reduction of uncertainty in exposure estimates. This case study provides a distinction between variability, ignorance and uncertainty. For the air/milk pathways, I explore the use of exposure models that combine information on environmental partitioning with data on human diet, behavior patterns, and physiology into a numerical expression that links ambient air concentrations with chronic daily intake. I examine how uncertainty limits current exposure modeling efforts and suggest research to reduce these uncertainty. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

McKone, T.E.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

New Food-Addiction Link Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20, 2002 May 20, 2002 Electronic newsroom 02-40 New Food-Addiction Link Found Mere sight/smell of food spikes levels of brain “pleasure” chemical UPTON, NY — Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have found that the mere display of food — where food-deprived subjects are allowed to smell and taste their favorite foods without actually eating them — causes a significant elevation in brain dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of pleasure and reward. This activation of the brain’s dopamine motivation circuits is distinct from the role the brain chemical plays when people actually eat, and may be similar to what addicts experience when craving drugs. “Eating is a highly reinforcing behavior, just like taking illicit drugs,” said psychiatrist Nora Volkow, the study’s lead investigator. “But this is the first time anyone has shown that the dopamine system can be triggered by food when there is no pleasure associated with it since the subjects don’t eat the food. This provides us with new clues about the mechanisms that lead people to eat other than just for the pleasure of eating, and in this respect may help us understand why some people overeat.” The study will appear in the June 1, 2002 issue of Synapse (now available online ).

310

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food. Purpose: As ... amazing. As it turns out, geospatial data are analytic super-food. ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Internet Food...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet Food Service for SRS Employees Sought Greater Aiken-Augusta area food service companies are invited to consider providing meal ordering via the internet for delivery to...

312

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

313

Central, peripheral, and contextual regulation of food intake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Grinker, JA. Food and water intake, meal patterns andreceptors in food and water intake. Neuropharmacology.hyperdipsic response (>10 ml water intake within 30 min) to

Parylak, Sarah Lynne; Parylak, Sarah Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS IN THE VERMONT-REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food systems are inherently complex areas of interaction between economic, environmental, and social factors. The local food movement in Vermont presents new opportunities to shape… (more)

Schattman, Rachel

315

Method and an apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adjustable guide, includes two or more mechanisms each having a rotatable retaining element containing a retaining groove with a variable radius in its perimeter surface. The grooves form a guidance path to control the lateral, i.e. non-axial, motion of a long bar moving along a longitudinal axis during a production process.The diameter of the guidance path varies according to the variable radii of the grooves. The guidance path increases in size at a predetermined rate, from a point of origin to an end point on the retaining groove. Rotating the retaining elements causes the diameter of the retaining grooves to change so that the size of the guidance path can be changed to match the diameter of the bar being rolled, size of the guidance path can be changed to fit the diameter of a new bar rolled without having to exchange the guide for a different sized guide, reduce fiction between the bar and the guide, a media, such as compressed air, can be injected between the retaining elements via orifices.Each retaining element is attached to a mounting apparatus. The mounting apparatus can be fixed or flexible. The flexible mounting apparatus includes one or more springs and one or more shock absorbers. A force neutral position of the flexible mounting apparatus is designed to be located on the predetermined ideal bar path line. The flexible mounting apparatus dissipates kinetic energy from the bar thereby reducing the bar's lateral motion relative to the ideal bar path line.The damping ratio of the mounting apparatus can be adjustable to alter the product's vibration mode to enable better control of the bar's lateral motion.

Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI); Lin, Chang-Hung (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Road to the Higgs in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

Presented is a series of analyses which are central to the search for a low-mass Higgs boson. A search for ZZ production in the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} channel is introduced then the successful combination of this analysis with with the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}'{sup +}{ell}'{sup -} search to produce the first observation of the ZZ process at a hadron collider is then detailed. The final analysis presented is the search for the Higgs in the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} channel and the interpretation as a ZZ {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search in order to validate the techniques. Common themes are discussed, such as multivariate techniques and instrumental backgrounds from energy measurement fluctuations and the tools used to combat them. The formalism of the statistical analysis of the final selected sample is introduced generally and demonstrated in the context of the above mentioned searches. The optimization of the selection through the identification of poorly reconstructed leptons is included as well as the utilization of b-quark identifying tools. Some space is given to jet reconstruction/identification and the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger. The efficient identification and calibration of jets is central to many physics analysis especially in the low mass higgs search. Another key component of the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search is the proficient identification of jets and an imbalance of transverse energy in the first level of the triggering system. Therefore, the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger, designed to achieve this, is a necessary component for a sensitive ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search.

Facini, Gabriel; /Northeastern U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell' Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, W.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Prototype Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as both an FY2103 End-of-Year and End-of-Project report on efforts that resulted in the design of a prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter leveraged upon the findings of previous project efforts. The prototype design includes 32 liquid scintillator detectors with cubic volumes 7.62 cm in dimension configured into 4 stacked rings of 8 detectors. Detector signal collection for the system is handled with a pair of Struck Innovative Systeme 16-channel digitizers controlled by in-house developed software with built-in multiplicity analysis algorithms. Initial testing and familiarization of the currently obtained prototype components is underway, however full prototype construction is required for further optimization. Monte Carlo models of the prototype system were performed to estimate die-away and efficiency values. Analysis of these models resulted in the development of a software package capable of determining the effects of nearest-neighbor rejection methods for elimination of detector cross talk. A parameter study was performed using previously developed analytical methods for the estimation of assay mass variance for use as a figure-of-merit for system performance. A software package was developed to automate these calculations and ensure accuracy. The results of the parameter study show that the prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter design is very nearly optimized under the restraints of the parameter space.

D.L. Chichester; S.A. Pozzi; J.L. Dolan; M.T. Kinlaw; S.J. Thompson; A.C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J.T. Johnson; S.M. Watson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fast Switching Ferroelectric Materials for Accelerator Applications  

SciTech Connect

Fast switching (<10 nsec) measurement results on the recently developed BST(M) (barium strontium titanium oxide composition with magnesium-based additions) ferroelectric materials are presented. These materials can be used as the basis for new advanced technology components suitable for high-gradient accelerators. A ferroelectric ceramic has an electric field-dependent dielectric permittivity that can be altered by applying a bias voltage. Ferroelectric materials offer significant benefits for linear collider applications, in particular, for switching and control elements where a very short response time of <10 nsec is required. The measurement results presented here show that the new BST(M) ceramic exhibits a high tunability factor: a bias field of 40-50 kV/cm reduces the permittivity by a factor of 1.3-1.5. The recently developed technology of gold biasing contact deposition on large diameter (110 cm) thin wall ferroelectric rings allowed {approx}few nsec switching times in witness sample experiments. The ferroelectric rings can be used at high pulsed power (tens of megawatts) for X-band components as well as at high average power in the range of a few kilowatts for the L-band phase-shifter, under development for optimization of the ILC rf coupling. Accelerator applications include fast active X-band and Ka-band high-power ferroelectric switches, high-power X-band and L-band phase shifters, and tunable dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH 44139 (United States); Nenasheva, E. [Ceramics Co. Ltd, St.Petersburg 194223 (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, V. [Omega-P Inc., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Dedyk, A.; Karmanenko, S.; Kozyrev, A.; Osadchy, V.; Kosmin, D.; Semenov, A. [St. Petersburg Electrical Engineering University, St. Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Fast Track to Fusion Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World energy use is predicted to double in the next 40 years. Today, 80% is provided by burning fossil fuels, but this is not sustainable indefinitely because (i) it is driving climate change, and (ii) fossil fuels will eventually be exhausted (starting with oil). The resulting potential energy crisis requires increased investment in energy research and development (which is currently very small on the scale of the $3 trillion p.a. energy market, and falling). The wide portfolio of energy work that should be supported must include fusion, which is one of very few options that are capable in principle of supplying a large fraction of need in an environmentally responsible manner. The case for fusion has been strengthened by recent advances in plasma physics and fusion technology and by studies of fusion power plants that address safety and cost issues. The big questions are, 'How can we deliver fusion power as fast as possible?' and 'How long is it likely to take?' I will review progress in fusion, and argue for a focused fast-track program that could deliver a working prototype power station in less than 30 years.

Smith, Chris Llewellyn (UKAEA, Culham)

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

The thermodynamic cost of fast thought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After more than sixty years, Shannon's research1-3 continues to raise fundamental questions, such as the one formulated by Luce4,5, which is still unanswered: "Why is information theory not very applicable to psychological problems, despite apparent similarities of concepts?" On this topic, Pinker6, one of the foremost defenders of the computational theory of mind6, has argued that thought is simply a type of computation, and that the gap between human cognition and computational models may be illusory. In this context, in his latest book, titled Thinking Fast and Slow8, Kahneman7,8 provides further theoretical interpretation by differentiating the two assumed systems of the cognitive functioning of the human mind. He calls them intuition (system 1) determined to be an associative (automatic, fast and perceptual) machine, and reasoning (system 2) required to be voluntary and to operate logical- deductively. In this paper, we propose an ansatz inspired by Ausubel's learning theory for investigating, from the c...

de Castro, Alexandre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

FastAero – A Precorrected FFT – Fast Multipole Tree Steady and Unsteady Potential Flow Solver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a precorrected FFT-Fast Multipole Tree (pFFT-FMT) method for solving the potential flow around arbitrary three dimensional bodies is presented. The method takes advantage of the efficiency of the pFFT and FMT ...

Willis, David

325

MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Design Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed by Idaho National Laboratory and the University of Michigan in fiscal year (FY) 2012 to examine design parameters related to the use of fast-neutron multiplicity counting for assaying plutonium for materials protection, accountancy, and control purposes. This project seeks to develop a new type of neutron-measurement-based plutonium assay instrument suited for assaying advanced fuel cycle materials. Some current-concept advanced fuels contain high concentrations of plutonium; some of these concept fuels also contain other fissionable actinides besides plutonium. Because of these attributes the neutron emission rates of these new fuels may be much higher, and more difficult to interpret, than measurements made of plutonium-only materials. Fast neutron multiplicity analysis is one approach for assaying these advanced nuclear fuels. Studies have been performed to assess the conceptual performance capabilities of a fast-neutron multiplicity counter for assaying plutonium. Comparisons have been made to evaluate the potential improvements and benefits of fast-neutron multiplicity analyses versus traditional thermal-neutron counting systems. Fast-neutron instrumentation, using for example an array of liquid scintillators such as EJ-309, have the potential to either a) significantly reduce assay measurement times versus traditional approaches, for comparable measurement precision values, b) significantly improve assay precision values, for measurement durations comparable to current-generation technology, or c) moderating improve both measurement precision and measurement durations versus current-generation technology. Using the MCNPX-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation code, studies have been performed to assess the doubles-detection efficiency for a variety of counter layouts of cylindrical liquid scintillator detector cells over one, two, and three rows. Ignoring other considerations, the best detector design is the one with the most detecting volume. However, operational limitations guide a) the maximum acceptable size of each detector cell (due to PSD performance and maximum-acceptable per-channel data throughput rates, limited by pulse pile-up and the processing rate of the electronics components of the system) and b) the affordability of a system due to the number of total channels of data to be collected and processed. As a first estimate, it appears that a system comprised of two rows of detectors 5" Ø ? 3" would yield a working prototype system with excellent performance capabilities for assaying Pu-containing items and capable of handling high signal rates likely when measuring items with Pu and other actinides. However, it is still likely that gamma-ray shielding will be needed to reduce the total signal rate in the detectors. As a first step prior to working with these larger-sized detectors, it may be practical to perform scoping studies using small detectors, such as already-on-hand 3" Ø ? 3" detectors.

D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. T. Kinlaw; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J. T. Johnsom; S. M. Watson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

$W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

An analysis of monojet data in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TEV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of events with a single jet and significant missing transverse energy selected from 4.7 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF detector. The goal is to identify events of the type p{bar p} {yields} Z{sup 0} + jet; Z{sup 0} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}. Event selection and backgrounds are discussed. The number of observed monojet events is compared to the number of observed Z{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{sup {minus}} events in which the Z{sup 0} is accompanied by a jet. We measure the number of light neutrino species to be N{sub {nu}} = 2.2{plus_minus}1.5 and we place an upper limit on the number of neutrino species at N{sub {nu}} < 5 (90% C.L.).

Markeloff, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

West Pico Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pico Food Pico Food Jump to: navigation, search Name West Pico Food Place Vernon, California Sector Solar Product A distributor of wholesale frozen foods to supermarket chains in Southern California, which has had a solar installation built on its roof. Coordinates 42.761624°, -72.511495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.761624,"lon":-72.511495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Collaborate - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborate - Food Community Collaborate - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Collaborate This Food, Agriculture, and Rural Community establishes a unified point of access to data and statistics, and tools to identify relevant data sets. Providing researchers and other users of data and statistics with authoritative, high quality sources will realize greater benefits from public research, help to coordinate effort and reduce duplication in scientific investigation, and reveal new connections for innovative uses. It is hoped that this community will foster the development of new applications and tools to improve agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental benefits, and global food security and poverty

330

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-rich foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-Rich Foods Blood Drive Home Seafood: Fish (cod, sardines, tuna, clams, oysters, shrimp) Poultry: Chicken, eggs, yolk Lean Red Meats: Beef, lamb, veal, pork,...

331

Early Days of Food and Environmental Virology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cells, so that the water produced as a byproduct wasproblem. Although the water produced by the hydrogen–oxygenof food produced for human consumption, plus water ad lib.

Cliver, Dean O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A systems approach to food accident analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

Helferich, John D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry.

334

By the MSU Food Security Group 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decades of research have led to substantially improved understanding of the nature of food insecurity. 2 Until the food crisis of 2007/08, a combination of economic growth and targeted programs resulted in a steady fall in the percentage of the world’s population suffering from under-nutrition (from 20 % in 1990/92 to 16 % in 2006). 3 Yet over a billion people still face both

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sechage solaire des aliments (solar food drying and conservation of food for year-round consumption)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to food drying as a measure to avoid the loss of agricultural surpluses, and conserve food for year-round consumption. It discusses the basic rules of food drying and gives an overview of various methods and appropriate dryer constructions. It also provides detailed explanations on how to process vegetables, fruits, and meats and gives advice on storage and cooking.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

An Analysis of a Spreader Bar Crane Mounted Gamma-Ray Radiation Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 95% of imports entering the United States from outside North America arrive via cargo containers by sea at 329 ports of entry. The current layered approach for the detection only scans 5% of cargo bound for the United States. This is inadequate to protect our country. This research involved the building of a gamma-ray radiation detection system used for cargo scanning. The system was mounted on a spreader bar crane (SBC) at the Port of Tacoma (PoT) and the applicability and capabilities of the system were analyzed. The detection system provided continuous count rate and spectroscopic data among three detectors while operating in an extreme environment. In a separate set of experiments, 60Co and 137Cs sources were positioned inside a cargo container and data were recorded for several count times. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to simulate a radioactive source inside an empty cargo container and the results were compared to experimentally recorded data. The detection system demonstrated the ability to detect 60Co, 137Cs, 192Ir, highly-enriched uranium (HEU), and weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) with minimum detectable activities (MDA) of 5.9 ± 0.4 microcuries (?Ci), 19.3 ± 1.1 ?Ci, 11.7 ± 0.6 ?Ci, 3.5 ± 0.3 kilograms (kg), and 30.6 ± 1.3 grams (g), respectively. This system proved strong gamma-ray detection capabilities, but was limited in the detection of fissile materials Additional details of this system are presented and advantages of this approach to cargo scanning over current approaches are discussed.

Grypp, Matthew D

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 {micro}{var_epsilon} peak) amplitude and a 100 {micro}s duration (measured at 10% amplitude).

Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Fast-wave ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, minority regime fast-wave ICRF (Ion cyclotron range of frequency) heating experiments conducted on the Alcator C tokamak (Nucl. Fusion {bold 26}, 1665 (1986)) are described. Up to 450 kW of rf (radio frequency) power at frequency {ital f}=180 MHz was injected into plasmas composed of deuterium majority and hydrogen minority ion species at magnetic fields of {ital B}{sub 0}{congruent}12 T, densities 0.8{le}{ital {bar n}}{sub {ital e}}{le}5{times}10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}, and minority concentrations 0.25{approx lt}{eta}{sub H}{le}8%. Typical ion temperatures were {ital T}{sub D}(0){similar to}1 keV, while, depending on density, typical electron temperatures were in the range {ital T}{sub {ital e}}(0){similar to}1.5--2.5 keV. Central deuterium ion temperature increases of {Delta}{ital T}{sub D}(0)=400 eV were observed at {ital {bar n}}{sub {ital e}}=1{times}10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}, while significantly smaller ion temperature increases were observed at higher densities. At the highest densities, ion heating became insignificant due in part to a limitation on power handling by the antenna that became more severe with increasing density. Significant electron heating was not observed at any density. Heating of the minority species at low densities indicated severe losses, but at higher densities it was consistent with efficient collisional coupling of the rf power from the hydrogen minority species to the deuterium majority species. Analysis of the deuterium power balance indicated no significant change in the deuterium thermal transport properties as a function of rf power. This may be consistent with the fact that the rf power never exceeded the Ohmic heating (OH) contribution. However, a very strong dependence of the deuterium transport properties on density was observed, and appears to be the dominant process limiting the effectiveness of ICRF heating at high density.

Shepard, T.D.; Fiore, C.L.; McDermott, F.S.; Parker, R.R.; Porkolab, M. (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Trade My Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trade My Food Trade My Food Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trade My Food Agency/Company /Organization: Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: hackerleague.org/hackathons/boston-cleanweb-hackathon/hacks/trade-my-f Country: USA Web Application Link: www.FoodForYouFoodFor.Me Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Cleanweb Hackathon, Boston, Community Generated UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 42.3490737°, -71.0481764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3490737,"lon":-71.0481764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Quantization effects and stabilization of the fast-Kalman algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact and actual cause of the failure of the fast-Kalman algorithm due to the generation and propagation of finite-precision or quantization error is presented. It is demonstrated that out of all the formulas that constitute this fast Recursive Least ... Keywords: Kalman filtering, adaptive algorithms, finite-precision error in RLS algorithms, quantization error in fast-Kalman algorithm, recursive least squares filtering

Constantin Papaodysseus; Constantin Alexiou; George Roussopoulos; Athanasios Panagopoulos

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FOOD-ASTRUCTURE: Re-Articulating the Architectural Space of Food Distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract a. Material processes and their catalysts shape urban and exurban morphology. b. Food distribution is an example of a material process. Its catalysts are… (more)

Bartell, Christopher R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mobile Food Fusion: Using the Power of Mobile Food to Create a New Restaurant Typology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mobile food vending has recently experienced a dramatic resurgence, providing lucrative opportunities for entrepreneurs in a difficult economy. By accessing larger regional networks that engage… (more)

Bohlman, Steven Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Dominican Republic-Fast-Track Development of Transformative  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominican Republic-Fast-Track Development of Transformative Dominican Republic-Fast-Track Development of Transformative Climate-Compatible Development Plans and Building of Regional and Local Capacities Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Dominican Republic-Fast-Track Development of Transformative Climate-Compatible Development Plans and Building of Regional and Local Capacities Name Dominican Republic-Fast-Track Development of Transformative Climate-Compatible Development Plans and Building of Regional and Local Capacities Agency/Company /Organization Coalition for Rainforest Nations Focus Area Economic Development Topics Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Presentation Website http://www.rainforestcoalition Country Dominican Republic UN Region Caribbean

344

Fast-Charging Demonstration at Buffalo Rock Bottling Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-month field study has demonstrated successful use of fast-charging technology on forklifts in a high-utilization, 24-hour, three-shift operation.

1999-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Ultra-Fast Calorimetry for Studies of Crystallization in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Ultra-Fast Calorimetry for Studies of Crystallization in Chalcogenides for Phase-Change Memory. Author(s), A. L. Greer. On-Site Speaker ...

346

Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth's Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recent- ly, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density...

347

"Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth's Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recent- ly, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density...

348

Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 29, 2008 ... Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem. Diogo V. Andrade (diogo ***at*** google.com) Mauricio G. C. Resende (mgcr ...

349

Dielectric liquid ionization chambers for detecting fast neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three ionization chambers with different geometries have been constructed and filled with dielectric liquids for detection of fast neutrons. The three dielectric liquids studied were Tetramethylsilane (TMS), Tetramethylpentane ...

Boyd, Erin M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Control rod assembly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors  

SciTech Connect

This standard establishes the requirements for fabrication, testing, and inspection of control rod assemblies for use in liquid metal fast breeder reactors.

1978-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Controlling biomass properties for optimizing fast pyrolysis products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy future of the United States is likely to include a large number of traditional and alternative energy sources and technologies. Fast pyrolysis has… (more)

Jeffrey, Brandon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Understanding the product distribution from biomass fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis of biomass is an attractive route to transform solid biomass into a liquid bio-oil, which has been envisioned as a renewable substitute for… (more)

Patwardhan, Pushkaraj Ramchandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Argonne fast-reactor pioneer receives international prize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne fast-reactor pioneer receives international prize Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About...

354

Fast magnetosonic wave propagation and absorption in Tokamaks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fast magnetostatic wave propagation and absorption in a tokamak model consisting of an axially symmetric cylindrical plasma column with a radially varying density profile is considered.

Phillips, C.K.; Perkins, F.W.; Hwang, D.Q.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Advanced Lithium Ion Battery Materials for Fast Charging and ...  

Advanced Lithium Ion Battery Materials for Fast Charging and Improved Safety Technology Summary ... a great low cost substitute for cobalt, were

356

Recoverable Class Loaders for a Fast Restart of Java Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 8, 2008 ... able a fast start-up and recovery of Java applications. This is achieved by snapshooting the static state of Java applications namely the class ...

357

Mechanical Testing of Core Fast Reactor Materials for the Advanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To achieve this goal, the core fast reactor materials (cladding and duct) must be ... in situ Mechanical Test Methods in the US Fusion Reactor Materials Program.

358

Pulse Shape Discrimination for a Fast Neutron Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as well as security applications such as detection of contraband fissile materials. Fast neutrons deposit energy in the scintillator by nuclear recoil ...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

HIGH-SPEED IMAGER FOR FAST, TRANSIENT EVENTS AT NIF  

Facility. HIGH-SPEED IMAGER . FOR FAST, TRANSIENT ... GATOR can convert x rays and other types of radiation to coherent optical radiation, which can be transported and

360

Insanely Fast Microprocessor Shop - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insanely Fast Microprocessor Shop Insanely Fast Microprocessor Shop VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydro-FAST Axial Flow Simulation Code Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

strategy Summary of work to date * HydroTurbSim (turbulence) * MAP (mooring) * HydroFAST (hydro-servo-elastic) Path forward Aquantis Verdant NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY...

362

A system for fast neutron radiography  

SciTech Connect

A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

Klann, R.T.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fast adaptive elliptical filtering using box splines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that it is possible to filter an image with an elliptic window of varying size, elongation and orientation with a fixed computational cost per pixel. Our method involves the application of a suitable global pre-integrator followed by a pointwise-adaptive localization mesh. We present the basic theory for the 1D case using a B-spline formalism and then appropriately extend it to 2D using radially-uniform box splines. The size and ellipticity of these radially-uniform box splines is adaptively controlled. Moreover, they converge to Gaussians as the order increases. Finally, we present a fast and practical directional filtering algorithm that has the capability of adapting to the local image features.

Chaudhury, Kunal Narayan; Unser, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Update; Sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept developed by the team of Rockwell International, Combustion Engineering, and Bechtel during the 3-year period extending from January 1985 to December 1987 as one element in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Program. In January 1988, the team was expanded to include Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., and the concept development was extended under DOE's Program for Improvement in Advanced Modular LMR Design. The SAFR plant concept employs a 450-MWe pool-type liquid metal cooled reactor as its basic module. The reactor assembly module is a standardized shop-fabricated unit that can be shipped to the plant site by barge for installation. Shop fabrication minimizes nuclear-grade field fabrication and reduces the plant construction schedule. Reactor modules can be used individually or in multiples at a given site to supply the needed generating capacity.

Oldenkamp, R.D.; Brunings, J.E. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Guenther, E. (Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (US)); Hren, R. (Bechtel National Inc., San Francisco, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

One more experiment on "fast-light"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary observational and theoretical studies on the temporal nature of microscopic measurements renewed the discussion about the fundamental constants, leading to the possibility of light speed variation and superluminal pulse propagation. Gain assisted experiments using anomalous dispersion near an absorption line in atomic gas, a "fast - light" medium, seem to lead to a wave group velocity vG exceeding c, the vacuum speed of light; moreover, definition of the information velocity vi sets the question of interpretation of the three speeds: one view is that vi = vG, but this violates Causality; another view is that vi = c in all situations, but this limits, a priori, the transport of information. Another view is that vi, vG and c are distinct. This contribution follows the last possibility. A draft discussion on space-time is given.

R Assumpcao

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a safety control rod to desired elevations within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump motor, an electric gear motor, and a solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch, allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Fast Camera Imaging of Hall Thruster Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Hall thrusters provide efficient space propulsion by electrostatic acceleration of ions. Rotating electron clouds in the thruster overcome the space charge limitations of other methods. Images of the thruster startup, taken with a fast camera, reveal a bright ionization period which settles into steady state operation over 50 ?s. The cathode introduces azimuthal asymmetry, which persists for about 30 ?s into the ignition. Plasma thrusters are used on satellites for repositioning, orbit correction and drag compensation. The advantage of plasma thrusters over conventional chemical thrusters is that the exhaust energies are not limited by chemical energy to about an electron volt. For xenon Hall thrusters, the ion exhaust velocity can be 15-20 km/s, compared to 5 km/s for a typical chemical thruster

C.L. Ellison, Y. Raitses and N.J. Fisch

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS OF THE PEACE-ATHABASCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS-7th Ave. SW, Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB, T2P 3P7, Canada ABSTRACT: Previously termed concave bank

370

Measurement of W and Z production cross-sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cross sections for W and Z production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are measured using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The detected final states are W {yields} ev{sub e}, Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, W {yields} {mu}v{sub {mu}}, and Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. In the ratio of these measurements, many common sources of systematic error cancel and we measure R = {sigma},(p{bar p} {yields} W) {center_dot} Br(W {yields} lv)/ {sigma},(p{bar p} {yields} Z) {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}). Assuming standard model couplings, this result is used to determine the width of the W bosom and to set a limit on the decay W{sup +} {yields} t{bar b}.

Quintas, P.Z.; D0 Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Search for the Higgs boson produced with $Z \\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a search for the Higgs boson in the process q{bar q} {yields} ZN {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} b{bar b}. The analysis uses an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions produced at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV and accumulated by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). They employ artificial neural networks both to correct jets mismeasured in the calorimeter, and to distinguish the signal kinematic distributions from those of the background. They see no evidence for Higgs boson production, and set 95% CL upper limits on {sigma}{sub ZH} {center_dot} {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}), ranging from 1.5 pb to 1.2 pb for a Higgs mass (m{sub H}) of 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Food and Beverage Manufacturing Subsectors in Lane County, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and employment multipliers that indicate that the brewing, flour milling, and a few other select food

Oregon, University of

373

Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for a new heavy particle M produced in association with a top quark, p{bar p} {yields} t(M {yields} {bar t}q) or p{bar p} {yields} {bar t}({bar M} {yields} t{bar q}), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a {bar t}+j or t+j resonance in t{bar t}+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (p{bar p} {yields} Mt or {bar M} {bar t}) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for M masses ranging from 200 GeV/c{sup 2} to 800 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Yale U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

375

Development of a Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector (Fast TRAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yu Yu & James Cowin PNNL Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector ......Fast TRAC...... Xiao-Ying Yu, Ali Hashim, Martin Iedema, and James Cowin Atmospheric Sciences, Chemical Sciences Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Research is supported by NOAA & DOE. *Patent Pending Xiao-Ying Yu & James Cowin PNNL Cloud Microstructures ≤ 1 m Want to know the aerosols at this resolution Aircraft flies at 150 m/s Need time resolution 1 m/150 m/s = 6 ms (!!!!!) Xiao-Ying Yu & James Cowin PNNL What is TRAC? - Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector * Uses an impactor * ~ 600 TEM samples * Flow rate: 1 l/min * Time resolution: ≥ 1 min* * Applications: Off-line analysis: - particle hygroscopicity, morphology, composition.. (6.5 in) 3 , 7 lb, 12 V, 8 W 0% 20% 40% 60%

376

Utility Direct Medium Voltage DC Fast Charger Update: DC Fast Charger Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI developed a fact charging technology for electric vehicles based on a solid state transformer technology known as the Intelligent Universal Transformer (IUT). The IUT technology replaces both the independent power conversion units as well as the conventional transformer with a single interface system which can be used for fast charging of electric vehicles. The versatility of the IUT provides an intermediate DC bus voltage at the 400-V level that can be directly used for a DC distribution ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in More than 80 persons participated in the presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in Bolivia' More than 80 persons participated in the presentation of a new book, `Innovación Tecnológica, Soberanía y Seguridad Alimentaría' (Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security). The book was written by Freddy

Richner, Heinz

378

Detectors for Energy-Resolved Fast Neutron Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two detectors for energy-resolved fast-neutron imaging in pulsed broad-energy neutron beams are presented. The first one is a neutron-counting detector based on a solid neutron converter coupled to a gaseous electron multiplier (GEM). The second is an integrating imaging technique, based on a scintillator for neutron conversion and an optical imaging system with fast framing capability.

V. Dangendorf; A. Breskin; R. Chechik; G. Feldman; M. B. Goldberg; O. Jagutzki; C. Kersten; G. Laczko; I. Mor; U. Spillman; D. Vartsky

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Task Parallel Implementation of Fast Multipole Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a task parallel implementation of ExaFMM, an open source implementation of fast multipole methods (FMM), using a lightweight task parallel library MassiveThreads. Although there have been many attempts on parallelizing FMM, experiences ... Keywords: task parallelism, fast multipole methods, FMM, divide and conquer, MassiveThreads, ExaFMM

Kenjiro Taura, Jun Nakashima, Rio Yokota, Naoya Maruyama

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Fast Response Continuous Analyzer for Halogenated Atmospheric Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast response version of the continuous SF6 analyzer originally introduced in 1976 has been developed. The new continuous analyzer has a response time constant of 0.36 s, which is 4–30 times faster than previous analyzers. The very fast ...

Richard L. Benner; Brian Lamb

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Welding austenitic steel clads for fast reactor fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

ABS>From symposium on fuel and elements for fast reactors; Brussels. Belgium (2 Jul 1973). Developmental programs aimed at fabrication of stainless steelclad PuO/sub 2/ fuel pins are described. Information and data are included on welding fast reactor fuel cans, methods of reducing the incidence of weld cracking, effects of weld stresses, and fuel plug design. (JRD)

Papeleux, P.; Flipot, A.J.; Lafontaine, I.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Fast Spectral Subtractional Solver for Elliptic Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a fast subtractional spectral algorithm for the solution of the Poisson equation and the Helmholtz equation which does not require an extension of the original domain. It takes O(N2 log N) operations, ... Keywords: equations in complex geometries, fast spectral direct solver, preconditioned iterative algorithm for elliptic equations, the Poisson equation, the modified Helmholtz equation

Elena Braverman; Boris Epstein; Moshe Israeli; Amir Averbuch

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Compositionality for Markov reward chains with fast and silent transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parallel composition is defined for Markov reward chains with stochastic discontinuity, and with fast and silent transitions. In this setting, compositionality with respect to the relevant aggregation preorders is established. For Markov reward chains ... Keywords: Aggregation, Fast transitions, Markov reward chains, Parallel composition, Silent transitions

J. Markovski; A. Sokolova; N. Tr?ka; E. P. de Vink

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Coupling to the fast wave via a phased waveguide array  

SciTech Connect

A dielectric-loaded waveguide array has been used to launch fast waves into a plasma in which ..omega../sup pi/ < ..omega.. << ..omega../sub pe/ approx. ..omega../sub ce/. The wave propagates when accessibility and cutoff requirements are satisfied. Reflection coefficients as low as 1% have been measured. Use of the fast wave for steady-state current drive is suggested.

Olson, L.; McWilliams, R.; Glanz, J.; Motley, R.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fast arithmetic for triangular sets: From theory to practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study arithmetic operations for triangular families of polynomials, concentrating on multiplication in dimension zero. By a suitable extension of fast univariate Euclidean division, we obtain theoretical and practical improvements over a direct recursive ... Keywords: High-performance computing, Fast polynomial arithmetic, Triangular set

Xin Li; Marc Moreno Maza; Éric Schost

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Direct Energy Conversion for Fast Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are a well-established technology for compact low power output long-life applications. Solid state TEGs are the technology of choice for many space missions and have also been used in remote earth-based applications. Since TEGs have no moving parts and can be hermetically sealed, there is the potential for nuclear reactor power systems using TEGs to be safe, reliable and resistant to proliferation. Such power units would be constructed in a manner that would provide decades of maintenance-free operation, thereby minimizing the possibility of compromising the system during routine maintenance operations. It should be possible to construct an efficient direct energy conversion cascade from an appropriate combination of solid-state thermoelectric generators, with each stage in the cascade optimized for a particular range of temperature. Performance of cascaded thermoelectric devices could be further enhanced by exploitation of compositionally graded p-n couples, as well as radial elements to maximize utilization of the heat flux. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena has recently reported segmented unicouples that operate between 300 and 975 K and have conversion efficiencies of 15 percent [Caillat, 2000]. TEGs are used in nuclear-fueled power sources for space exploration, in power sources for the military, and in electrical generators on diesel engines. Second, there is a wide variety of TE materials applicable to a broad range of temperatures. New materials may lead to new TEG designs with improved thermoelectric properties (i.e. ZT approaching 3) and significantly higher efficiencies than in designs using currently available materials. Computational materials science (CMS) has made sufficient progress and there is promise for using these techniques to reduce the time and cost requirements to develop such new TE material combinations. Recent advances in CMS, coupled with increased computational power afforded by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), should improve the speed and decrease the cost of developing new TEGs. The system concept to be evaluated is shown in Figure 1. Liquid metal is used to transport heat away from the nuclear heat source and to the TEG. Air or liquid (water or a liquid metal) is used to transport heat away from the cold side of the TEG. Typical reactor coolants include sodium or eutectic mixtures of lead-bismuth. These are coolants that have been used to cool fast neutron reactors. Heat from the liquid metal coolant is rejected through the thermal electric materials, thereby producing electrical power directly. The temperature gradient could extend from as high as 1300 K to 300 K, although fast reactor structural materials (including those used to clad the fuel) currently used limit the high temperature to about 825K.

Brown, N.; Cooper, J.; Vogt, D.; Chapline, G.; Turchi, P.; Barbee Jr., T.; Farmer, J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Data Call - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Call - Food Community Data Call - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Data Call Understanding food, agriculture, and rural issues is a multidisciplinary effort that incorporates natural resources and land use, biological and physical sciences, international commodity and financial market information, social sciences, human health and nutrition, and many other areas. Relevant data collection and compilation of official statistics occur throughout the U.S. government, not just in agencies with an explicit focus on agriculture. With so many different sources of knowledge and widely felt areas of impact, successful data integration and distribution requires making full use of new approaches and technologies.

388

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fast power cycle for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

The unique, deep penetration capability of 14 MeV neutrons produced in DT fusion reactions allows the generation of very high temperature working fluid temperatures in a thermal power cycle. In the FAST (Fusion Augmented Steam Turbine) power cycle steam is directly superheated by the high temperature ceramic refractory interior of the blanket, after being generated by heat extracted from the relatively cool blanket structure. The steam is then passed to a high temperature gas turbine for power generation. Cycle studies have been carried out for a range of turbine inlet temperatures (1600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F (870 to 1650/sup 0/C)), number of reheats, turbine mechanical efficiency, recuperator effectiveness, and system pressure losses. Gross cycle efficiency is projected to be in the range of 55 to 60%, (fusion energy to electric power), depending on parameters selected. Turbine inlet temperatures above 2000/sup 0/F, while they do increase efficiency somewhat, are not necessarily for high cycle efficiency.

Powell, J.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Applications of fast wave in spherical tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

In spherical tokamaks (ST), the magnetic field strength varies over a wide range across the plasma, and at high betas it deviates significantly from the 1/R dependence of conventional tokamaks. This, together with the high density expected in ST, poses challenging problems for RF heating and current drive. In this paper, the authors investigate the various possible applications of fast waves (FW) in ST. The adjoint technique of calculating current drive is implemented in the raytracing code CURRAY. The applicability of high harmonic and subharmonic FW to steady state ST is considered. They find that high harmonic FW tends to be totally absorbed before reaching the core and may be considered a candidate for off axis current drive while the subharmonic FW tends to be absorbed mainly in the core region and may be considered for central current drive. A difficult problem is the maintenance of current at the startup stage. In the bootstrap ramp-up scenario, the current ramp-up is mainly provided by the bootstrap current. Under this condition, the role of rf becomes mainly the sustainment of plasma through electron heating. Using a slab full-wave code SEMAL, the authors find that the ion-ion-hybrid mode conversion scheme is a promising candidate. The effect of possible existence of edge Alfven resonance and high harmonic cyclotron resonance is investigated and regimes of minimization of edge heating identified.

Chiu, S.C.; Chan, V.S.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.; Prater, R.; Politzer, P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary mission for the SFR is the management of high-level wastes, and in particular, management of plutonium and other actinides. The Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) found that the limiting factor facing an essential role for nuclear energy with the once-through cycle is the availability of repository space worldwide [FCCG Report]. This becomes an important issue, requiring new repository development in only a few decades. Systems that employ a fully closed fuel cycle hold the promise to reduce repository space and performance requirements, although their costs must be held to acceptable levels. Closed fuel cycles, working alone or symbiotically with systems using a once-through cycle, permit partitioning the nuclear waste and management of each partitioned fraction. In the longer term, beyond 50 years, or if major new missions requiring nuclear energy production (such as a major growth in the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier) develop, uranium resource availability also becomes a limiting factor unless breakthroughs occur in mining or extraction technologies. Fast spectrum reactors have the ability to utilize almost all of the energy in the natural uranium versus the 1% utilized in thermal spectrum systems.

Lineberry, M. J.; Allen, T. R.

2002-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fast Beam-Based BPM Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alignment Diagnostic System (ADS) of the LCLS undulator system indicates that the 33 undulator quadrupoles have extremely high position stability over many weeks. However, beam trajectory straightness and lasing efficiency degrade more quickly than this. A lengthy Beam Based Alignment (BBA) procedure must be executed every two to four weeks to re-optimize the X-ray beam parameters. The undulator system includes RF cavity Beam Position Monitors (RFBPMs), several of which are utilized by an automatic feedback system to align the incoming electron-beam trajectory to the undulator axis. The beam trajectory straightness degradation has been traced to electronic drifts of the gain and offset of the BPMs used in the beam feedback system. To quickly recover the trajectory straightness, we have developed a fast beam-based procedure to recalibrate the BPMs. This procedure takes advantage of the high-precision monitoring capability of the ADS, which allows highly repeatable positioning of undulator quadrupoles. This report describes the ADS, the position stability of the LCLS undulator quadrupoles, and some results of the new recovery procedure.

Bertsche, K.; Loos, H.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Peters, F.; /SLAC

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Real-time rotor bar current measurements using bluetooth technology for a brushless doubly-fed machine (BDFM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brushless Doubly Fed Machine (BDFM) shows economic promise as a variable speed drive or generator. The optimization of the machine and model-based control strategies both rely on machine models, and the experimental verification of these models. To date, dynamic measurements of rotor quantities have not been possible. The authors present a system of measuring rotor bar currents in real time using a Rogowski coil to detect the current and recently developed Bluetooth wireless technology to transmit the data from the moving rotor to a computer. Experimental data collected from the system are included. 1.

P. C. Roberts; E. Abdi Jalebi; R. A. Mcmahon; T. J. Flack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mutual transformation of light waves by reflection holograms in photorefractive crystals of the 4-bar 3m symmetry  

SciTech Connect

The mutual transformation of light waves in the case of their simultaneous diffraction from a bulk reflection phase hologram, which was formed in a cubic photorefractive crystal of the 4-bar 3m symmetry class, has been studied. The indicator surfaces of the polarization-optimized values of the relative intensity of the object wave, which make it possible to determine the amplification of this wave for any crystal cut, are constructed. The linear polarization azimuths at which the energy exchange between the light waves reaches a maximum are found numerically for crystals of different cuts.

Naunyka, V. N.; Shepelevich, V. V., E-mail: vasshep@inbox.ru [Mozyr State Pedagogical University (Belarus)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

(BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System Sandia shock compression (SSC) database shock physics index (SPHINX) database. Volume 3, UNIX version Systems Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a database management system specially designed to store and retrieve bibliographic references and track documents. The system uses INGRES to manage this database and user interface. It uses forms for journal articles, books, conference proceedings, theses, technical reports, letters, memos, visual aids, as well as a miscellaneous form which can be used for data sets or any other material which can be assigned an access or file number. Sorted output resulting from flexible BOOLEAN searches can be printed or saved in files which can be inserted in reference lists for use with word processors.

von Laven, G.M. [Advanced Software Engineering, Madison, AL (United States); Herrmann, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science &

399

Branching Fraction for B0 -> pi- l+ nu and Determination of |Vub| in Upsilon(4S) -> B0 B0bar Events Tagged by B0bar -> D(*)+ l- nubar  

SciTech Connect

We report preliminary results from a study of the charmless exclusive semileptonic decay B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} based on the data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance using the BABAR detector at SLAC. The analysis uses events in which the signal B meson recoils against a B meson that has been reconstructed in a semileptonic decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)+}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}. We extract the total branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.03 {+-} 0.25{sub stat.} {+-} 0.13{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} and the partial branching fractions in three bins of q{sup 2}, the invariant mass squared of the lepton-neutrino system. From the partial branching fractions and theoretical predictions for the form factors, we determine the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. We find |V{sub ub}| = (3.3 {+-} 0.4{sub stat.} {+-} 0.2{sub syst.} {sub -0.4}{sup +0.8}FF) x 10{sup -3}, where the last error is due to normalization of the form factor.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Measurement of CP-violation Parameters in B0B0barMixing using Partially Reconstructed D^{*-}l^+ nu_l Events at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

CP violation in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} mixing is characterized by the value of the parameter |q/p| being different from 1, and the Standard Model predicts this difference to be smaller than 10{sup -3}. We present a measurement of this parameter using a partial reconstruction of one of the B mesons in the semileptonic channel D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where only the hard lepton and the soft pion from the D*{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} decay are reconstructed. The flavor of the other B is determined by means of lepton tagging. The determination of |q/p| is then performed with a fit to the proper time difference of the two B decays. We use a luminosity of 200.8 fb{sup -1}, collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetrical-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, in the period 1999-2004. We obtain the preliminary result: |q/p| - 1 = (6.5 {+-} 3.4(stat.) {+-} 2.0(syst.)) {center_dot} 10{sup -3}.

Aubert, B.

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ���µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125���°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90���ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The

George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils  

SciTech Connect

This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ���µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125���°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90���ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The

George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cultivation of fast-growing hardwoods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intensive culture of hybrid poplar has received in-depth study as part of the Fast-Growing Hardwood Program. Research has concentrated on short-rotation intensive culture systems. Specific studies and operations included establishing and maintaining a nursery/cutting orchard, installing clone-site trials in central and southern New York State and initiating studies of no-till site preparation, nutrient utilization efficiency, wood quality and soil solution chemistry. The nursery/cutting orchard was used to provide material for various research plantings and as a genotype repository. Clone- site trials results showed that hybrid poplar growth potential was affected by clone type and was related to inherent soil-site conditions. No-till techniques were shown to be successful in establishing hybrid poplar in terms of survival and growth when compared to conventional clean tillage and/or no competition control, and can be considered for use on sites that are particularly prone to erosion. Nutrient use efficiency was significantly affected by clone type, and should be a consideration when selecting clones for operational planting if fertilization is to be effectively and efficiently used. Wood quality differed among clones with site condition and tree age inferred as important factors. Soil solution chemistry was minimally affected by intensive cultural practices with no measured adverse effect on soil water quality. Generally, results of these studies showed that appropriate hybrid poplar clones grown in short-rotation intensively cultured systems can be used successfully in New York State if proper site conditions exist and appropriate establishment and maintenance techniques are used. 37 refs., 4 figs., 22 tabs.

White, E.H.; Abrahamson, L.P. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy Use In American Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dale Pfeiffer (2006, 29) opens the fifth chapter of his book Eating Fossil Fuels with the statement, “Current civilization is founded upon an abundance of cheap energy derived from hydrocarbons.” He presents the natural extension of that premise to food production in the opening of his sixth chapter, “Modern industrial agriculture is unsustainable. It has been pushed to the limit and is in

Michael Minn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

10/1/2010 1 Biotech Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for new materials and energy sources Develop Crops as production vehicles for medicines and vaccines) ­2000 American Society of Microbiology ­2000 American Medical Association ­2001 US National Research"... states Joel Cohen and colleagues in a brief issued by the International Food Policy Research Institute

Hammock, Bruce D.

407

Satiating Effects of Rye Foods Hanna Isaksson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= 15 Increased satiety during 120 min (Hlebowicz et al., 2008b) Bread with 80% whole-grain wheat flour., 1998) Bread with 15% pearled barley flour (6 g df) Control: refined wheat bread (0.1 g df) Higher rye foods, compared with iso-caloric refined wheat bread, served as parts of breakfast meals in cross

408

Food Safety & Functionality Forum Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryFood Structure & Functionality Forum Division2013 Members116 Members as of July 1, 2013Acevedo, NuriaUniversity of GuelphAmes, IA, USAAdriaenssens, MarkBarry CallebautPennsauken, NJ, USAAimutis, WilliamCargill IncWayzata

409

ORGANICS: YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOOD SCRAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for yard trimmings and food scraps beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with these two organic material types in the following three

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Measurements of fast electron scaling generated by petawatt laser systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast electron energy spectra have been measured for a range of intensities between 10{sup 18} and 10{sup 21} W cm{sup -2} and for different target materials using electron spectrometers. Several experimental campaigns were conducted on petawatt laser facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and Osaka University, where the pulse duration was varied from 0.5 to 5 ps relevant to upcoming fast ignition integral experiments. The incident angle was also changed from normal incidence to 40 deg. in p-polarized. The results confirm a reduction from the ponderomotive potential energy on fast electrons at the higher intensities under the wide range of different irradiation conditions.

Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Habara, H.; Kodama, R.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Tanaka, Kazuo A. [Graduate School of Engineering and Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Lancaster, K. L.; Green, J. S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Scott, R. H. H.; Sherlock, M.; Norreys, Peter A. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Evans, R. G.; Haines, M. G. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Kar, S.; Zepf, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); King, J.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gillman Drive 0411, La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States); Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] (and others)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fast Heating of Cylindrically Imploded Plasmas by Petawatt Laser Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We produced cylindrically imploded plasmas, which have the same density-radius product of the imploded plasma {rho}R with the compressed core in the fast ignition experiment and demonstrated efficient fast heating of cylindrically imploded plasmas with an ultraintense laser light. The coupling efficiency from the laser to the imploded column was 14%-21%, implying strong collimation of energetic electrons over a distance of 300 {mu}m of the plasma. Particle-in-cell simulation shows confinement of the energetic electrons by self-generated magnetic and electrostatic fields excited along the imploded plasmas, and the efficient fast heating in the compressed region.

Nakamura, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Yabuuchi, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Sentoku, Y. [Nevada Terawatt Facility, Department of Physics, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Matsuoka, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Shiraga, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kondo, K.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5-Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Study of Higgs boson production and its b-b(bar) decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (m{sub H} = 115-140 GeV/c{sup 2}) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (p Pb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b{bar b} decay. Using equivalent Weizsacker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} p H Pb) and semielastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} X H Pb) processes at {radical}S{sub NN} = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} b{bar b} and misidentified {gamma}{gamma} {yields} q{bar q} events), we find that a Higgs boson with m{sub H} = 120 GeV/c{sup 2} could be observed in the b{bar b} channel with a 3{sigma}-significance integrating 300 pb{sup -1} with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t{bar t} cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

d' Enterria, David; /ICC, Barcelona U. /ICREA, Barcelona; Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; /Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT /SLAC

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

Homeward Bound: Food-Related Transportation Strategies in Low Income and Transit Dependent Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Ad Hoc Food Security ing Home the Broccoli: Innovativeor administrative home for food security planning, includingtheir goods home. broadly, food security approaches. The

Gottlieb, Robert; Fisher, Andrew; Dohan, Marc; O'Connor, Linda; Parks, Virginia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Food Nutrition Link--Level III Nutrition for the Health of It  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-H members in the level three food project learn about nutrients, foods of different cultures, and careers in the food industry.

Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Charles R.

1995-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

416

The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

Iyer, Neetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures Suitable for Food Economy Exhibitions. Apr. 1917.F. C. No. 17: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions forF. C. No. 44: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions as to

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

419

trans Fatty acid content of foods in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing evidence that dietary consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease has made TFA a hot topic among people, food industries, and government officials in China. trans Fatty acid content of foods in China

420

Business plan for the frozen food industry in Morocco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I develop a business plan for a frozen food company (Chiwate) that will operate in Morocco. Until very recently, the frozen food product-line in Morocco was very restricted. However, recent demographic and ...

Miri, Leila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A center for food, Kowloon City, Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern day living limits us from understanding and seeing where our food comes from and how it was planted, grown, and manufactured. As we become more and more conscious about our diets, our relationship to food is more ...

Chan, Kwan Yue, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Curbside eating : mobilizing food trucks to activate public space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 5 years, cities across the United States have seen the rise of a new form of street vending: the modern food truck. Nearly overnight, food trucks have become an expected and anticipated occurrence in many ...

Sheppard, Alison Marguerite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Buffers between grazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sheep and the edge of a food crop was adequate to preventgrazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety Thedomestic animals and the crop edge is adequate to minimize

Hoar, Bruce R; Atwill, Edward R; Carlton, Lesa; Celis, Jorge; Carabez, Jennifer; Nguyen, Tran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lesson 4 HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light To prepare foods lower in fat Heart Smart? True or False ______ 1. A cholesterol- free product is also fat-free. True or False

426

VENUS-F: A fast lead critical core for benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zero-power thermal neutron water-moderated facility VENUS at SCK-CEN has been extensively used for benchmarking in the past. In accordance with GEN-IV design tasks (fast reactor systems and accelerator driven systems), the VENUS facility was modified in 2007-2010 into the fast neutron facility VENUS-F with solid core components. This paper introduces the projects GUINEVERE and FREYA, which are being conducted at the VENUS-F facility, and it presents the measurement results obtained at the first critical core. Throughout the projects other fast lead benchmarks also will be investigated. The measurement results of the different configurations can all be used as fast neutron benchmarks. (authors)

Kochetkov, A.; Wagemans, J.; Vittiglio, G. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fast Fourier transform on a 3D FPGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast Fourier Transforms perform a vital role in many applications from astronomy to cellphones. The complexity of these algorithms results from the many computational steps, including multiplications, they require and, as ...

Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Relativistic electron beam transport for fast ignition relevant scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A crucial issue surrounding the feasibility of fast ignition, an alternative inertial confinement fusion scheme, is the ability to efficiently couple energy from an incident short-pulse laser to a high-density, pre-compressed ...

Cottrill, Larissa A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the… (more)

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Iterative solution of elliptic difference equations using fast direct methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, fast direct methods have been developed for the numerical solution of the Poisson equation on a rectangle. By taking advantage of the special block structure of the approximating discrete equation on a uniform rectangular mesh, these ...

Paul Concus

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Large-scale structure of the fast solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001), Connecting the Sun and the Solar Wind: Comparison of592: Solar Wind 11/SOHO 16, Connecting Sun and Heliosphere,scenario, the fast solar wind from the quiet Sun wind would

Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. Rifai; Jones, R. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Simulations reveal fast mode shocks in magnetic reconnection outflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic reconnection is commonly perceived to drive flow and particle acceleration in flares of solar, stellar, and astrophysical disk coronae but the relative roles of different acceleration mechanisms in a given reconnection environment are not well understood. While outflow fast mode shocks have been predicted analytically, we show for the first time via direct numerical simulations that such shocks do indeed occur in the outflows of fast reconnection when an obstacle is present. These shocks are distinct from the slow mode Petschek inflow shocks. If Fermi acceleration of electrons operates in the weak fast shocks, the associated compression ratios will induce a Fermi acceleration particle spectrum that is significantly steeper than strong fast shocks commonly studied, but consistent with the demands of solar flares. While this is not the only acceleration mechanism operating in a reconnection environment, it is plausibly a ubiquitous one.

Workman, Jared C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, Colorado 81501 (United States); Blackman, Eric G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ren, Chuang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s. We used a specialized area (NIF) that allows fast neutronequivalent neutron facility NIF as well as their Ge detectorfrom our ?rst 46 min run in NIF at MNRC to obtain trace

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF), is a risk-informed ...

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

An Advanced Fast Steering Mirror for optical communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe in this thesis the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of an Advanced Fast Steering Mirror (AFSM) for precision optical platforms. The AFSM consists of a mirror driven in two rotational axes by normal ...

Kluk, Daniel Joseph

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Acidity of biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the TAN method for measuring the acidity of biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil was evaluated. Suggestions for carrying out the analysis have been made. The TAN method by ASTM D664 or D3339 can be used for measuring the acidity of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and their hydrotreating products. The main difference between the methods is that ASTM D664 is specified for higher TAN values than ASTM D3339. Special focus should be placed on the interpretation of the TAN curves because they differ significantly from those of mineral oils. The curve for bio-oils is so gentle that the automatic detection may not observe the end point properly and derivatization should be used. The acidity of fast pyrolysis bio-oils is mainly derived (60-70%) from volatile acids. Other groups of compounds in fast pyrolysis bio-oils that influence acidity include phenolics, fatty and resin acids, and hydroxy acids.

Oasmaa, Anja; Elliott, Douglas C.; Korhonen, Jaana

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reactor physics design of supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) are among the GEN-IV designs proposed for future deployment. Driven by anticipated plant cost reduction, the use of supercritical CO? (S-CO?) as a Brayton cycle working fluid in a direct ...

Pope, Michael A. (Michael Alexander)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Production EVSE Fact Sheet: DC Fast Charger: Hasetec  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

38 x 69 x 21 Charge level DC Fast Charge Input voltage 480 VAC - 3 Phase Isolation Transformer 1 75 kVA Maximum input current 2 120 Amp Test Conditions Test date 10232012...

440

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Level Dosimeters used in the SLAC Photon andNeutron Fields”, SLAC-PUB-8517, 2002. [7] G. Gross, J.SLAC-PUB-11219 May2005 Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reactor protection system design alternatives for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, unprotected transients have been viewed as design basis events that can significantly challenge sodium-cooled fast reactors. The perceived potential consequences of a severe unprotected transient in a ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy Storage for DC Fast Chargers Development and Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-13-28684 Energy Storage for DC Fast Chargers Development and Demonstration of Operating Protocols for 20-kWh and 200-kWh Field Sites Russell Newnham a Sally (Xiaolei) Sun a...

444

Initial measurements of fast ion loss in KSTAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast ion loss detector (FILD) has been installed and tested in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). KSTAR FILD measures the energy and the pitch-angle of the escaping ions with the striking positions on the scintillator plane. Measurements of the fast ion loss have been performed for the neutral beam heated plasmas. Initial experimental results indicate the prompt losses from neutral beam are dominant and the effects of the resonant magnetic perturbation on the fast ion loss are investigated. In addition, further design change of the detector-head in order to avoid excessive heat load and to detect the fusion products or the fast ions having order of MeV of energy is also discussed.

Kim, Junghee; Yoon, S. W.; Kim, W. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Garcia-Munoz, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association IPP, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

A Model for Fast Analog Computation Based on Unreliable Synapses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate through theoretical analysis and computer simulations the consequences of unreliable synapses for fast analog computations in networks of spiking neurons, with analog variables encoded by the current firing activities of pools of spiking ...

Wolfgang Maass; Thomas Natschläger

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The effects of biomass pretreatments on the products of fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis thermochemically degrades lignocellulosic material into solid char, organic liquids, and gaseous products. Using fast pyrolysis to produce renewable liquid bio-oil to replace crude… (more)

Kasparbauer, Randall Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An alternative approach to accelerated PF curing can be accomplished with the addition amines or amides. The later functionality undergoes base catalyzed hydrolysis yielding the corresponding carboxyl ate and free amine which rapidly reacts with the phenolic methylol groups facilitating polymerization and curing of the PF resin (Pizzi, 1997).

Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research has barely begun. Handbook of Indian Foods andeffort was remarkable, and his Handbook should be a standard

Sutton, Mark Q

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Hexagonal-geometry fast-reactor nodal modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several nodal methods have been developed for simulating power distributions in thermal reactors, and have been tested for applicability to fast reactor problems. The testing was performed in rectangular geometry. Since fast reactor configurations typically use hexagonal assemblies, the most promising of the techniques tested was extended to hexagonal geometry and applied to a range of test cases. The approach selected was the generalized coarse mesh procedure (GCMDT) using different interpolation parameters in different zones.

Caro, E.; Becker, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to method and apparatus for polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for said beam, said medium being sufficiently thick to allow said beam to interact with said medium to produce collisional pumping whereby said particle beam becomes highly polarized.

Stearns, J.W.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Anderson, L.W.; Schlachter, A.S.; Ruby, L.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

FastFit (FFit) Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FastFit 3.0 is a substantial update of an EPRI software application that produces probabilistic market descriptions for analysts making decisions about energy portfolios. FastFit uses "Kahlman filtering" to analyze market history and current forward curves for the purpose of producing extended forward curves, volatility term structures, and correlation term structures. Description Energy market participants need forward curve, volatility, and correlation information to evaluate contract and physical asse...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

453

Enhancing and Testing Fast Fault Screening (FFS) Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this multi-year study is to develop a methodology for fast prediction of the most severe three-phase fault locations for transient stability studies and rank them in order of severity. The methodology is called Fast Fault Screening (FFS).  The key advantage of the FFS is the ability to quickly scan through thousands of potential fault locations from transient stability perspective and identify the most severe locations. In the previous efforts, FFS was developed for angular ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Task 5: TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of Task 5 of the Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI05-91OR22007 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir, and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measurement of the differential cross section d?/dt in elastic $p\\bar{p}$ scattering at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the elastic differential cross section $d\\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow p\\bar{p})/dt$ as a function of the four-momentum-transfer squared t. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\approx 31 nb^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector using dedicated Tevatron $p\\bar{p} $ Collider operating conditions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV and covers the range $0.26 <|t|< 1.2 GeV^2$. For $|t|<0.6 GeV^2$, d\\sigma/dt is described by an exponential function of the form $Ae^{-b|t|}$ with a slope parameter $ b = 16.86 \\pm 0.10(stat) \\pm 0.20(syst) GeV^{-2}$. A change in slope is observed at $|t| \\approx 0.6 GeV^2$, followed by a more gradual |t| dependence with increasing values of |t|.

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Aoki; A. Askew; S. Atkins; K. Augsten; C. Avila; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; A. Bean; M. Begalli; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; S. Bhatia; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdin; C. P. Buszello; E. Camacho-Pérez; W. Carvalho; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Caughron; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; E. Chapon; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Théry; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; A. Das; G. Davies; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; C. De Oliveira Martins; F. Déliot; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; C. Deterre; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; P. F. Ding; A. Dominguez; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; L. Feng; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. A. García-González; G. A. García-Guerra; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; T. Guillemin; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; I. Howley; Z. Hubacek; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; Y. Ilchenko; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; A. Jayasinghe; R. Jesik; K. Johns; E. Johnson; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. W. Jung; A. Juste; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; I. Kiselevich; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; S. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kur?a; V. A. Kuzmin; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; H. Li; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; H. Liu; Y. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; R. Lopes de Sa; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garcia; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; R. Madar; R. Magaña-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martínez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; L. Mendoza; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; F. Miconi; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; H. da Motta; M. Mulhearn; L. Mundim; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; V. Oguri; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; M. Padilla; A. Pal; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; Y. Peters; K. Petridis; G. Petrillo; P. Pétroff; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; M. -E. Pol; A. V. Popov; W. L. Prado da Silva; M. Prewitt; D. Price; N. Prokopenko; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; A. Ross; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Sajot; P. Salcido; A. Sánchez-Hernández; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. Santoro; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; S. Shaw; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Söldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; K. Soustruznik; J. Stark; D. A. Stoyanova; M. A. Strang; M. Strauss; L. Stutte; L. Suter; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; Y. -T. Tsai; K. Tschann-Grimm; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; L. Uvarov; S. Uvarov; S. Uzunyan; R. Van Kooten; W. M. van Leeuwen; N. Varelas; E. W. Varnes; I. A. Vasilyev; P. Verdier; A. Y. Verkheev; L. S. Vertogradov; M. Verzocchi; M. Vesterinen; D. Vilanova; P. Vokac; H. D. Wahl; M. H. L. S. Wang; J. Warchol

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

Part 70 License NRC Docket No. 70-07018 Subject: References: SUPPLEMENT TO APPLICATION FOR A SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LICENSE FOR WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT UNIT 2 IN ACCORDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TAC NO. ME0853)" As part of TVA's application for a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) License for Watts Bar Unit 2

Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant; Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Fast Test to Diagnose Flu  

SciTech Connect

People with flu-like symptoms who seek treatment at a medical clinic or hospital often must wait several hours before being examined, possibly exposing many people to an infectious virus. If a patient appears to need more than the routine fluids-and-rest prescription, effective diagnosis requires tests that must be sent to a laboratory. Hours or days may pass before results are available to the doctor, who in the meantime must make an educated guess about the patient's illness. The lengthy diagnostic process places a heavy burden on medical laboratories and can result in improper use of antibiotics or a costly hospital stay. A faster testing method may soon be available. An assay developed by a team of Livermore scientists can diagnose influenza and other respiratory viruses in about two hours once a sample has been taken. Unlike other systems that operate this quickly, the new device, called FluIDx (and pronounced ''fluidics''), can differentiate five types of respiratory viruses, including influenza. FluIDx can analyze samples at the point of patient care--in hospital emergency departments and clinics--allowing medical providers to quickly determine how best to treat a patient, saving time and potentially thousands of dollars per patient. The FluIDx project, which is led by Livermore chemist Mary McBride of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. To test the system and make it as useful as possible, the team worked closely with the Emergency Department staff at the University of California (UC) at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. Flu kills more than 35,000 people every year in the US. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome and the ongoing concern about a possible bird flu pandemic show the need for a fast, reliable test that can differentiate seasonal flu from a potentially pandemic influenza. Such a test should also discriminate influenza from pathogens that cause illnesses with flu-like symptoms. When a precise diagnosis is required to treat an adult patient with serious respiratory symptoms, sample cells are usually obtained with a nasal or throat swab and analyzed with one of several laboratory methods. The gold standard test is viral culturing, a highly sensitive method that can identify the specific strain of virus. However, viral culturing is a labor-intensive process and requires 3-10 days to produce results, too long for early intervention. Enzyme and optical immunoassays offer results in 30 minutes, but these methods are less sensitive than viral culturing so they can produce false positives or negatives. They also cannot distinguish the type of virus found. Direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA) staining is as sensitive as viral culturing. It also can detect multiple respiratory pathogens simultaneously by a process known as multiplexing. However, DFA staining requires expensive equipment, a skilled microscopist, and samples with enough target cells for testing. In addition, the results are ultimately subjective. Another method, called reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay, offers sensitivity and specificity comparable to viral culturing and DFA staining. It also produces results in two hours and can rapidly test a large number of samples. The drawback with these tests, however, is that they must be performed in a laboratory. None of them can be used where they are needed most: in the clinic or emergency department where patients are being treated. Livermore's FluIDx diagnostic system, with its instrumentation and multiplexed assays, is designed specifically for point-of-care diagnosis. The fast, easy-to-use system is based on the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System, a homeland security technology developed by LLNL. This R&D 100 Award-winning technology constantly monitors the air to detect airborne bioterrorism agents, such as anthrax. FluIDx is an integrated system designed to p

Hazi, A U

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Charge exchange spectroscopy as a fast ion diagnostic on TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect

An upgraded charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic has been taken into operation at the TEXTOR tokamak. The angles of the viewing lines with the toroidal magnetic field are close to the pitch angles at birth of fast ions injected by one of the neutral beam injectors. Using another neutral beam for active spectroscopy, injected counter the direction in which fast ions injected by the first beam are circulating, we can simultaneously measure a fast ion tail on the blue wing of the D{sub {alpha}} spectrum while the beam emission spectrum is Doppler shifted to the red wing. An analysis combining the two parts of the spectrum offers possibilities to improve the accuracy of the absolute (fast) ion density profiles. Fast beam modulation or passive viewing lines cannot be used for background subtraction on this diagnostic setup and therefore the background has to be modeled and fitted to the data together with a spectral model for the slowing down feature. The analysis of the fast ion D{sub {alpha}} spectrum obtained with the new diagnostic is discussed.

Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Hellermann, M. G. von [FOM-Rijnhuizen, EURATOM-FOM, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nielsen, S. K. [Association EURATOM-Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Marchuk, O. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-FZJ, D-52424 Juelich (Germany)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high [beta] VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. (ANT-Nachrichtentechnik GmbH, Backnang (Germany))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high {beta} VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. [ANT-Nachrichtentechnik GmbH, Backnang (Germany)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bar fast food" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Food web complexity and chaotic population Gregor F. Fussmann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT Food web complexity and chaotic population dynamics Gregor F. Fussmann1 * and Gerd Heber2 1 their complexity increases. We determined the dynamical stability of a universe of mathematical, nonlinear food web, chaotic dynamics increases with the number of trophic levels in a food web but decreases with the degree

Fussman, Gregor