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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lapping slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina work pieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid. 1 fig.

Simandl, R.F.; Upchurch, V.S.; Leitten, M.E.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

Lapping slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina workpieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Upchurch, Victor S. (Powell, TN); Leitten, Michael E. (Frederick, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Aqueous coal slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aqueous slurry containing coal and dextrin as a dispersant. The slurry, in addition to containing dextrin, may contain a conventional dispersant or, alternatively, a pH controlling reagent.

Berggren, Mark H.; Smit, Francis J.; Swanson, Wilbur W.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Aqueous coal slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aqueous slurry containing coal and dextrin as a dispersant. The slurry, in addition to containing dextrin, may contain a conventional dispersant or, alternatively, a pH controlling reagent.

Berggren, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Smit, Francis J. (Arvada, CO); Swanson, Wilbur W. (Golden, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ultrasound Analysis of Slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N, gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

Soong, Yee and Blackwell, Arthur G.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ultrasound Analysis Of Slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N.sub.2 gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Blackwell, Arthur G. (Duquesne, PA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Dam Safety Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

8

Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

9

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

10

Dam Safety (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety,...

11

Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may be subject to periodic inspections. The...

12

Power Plant Dams (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

13

Dams – Fishways (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.

14

Dam Safety Program (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

15

Streamline coal slurry letdown valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Medical ice slurry production device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Comparative testing of slurry monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, M.S. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Van Essen, D.C. [Advanced Integrated Management Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water impoundments. The Dam Safety page of the State Water...

19

Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure....

20

Coal slurry fuel supply and purge system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal slurry fuel supply and purge system for a locomotive engines is disclosed which includes a slurry recirculation path, a stand-by path for circulating slurry during idle or states of the engine when slurry fuel in not required by the engine, and an engine header fluid path connected to the stand-by path, for supplying and purging slurry fuel to and from fuel injectors. A controller controls the actuation of valves to facilitate supply and purge of slurry to and from the fuel injectors. A method for supplying and purging coal slurry in a compression ignition engine is disclosed which includes controlling fluid flow devices and valves in a plurality of fluid paths to facilitate continuous slurry recirculation and supply and purge of or slurry based on the operating state of the engine.

McDowell, Robert E. (Fairview, PA); Basic, Steven L. (Hornell, NY); Smith, Russel M. (North East, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It regulates dam construction, operation, and...

22

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Dams (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork...

26

Regulation of Dams (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The...

27

Dam Safety (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from...

28

Dam Safety (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

29

Flood Protection and Dam Safety (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All dams in Virginia are subject to the Dam Safety Act and Dam Safety Regulations unless specifically excluded. A dam is excluded if it: (a) is less than six feet high; (b) has a maximum capacity...

30

Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to settle disputes regarding the construction and operation of dams on non-navigable waters. Dam construction or alteration is...

31

Coal-CO[subscript 2] Slurry Feed for Pressurized Gasifiers: Slurry Preparation System Characterization and Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification-based plants with coal-CO[subscript 2] slurry feed are predicted to be more efficient than those with coal-water slurry feed. This is particularly true for high moisture, low rank coal such as lignite. ...

Botero, Cristina

32

Cryogenic slurry for extinguishing underground fires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic slurry comprising a mixture of solid carbon dioxide particles suspended in liquid nitrogen is provided which is useful in extinguishing underground fires.

Chaiken, Robert F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kim, Ann G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kociban, Andrew M. (Wheeling, WV); Slivon, Jr., Joseph P. (Tarentum, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ICP analysis of water slurries of ashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct injection of solids-water slurries into the torch of an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer offers a rapid and easy method for the analysis of major and minor elements in various solids. In this project aqueous slurries of solids were prepared by milling with a stirred-ball slurry attritor mill and analyzed. Slurries of standard reference materials, prepared in the same manner, were used to calibrate the spectrometer. The best results were obtained with solids having a small particle size (2-5 {mu}m) and a close distribution of particle sizes. The average percent relative error for slurry-ICP analysis of most major and minor elements was generally less than 5% for the materials studied.

Riley, J.T.; Renfrow, M.B.; Riley, J.M. Jr.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli (kmc7r@virginia.edu) and Joanna Crowe Curran (curran@virginia.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli it downstream. At the same time, the lack of sediment supply downstream leads to channel and bank erosion of dam removal sequencing on sediment transport rates and downstream channel bathymetry. Vertical, Staged

Curran, Joanna C.

35

Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of dams and also establishes requirements to govern the...

36

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

Huub van Dam | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeteranstoHuub van Dam Recent Highlights

39

Huub van Dam | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmasSandy-Nor'easter Situation ReportsHuub van Dam Recent

40

Regulations and Permits Related to Dams (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vermont law requires a permit, or a dam order, for the construction, alteration, or removal of dams impounding more than 500,000 cubic feet of water, including any accumulated sediments. Dam...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

43

Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all...

44

Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may...

45

Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

Phatak, Ramkrishna G. (San Antonio, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

Phatak, R.G.

1984-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

48

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retirement of Dams and Hydroelectric Facilities. ASCE, Newon the Allier River, a hydroelectric plant in France. Thethe dam generating hydroelectric power versus the ecological

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

50

Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Georgia Safe Dams Act is to provide regulation, inspection and permitting of dams to the State. The Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD) is responsible for...

52

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control....

53

Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

54

Essays on banking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis consists of two chapters that investigate two important issues in banking of the past decade: the effect of banking consolidation on the borrowers and the regulatory capital requirements for banks. The first ...

Erel, Isil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government and (a) have a structural height of more than 6 feet and a maximum storage capacity of 50 acre–feet or more of water, (b)...

56

System for pressure letdown of abrasive slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for releasing erosive slurries from containment at high pressure without subjecting valves to highly erosive slurry flow. The system includes a pressure letdown tank disposed below the high-pressure tank, the two tanks being connected by a valved line communicating the gas phases and a line having a valve and choke for a transfer of liquid into the letdown tank. The letdown tank has a valved gas vent and a valved outlet line for release of liquid. In operation, the gas transfer line is opened to equalize pressure between tanks so that a low level of liquid flow occurs. The letdown tank is then vented, creating a high-pressure differential between the tanks. At this point, flow between tanks is controlled by the choke. High-velocity, erosive flow through a high-pressure outlet valve is prevented by equalizing the start up pressure and thereafter limiting flow with the choke.

Kasper, Stanley (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Pretreated Slurries; Issue Date: August 2010; Revision Date:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Material." This LAP is used to determine the fraction of insoluble solids (FIS) that is present in the pretreated slurry. It describes the detailed measurement of...

59

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July...

60

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pumping characteristics of chopped sorghum slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the mechanics of flow of substances, including solid-liquid mixtures, is called rheology. A solid does not mix homogeneously with a fluid, but retains its own shape and identity. The solid is simply transported by the fluid while conserving its own state...- head difference. Therefore, between any two points in a pumping 20 system where the energy is added only by the pump and the specific weight of the slurry does not change (for example, as a result of temperature), The Bernoulli equation...

Ou, Shichuan

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Multi-stage slurry system used for grinding and polishing materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A slurry system draws slurry from a slurry tank via one of several intake pipes, where each pipe has an intake opening at a different depth in the slurry. The slurry is returned to the slurry tank via a bypass pipe in order to continue the agitation of the slurry. The slurry is then diverted to a delivery pipe, which supplies slurry to a polisher. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is stopped in order for the slurry in the slurry tank to begin to settle. As the polishing continues, slurry is removed from shallower depths in order to pull finer grit from the slurry. When the polishing is complete, the flow in the delivery pipe is ceased. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is resumed to start agitating the slurry. In another embodiment, the multiple intake pipes are replaced by a single adjustable pipe. As the slurry is settling, the pipe is moved upward to remove the finer grit near the top of the slurry tank as the polishing process continues.

Hed, P. Paul (San Ramon, CA); Fuchs, Baruch A. (Aventura, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrasive slurry wear Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

polishing slurries containing abrasive... slurry serve as fine abrasives removing micro peaks from the wafer surface caused by earlier processing... -mail:...

64

Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.

65

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

Boyer, Edmond

66

Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

Rice, L.E. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.; Hughes, R.W. [Professional Services Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baggett, G. [Genex/Praxair, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

US Army Corps of Engineers

68

Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Supercritical Shallow Granular and Slurry Flows through a Contraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and outcrops: mixture of tephra and Rhine water, dam formation at nozzle near Andernach in Rhine Valley, lake, subcritical phenomena: F0

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

71

Hydraulic and slurry flows through a channel contraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic and slurry flows through a channel contraction Onno Bokhove o, Twente #12;Hydraulic flow through channel contraction Outline · 1. Introduction · 2. Experiments · 3. Conclusions · References ISSF 2008 University of Twente Page 2 #12;Hydraulic flow through channel contraction

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

72

Modeling the structure of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a model of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays and presents new experimental data for CWS viscosities. The model is based on the aerodynamic theory of spray atomization which has been successfully used for Diesel sprays. However...

Prithiviraj, Manikandan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

RHEOLOGICAL STUDY OF AN HYDRATE SLURRY FOR AIR CONDITIONNING APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These slurries seems to be well appropriate for cold storage and transportation in the case of air- conditioning as secondary refrigerants. Concerning hydrates, they have been used as PCM for cold storage for years

Boyer, Edmond

74

Civil Engineering Explore the environmental impact of dams.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dams Civil Engineering Objective · Explore the environmental impact of dams. · Discuss the need for dams, and how environmental engineers mitigate some impacts. Standards and Objectives · Earth Systems humans' standard of living and environmental impacts. · The basic concept of constructing a dam

Provancher, William

75

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

Nodd, Dennis G. (West Mifflin, PA); Walker, Richard J. (Bethel Park, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effects of mineral fillers in slurry seal mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rather than a desi~. The current practice among engineers and contractors is to prepare a mixture in ac- cordance with these specifications using local materials. In many cases a mineral filler, usually portland cement, is added to "improve... applied to portland cement concrete pavements to improve the skid resistance and riding qualities of tbe surface. A slurry seal cost does not increase or improve the strength of the pavement structure . The City of Las Vagas, New Mexico, used slurry...

Harper, William Joe

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply, flood control, hydropower, and recreation. However,as changes induced by hydropower, flood control, or waterFERC requires private hydropower dams to provide “equal

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Safe Dams Act of 1973 (SDA) gives the Commissioner of the Department of Environment and Conservation the power to issue certificates authorizing the construction, alteration, or operation of a...

79

Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to...

80

Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction over dams as indicated in the subsections of the law. This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a...

82

Providing protection: Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Providing protection Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams along with local partners, can apply for grant funds, he said. Construction of the dams began through four federal authorizations... totaling about $11 million. Of the 343 dams currently classified as high hazard, Scattered across Texas are almost 2,000 nondescript, earthen dams built on private land to protect property, roads, and bridges from flood damages. Some of these dams...

Wythe, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Iowa Energy Bank  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Iowa Energy Bank offers Iowa's public facilities, schools, area education agencies, colleges, universities, hospitals and local governments a 1% financing option for the implementation of cost...

85

Corporate governance and banking regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The globalisation of banking markets has raised important issues regarding corporate governance regulation for banking institutions. This research paper addresses some of the major issues of corporate governance as it relates to banking regulation...

Alexander, Kern

86

A bank management audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bogle Letbetter for their assistance in the preparation of this thesis. Special acknowledgement is also extended to the exec- utives of the Blank Eational Bank foz their time and. co- operation in deueloplnp answers to the questions contained..., ~ ~ ~ 49 X EXECUTIVE EVALUATION w ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 52 XI CCNCLUSION ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ BIBLIOGRAPHY ~ o APPENDIX ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ 6) LIST OP CHAHTS Chart I, Organisation Chart of the Bank Manage- ment...

Kennemer, Hoyt Granville

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Slurry blankets for D-T fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief overview of the blanket design problem is followed by a general model for fusion power plants based on tritium material balances. This model is used to determine the relationships between important design parameters including doubling time, plant tritium inventory, tritium breeding ratio, and tritium burn rate. A novel concept, the Poor Blanket is then described along with the results of neutron transport calculations that indicate that slurries of Li/sub 2/O particles in molten flibe (LiF-BeF/sub 2/) would provide adequate tritium breeding rates. A preliminary design study of a Pool Blanket is reported for a spheromak reactor in which a Li/sub 2/O slurry is both a breeder and the heat transfer medium. Laboratory experiments indicate that the tritium would exist primarily in the molten salt phase. The results of these studies indicate that the Pool Blanket with a slurry breeder would be an attractive choice for first generation fusion reactors. Calculations of the tritium breeding ratios for slurries of Li/sub 2/O in molten LiF-NaF (a salt that is less toxic than those that contain Be) indicate that such systems merit further investigation. A brief study of neutron multipliers for fusion reactor blankets indicates that Be is by far the best material in that respect. Finally, the results of some density and viscosity measurements for slurries of Li/sub 2/O in molten flibe are reported.

Kasturirangan, T.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidified pig slurry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: acidified pig slurry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Summary: AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario...

91

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral Intensity With 5% Coal (x ::: 86.9 cm) CalculatedPredictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMethanol as the Fuel B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel C.

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Their numbers were few and their total effect was relatively minor. In the 1880's dams for hydroelectric power. In the 1930's major hydroelectric dams were built on the mainstem Columbia River (Fig. I), initiating

93

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System for Conowingo Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System for Conowingo Dam Rayhan Ain, Kevin Cazenas, Sheri Gravette as enhanced erosion of sediment due to significantly increased flow rates and constant interaction of water with the Dam. During these events, the sediment build up at Conowingo Dam in the Lower Susquehanna River has

94

Chapter 13 Water Resources Hoover Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Water shortage linked to food supply Learning Objectives #12; The global water cycleChapter 13 Water Resources #12;Hoover Dam #12;The Colorado River Basin Population growth Urbanization Climate change #12; Water cycle Water use Surface water and groundwater processes Water

Pan, Feifei

95

Using Ultrasound to Characterize Pulp Slurries with Entrained Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of fast and practical methods for inspecting fiber suspensions is of great interest in the paper making industry. For process control and paper quality prediction, several elements of the refining process during paper making must be accurately monitored, including specific fiber properties, weight percent fiber (composition), degree of refining, amount of solids, and entrained air content. The results of previous ultrasonic studies applied to wood pulp provide guidance that ultrasound attenuation is information rich, and it does potentially provide a tool for consistency measurement. Ultrasound has the ability to penetrate dense suspensions such as wood pulp slurries. It is has been shown, in some studies, that ultrasound is sensitive to degree of refining. The effects of entrained air, additives, the origin and treatment of the fibers do however all influence the measured data. A series of measurements were made with hardwood and softwood slurries to evaluate the ability of measuring pulp consistency, solids, and entrained air. The attenuation through the slurry was measured as the ultrasound travels from one transducer through the slurry to the other. The measurements identified the presence of entrained air in the pulp samples. To better understand the effects of air, measurements were made at increasing pressures to show how increased pressure reduced the amount of air observed in the spectrum.

Bamberger, Judith A.

2006-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

CoalWater Slurry technology: problems and modeling solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

·· Coal­Water Slurry technology: problems and modeling solutions A. Fasano, E. De Angelis, A viscosity reaches extremely high values and the product becomes useless. Sedimentation Firenze - 29 october viscosity reaches extremely high values and the product becomes useless. Sedimentation: it's also a long

Rosso, Fabio

97

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effects of friction factor and slip factor on the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and concentration ratios for sand and glass bead slurries. Figures 16 and 17 show the calibration curves for the sand slurry and glass bead slurry respectively. 4. 3 Concentration Ratio Calculation The density of the slurry depends on the densities...+83 . 288E+83 FLSSATE (6PH) Figure 17. Calibration curve for elbowmeter for glass bead slurry. 43 by weight is given by equating Equations 4. 1 and 4. 2. Peng [19) has given it as: S s v w 1-C +S (4. 3) or C C s w (4. 4) Figure 18 shows...

Sheth, Ketankumar Kantilal

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL downstream were virtually undetectable. One year after dam removal, substrates of bars and riffles within 400 m downstream of the dam coarsened and a dominance of gravel and cobble sediments replaced previously

Tullos, Desiree

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Aerosols generated by spills of viscous solutions and slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop methods for estimating source terms from these accidents. Experiments were run by spilling viscous solutions and slurries to determine the mass and particle-size distribution of the material made airborne. In all cases, 1 L of solution was spilled from a height of 3 m. Aqueous solutions of sucrose (0 to 56%) gave a range of viscosities from 1.3 to 46 cp. The percent of spill mass made airborne from the spills of these solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0.0001. The mass of particles made airborne decreased as solution viscosity increased. Slurry loading ranged from 25 to 51% total solids. The maximum source airborne (0.0046 wt %) occurred with the slurry that had the lightest loading of soluble solids. The viscosity of the carrying solution also had an impact on the source term from spilling slurries. The effect of surface tension on the source term was examined in two experiments. Surface tension was halved in these spills by adding a surfactant. The maximum weight percent airborne from these spills was 0.0045, compared to 0.003 for spills with twice the surface tension. The aerodynamic mass medium diameters for the aerosols produced by spills of the viscous solutions, slurries, and low surface tension liquids ranged from 0.6 to 8.4 ..mu..m, and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.8 to 28.0.

Ballinger, M Y; Hodgson, W H

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Slurry atomizer for a coal-feeder and dryer used to provide coal at gasifier pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a coal-water slurry atomizer for use a high-pressure dryer employed in a pumping system utilized to feed coal into a pressurized coal gasifier. The slurry atomizer is provided with a venturi, constant area slurry injection conduit, and a plurality of tangentially disposed steam injection ports. Superheated steam is injected into the atomizer through these ports to provide a vortical flow of the steam, which, in turn, shears slurry emerging from the slurry injection conduit. The droplets of slurry are rapidly dispersed in the dryer through the venturi where the water is vaporized from the slurry by the steam prior to deleterious heating of the coal.

Loth, John L. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, William C. (Morgantown, WV); Friggens, Gary R. (Morgantown, WV)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Sustainable Energy Dam: research into possible improvement of dam/dike safety by application of sustainable energy on dams/dikes:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study on the use of the Afsluitdijk (or more generic, enclosure dams in general) for the generation of energy. Focus in this study in… (more)

Wondergem, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

RHEOLOGICAL AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSES OF SIMULANT SB5 SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR-MELTER FEED TANK SLURRIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will complete Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in fiscal year 2010. DWPF has experienced multiple feed stoppages for the SB5 Melter Feed Tank (MFT) due to clogs. Melter throughput is decreased not only due to the feed stoppage, but also because dilution of the feed by addition of prime water (about 60 gallons), which is required to restart the MFT pump. SB5 conditions are different from previous batches in one respect: pH of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product (9 for SB5 vs. 7 for SB4). Since a higher pH could cause gel formation, due in part to greater leaching from the glass frit into the supernate, SRNL studies were undertaken to check this hypothesis. The clogging issue is addressed by this simulant work, requested via a technical task request from DWPF. The experiments were conducted at Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) wherein a non-radioactive simulant consisting of SB5 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product simulant and frit was subjected to a 30 hour SME cycle at two different pH levels, 7.5 and 10; the boiling was completed over a period of six days. Rheology and supernate elemental composition measurements were conducted. The caustic run exhibited foaming once, after 30 minutes of boiling. It was expected that caustic boiling would exhibit a greater leaching rate, which could cause formation of sodium aluminosilicate and would allow gel formation to increase the thickness of the simulant. Xray Diffraction (XRD) measurements of the simulant did not detect crystalline sodium aluminosilicate, a possible gel formation species. Instead, it was observed that caustic conditions, but not necessarily boiling time, induced greater thickness, but lowered the leach rate. Leaching consists of the formation of metal hydroxides from the oxides, formation of boric acid from the boron oxide, and dissolution of SiO{sub 2}, the major frit component. It is likely that the observed precipitation of Mg(OH){sub 2} and Mn(OH){sub 2} caused the increase in yield stress. The low pH run exhibited as much as an order of magnitude greater B and Li (frit components) leachate concentrations in the supernate. At high pH a decrease of B leaching was found and this was attributed to adsorption onto Mg(OH){sub 2}. A second leaching experiment was performed without any sludge to deconvolute the leach rate behavior of Frit 418 from those of the SB5 sludge-Frit 418 system. At high pH, the sludgeless system demonstrated very fast leaching of all the frit components, primarily due to fast dissolution of the main component, silica, by hydroxide anion; various semiconductor studies have established this reactivity. Overall, the frit-water system exhibited greater leaching from a factor two to almost three orders of magnitude (varying by conditions and species). The slower leaching of the sludge system is possibly due to a greater ionic strength or smaller driving force. Another possible reason is a physical effect, coating of the frit particles with sludge; this would increase the mass transfer resistance to leaching. Based on this study, the cause of clogs in the melter feed loop is still unknown. A possible explanation is that the SME product, like the simulant, is too thin and could contribute to a loss of two-phase flow which could cause plugging of a restricted and poorly mixed zone like the melter feed loop. This is feasible since a previous study of a slurry showed an increase in resistance to flow at lower flow rates. Testing with a radioactive SME sample is underway and should help understand this potential mechanism.

Fernandez, A.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Coal slurry letdown valve-concept test phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the concept test phase of a novel pressure letdown device indicate usefulness of the concept. The device, using staged letdown, was designed to minimize erosion damage by minimizing slurry velocities through the pressure restrictions. Tests were performed on air, steam/water and a coal slurry with a flashing component. Two valve sizes were used. Based on the results of these tests, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) the basic operating principle of designing for a constant velocity through the orifice restrictions is correct; (2) multiphase pressure letdown can be modeled; (3) temperature profiles are predictable; and (4) erosion in three-phase flow is a complex phenomenon. Recommendations for further work on the device include: (1) development of a controllable device; (2) correlation of further test data; and (3) study of flow regimes where erosion is minimized. 9 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

Collins, E.R. Jr.; Suitor, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Freeforming of Ceramics and Composites from Colloidal Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the work completed for an LDRD project. The objective of the project was to develop a solid freeform fabrication technique for ceramics and composites from fine particle slurries. The work was successful and resulted in the demonstration of a manufacturing technique called robocasting. Some ceramic components may pow be fabricated without the use of molds or tooling by dispensing colloidal suspensions through an orifice and stacking two-dimensional layers into three-dimensional shapes. Any conceivable two-dimensional pattern may be ''written'' layer by layer into a three-dimensional shape. Development of the robocasting technique required the materials expertise for fabrication and theological control of very highly concentrated fine particle slurries, and development of robotics for process control and optimization. Several ceramic materials have been manufactured and characterized. Development of techniques for robocasting multiple materials simultaneously have also been developed to build parts with unique structures or graded compositions.

CESARANO III,JOSEPH; DENHAM,HUGH B.; STUECKER,JOHN N.; BAER,THOMAS A.; GRIFFITH,MICHELLE L.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Assicurativo | Bancario | Finanziario DEUTSCHE BANK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assicurativo | Bancario | Finanziario DEUTSCHE BANK CHI SIAMO Deutsche Bank, fondata nel 1870 clientela di standing elevato e crea valore con le sue attività per gli azionisti e il personale. Deutsche Finanza & Futuro Banca. Deutsche Bank è inoltre presente sul mercato italiano con le attività di

Schettini, Raimondo

110

Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Robben, F.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal.

Robben, Franklin A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling the costs and benefits of dam construction from a multidisciplinary perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, energy, and environmental protection well into the future, a broader view of dams is needed. We thus and to articulate priorities associated with a dam project, making the decision process about dams more informed dams, the next generation may witness a renewed intensity in large dam development in the U.S. More

Tullos, Desiree

114

Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or Dikes Generally; ExemptionsLegal Abstract Section...

115

EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA's proposed action was to fund the project. PUBLIC COMMENT...

116

Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP – Passivation Kinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribochemical Mechanisms of Copper Chemical MechanicalE06-02 Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP – PassivationKinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents Shantanu

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, F M; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic soil slurry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aberystwyth Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Summary: scenarios. In fact, anaerobic digestion of animal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix DOE-STD-3009-2014ofOutline of RemarksType text] Dams and

122

Milner Dam Wind Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources JumpMicrelBirds JumpMilner Dam Wind Park Jump to:

123

McNary Dam hits the rewind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMissionreal-timeMaRIEMcNary-Dam-hits-the-rewind Sign In About |

124

Potential Geomorphic and Ecological Impacts of Marmot Dam Removal, Sandy River, OR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marmot Dam is a 13-meter (42 ft) high hydroelectric diversion dam on the Sandy River that is owned Run Hydroelectric project and began the process of creating a decommissioning plan for the dam

125

The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framework for Interpreting Downstream Effects of Dams onF. and N. Shin, 2001. The downstream effects of dams on theG.P. and M.G. Wolman, 1984. Downstream Effects of Dams on

Minear, Justin Toby

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The distribution of dams in Costa Rica and their hydrologic impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dam construction has increased exponentially over the past century, primarily in temperate environments. While the impacts of dams in temperate regions have been well-documented, a parallel level of research on dam impacts has not been achieved...

Laurencio, Laura Richards

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

128

The effects of culture on banking strategy : a study of three banks in three countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every company pursues a different strategy, and banks are no different. In the banking industry, each bank performs its business based on its own business strategies. Japanese banks have different strategies, but in terms ...

Kuroiwa, Seiichi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report was prepared by Argonne Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (Western. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams equipped for power

Kemner, Ken

130

GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geosynthetic liners for dams involves heads much larger than those in environmental applications. Accordingly. Geosynthetics have been used in a large number of geotechnical, transportation, environmental and hydraulic and industrial use. As dams age, deterioration and structural damage are of major concern as they can lead

Zornberg, Jorge G.

131

Processes affecting the spatial and temporal variability of methane in a temperate dammed river system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas emissions from a hydroelectric reservoir (Brazil’sgas emissions from hydroelectric dams: controversies provideP. M. , 2005a. Do hydroelectric dams mitigate global

Bilsley, Nicole A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Kevin Banks | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

friction and wear on machines using engine oils. "What I liked most about my internship experience was really, everything," said Banks. "It gave me a very diverse and...

133

Kenyan Shilling KES Stanbic Bank, Nairobi Namibian Dollar NAD Standard Bank Namibia, Ltd, Windhoek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chartered Bank, Tokyo Singapore Dollar SGD The Bank of New York Mellon Thai Bhat THB HSBC Bank, Bangkok Australian Dollar AUD HSBC Bank, Sydney Fiji Dollar FJD Westpac Banking Corporation, Suva New Zealand Dollar, Port Vila British Pound GBP HSBC Bank PLC, London Czech Republic Koruna CZK Ceskoslovenska Obchodni

Qian, Ning

134

Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Wittmer, Dale E. (Carbondale, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

Tiegs, T.N.; Wittmer, D.E.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity, reduction of slurry viscosity, and corrosion inhibition. INTRODUCTION Water often forms gas hydrates antiagglomeration (AA) in the natural gas hydrate literature. The main limitation to application has been the need

Firoozabadi, Abbas

137

Analysis of the tube-sheet cracking in slurry oil steam , L.J. Qiao a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the tube-sheet cracking in slurry oil steam generators L.K. Zhu a , L.J. Qiao a, , X and increased costs. In this study, the mechanisms of the tube- sheet cracking in slurry oil steam generators steam generator is a kind of shell and tube heat exchanger extensively used in the oil refinement

Volinsky, Alex A.

138

US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and value judgements. ICOLD (2005) ABSTRACT Risk assessment provides an opportunity to manage dam safety for the tolerability of risk developed by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is summarized. The important role and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah State University, Logan

Bowles, David S.

139

Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

140

KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the first year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sup 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we have completed one STSR test with precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany). This catalyst was initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. The catalyst was tested at 13 different sets of process conditions, and had experienced a moderate deactivation during the first 500 h of testing (decrease in conversion from 56% to 50% at baseline process conditions). The second STSR test has been initiated and after 270 h on stream, the catalyst was tested at 6 different sets of process conditions.

Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Lech Nowicki; Jiang Wang; Wen-Ping Ma

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the second year of the project we completed the STSR test SB-26203 (275-343 h on stream), which was initiated during the first year of the project, and another STSR test (SB-28603 lasting 341 h). Since the inception of the project we completed 3 STSR tests, and evaluated catalyst under 25 different sets of process conditions. A precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany) was used in all tests. This catalyst was used initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. Also, during the second year we performed a qualitative analysis of experimental data from all three STSR tests. Effects of process conditions (reaction temperature, pressure, feed composition and gas space velocity) on water-gas-shift (WGS) activity and hydrocarbon product distribution have been determined.

Dragomir B. Bukur

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by slurring them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation.

White, Curt M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Quiring, Michael S. (Katy, TX); Jensen, Karen L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hickey, Richard F. (Bethel Park, PA); Gillham, Larry D. (Bartlesville, OK)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst-free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by mixing them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation. 2 figs.

White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Distribution and Flux of Fish in the Forebay of The Dalles Dam in 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spring and summer 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led a team that conducted mobile and fixed hydroacoustic surveys in the forebay of The Dalles Dam for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District, for the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program. The surveys provided information on the distribution and movement of smolt-sized fish relative to ambient factors such as flow, bathymetry, or diel cycle in the forebay at The Dalles Dam. This information is intended to provide baseline data for the development of a surface bypass alternative for juvenile salmon at The Dalles Dam. We sampled the forebay of The Dallas Dam one day and night each week for six weeks in the spring and another six weeks in the summer. In general, during the day in the spring, the greatest densities of smolt-sized fish were observed in the thalweg of the main channel from the Washington bank, to the east side of the powerhouse, along the powerhouse, and concentrated in the areas next to the sluiceway. Fish density was lower on the Washington side of the river and west of mid-powerhouse (north spillway side). The spring night distribution was similar, with a few notable differences. The density of fish was high on the east side of the powerhouse and along the face of the powerhouse, and more fish were detected on the north spillway side. The distribution of sub-yearling sized fish in summer followed the same general patterns as spring, except that summer fish had a greater presence on the east side of the powerhouse and on the north spillway side. The vertical distribution of fish was also determined. In spring 80% of fish were above 5.6 m of depth during the day and above 4.7 m in the night. The summer fish were similarly distributed in the day and night with 80% of the fish in the upper 4.5 m and 4.7 m of the water column respectively. In general the smolt-sized fish were distributed deeper in the water column in the center of the channel than near the edges. The net movement of smolt-sized fish in the forebay from fixed-point samples appeared to be in a circular pattern, with fish moving with the flow and channel upstream of the powerhouse, and upstream at points near the powerhouse. The rate of fish movement (flux) was greatest at the east end of the powerhouse and on the upstream-north side of the channel.

Faber, Derrek M.; Hanks, Michael E.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Skalski, John R.; Dillingham, Peter W.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

South Carolina Conservation Bank Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The South Carolina Conservation Bank Act establishes a state funding source to acquire property interests for environmental preservation purposes. The Bank's activity draws heavily on the earlier...

146

Regulation of Foreign Banks in Russia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this paper, the issues of foreign investment in Russian banking sector are addressed. The study aims to shed light on foreign banks challenges in… (more)

Trofimov, Kirill

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal LIquefaction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the fourth six month period of this three year grant under the University Coal Research program. During this period, we have begun the synthesis of precipitated catalysts using a bench-top spray dryer. The influence of binders on particle strength was also studied using the ultrasonic fragmentation approach to derive particle breaking stress. A similar approach was used to derive particle strength of catalysts obtained from Mr. Robert Gormley at FETC. Over the next six month period, this work will be continued while the catalysts prepared here will be examined by TPR to determine reducibility and the extent of adverse iron-silica interactions. A fundamental study of Fe/silica interactions has been performed using temperature programmed reaction and TEM to provide understanding of how the silica binders influence the activity of Fe catalysts. To understand differences in the reducibility of the iron phase caused by silica, we have set up a temperature programmed reduction facility. TPR in H, as well as in CO was performed of Fe/ SiO, catalysts prepared by impregnation as well as by precipitation. What is unique about these studies is that high resolution TEM was performed on samples removed from the reactor at various stages of reduction. This helps provide direct evidence for the phase changes that are detected by TPR. We have continued the analysis of catalysts received from slurry reactor runs at Texas A&M university (TAMU) and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) by x-ray diffraction. The purpose of the XRD analysis was to determine the phase composition of catalysts derived from a slurry reaction run using Fe Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. We had previously described how catalyst removed in the hot wax may oxidize to magnetite if the wax is air-exposed. We have now received catalysts from CAER that were removed under a protective inert blanket, and we are in the process of analyzing them, but preliminary work presented here shows very little oxide by XRD. However, the catalyst that was used in these runs at CAER was a different composition than that used in previous runs, so the protective effect of an inert blanket will need further study. Finally, we point out how the interference by the wax can make it difficult in some cases to analyze the phases in a Fe catalyst. Several approaches have been used to remove the interference from the wax and we come to the surprising conclusion that Fe may be present in a working slurry reactor despite the high CO/ H{sub 2} ratio. Further work is underway to corroborate this finding.

Datye, A.K.

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Experimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a fluid hits the dam (fluid impact load). The former tends to cause partial break of the concrete damExperimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1 lwao Miyoshi2 ABSTRACT When a dam is struck by mud or debris flow, it is put under a great impact load and sometimes is destroyed. To prevent

Standiford, Richard B.

150

TSSGNEO suggestions for refinement of safety criteria for dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of radial-displacements of the dam, measured by direct and inverted plumb lines, indicates that curves of the variation in radial displacements of the dam at different elevations make it possible to plot diagrams of increases in the radial displacement over the entire height of the dam, i.e., inclines of the axis of the dam to the vertical.

Savich, A. I.; Gaziev, E. G. [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)] [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall downstream from the dam and in an upstream control reach using aerial photos (1994­2008) and in the field

Tullos, Desiree

152

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors. The past three months of research have been focused on two major areas of bubble column hydrodynamics: (1) pressure and temperature effects on gas holdup and (2) region transition using a sparger as a gas distributor.

Bernard A. Toseland, Ph.D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method of burning lightly loaded coal-water slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a preferred arrangement of the method of the invention, a lightly loaded coal-water slurry, containing in the range of approximately 40% to 52% + 2% by weight coal, is atomized to strip water from coal particles in the mixture. Primary combustor air is forced around the atomized spray in a combustion chamber of a combustor to swirl the air in a helical path through the combustion chamber. A flame is established within the combustion chamber to ignite the stripped coal particles, and flame temperature regulating means are provided for maintaining the flame temperature within a desired predetermined range of temperatures that is effective to produce dry, essentially slag-free ash from the combustion process.

Krishna, C.R.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

Toseland, B.A.

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column rector to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

Bernard A. Toseland

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Deutsche Bank Deutsche Bank S.p.A. la consociata italiana di Deutsche Bank AG che, con oltre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deutsche Bank Deutsche Bank S.p.A. è la consociata italiana di Deutsche Bank AG che, con oltre 100.000 collaboratori in più di 72 Paesi nel mondo, vanta più di 24 milioni di clienti. Deutsche Bank ricerca brillanti

Robbiano, Lorenzo

157

Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large-diameter reactors. Washington University's work during the reporting period involved the implementation of the automated calibration device, which will provide an advanced method of determining liquid and slurry velocities at high pressures. This new calibration device is intended to replace the original calibration setup, which depended on fishing lines and hooks to position the radioactive particle. The report submitted by Washington University contains a complete description of the new calibration device and its operation. Improvements to the calibration program are also discussed. Iowa State University utilized air-water bubble column simulations in an effort to determine the domain size needed to represent all of the flow scales in a gas-liquid column at a high superficial velocity. Ohio State's report summarizes conclusions drawn from the completion of gas injection phenomena studies, specifically with respect to the characteristics of bubbling-jetting at submerged single orifices in liquid-solid suspensions.

Bernard A. Toseland

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

CARL J. BAUER* Dams and Markets: Rivers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a variety of new thermal power plants.3 The proposed dams in Patagonia have gotten the headlines and caused the most public conflict, both within Chile and internationally.4 Patagonia is the rugged and remote region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for...

162

Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to dams and bridges on or near navigable waters. This statute establishes that the Department of Natural Resources has...

163

Power benefits of the lower Snake River dams - FACT SHEET  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dams to have been built in the Federal Columbia River Power System. The FCRPS is the largest source of electricity in the Pacifi c Northwest and the largest source of renewable...

164

Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications for the Age and Evolution of the Valles Caldera Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

165

Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Introduction Operations Management of Blood Banking Systems Blood Banking Systems Network Design Supply Chain Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Operations Management of Blood Banking Systems Blood Banking Systems Network Design Supply Chain Network Operations Management and Design of A Sustainable Blood Banking System Amir Masoumi of Massachusetts Amherst #12;Introduction Operations Management of Blood Banking Systems Blood Banking Systems

Nagurney, Anna

167

Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, Michael H. (Fairmont, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal Performance of Microencapsulated Phase Material (MPCM) Slurry in a Coaxial Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries and coil heat exchangers had been recently studied separately as enhancers of convective heat transfer processes. Due to the larger apparent heat related to the phase change process...

Yu, Kun

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a...

Gaskill, Travis

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

Pendse, H.P.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement...

Ko, Sae Bom

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Minority Banks | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor ShadeProjectMinority Banks Minority Banks

174

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

The role of microorganisms in the production of volatile sulfhydryl compounds in cheddar cheese slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the role of lac- tic cultures on the production of volatile sulfhydryl com- pounds in the slurries. Hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide were found in the headspace of slurries prepared from curd manufactured.... (39) stated that although the role of hydrogen sulfide in the production of Cheddar flavor is uncertain, its influence should not be discounted. They suggested that dimethyl sulfide does not contribute directly to flavor. Aston and Douglas (1...

Ponce-Trevino, Raul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Thorium oxide slurries as blankets in fissile producing fusion- fission hybrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the blanket as related to the energy of the incident fusion neutrons. CALCULATIONAL MODEL The MARS computer code package from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 11 was used to determine... the aqueous homogeneous power reactor program at ORNL was begun. Significant progress was made in studies of uranium oxide (UO ) and its slurries, and in the development of equipment for circulating slurries at concentrations of several hundred grams per...

Geer, Thomas Charles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Supercritical CO2 extraction of organic compounds from soil-water slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERCRITICAL COi EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering SUPERCRITICAL COz FXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL-WATER SLURRIES A Thesis by BRIAN DEAN CARTER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Carter, Brian Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. Van der Laan and Beenackers hydrocarbon selectivity model provides a very good fit of the experimental data for hydrocarbons up to about C{sub 20}. However, the experimental data shows higher paraffin formation rates in C{sub 12}-C{sub 25} region which is likely due to hydrocracking or other secondary reactions. The model accurately captures the observed experimental trends of decreasing olefin to paraffin ratio and increasing {alpha} (chain growth length) with increase in chain length.

Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYSTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the third year of this research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we utilized experimental data from the STSR, that were obtained during the first two years of the project, to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations and estimate kinetic parameters. We used a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) with estimated values of binary interaction coefficients for the VLE calculations. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Occasional discrepancies (for some of the experimental data) between calculated and experimental values of the liquid phase composition were ascribed to experimental errors. The VLE calculations show that the vapor and the liquid are in thermodynamic equilibrium under reaction conditions. Also, we have successfully applied the Levenberg-Marquardt method (Marquardt, 1963) to estimate parameters of a kinetic model proposed earlier by Lox and Froment (1993b) for FTS on an iron catalyst. This kinetic model is well suited for initial studies where the main goal is to learn techniques for parameter estimation and statistical analysis of estimated values of model parameters. It predicts that the chain growth parameter ({alpha}) and olefin to paraffin ratio are independent of carbon number, whereas our experimental data show that they vary with the carbon number. Predicted molar flow rates of inorganic species, n-paraffins and total olefins were generally not in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values. In the future we'll use kinetic models based on non-constant value of {alpha}.

Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a collaborative effort between the University of Akron, Illinois Institute of Technology and two industries: UOP and Energy International. The tasks involve the development of transient two and three dimensional computer codes for slurry bubble column reactors, optimization, comparison to data, and measurement of input parameters, such as the viscosity and restitution coefficients. To understand turbulence, measurements were done in the riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. This report summarizes the measurements and simulations completed as described in details in the attached paper, ''Computational and Experimental Modeling of Three-Phase Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor.'' The Particle Image Velocimetry method described elsewhere (Gidaspow and Huilin, 1996) was used to measure the axial and tangential velocities of the particles. This method was modified with the use of a rotating colored transparent disk. The velocity distributions obtained with this method shows that the distribution is close to Maxwellian. From the velocity measurements the normal and the shear stresses were computed. Also with the use of the CCD camera a technique was developed to measure the solids volume fraction. The granular temperature profile follows the solids volume fraction profile. As predicted by theory, the granular temperature is highest at the center of the tube. The normal stress in the direction of the flow is approximately 10 times larger than that in the tangential direction. The <{nu}{prime}{sub z}{nu}{prime}{sub z}> is lower at the center where the <{nu}{prime}{sub {theta}}{nu}{prime}{sub {theta}}> is higher at that point. The Reynolds shear stress was small, producing a restitution coefficient near unity. The normal Reynolds stress in the direction of flow is large due to the fact that it is produced by the large gradient of velocity in the direction of flow compared to the small gradient in the {theta} and r directions. The kinetic theory gives values of viscosity that agree with our previous measurements (Gidaspow, Wu and Mostofi, 1999). The values of viscosity obtained from pressure drop minus weight of bed measurements agree at the center of the tube.

Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Rules governing the classification of coal slurries for filtering centrifuges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using filtering centrifuges for the cleaning of a coking-coal slurry is confirmed in principle, and regime operating parameters which ensure the production of a concentrate of conditioned quality are determined on the basis of results of experimental-industrial tests of a new procedure for this operation at the Neryungrinskaya Concentrating Mill. An equation is proposed for determination of solid carry-off in the centrifuge effluent, which completely satisfactorily (with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.8) describes the dependence of the parameter in question on the solid content in the centrifuge feed, and on its content of -0.2-mm material. It is noted that special investigations to determine the effect of the speed of the rotor and shape of the particles on the amount of solid carry-off in the centrifuge effluent are required for construction of a model describing the size reduction of solid-phase particles in the effluent during centrifuge filtration.

G.Y. Gol'berg; Y.B. Rubinshtein; S.A. Osadchii [Institute for Enrichment of Solid Fuel (IOTT), Moscow Oblast (Russian Federation)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Coal slurry combustion optimization on single cylinder engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, GE Transportation System has been conducting a proof of concept program to use coal water slurry (CWS) fuel to power a diesel engine locomotive since 1988. As reported earlier [1], a high pressure electronically controlled accumulator injector using a diamond compact insert nozzle was developed for this project. The improved reliability and durability of this new FIE allowed for an improved and more thorough study of combustion of CWS fuel in a diesel engine. It was decided to include a diesel pilot fuel injector in the combustion system mainly due to engine start and low load operation needs. BKM, Inc. of San Diego, CA was contracted to develop the electronic diesel fuel pilot/starting FIE for the research engine. As a result, the experimental combustion study was very much facilitated due to the ability of changing pilot/CWS injection timings and quantities without having to stop the engine. Other parameters studied included combustion chamber configuration (by changing CWS fuel injector nozzle hole number/shape/angle), as well as injection pressure. The initial phase of this combustion study is now complete. The results have been adopted into the design of a 12 cylinder engine FIE, to be tested in 1992. This paper summarizes the main findings of this study.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

In-line ultrasonic monitoring of waste slurry suspended solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the transport of tank waste, it is very important to quantitatively measure the percent solids concentration (PSC) of the waste, which indicates the flow conditions and the extent of solids settling. At Argonne National Laboratory, an in-line, real-time, a nonintrusive ultrasonic monitoring system has been developed to measure the PSC and flow density of tank waste by measuring sound velocity and attenuation in the flow. This system consists of a pair of longitudinal transducers bonded to waveguides on the opposite sides of the pipe and operating at IMHz simultaneously in pulse-and-echo and pitch-and-catch modes. The PSC measurement is provided by attenuation, while the density measurement is calculated by impedance and sound velocity. A thermocouple is attached to one of the waveguides for automatic temperature correction of the measurements. This system was one of four evaluated for in-line measurement of slurry at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1998. The results indicate that the measurements are in good agreement with a Coriolis meter and that the system can be used to monitor PSC up to 40 wt.%. However, the system is greatly affected by entrained air bubbles within the solid flow during Puisair mixing. A different mixing mechanism will solve this problem.

Chien, H.-T.; Sheen, S.-H.; Raptis, A. C.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

The influence of Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp. and Pediococcus spp. on production of volatile sulfhydryl compounds in Cheddar cheese slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There was a decrease in production of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and dimethyl sulfide in slurries prepared from Cheddar cheese manufactured from pasteurized milk when compared to slurries prepared from Cheddar cheese manufactured from raw milk.... . 3. Standard curve for carbonyl sulfide. . 4. Standard curve for methanethiol. 32 33 34 5. Standard curve for dimethyl sulfide. . 35 6. Hydrogen sulfide production in Cheddar cheese slurries. . . . . . . . . . 37 7. ~~~ill spp. growth...

Dagerath, Michael Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fluid dynamic studies for a simulated Melton Valley Storage Tank slurry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), are used for the collection and storage of remote-handled radioactive liquid wastes. These wastes, which were typically acidic when generated, were neutralized with the addition of sodium hydroxide to protect the storage tanks from corrosion, but this caused the transuranic and heavy metals to precipitate. These wastes will eventually need to be removed from the tanks for ultimate disposal. The objective of the research activities discussed in this report is to support the design of a pipeline transport system between the MVSTs and a treatment facility. Since the wastes in the MVSTs are highly radioactive, a surrogate slurry was developed for this study. Rheological properties of the simulated slurry were determined in a test loop in which the slurry was circulated through three pipeline viscometers of different diameters. Pressure drop data at varying flow rates were used to obtain shear stress and shear rate data. The data were analyzed, and the slurry rheological properties were analyzed by the Power Law model and the Bingham plastic model. The plastic viscosity and yield stress data obtained from the rheological tests were used as inputs for a piping design software package, and the pressure drops predicted by the software compared well with the pressure drop data obtained from the test loop. The minimum transport velocity was determine for the slurry by adding known nominal sizes of glass spheres to the slurry. However, it was shown that the surrogate slurry exhibited hindered settling, which may substantially decrease the minimum transport velocity. Therefore, it may be desired to perform additional tests with a surrogate with a lower concentration of suspended solids to determine the minimum transport velocity.

Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch dams Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

infectious secretions from both the vagina and anus, the dental dam is a popular safer sex tool. Dental dams... now come in different colors, scents, sizes and even flavors How...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis model dam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water from Yongdam Dam. The advantages of a model such as the one... , irrigation, hydropower, and recreation. Two major dams are ... Source: Kim, Young-Oh - Department of Civil...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch dams including Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

part of the East Branch Dam Safety Initiative in Elk County, Pa. The site development work went to Tab... seepage-related dam safety concerns at East Branch Clarion River Lake in...

191

Information externality, bank structure, and growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation addresses the question of whether a monopolistic banking system can lead to a higher steady state level of capital stock. Specifically, this research analyzes the comparative advantage of a monopoly banking system. By doing that...

Doh, Bo-Eun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

E-Banking Diffusion in the Jordanian Banking Services Sector: An Empirical Analysis of Key Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E-Banking Diffusion in the Jordanian Banking Services Sector: An Empirical Analysis of Key Factors influence e- banking adoption in Jordanian banks. This article added some constructs to (TOE) framework, availability of online revenues, competition intensity or pressure, and regulatory support environment) while e

193

Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

Harbottle, David; Fairweather, Michael; Biggs, Simon [Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, UK, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Rhodes, Dominic [Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Coal liquefaction process utilizing coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal hydrogenation and liquefaction process in which particulate coal feed is pressurized to an intermediate pressure of at least 500 psig and slurried with CO.sub.2 liquid to provide a flowable coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream, which is further pressurized to at least 1000 psig and fed into a catalytic reactor. The coal particle size is 50-375 mesh (U.S. Sieve Series) and provides 50-80 W % coal in the coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream. Catalytic reaction conditions are maintained at 650.degree.-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure and coal feed rate of 10-100 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 reactor volume to produce hydrocarbon gas and liquid products. The hydrogen and CO.sub.2 are recovered from the reactor effluent gaseous fraction, hydrogen is recycled to the catalytic reactor, and CO.sub.2 is liquefied and recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, two catalytic reaction stages close coupled together in series relation can be used. The process advantageously minimizes the recycle and processing of excess hydrocarbon liquid previously needed for slurrying the coal feed to the reactor(s).

Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); McLean, Joseph B. (S. Somerville, NJ)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Competition and Collaboration in Mobile Banking: A Stakeholder Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mobile technologies offers an opportunity for mobile carriers and banks to offer mobile banking services technology-aware customers. For banks, mobile banking is the next sequence after Internet banking. Thanks to the development of mobile technology which enables the delivery of banking services via mobile devices, mobile

Kurnia, Sherah

198

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

199

Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South: Channels; Geometry; Dams; Korea, South; Sediment transport. Author keywords: Alluvial channels; Downstream

Julien, Pierre Y.

200

STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Six new generating unit.s were added in t.he powerhouse (locat.ed on the left. side of t.he dam returns from below and above dam releases were compared; data failed to show that the dam caused losses

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and lacustrine December 2006 Abstract. The effects of high-alpine hydropower damming on lacustrine sedimentation impact, such as by hydropower dam construction that form artifi- cial sediment sinks acting as manmade

Gilli, Adrian

202

Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004 ANCOLD 2004 Conference Page 1 TRANSPORTATION MODEL FOR EVACUATION IN ESTIMATING DAM FAILURE and requiring only a reasonable level of effort to #12;Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams

Bowles, David S.

203

Chris Banks Director of Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chris Banks Director of Library Services Frances Boyle Assistant Director Library Academic Services Assistant to the Library Leadership Team Susan Howard Assistant Director Library Resource and Innovation Chart 1 Library Leadership Team Ruth Newton Staff Resource Coordinator (0.6 fte) Level 3b #12;Chris

204

Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad Taher-shamsi2 ; and Ampar V. Shetty3 Abstract: An analytical model of flood wave propagation is used

Ponce, V. Miguel

205

James W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenarios, ... · Diagnostics ­ High time/space resolution, velocity distribution measurements, ... · Plasma · Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes · Internal plasma diagnostic #12;Page 12 USBPO · Plasma ions and electrons: ­ TiJames W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization US ITER Project Office Institute for Fusion Studies

206

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reclamation are using risk assessment as a decision support tool. This paper summarizes an approach to incorporating input uncertainties into risk analysis model. Input uncertainties are captured by using for uncertainty analysis in dam safety risk assessment, and demonstrates some useful formats for presenting

Chauhan, Sanjay S.

208

Carbon black: A low cost colloidal additive for controlling gas-migration in cement slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of different additives on the permeability of cement slurries to formation gas has been studied with the aid of a gas flow apparatus. The performance of two commercial additives (polymer latex and silica fume) has been compared to that of a novel additive (carbon black) that has been developed in the authors laboratories with the aim of simplifying the cement slurry composition and reducing field operational costs. Data on the thickening time, fluid loss, rheology and compressive strength are also presented to provide a clear picture of the potential of carbon black as a substitute for silica fume and polymer latex in some field applications. Finally, the paper describes the results of a field application using carbon black as a gas-block additive in the cement slurry.

Calloni, G.; Moroni, N.; Miano, F.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE MIXING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 211B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous radioactive high-level waste slurries are combined during processing steps that ultimately produce a stable borosilicate glass waste form. Chemically treated waste slurries are combined with each other and with glass frit-water slurries to produce the melter feed. Understanding the evolution of the rheological properties of the slurries is an important aspect of removing and treating the stored waste. To a first approximation, combinations of colloidal waste slurry with {approx}0.1-mm mean diameter glass frit or glass beads act in an analogous matter to slurries of spherical beads in Newtonian liquids. The non-Newtonian rheological properties of the waste slurries without frit, however, add complexity to the hydrodynamic analysis. The use of shear rate dependent apparent viscosities with the modified Einstein equation was used to model the rheological properties of aqueous frit-waste slurries.

Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Economic Efficiency of Texas Country Banks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The poor showing of the smaller banks is due largely to high expenses per unit of business and a low ratio of earning assets to the bank investment. Total expenses, excIusive of interest on deposits and borrowed money and taxes, averaged 4.23 cents per... assets to the bank investment for these three groups of banks were 3.49, 4.43, and 5.96, respectively. Banks with less than $400,000 in earning assets paid an amount equivalent to an average of 0.78 per cent on all deposits as compared with 1.43 per...

Lee, Virgil P. (Virgil Porter)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Rheological properties of water-coal slurries based on brown coal in the presence of sodium lignosulfonates and alkali  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of the oxidized surface of brown coal on the structural and rheological properties of water-coal slurries was found. The kinetics of structure formation processes in water-coal slurries based on as-received and oxidized brown coal was studied. The effect of lignosulfonate and alkali additives on the samples of brown coal was considered.

D.P. Savitskii; A.S. Makarov; V.A. Zavgorodnii [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine). Dumanskii Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Enlargement of concrete blocks of arch dams with allowance of the formation of radial thermal cracks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable acceleration of the construction of arch dams with the use of highly productive continuous concreting mechanisms is possible with enlargement of the blocks and allowance of the formation of thermal radial cracks in them. A theoretical analysis and the results of on-site observations show that under the effect of the hydrostatic head of water, radial joints and cracks in compressed zones of an arch dam close and the dam in these zones works as a solid dam. Thermal cracking in concrete blocks of arch dams enlarged in plan should be controlled by making radial notches to concentrate tensile stresses providing the formation of radial cracks at prescribed places and through the usual methods of thermal regulation. The block size along the face of an arch dam is then no longer limited by the condition of crack resistance but is determined by the rate of concreting. The technical and economic effects from concreting arch dams are cited.

Verbetskii, G.P.; Chogovadze, G.I.; Daneliya, A.I.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

On the Effectiveness of Global Private Regulation: The Implementation of the Equator Principles by Multinational Banks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMRO, Bank of America and HSBC have stronger biodiversityimplementing them. In May 2005, HSBC bank developed a waterincluding Deutsche Bank, HSBC Holdings, Natwest, Royal Bank

Meyerstein, Ariel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Dewatering Fly Ash Slurries Using Geotextile Containers M. E. Kutay1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during its settlement. However, the hydraulic compatibility of a geotextile with the contact soil is also for ensuring hydraulic compatibility is that the geotextile should not be clogged during the dewatering process ash slurries. A testing program that included filter press and hanging bag tests was implemented

Aydilek, Ahmet

216

Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE.sub.10 rectangular mode to TE.sub.01 circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power.

White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kellogg, L.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: addition of i-butylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H[sub 2] during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of i-butylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the seventh quarter we continued the shake down experiments for the SBCR and conducted an initial aborted run. We have also re-started experiments on Scheme 1, i.e., the addition of iso-butylene during CO hydrogenation. Using a dual bed arrangement, we have demonstrated the synthesis of MTBE from syngas and iso-butylene.

Marcelin, G.

1992-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini- Grid TIAX, LLC Acorn Park Cambridge_MERIT_REVIEW_MAY2003 2 Introduction Hydrogen Mini-Grid Concept Distributed FCPS utilizing a H2 Mini-Grid can provide waste heat can be used for hot water or space heating in buildings (i.e. "cogen") Distributed FCPS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Spontaneous iginition of low-concentration nano-sized Al-water slurry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spontaneous ignition of a nano-sized aluminum (Al) particles-water slurry using a hot plate was investigated. The aluminum weight fractions were 17% and 27%. The hot plate temperatures ranged from 303 to 343 K. For all experimental conditions used, ignition was observed to occur at about 321 K and it was followed by a rapid temperature increase to above the boiling temperature of the water. Although the thermal runaway condition did not occur until the slurry reached a temperature of 321 K, it was able to react at a temperature as low as 303 K and develops sufficient heat for the slurry to reach the ignition condition. The ignition kinetic data were determined showing that E/R = 28619.66 (K) and k = 1.2644 × 10{sup 37} K/s for the slurry containing 17% aluminum and, the value of k was about 2.398 × 10{sup 37} K/s for those having 27% aluminum by weight.

Tran, Phuoc [U.S. DOE; Chen, Ruey-Hung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Liquid CO{sub 2}/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas™ gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration. Liquid CO{sub 2} has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal gasification-based power plants. First, the viscosity of liquid CO{sub 2} is much lower than water. This means it should take less energy to pump liquid CO{sub 2} through a pipe compared to water. This also means that a higher solids concentration can be fed to the gasifier, which should decrease the heat requirement needed to vaporize the slurry. Second, the heat of vaporization of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 80% lower than water. This means that less heat from the gasification reactions is needed to vaporize the slurry. This should result in less oxygen needed to achieve a given gasifier temperature. And third, the surface tension of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than water, which should result in finer atomization of the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry, faster reaction times between the oxygen and coal particles, and better carbon conversion at the same gasifier temperature. EPRI and others have recognized the potential that liquid CO{sub 2} has in improving the performance of an IGCC plant and have previously conducted systemslevel analyses to evaluate this concept. These past studies have shown that a significant increase in IGCC performance can be achieved with liquid CO{sub 2} over water with certain gasifiers. Although these previous analyses had produced some positive results, they were still based on various assumptions for liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry properties. This low-rank coal study extends the existing knowledge base to evaluate the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry concept on an E-Gas™-based IGCC plant with full 90% CO{sub 2} capture. The overall objective is to determine if this technology could be used to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of IGCC plants. The study goes beyond the systems-level analyses and initial lab work that formed the bases of previous studies and includes the following tasks: performing laboratory tests to quantify slurry properties; developing an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2} slurry preparation and feed system; conducting a full IGCC plant techno-economic analysis for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and North Dakota lignite in both water and liquid CO{sub 2} slurries; and identifying a technology development plan to continue the due diligence to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of this technology. The initial task included rheology tests and slurry data analyses that would increase the knowledge and understanding of maximum solids loading capability for both PRB and lignite. Higher coal concentrations have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} over water slurries, and a coal concentration of 75% by weight in liquid CO{sub 2} has been estimated to be achievable in a commercial application. In addition, lower slurry viscosities have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} at the same solids loading, where the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry viscosity has been measured to be about a factor of 10 lower than the comparable water slurry and estimated to be less than 100 centipoise in a commercial application. In the following task, an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and mixing system has been developed for both a batch and continuous system. The capital cost of the design has also been estimated so that it could be used in the economic analysis. An industry search and survey has been conducted to determine if essential components required to construct the feed system are available from commercial sources or if targeted R&D efforts are required. The search and survey concluded that commercial sources are available for selected components that comprise both the batch and continuous type systems. During normal operation, the fuel exits the bottom of the coal silo and is fed to a rod mill fo

Marasigan, Jose; Goldstein, Harvey; Dooher, John

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Dam constructions as sealing systems in rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dam constructions represent an essential component of the multibarrier safety concept in the Federal Republic of Germany for a repository of radioactive waste in salt formations. They enhance safety during the operational phase as well as in the post operational phase of the repository. In the framework of a joint R and D-project between BGR, DBE and GSF the components of a suitable dam have been developed and will be constructed and tested in the GSF-Asse salt mine in Lower-Saxony. The aims of the investigation program, its realization and some results on the development of construction materials will be presented and discussed. Experiences gained during these tests in laboratory and in situ will be described.

Engelmann, H.J.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Fischer, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

Seismic safety of earth dams: A probabilistic approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaluation of the potential for slope sliding and/or liquefaction failure of earthen dams subjected to earthquake loadings is most often based on deterministic procedures of both the excitation input and of the physical model. Such treatment provides answers in the form of either factor of safety values or a yes or no as to whether liquefaction will occur or not. Uncertainties in the physical properties of the soil in the embankment and the foundation layers underlying the dam are typically treated with parametric studies. Consideration of probabilities pertaining to the uncertainties of the earthquake and of the site characterization is expected to augment the prediction of failure potential by associating slope and liquefaction failure to generic properties of the earthquake and of the site characterization. In this study, the procedures for conditional slope failure/liquefaction probabilities are formulated based on a series of simulated deterministic analyses of a dam cross section . These synthetic earthquakes emanate from a 1-D stationary stochastic process of zero mean and an analytical form of power spectral density function. The response of the dam section is formed upon a dynamic finite element approach which provides the temporal variations of the stresses, strains and pore water pressure throughout the model. The constitutive response of the granular soil skeleton and its coupling with the fluid phase is formulated based on the Biot dynamic equations of motion with nonlinear terms compensated for into soil hysteretic damping. Lastly, a stochastic approach to liquefaction based on the transferring of the input motion statistics to the cross section is presented.

Simos, N.; Costantino, C.J.; Reich, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) Jump to:Chicopee,Colman Place:Cornell,Coulee Dam,

228

Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Technical report, March 1- May 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Williams Technologies, Inc. And Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be, concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and re-mixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology can enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant cost and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. Testing was also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back-filled, eliminating the need for tailings ponds. During the grant period, a laboratory-scale test apparatus (up to 3 GPM feed rate) was assembled and operated to demonstrate process performance over a range of feed temperatures and pressures. A dilute coal/water slurry from Consol, Inc.`s Rend Lake Preparation Plant was concentrated using the process to a maximum recorded solids loading of 61.9% solids by weight. Analytical results from the concentrate were evaluated by Destec Energy for suitability as an IGCC fuel.

Rajchel, M.; Ehrlinger, H.P.; Fonseca, A.; Mauer, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2000 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by lower than average spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased unclipped yearling and subyearling chinook smolts, and 8,300,546 smolts collected and transported compared to 5,882,872 in 1999. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above Lower Granite Dam, we can no longer accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Although some table titles in this report still show ''wild'' column headings, the numbers in these columns for 1999 and 2000 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. The increases over previous years reflect the increased supplementation. A total of 8,300,546 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, 187,862 fish were bypassed back to the river and 7,950,648 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 7,778,853 by barge and 171,795 by truck. A total of 151,344 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 1,361,006 smolts (16.4% of the total collection).

Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Mensik, Fred

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

An analysis of the bank holding company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

company exercises more supervision over the investments of each affiliate bank than over any of the other affiliate bank's activities. This service improves the flow of information, thus increasing the productivity of investments . Many of the services...) the conven- ience, needs, and welfare of the communities and the area concerned; and (5) whether or not the effect of such acquisition or merger or consolidation would be to expand the size or extent of the bank holding company system involved beyond...

Facka, David William

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Building Green in Greensburg: Centera Bank  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Centera Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

233

Building Green in Greensburg: The Peoples Bank  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Peoples Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

234

University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement Name: Address: City: State: Zip by the University of Kentucky on my bank account for purpose of charitable donations. Donations paid by bank draft

Hayes, Jane E.

235

Measuring Identity Theft at Top Banks (Version 1.5)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ryan Singel, Bank of America, HSBC Most Prone to I.D. Theft,Ryan Singel, Bank of America, HSBC Most Prone to I.D. Theft,problems. An unidentified HSBC bank official was quoted by

Hoofnagle, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Estimating the seismic stability of the arch dam in the Chirkeiskaya hydrosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A calculation analysis of the arch dam constructed in an area with standardized seismicity of magnitude 9-10 is presented.

Khrapkov, A. A.; Skomorovskaya, E. Ya

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam Relicensing Consumers Protection Act (1986), which instructs federal regulators to ``balance'' hydropower

Kotchen, Matthew J.

238

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz...

Payne, Stephen Ellis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE R. Lacasse #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia 140-ft CASSEGRAIN BAa

Groppi, Christopher

240

Building Green in Greensburg: Greensburg State Bank | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Greensburg State Bank Building Green in Greensburg: Greensburg State Bank This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

affect foreign bank: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement Name: Address: City: State: Zip by the University of Kentucky on my bank account...

242

allied irish bank: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement Name: Address: City: State: Zip by the University of Kentucky on my bank account...

243

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WTP pipe plugging issue, as stated by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Executive Summary, is as follows: “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” A strategy was employed to perform critical-velocity tests on several physical simulants. Critical velocity is defined as the point where a stationary bed of particles deposits on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry transport operations. Results from the critical velocity testing provide an indication of slurry stability as a function of fluid rheological properties and transport conditions. The experimental results are compared to the WTP design guide on slurry transport velocity in an effort to confirm minimum waste velocity and flushing velocity requirements as established by calculations and critical line velocity correlations in the design guide. The major findings of this testing is discussed below. Experimental results indicate that the use of the Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation in the design guide is conservative—Slurry viscosity has a greater affect on particles with a large surface area to mass ratio. The increased viscous forces on these particles result in a decrease in predicted critical velocities from this traditional industry derived equations that focus on particles large than 100 ?m in size. Since the Hanford slurry particles generally have large surface area to mass ratios, the reliance on such equations in the Hall (2006) design guide is conservative. Additionally, the use of the 95% percentile particle size as an input to this equation is conservative. However, test results indicate that the use of an average particle density as an input to the equation is not conservative. Particle density has a large influence on the overall result returned by the correlation. Lastly, the viscosity correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative—In cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 ?m or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP— Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Abrefah, John; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Nigl, Franz; Minette, Michael J.; Toth, James J.; Tingey, Joel M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Centrifugal slurry pump wear and hydraulic studies. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1987--March 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report marks the third quarter of the third phase of the centrifugal slurry pump improvement program. The program was begun in 1982 for the purpose of improving the operating life of centrifugal slurry pumps for coal liquefaction service. This phase of work will verify the design of a pump at higher speed operation. Eventual scale-up of the prototype slurry pumps to full-scale synthetic fuel generation plants could require ten times the flow. The higher speed will allow pumps to be smaller with respectable efficiencies. Conversely, without increasing the specific speed of the pump design, the eventual size would be more than triple that of the prototype slurry pump. The prototype slurry pump during this phase of the program incorporated all the features proven in the earlier phases of the program. This new, higher specific speed pump will be tested for the ability of the hydraulic design to inhibit wear. It will be tested and compared to the previous optimum prototype slurry pump of this program.

Bonney, G.E. [Ingersoll-Rand Co., Phillipsburg, NJ (United States)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

An Approach to Understanding Cohesive Slurry Settling, Mobilization, and Hydrogen Gas Retention in Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. Some of these vessels have mixing-system requirements to maintain conditions where the accumulation of hydrogen gas stays below acceptable limits, and the mixing within the vessels is sufficient to release hydrogen gas under normal conditions and during off-normal events. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries of solid particles suspended in Newtonian fluids that behave as non-Newtonian slurries, such as Bingham yield-stress fluids. When these slurries are contained in the process vessels, the particles can settle and become progressively more concentrated toward the bottom of the vessels, depending on the effectiveness of the mixing system. One limiting behavior is a settled layer beneath a particle-free liquid layer. The settled layer, or any region with sufficiently high solids concentration, will exhibit non-Newtonian rheology where it is possible for the settled slurry to behave as a soft solid with a yield stress. In this report, these slurries are described as settling cohesive slurries.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

EIS-0352: U.S. 93 Hoover Dam Bypass Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) served as a cooperating agency for this Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) due to WAPA’s role in the relocation of several transmission lines. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for construction of a new segment of U.S. Highway 93 for the purpose of improving congestion and hazardous vehicle/pedestrian conflicts where the highway crosses the Colorado River over Hoover Dam. As a cooperating agency for the EIS, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposed modifications to its transmission system and facilities to accommodate the construction of the new highway and bridge spanning the Colorado River.

248

Women @ Energy: Kerstin Kleese van Dam | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| WEATHERIZATION5Iski WomenKerstin Kleese van Dam Women @

249

Four Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlintFluxInputDam Pool Power Agency FDPPA Jump

250

Research on drilling fluids and cement slurries at Standard Oil Production Company: an internship report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1986 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering Research on Drilling Fluids and Cement Slurries at Standard Oil Production Company An Internship Report by EUGENE CHARLES FLIPSE Dr. K. R. Hall Chairman, Advisory Committee Dr. A Juazis Internship... was assigned to the SOPC Drilling Fluids Laboratory during his internship. Dr. W. C. McMordie, Jr. was his direct supervisor. The technical and administrative duties of this internship fell into six categories: orientation, laboratory build-out, office...

Flipse, Eugene Charles, 1956-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Volatile sulfhydryl compounds produced in Cheddar cheese slurries upon the addition of whey protein and casein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The addition of whey protein, casein or a combination of whey protein plus 7-glutamyl transpeptidase to slurries was studied to determine the effect of these proteins on volatile sulfhydryl compound production. Milk heat treatment decreased (P&0. 05... measurable free sulfhydryl groups are present in native caseins and only limited amounts are generated by high heat treatments. Those proteins remaining in solution after removal of caseins from milk comprise about 0. 6 to 0. 7% of milk and are designated...

Sheffield, Amelia Rose

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Williams Technologies, Inc. and Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and re-mixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology will enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant coast and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. In addition, testing is also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back-, filled and thus eliminate the need for tailings ponds. This reporting period, September 1, 1995 through November 30, 1995, marked the inception of this project. During this period Task No. 1, Procurement and Set-Up, was completed. The pilot plant apparatus was constructed at the SIU Coal Research Center in Carterville, Illinois. All equipment and feedstock were received at the site.

Rajchel, M. [Williams Technologies, Inc. (United States)]|[Clarke Rajchel Engineering, Arvada, CO (United States); Harnett, D. [Williams Technologies, Inc. (United States); Fonseca, A. [CONSOL, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maurer, R. [Destec (United States); Ehrlinger, H.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

The effects of glutathione on the production of free fatty acids in Cheddar cheese slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF GLUTATHIONE ON THE PRUDUCTIUN OF FREE FATTY ACIDS IN CHEDDAR CHEESE SLURRIFS A Thesis by JANE MARGUERITE BROUSSARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subuect: Food Science and Technology THE EFFECTS UF GLUTATHIONE ON THE PRODUCTION OF FREE FATTY ACIDS IN CHEDDAR CHEESE SLURRIES A Thesis by JANE MARGUERITE HROUSSARD Approved as to style and content...

Broussard, Jane Marguerite

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Processes and catalysts for conducting fischer-tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided.

Singleton, Alan H. (Marshall Township, Allegheny County, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Allison Park, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes and catalysts are disclosed for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided. 1 fig.

Singleton, A.H.; Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

257

Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE[sub 10] rectangular mode to TE[sub 01] circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power. 4 figures.

White, T.L.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Effect of iron salts on the carbonization of coal-bitumen slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibition of coke fusion by the presence of iron salts in coal-bitumen slurries. A Plastofrost apparatus was used for the above purpose, along with a specially developed procedure to handle the slurry. Three Canadian and one US coals were used along with a heavy bitumen (Cold Lake vacuum bottoms). Plastofrost samples were prepared of the coals with 0, 5 and 20 wt% additive, the vacuum bottoms, and slurries of 30 wt% coal in the vacuum bottoms with additive levels of 0, 5 and 20 wt%. The additive delayed initial fusion of the coal grains and completion of fusion. The anisotropic texture of the semicoke was diminished by the additive. The presence of vacuum bottoms suppressed coal fusion, probably by physically separating the coal grains. Fusion is also slightly suppressed at 20 wt% additive; 5 wt% seemed to have little effect. Dissolution of vitrain in the bitumen was not observed. The coal and vacuum bottom phases carbonize separately yielding distinct, but well bonded semicokes. Anisotropic texture of the vacuum bottoms coke is strongly diminished by the presence of the finely ground coal.

Royce, A.; Silveston, P.L.; Readyhough, P.J.; Fouda, S.A.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron within 3.1 hours, and three rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron within 2.5 hours. (6) If the Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets are drawn through the pump, they will be further reduced in size, with a maximum drop size less than 15 micron.

Poirier, M.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado Victor G. deWolfe a May 2007 Abstract To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs

262

Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam on voluntary ethanol rats as subjects, we examined effects of exposure during weaning to a dam consuming ethanol on adolescents' later affinity for ethanol. In a preliminary experiment, we offered rat pups a choice between 8

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

263

Continuous Monitoring of an Ice Sheet in a Reservoir Upstream of Beaumont Dam, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted at the Beaumont hydroelectric dam owned and operated by Hydro-Québec. This power plant has six find- ings will help to harmonize the different standards that are used to manage hydroelectric power considerable economic savings related to minimizing production losses, optimizing dam reinforcement works

Santerre, Rock

264

A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO, and restoration efforts. Cochiti Dam was constructed on the main stem of the Rio Grande in 1973 for flood control minnow. Recent restoration strategies include removal of non-native riparian vegetation, mechanical

Julien, Pierre Y.

265

PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Karun 3 Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i ­ CEE 491University of Hawai`i ­ CEE;Location #12;Description/Background Hydroelectric dam on Karun River Help with national energy needs

Prevedouros, Panos D.

267

Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

Leandro, Gianna Dee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

and 19% of the stomachs of late-lifted fish were Food of the striped bass at Holyoke Dam was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

below hydroelectric dams and feed on the parts of fish (anadromous or freshwater species) that die Kaplan turbine at a low-head hydroelectric dam. North Am. J. Fish. Manage. 5:33-38. HOLLIS, E. H. 1952

269

Geology of the South Texas shelf banks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEI CONALSAL NASA NSNSTNICT NSSLSC TON Figure 5. Line drawing of 3. 5 kBN profile A-A over Southern Bank and diagrasssatic representation of four cores located on this profAle (V, B. = vertical exaggeration). 23 40 BO 70 100 0I 1 ~ ~ 2 v 0... surrounding the bank, only one major textural deviation is evident. The shelly zone on the western periphery of the bank ends at 2. 5 m depth in Core 39 and is underlain by a silty clay with occasional shell fragments. A sample from the bottom of Core 39...

Lindquist, Paul

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reverse-Engineering Banks' Financial Strength Ratings Using ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 27, 2006 ... reverse-engineering a superior bank rating system, which turns out to ...... sector (

mal92

2009-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Synthesis of octane enhancer during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butytl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; (2) addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and, (3) addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

The effect of heat, cysteine, glutathione, and [gamma]-glutamyl transpeptidase on the production of volatile sulfhdryl compounds in cheddar cheese slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table Page Al. Concentration of hydrogen sulfide in control slurries prepared from raw milk Cheddar cheese curd. 85 A2. Concentration of carbonyl sulfide in control slurries prepared from raw milk Cheddar cheese curd. 86 A3 Concentration...-glutamyl transpeptidase. . . . 127 A44. Concentration of dimethyl sulfide in 75 C heated milk Cheddar cheese slurries with added glutathione and V-glutamyl transpeptidase. . . . . . 128 A45. pH changes in raw milk Cheddar cheese slurries. 129 A46 pH changes...

Staff, Cynthia Ann

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam SafetyICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

Bowles, David S.

276

Andrew G Haldane: Banking on the state Paper by Mr Andrew G Haldane, Executive Director, Financial Stability, Bank of England,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability, Bank of England, and Mr Piergiorgio Alessandri, based on a presentation delivered at the Federal

Ahmad, Sajjad

277

SKA Organisation Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SKA Organisation Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics Room 3.116 Alan Turing Building. The SKA Organisation is based in the Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester and will move

Tian, Weidong

278

On the Banks of the Karakoro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Banks of the Karakoro offers readers intimate details of life in Mauritania, a little-known West African country saddled by the Sahara and underdevelopment. Heartbreaking, visceral, honest, and hopeful, the account ...

Miller, Jeremiah

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

Gidaspow, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank Background Overview T The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank, there are well over 600 peer-reviewed journals articles addressing the structure and behavior of the Argonne of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy. From 1983­1985 Argonne National

Maranas, Costas

288

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

River Sediment Analysis by Slurry Sampling FAAS: Determination of Copper, Zinc and Lead Flvia L. Alves, Solange Cadore, Wilson F. Jardim and Marco A. Z. Arruda*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article River Sediment Analysis by Slurry Sampling FAAS: Determination of Copper, Zinc and Lead sediment analysis was developed. Using this procedure, copper, zinc and lead were determined. The influence of the nitric acid concentration on the slurry preparation, as well as the sediment particle size

Jardim, Wilson de Figueiredo

291

Impact of finite-rate kinetics on carbon conversion in a single-stage entrained flow gasifier with coal-CO2 slurry feed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract Coal-CO2 slurry Botero) #12;Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, June 3-7, 2012 Botero et al. operating costs related with coal-CO2 slurry feed Cristina Botero , Randall P. Field, Howard J. Herzog, Ahmed F. Ghoniem

292

Analytical services: 222-S characterization of 242-A Evaporator Slurry, Campaign 94-1. Addendum 1A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 242-A Evaporator`s 94-1 campaign, five process samples were collected from the slurry stream for waste characterization. The five samples were collected over a 36 day time span, respectively on May 4, May 9, May 16, May 23, and June 9, 1994. Sample collections were performed per the protocol described in 242-A Evaporator Waste Analysis Plan, WHC-SD-WM-EV-060, Rev. 3 and in 242-A Evaporator Quality Assurance Project Plan, WHC-SD-WM-QAPP-009, Rev. 0. Slurry waste was characterized chemically and radiochemically by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 222-S Laboratory as directed.

Not Available

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE PROCESSING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 205E  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slurries of inorganic solids, containing both stable and radioactive elements, were produced during the cold war as by-products of the production of plutonium and enriched uranium and stored in large tanks at the Savannah River Site. Some of this high level waste is being processed into a stable glass waste form today. Waste processing involves various large scale operations such as tank mixing, inter-tank transfers, washing, gravity settling and decanting, chemical adjustment, and vitrification. The rheological properties of waste slurries are of particular interest. Methods for modeling flow curve data and predicting the properties of slurry blends are particularly important during certain operational phases. Several methods have been evaluated to predict the rheological properties of sludge slurry blends from the data on the individual slurries. These have been relatively successful.

Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And...

296

Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Factors affecting calf and dam weights and their effects on breeding programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS AFFECTING CALF AND DAM WEIGHTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BREEDING PROGRAMS A Thesis By LAMRENCE ALLEN MADDOX, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulf illment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964 Major Subject: Animal Breeding FACTORS AFFECTING CALF AND DAM WEIGHTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BREEDING PROGRAMS A Thesis By IAWRENCE ALLEN MADDOX, JR Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commit ee) (Head...

Maddox, Lawrence Allen

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

302

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Hydropower and the environment: A case study at Glen Canyon Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of hydroelectric resources in the Colorado River requires a balancing of hydrologic, social, natural and cultural resources. The resulting management often has to deal with inherently conflicting objectives, short and long-term goals, time frames and operational flexibility. Glen Canyon Dam, AZ, on the Colorado River, controls the release of water into the Grand Canyon. The dam has been under intense public scrutiny since it was completed in 1963. An Environmental Impact Statement evaluating the future operations and options for Glen Canyon Dam was initiated by the Department of the Interior in 1989 and completed in 1995. An Adaptive Management approach to future operational management has been developed as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement process. Future operations at Glen Canyon Dam will take into consideration the need to balance water movement and hydroelectricity development with natural, recreation, Native American and cultural needs. Future management of rivers requires acknowledgement of the dynamic nature of ecosystems and the need to link scientific information into the decision-making process. Lessons learned and programs developed at Glen Canyon Dam may be applied to other river systems.

Wegner, D.L. [Denver Technical Service Center, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Essays on banking and corporate finance in developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation consists of three essays that examine banking and corporate finance in developing countries. Specifically, it explores the theoretical and empirical implications of open capital markets, foreign bank ...

Gormley, Todd A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

automated blood bank: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Blood Banking in Living Droplets MIT - DSpace Summary: Blood banking has a broad public health impact...

306

Geologic Survey of the Ewing Bank, Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Located along the edge of the continental shelf in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, the Ewing Bank is a significant geologic feature: yet, little information about the bank is generally available. This thesis represents a preliminary survey...

Brooks, Daniel M

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Characteristics of rural bank acquisitions: a logit analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study evaluates acquisitions of rural banks by multi-bank holding companies. Evaluation of pre-acquisition characteristics including profitability, size, market concentration, and agricultural lending volume are the basis of the analysis...

Applewhite, Jennifer Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Surface features of the Stetson Bank area and a non-bank area of comparable depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bathymetric survey tracks from cruise 74-G-10 of the R/V Gyre. 39 10. 12. 13. 14. 15. Fathogram I. Fathogram 2. Fathogram 3. Fathogram 4. Fathogram 5. Fathogram 6. Fathogram 7. Fathogram 8. 42 43 45 46 Bathymetric profiles of Stetson Bank... or secondary disturbances for all sediment cores. 93o 40 3 ~ 2o lo 12 ~ ~ ~ IO 5o NON-BANK AREA 28o20 7 ~ 8o 4 ~ ' ~ STETSON BANK 30 LOU. NIUIICAL III 10 94 00' 25 C3 STUDY, ( 1 && ' ? AREA / / I ( . r 1 1 Fig. 1 ? Location...

Dunphy, Janet Louise

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

Harmon, Jerrel R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Evolution of the Governing Law for Loan Agreements of the World Bank and Other Multilateral Development Banks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the governing law for loan agreements entered into by the World Bank and other multilateral development banks (MDBs) in carrying out their public sector lending? That question was first definitively addressed about ...

Head, John W.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Credit Risk Systems Topics in Banking and Finance -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(securitization vs. credit derivatives) - Change in bank valuations, RoC · Project costs estimated at around 5 bps impact on the banking industry. · Strategic effects - Risk-sensitive capital requirements - Focus - How can the bank position itself strategically well and allocate the scarce resources where

Fulmek, Markus

312

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Banking and International Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name Banking and International Finance Award BSc The BSc (Hons) Banking and International Finance degree provides you with the academic knowledge skills and knowledge in the key areas of banking and international finance, including Financial

Weyde, Tillman

313

Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department Environment Division Forest Correa Pertti Veijalainen Harri Ahveninen Inter-American Development Bank Washington, D.C. Sustainable. At the IDB the work was supervised by Kari Keipi of the Sustainable Development Department (SDS). Bank staff

314

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 159 INTERFERENCE POTENTIAL FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA CRAIG ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA Craig R. Moore and James L. Dolan Introduction

Groppi, Christopher

315

Money and Banking Economics 230 Spring 1996 Mr. Miller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Money and Banking Economics 230 Spring 1996 Mr. Miller Office: HRM 323 (486-3853) Office Hours: TuTh 10:30 - 12:00 Text 1: The Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets, fourth edition. Weeks 1 - 2: Chapters 1, 2, and 3 Why Study Money, Banking, and Financial Markets; Asymmetric

Ahmad, Sajjad

316

Deposition Velocities of Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines: Complex Simulant Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the concerns expressed by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) is about the potential for pipe plugging at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Per the review’s executive summary, “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” To evaluate the potential for plugging, deposition-velocity tests were performed on several physical simulants to determine whether the design approach is conservative. Deposition velocity is defined as the velocity below which particles begin to deposit to form a moving bed of particles on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry-transport operations. The deposition velocity depends on the system geometry and the physical properties of the particles and fluid. An experimental program was implemented to test the stability-map concepts presented in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 01. Two types of simulant were tested. The first type of simulant was similar to the glass-bead simulants discussed in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 0 ; it consists of glass beads with a nominal particle size of 150 µm in a kaolin/water slurry. The initial simulant was prepared at a target yield stress of approximately 30 Pa. The yield stress was then reduced, stepwise, via dilution or rheological modifiers, ultimately to a level of <1 Pa. At each yield-stress step, deposition-velocity testing was performed. Testing over this range of yield-stress bounds the expected rheological operating window of the WTP and allows the results to be compared to stability-map predictions for this system. The second simulant was a precipitated hydroxide that simulates HLW pretreated sludge from Hanford waste tank AZ-101. Testing was performed in a manner similar to that for the first simulant over a wide range of yield stresses; however, an additional test of net-positive suction-head required (NPSHR) was performed at each yield stress condition. Unlike the previous simulant, the sizes and densities of the particles that can deposit in the piping are a result of the simulant precipitation process; there is expected to be a complex mixture of particles of various sizes and densities that make it difficult to predict a stability map. The objective of the testing is to observe whether behavior consistent with the stability-map concept occurs in complex simulants with mixtures of different sizes and densities.

Poloski, Adam P.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Casella, Andrew M.; Johnson, Michael D.; Toth, James J.; Adkins, Harold E.; Chun, Jaehun; Denslow, Kayte M.; Luna, Maria; Tingey, Joel M.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Can a bank crisis break your heart?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 2002 Results A system-wide banking crisis increases population heart disease mortality rates by 6.4% (95% CI: 2.5% to 10.2%, p < 0.01) in high income countries, after controlling for economic change, macroeconomic instability, and population age...

Stuckler, David; Meissner, Christopher M; King, Lawrence P

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

December 9, 2013 DAVID L. BANKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Aug. 1987 - May, 1993 Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics Carnegie Mellon University. Sept. 1986 - July 1987 Visiting Assistant Lecturer, Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical, Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, FL. 2. D. Banks and E. P. Smith (2010). The Good Book: Thirty Years

Wolpert, Robert L

319

Master of Science in Banking and Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Luxembourg School of Finance ­ Master of Science in Banking and Finance ­ FACULTYOFLAW School of Finance. In its seven years of existence, the University of Luxembourg has earned a place in Luxembourg's intellectual, economic and cultural life. This is particularly so in the area of finance

van der Torre, Leon

320

Sam Madden Basically Everyone Except My Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sam Madden Physicists Biologists Basically Everyone Except My Bank #12;· Benefit(DBMS) DBMS? · DBMS setup & boundary crossings painful ­ Especially if you have to do it multiple times! MATLAB a fleet of 40 cabs on Boston streets · Pipeline ­ Raw data in DBMS ­ Trajectories with Matlab ­ Queries

O'Brien, James F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California's largest ice-bank storage system is an example of how thermal storage can be applied to both new and existing buildings. At the Union Oil Company in Brea, California, one massive ice-storage system satisfies the air conditioning needs...

Brarmann, G. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Williams Technologies, Inc. And Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and remixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology can enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant cost and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. Testing was also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back- filled, eliminating the need for tailings ponds. During the grant period, a laboratory-scale test apparatus (up to 3 GPM feed rate) was assembled and operated to demonstrate process performance over a range of feed temperatures and pressures. A dilute coal/water slurry from Consol, Inc.`s Rend Lake Preparation Plant was concentrated with the process to a maximum recorded solids loading of 61.9% solids by weight. Analytical results from the concentrate were evaluated by Destec Energy for suitability as an IGCC fuel.

Rajchel, M.; Ehrlinger, H.P.; Harnett, D.; Fonseca, A.; Maurer, R.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Dalles Dam, Columbia River: Spillway Improvement CFD Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that were applied to The Dalles spillway for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The models have been successfully validated against physical models and prototype data, and are suitable to support biological research and operations management. The CFD models have been proven to provide reliable information in the turbulent high-velocity flow field downstream of the spillway face that is typically difficult to monitor in the prototype. In addition, CFD data provides hydraulic information throughout the solution domain that can be easily extracted from archived simulations for later use if necessary. This project is part of an ongoing program at the Portland District to improve spillway survival conditions for juvenile salmon at The Dalles. Biological data collected at The Dalles spillway have shown that for the original spillway configuration juvenile salmon passage survival is lower than desired. Therefore, the Portland District is seeking to identify operational and/or structural changes that might be implemented to improve fish passage survival. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) went through a sequence of steps to develop a CFD model of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The first step was to identify a preferred CFD modeling package. In the case of The Dalles spillway, Flow-3D was as selected because of its ability to simulate the turbulent free-surface flows that occur downstream of each spilling bay. The second step in development of The Dalles CFD model was to assemble bathymetric datasets and structural drawings sufficient to describe the dam (powerhouse, non-overflow dam, spillway, fish ladder entrances, etc.) and tailrace. These datasets are documented in this report as are various 3-D graphical representations of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The performance of the CFD model was then validated for several cases as the third step. The validated model was then applied to address specific SIS design questions. Specifically, the CFD models were used to evaluate flow deflectors, baffle block removal and the effects of spillwalls. The CFD models were also used to evaluate downstream differences at other locations, such as at the Highway 197 bridge piers and Oregon shore islands, due to alterations in spill pattern. CFD model results were analyzed to quantitatively compare impacts of the spillwall that has subsequently been constructed between bays 6 and 7. CFD model results provided detailed information about how the spillwall would impact downstream flow patterns that complemented results from the 1:80 scale physical model. The CFD model was also used to examine relative differences between the juvenile spill pattern used in previous years and the anticipated spill pattern that will be applied once the wall is complete. In addition, the CFD model examined velocity magnitudes over the downstream basalt shelf to investigate potential for erosion under high flow conditions (e.g., 21 kcfs/bay for bays 1 through 6) with the spillwall in place. Several appendices follow the results and discussion sections of this report. These appendices document the large number of CFD simulations that have been performed by PNNL; both spillway improvement study (SIS) related and those performed for related biological tests.

Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Asian Development Bank Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio EnergyInstitute Name: Asian Development Bank

330

Banks, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT BiomassArnprior,AurantiaBanburyBankInvest Technology AS Jump

331

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

Relationship of the weaning weight of beef calves to the size of their dams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1964 Major Subject; Animal Breeding REIATIONSHIP OF THE WEANING WEIGHT OF BEEF CALVES TO THE SIZE OF THEIR DAMS A Thesis By JAMES EDWARD TANNER Approved as to style and content by: ';/ . (Chatrman o Committee) (Head... of age of dam within weight groups of Angus cows 20 Analyses of covariance of 200-day weight (lb. ? of Angus calves. Estimated least-squares constants for 200-day weight (lb. ) of Angus calves Least-squares means of 200-day weight (lb. ) of Angus...

Tanner, James Edward

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A biometrical evaluation of relationships between dam weight and progeny preweaning performance in beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A BIDMETRICA' EVALUA11ON Oi. RELATIONSV, IPS BFT'AEENI DAM W. IGHT AND PROGENY nREIfEANING PERFORMANCE IN BEEF CATILE A Thesis by GFRALD MAX SMITH Suf&mitfed to the Cradua'te Colleae of Texas Aiild University in pardial f. . lfillmen...& I TH App oved as Io style and content by: (Head of Doper t nant ) I Pie p1 be I' ) AoGnst ISSB ABS'IRAC) A P&ometricaI Bvaluation o~ Relationships Betweor Dam lrieight and Progeny Preweaning Performance in Beef Cattle. (Augusl I"GB) Gerald...

Smith, Gerald Max

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Eco-Design of River Fishways for Upstream Passage: Application for Hanfeng Dam, Pengxi River, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a scientific approach to eco-design of river fishways to allow upstream movement of fish past new and existing dams in China. This eco-design approach integrates principles of fish ecology/behavior and engineering, a scientific field also known as bio-engineering or eco-hydraulics. We define a fishway as a structure or mechanism to convey fish upstream past a dam. Man-made or natural stream beds can be part of the fishway mechanism. Fish include bony and non-bony fishes, and upstream passage is the concern here, not downstream passage. The problem is dams block access to upstream habitat used for spawning, rearing, and refuge, i.e., dams decrease habitat connectivity. A solution to alleviate this problem is to design fishways, preferably while the dam is being designed, but if necessary, as retrofits afterward to provide a route that fish can and will use to pass safely upstream without undue delay. Our eco-design approach for fishways involves eight steps: 1) identify the primary species of importance; 2) understand basic ecology and behavior of these fish; 3) characterize the environmental conditions where passage is or will be blocked; 4 identify fishway alternatives and select a preferred alternative; 5) establish eco-design criteria for the fishway, either from management agencies or, if necessary, developed specifically for the given site; 6) where needed, identify and perform research required to resolve critical uncertainties and finalize the eco-design criteria; 7) apply the eco-design criteria and site-specific considerations to design the fishway, involving peer-review by local stakeholders in the process; 8) build the fishway, monitor its effectiveness, and apply the lessons learned. Example fishways are described showing a range of eco-designs depending on the dam site and fish species of concern. We apply the eco-design principles to recommend an approach and next steps for a fishway to pass fish upstream at Hanfeng Dam, an existing regulating dam forming Hanfeng Lake on the Pengxi River near Kaixian, China.

Johnson, Gary E.; Rainey, William S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring in Flathead Lake, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork-of the Flathead River reduced the reproductive success of kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) spawning in the Flathead River. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) authored a mitigation plan to offset those losses. The mitigation goal, stated in the Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributed to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, is to: {open_quotes}Replace lost annual production of 100,000 kokanee adults, initially through hatchery production and pen rearing in Flathead Lake, partially replacing lost forage for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Flathead Lake.{close_quotes}

Fredenberg, Wade; Carty, Daniel (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Kalispell, MT); Cavigli, Jon (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure. 25 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Do impassable dams and flow regulation constrain the distribution of green sturgeon in the Sacramento River, California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, American River, and Yuba River. While dams block access to about 9% of historically available habitatDo impassable dams and flow regulation constrain the distribution of green sturgeon in the Sacramento River, California? By E. A. Mora1 , S. T. Lindley2 , D. L. Erickson3 and A. P. Klimley4 1 Joint

Klimley, A. Peter

342

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of rapid methods for estimating the fertilizing ability (nitrogen and potassium) of pig slurry and its changes during storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The digester output expressed as ml biogas/M3 tank/day ranged from 0.4 to 1.3 m"11' m3. d over a period of 9 should lead to a better use of pig slurry in agriculture. Swine waste anaerobic digesters : technical More than 120 animal waste anaerobic digesters exist in France. They were built bet- ween 1979 and 1983

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

A study of ignition and combustion characteristics of isolated coal water slurry droplet using digital image processing technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at constant pressure Coal water slurry Diffusion coefficient (Damkohler number) Activation energy Higher heating value Gasification rate constant Flame lift off distance Mass of CWS drop Number of coal particles in a single CWS drop Prandtl number... Parameters. . . II. 2. Coal Ignition and Combustion . . 13 II. 2. 1. Introduction. II. 2. 2. Pyrolysis. . . . . . II. 2. 3. Volatiles Oxidation. . . 13 . . 15 . . 16 II. 2. 4. Ignition. II. 2. 5. Coal Combustion . . . . 16 . . 17 CHAPTER Page 11...

Bhadra, Tanmoy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries (including shape characterization). Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) sensor projects was to develop and commercialize a sensor system capable of particle analysis, in terms of size distributions, using concentrated suspensions at high solids concentrations. The early research was focused on application of ultrasonic spectroscopy of inorganic pigment slurries (e.g. titanium dioxide) commonly encountered on paper industry. During the project prototypes were tested in both academic and industrial laboratories. Work also involved successful field tests of the on-line prototype at a pigment manufacturing facility. Pen Kem continued the work at its cost beyond the initial funded period from March `92 to September `94. The first project (DE- FC05-88CE40684), which began in September 1988, culminated in a commercial laboratory instrument, Pen Kem AcoustoPhor {trademark} 8000, put on the market in June 1993. The follow-on project was aimed at investigation of shape and orientation effects on ultrasonic spectroscopy. A new cooperative agreement was awarded in September 1994 (DE-FC05-94CE40005) to develop shape characterization capabilities deemed critical by the clay industry. This follow-on project achieved following successes: A theoretical model was developed to account for the effects of size-dependent aspect ratios of spheroid particles under different orientations on ultrasound attenuation spectra of concentrated slurries. The theoretical model was confirmed by laboratory tests on kaolin slurries. An algorithm was developed to simulate evolution of particle orientation fields in simple squeezing flows.

Pendse, H.P.; Goetz, P.J.; Sharma, A.; Han, W; Bliss, T.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Asian Development Bank Technical Assistance Report on Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Sustainable Energy Authority in Sri Lanka Jump to: navigation, search Name Asian Development Bank Technical Assistance Report on Building the Capacity of the Sustainable...

353

Financial liberalisation and banking crises in sub-Saharan Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. This study aims to investigate the causal effect of ?financial liberalisation policies on the stability of banking sectors in selected countries in Sub… (more)

Gamariel, Gladys.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ANALYSES AND COMPARISON OF BULK AND COIL SURFACE SAMPLES FROM THE DWPF SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) heating coil frame and coil surface were characterized to identify differences that might help identify heat transfer fouling materials. The SME steam coils have seen increased fouling leading to lower boil-up rates. Samples of the sludge were taken from the coil frame somewhat distant from the coil (bulk tank material) and from the coil surface (coil surface sample). The results of the analysis indicate the composition of the two SME samples are very similar with the exception that the coil surface sample shows {approx}5-10X higher mercury concentration than the bulk tank sample. Elemental analyses and x-ray diffraction results did not indicate notable differences between the two samples. The ICP-MS and Cs-137 data indicate no significant differences in the radionuclide composition of the two SME samples. Semi-volatile organic analysis revealed numerous organic molecules, these likely result from antifoaming additives. The compositions of the two SME samples also match well with the analyzed composition of the SME batch with the exception of significantly higher silicon, lithium, and boron content in the batch sample indicating the coil samples are deficient in frit relative to the SME batch composition.

Hay, M.; Nash, C.; Stone, M.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program with the objective of demonstrating the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in industrial boilers designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with less than 3.0% ash and 0.9% sulfur) can effectively be burned in oil-designed industrial boilers without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of three phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, and (3) demonstration and evaluation. The boiler testing will determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting and operating boilers will be identified to assess the viability of future oil-to-coal retrofits. Progress is reported. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Miller, B.G.; Schobert, H.H.

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Attrition resistant catalysts for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T because they are relatively inexpensive and possess reasonable activity for F-T synthesis (FTS). Their most advantages trait is their high water-gas shift (WGS) activity compared to their competitor, namely cobalt. This enables Fe F-T catalysts to process low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas without an external shift reaction step. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, make the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, an d result in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance.

K. Jothimurugesan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Modified sedimentation-dispersion model for solids in a three-phase slurry column  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solids distribution data for a three-phase, batch-fluidized slurry bubble column (SBC) are presented, using air as the gas phase, pure liquids and solutions as the liquid phase, and glass beads and carborundum catalyst powder as the solid phase. Solids distribution data for the three-phase SBC operated in a continuous mode of operation are also presented, using nitrogen as the gas phase, water as the liquid phase, and glass beads as the solid phase. A new model to provide a reasonable approach to predict solids concentration distributions for systems containing polydispersed solids is presented. The model is a modification of standard sedimentation-dispersion model published earlier. Empirical correlations for prediction of hindered settling velocity and solids dispersion coefficient for systems containing polydispersed solids are presented. A new method of evaluating critical gas velocity (CGV) from concentrations of the sample withdrawn at the same port of the SBC is presented. Also presented is a new mapping for CGV which separates the two regimes in the SBC, namely, incomplete fluidization and complete fluidization.

Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.; Shah, Y.T.; Badgujar, M.N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS(SBCR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishment made during the third year of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Air Products and Chemicals. Data processing of the performed Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) experiments in 6 inch column using air-water-glass beads (150 {micro}m) system has been completed. Experimental investigation of time averaged three phases distribution in air-Therminol LT-glass beads (150 {micro}m) system in 6 inch column has been executed. Data processing and analysis of all the performed Computed Tomography (CT) experiments have been completed, using the newly proposed CT/Overall gas holdup methodology. The hydrodynamics of air-Norpar 15-glass beads (150 {micro}m) have been investigated in 2 inch slurry bubble column using Dynamic Gas Disengagement (DGD), Pressure Drop fluctuations, and Fiber Optic Probe. To improve the design and scale-up of bubble column reactors, a correlation for overall gas holdup has been proposed based on Artificial Neural Network and Dimensional Analysis.

M.H. Al-Dahhan; L.S. Fan; M.P. Dudukovic

2002-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX SOLIDS WITH LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). In the summer of 2011, Tank 50H contained two standard slurry pumps and two quad volute slurry pumps. Current requirements for mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste moved both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that were failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to mix solids with liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange Process (SCIX), SRNL computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, Tank 50H operating experience, and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters of pumps needed to mix the solid particles with the liquid in Tank 50H. The analysis determined pump requirements to suspend the solids with no 'dead zones', but did not determine the pump requirements to produce a homogeneous suspension. In addition, the analysis determined the pump requirements to prevent the accumulation of a large amount of solid particles under the telescoping transfer pump. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) The analysis shows that three Quad Volute pumps should be able to suspend the solid particles expected ({approx}0.6 g/L insoluble solids, {approx}5 micron) in Tank 50H. (2) Three standard slurry pumps may not be able to suspend the solid particles in Tank 50H; (3) The ability of two Quad Volute pumps to fully suspend all of the solid particles in Tank 50H is marginal; and (4) One standard slurry pump should be able to achieve a cleaning radius larger than 43.5 feet, which will prevent large amounts of solid particles from settling under the telescoping transfer pump (TTP). The report recommends a pump operating approach to maximize the achieved cleaning radius.

Poirier, M.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Updating of Safety Criteria for Basic Diagnostic Indicators of Dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Values of diagnostic indicators [K]-limitations placed on radial displacements and turn angles of horizontal sections of the dam - which are permitted for each upper-pool level within the range from 520 to 539 m are determined and proposed for inclusion in the Declaration of Safety. Empirical relationships used to develop safety criteria K1 and K2 are modified.

Gordon, L. A.; Skvortsova, A. E. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS of downstream channels and lead to accumulation of fine sediments and habitat degradation. To investigate, we-sediment measures, and an intensive sampling scheme, this study found that channels downstream of diversions

Poff, N. LeRoy

364

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Sluiceway Operations to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing ice and trash sluiceways are commonly used to pass juvenile salmonids downstream at hydropower dams through a benign, non-turbine route. At The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, managers undertook optimizing operations of sluiceway weirs to maximize survival of juvenile salmonids at the powerhouse. We applied fixed-location hydroacoustic methods to compare fish passage rates and sluiceway efficiencies for two weir configurations during 2004 and 2005: three weirs versus six weirs, located at the mid- versus east powerhouse, respectively. We also analyzed horizontal distributions of passage at the sluiceway and turbines and the effects of operating turbines beneath open sluiceway gates to provide supporting data relevant to operations optimization. Based on the findings, we recommend the following for long-term operations for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam: open six rather than three sluiceway weirs to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway; open the three weirs above the western-most operating main turbine unit (MU) and the three weirs at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high; operate the turbine units below open sluiceway weirs as a standard procedure; operate the sluiceway 24 h/d year-round to maximize its benefits to juvenile salmonids; and use the same operations for spring and summer emigrants. These operational concepts are transferable to dams where sluiceway surface flow outlets are used protect downstream migrating fishes.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, J. R.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Monitoring of the stresses induced by AAR in the Beauharnois concrete gravity dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Beauharnois dam is a well known example of a large dam subjected to AAR attack. This particular dam was built in different stages and its powerhouse contains 3 sections having distinct AAR evolutions over time. It has been decided to monitor the stress variations in the different structural parts of the dam using a new technique; instrumented concrete inclusion (CIUS: Cylindre instruments de l`Universite de Sherbrooke) grouted into concrete mass. With the readings obtained from vibrating wire extensometers, it is possible to monitor the stress variations in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D) taking into account the surrounding conditions (temperature, relative humidity, etc.). Three cylinders (2D) were installed in 1987 and seven (3D) in 1992. It appears that compressive stresses are induced in powerhouse numbers 1 and 3 and anisotropic conditions produced in powerhouse number 1, with large horizontal stresses due to closing of the expansive joints. It appears also that stresses are building around the injected inclusion very quickly, within a few months, and are close to the maximum tensile strength value of the concrete. These stress changes, when isotropic are comparable to variations of interstitial pressures in saturated soils during a loading processes.

Ballivy, G.; Bois, A.P. [Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Saleh, K.; Rivest, M. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High Performance Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the viscoelastic parameters; 3D FEM analysis using High Performance Computing (parallel and vector features) to run Performance Computing. E. M. R. Fairbairn, E. Goulart, A. L. G. A. Coutinho, N. F. F. Ebecken COPPEDurability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

369

EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement Project, Malheur County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bureau of Land Management, with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed authorization of a right of way to the Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA’s proposed action was to fund the project

370

EIFAC 2006: DAMS, WEIRS AND FISH Long-term effects of hydropower installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EIFAC 2006: DAMS, WEIRS AND FISH Long-term effects of hydropower installations and associated river on stocking lakes with elvers and fingerling eels. These were trapped at the hydropower facilities.) stocks is a matter of great concern and Guest editors: R. L. Welcomme & G. Marmulla Hydropower, Flood

McCarthy, T.K.

371

Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

Fouch, Matthew J.

372

Seismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam-age based on experimental modal parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam- age based on experimental modal parameters Clotaire Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich, Switzerland. Michel C., Gueguen P., Causse M. 2011. Seismic higher modes and full seismic ground motion, (2) using a single-degree of freedom model considering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams Clifford E and associated streams. During 1999 and 2000, tree canopy damage, stream physical habitat, and wood deposition were evaluated within 51 first-, second-, and third-order streams located within five eastern

Kraft, Clifford E.

374

LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clay liner (e.g. 10-9 m/s). In spite of their function as hydraulic barriers, geomembrane liners shouldLEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas was conducted to quantify leakage through a geomembrane liner system when subjected to high hydraulic heads

Zornberg, Jorge G.

375

The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reports that large dams influence local climate most in Mediterranean, and semiarid climates, while in impounded basins of the Mediterranean and arid climates of the United States. Citation: Degu, A. M., F, then it is physically plausible to expect a gradual change in the local climate and rainfall patterns in the impounded

Niyogi, Dev

376

FACTORS FOR DECLINE 3.4.5 EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAMS ON VIABILITY OF WILD FISH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS FOR DECLINE 3.4.5 EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAMS ON VIABILITY OF WILD FISH The existence and operation of the Columbia River Hydrosystem poses risks to wild populations of anadromous salmonids. Run-tagged hatchery fish or a mixture of hatchery and wild fish are used as indicator stocks. In the Snake River

377

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 General Motors 2 Variable Height Vehicle Air Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economy and aerodynamic drag requirements. Therefore we are required to use our creativity and figure out to increase the fuel economy of a particular vehicle at highway speeds. The dam must successfully divert air existing products and patents · Brainstorming, concept generation, refinement and selection · NO SITE VISIT

Demirel, Melik C.

378

PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA and an initial prioritisation of future investigations and possible risk reduction measures. The PRA comprised

Bowles, David S.

379

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Asian Development Bank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ashton-SandyLeibo- Transport JumpBank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Banks, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: EnergyAustin EnergyBacliff,BallengerEnergyNIES Low-CarbonCaseBanks

382

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business X-ray Image Bank Open for Business February 22, 2011 Filipe Maia is building a data bank where scientists from around the world can deposit and...

383

Sustainability principles of the Asian Development Bank's (ADB's) energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability principles of the Asian Development Bank's (ADB's) energy policy: An opportunity Development Bank (ADB) energy projects to determine how they address the energy sector challenges facing) improving energy efficiency; (2) promoting renewable energy; (3) reducing energy poverty; and (4) enhancing

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

384

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The general design concept was taken from previous receivers assembled at NRAO. S. Weinreb and N

Groppi, Christopher

385

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Rep preformed by the Standard Receiver Section of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The following breakdown was used to divide the costs into various categories: (1) Emckajs.c1 . 1

Groppi, Christopher

386

Opening a UK bank account money&consumeradvice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opening a UK bank account money&consumeradvice Student Information, Advice & Guidance www a non-UK bank card you will be charged every time you withdraw money from cash machines. · If you get a job in the UK your employer will want to pay your money directly into a UK accounts. · You cannot set

Applebaum, David

387

Reasons for bank mergers in Europe since 1985  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis deals with mergers and acquisitions that were undertaken by the largest European banks between 1985 and 1992. On the basis of an empirical survey among executives from 61 banks and a survey of financial news sources, the study finds...

Lausberg, Carsten

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Novel Slurry-Based Biomass Reforming Process Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was focused on developing a catalytic means of producing H2 from raw, ground biomass, such as fast growing poplar trees, willow trees, or switch grass. The use of a renewable, biomass feedstock with minimal processing can enable a carbon neutral means of producing H2 in that the carbon dioxide produced from the process can be used in the environment to produce additional biomass. For economically viable production of H2, the biomass is hydrolyzed and then reformed without any additional purification steps. Any unreacted biomass and other byproduct streams are burned to provide process energy. Thus, the development of a catalyst that can operate in the demanding corrosive environment and presence of potential poisons is vital to this approach. The concept for this project is shown in Figure 1. The initial feed is assumed to be a >5 wt% slurry of ground wood in dilute base, such as potassium carbonate (K2CO3). Base hydrolysis and reforming of the wood is carried out at high but sub-critical pressures and temperatures in the presence of a solid catalyst. A Pd alloy membrane allows the continuous removal of pure , while the retentate, including methane is used as fuel in the plant. The project showed that it is possible to economically produce H2 from woody biomass in a carbon neutral manner. Technoeconomic analyses using HYSYS and the DOE's H2A tool [1] were used to design a 2000 ton day-1 (dry basis) biomass to hydrogen plant with an efficiency of 46% to 56%, depending on the mode of operation and economic assumptions, exceeding the DOE 2012 target of 43%. The cost of producing the hydrogen from such a plant would be in the range of $1/kg H2 to $2/kg H2. By using raw biomass as a feedstock, the cost of producing hydrogen at large biomass consumption rates is more cost effective than steam reforming of hydrocarbons or biomass gasification and can achieve the overall cost goals of the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program. The complete conversion of wood to hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide was repeatedly demonstrated in batch reactors varying in size from 50 mL to 7.6 L. The different wood sources (e.g., swamp maple, poplar, and commercial wood flour) were converted in the presence of a heterogeneous catalyst and base at relatively low temperatures (e.g., 310 �������°C) at sub-critical pressures sufficient to maintain the liquid phase. Both precious metal and base metal catalysts were found to be active for the liquid phase hydrolysis and reforming of wood. Pt-based catalysts, particularly Pt-Re, were shown to be more selective toward breaking C-C bonds, resulting in a higher selectivity to hydrogen versus methane. Ni-based catalysts were found to prefer breaking C-O bonds, favoring the production of methane. The project showed that increasing the concentration of base (base to wood ratio) in the presence of Raney Ni catalysts resulted in greater selectivity toward hydrogen but at the expense of increasing the production of undesirable organic acids from the wood, lowering the amount of wood converted to gas. It was shown that by modifying Ni-based catalysts with dopants, it was possible to reduce the base concentration while maintaining the selectivity toward hydrogen and increasing wood conversion to gas versus organic acids. The final stage of the project was the construction and testing of a demonstration unit for H2 production. This continuous flow demonstration unit consisted of wood slurry and potassium carbonate feed pump systems, two reactors for hydrolysis and reforming, and a gas-liquid separation system. The technical challenges associated with unreacted wood fines and Raney Ni catalyst retention limited the demonstration unit to using a fixed bed Raney Ni catalyst form. The lower activity of the larger particle Raney Ni in turn limited the residence time and thus the wood mass flow feed rate to 50 g min-1 for a 1 wt% wood slurry. The project demonstrated continuous H2 yields with unmodified, fixed bed Raney Ni, from 63% to 100% with correspond

Sean C. Emerson; Timothy D. Davis; A. Peles; Ying She; Joshua Sheffel; Rhonda R. Willigan; Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Tianli Zhu

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Golden, Jeffry

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

394

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Application of the Granuflow Process to Pipeline-Transported Coal Slurry CRADA PC96-010, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light of the current difficulties in processing fine coal and the potential for a significant increase in fines due to more demanding quality specifications, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has been involved in the reconstitution of the fine clean coal resulting from advanced fine coal cleaning technologies. FETC has invented and developed a new strategy that combines fine-coal dewatering and reconstitution into one step. The process reduces the moisture content of the clean coal, and alleviates handling problems related to dustiness, stickiness, flowability, and freezing. This process has been named the GranuFlow Process. Early work successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the process for laboratory-scale vacuum filtration dewatering using asphalt emulsion. Further tests focused on the application of the process to a screen-bowl centrifuge via batch mode tests at 300 lb/hr. These tests produced roughly the same results as the laboratory filtration tests did, and they included some testing using Orimulsion, a bitumen emulsion. The Orimulsion seemed to offer greater potential for moisture reduction and was less affected by colder slurry temperatures. Most recently, FETC has conducted several series of tests in its Coal Preparation Process Research Facility. These tests dramatically showed the visible difference in the dewatered product by applying the GranuFlow Process, turning it from a clumpy, wet, sticky material into a granular, dry free-flowing product. In addition, it verified previous results with improvements in moisture content, dustiness, stickiness, and freezing. Orimulsion showed a significant benefit over asphalt emulsion in moisture reduction at additions more than 5%. The overall goal of this project was to successfully apply FETC'S GranuFlow Process to improve coal slurry pipeline operations. Williams Technologies, Inc. (WTI), a leader in pipeline technology, has an interest in reducing the moisture content of the coal at the end of a coal slurry pipeline beyond what is being achieved with conventional mechanical dewatering technology. In addition, they would like to improve the handling characteristics of the dewatered coal. The GranuFlow Process has the potential of assisting in both of these areas, and its degree of applicability needed to be explored. A formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between FETC and WTI was signed in November 1996. This CRADA consisted of 6 tasks progressing from preliminary scoping tests to a commercial field test. Task 1 was completed in February 1997, and it provided sufficient information about the applicability of the GranuFlow Process to coal slurry pipelines that further testing was not needed at the present time. Thus the CRADA was terminated.

Richard P. Killmeyer; Wu-Wey Wen

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Feasibility of Using an Ultrasonic Fish Tracking System in the Tailrace of Lower Granite Dam in 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL in Spring 2002 at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District. Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic fish tracking in the untested environment of a hydroelectric dam tailrace. If fish tracking were determined to be feasible, we would track the movement of juvenile hatchery chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), juvenile hatchery steelhead (O. mykiss), and juvenile wild steelhead (O. mykiss) and relate their movement to dam operations. The majority of fish to be tracked were released as a part of a separate study conducted by the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (BRD), which was investigating the movement of juvenile salmon in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam in relation to Removable Spillway Weir (RSW) testing. The two studies took place consecutively from April 14 to June 7, 2002.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cash, Kenneth; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction. [partial liquefaction of coal in slurry, filtration and gasification of residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300 to 550/sup 0/C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400 to 500/sup 0/C for a limited time of only about 1 to 5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300/sup 0/C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

Longanbach, J.R.

1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

399

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACE’s continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

403

Government chartered banks step up oil and gas lending  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International government chartered banks are playing an increasingly prominent role in lending for world oil and gas development projects. The main players are the World Bank's International Finance Corp. (IFC), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), US Export-Import Bank, and Overseas Private Investment Corp. (OPIC). Those institutions and similar ones are the catalysts for a large number of projects in the former Soviet Union (FSU) and in other nations that are seeking to develop oil and gas resources and build processing plants, pipelines, and distribution networks. Banks also are taking a greater degree of interest in the environmental aspects of projects. In country after country, especially in the developing world, barriers to foreign investment in domestic petroleum sectors are falling. Oil and gas law reforms are under way on each continent. The paper discusses the major players, the World Bank grouped, the Romanian example, the Ex-Im Bank, OPIC, the emphasis on FSU, environmental issues, and new sources of capital in developing countries.

Crow, P.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Scientific substantiation of safe operation of the Earthen Dams at the Votkinsk HPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a period of 15 years, coworkers of the B. E. Vedeneev Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering have conducted scientific accompaniment of the operation of the earthen dams at the Votkinsk HPP. During that time, basic performance characteristics associated with complex hydrogeologic and hydrochemical conditions, and the forms of their unfavorable manifestations influencing the reliability and safety of the structures were revealed, and, recommendations and measures were developed for their elimination.

Deev, A. P.; Fisenko, V. F. [Votkinsk HPP Branch of the JSC 'RusGidro,' Chaikovskii (Russian Federation); Sol'skii, S. V.; Lopatina, M. G.; Gints, A. V.; Aref'eva, A. N. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva', Branch of JSC 'RusGidro' (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam ROHAN D'SOUZA For several University Press, 2006). #12;I N D I A ' S H Y D R A U L I C C R I S I S 1 1 3 commentator on India, declared landscape.4 The TVA model was soon to mark a profound hydraulic departure by kick-starting the post

Sussex, University of

407

Oxygenation cost estimates in 1983 dollars for Cherokee and Douglas Dams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Reservoir Releases Program, estimates of costs associated with providing high purity oxygen injection systems at Cherokee and Douglas Dams were computed in 1983 dollars. This report presents results of the computations. An 8.125% interest rate, a 25-year economic life, and a 10-year diffuser life were assumed. Weekly average dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and turbine flowrate data were available for the years 1958 through 1980. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fain, T.G.; Boyd, J.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Forensic DNA data banking by state crime labortaories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports the results of a survey of the responsible crime laboratories in the first 19 states with legislation establishing forensic DNA data banks. The survey inquired into the labs` policies and procedures regarding the collection, storage, and analysis of samples; the retention of samples and data; search protocols; access to samples and data by third parties; and related matters. The research suggests that (1) the number of samples collected from convicted offenders for DNA data banking has far surpassed the number that have been analyzed; (2) data banks have already been used in a small but growing number of cases, to locate suspects and to identify associations between unresolved cases; (3) crime labs currently plan to retain indefinitely the samples collected for their data banks; and (4) the nature and extent of security safeguards that crime labs have implemented for their data banks vary among states. The recently enacted DNA Identification Act (1994) will provide $40 million in federal matching grants to states for DNA analysis activities, so long as states comply with specified quality-assurance standards, submit to external proficiency testing, and limit access to DNA information. Although these additional funds should help to ease some sample backlogs, it remains unclear how labs will allocate the funds, as between analyzing samples for their data banks and testing evidence samples in cases without suspects. The DNA Identification Act provides penalties for the disclosure or obtaining of DNA data held by data banks that participate in CODIS, the FBI`s evolving national network of DNA data banks, but individual crime labs must also develop stringent internal safeguards to prevent breaches of data-bank security. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

McEwen, J.E. [Eunice Kennedy Shrive Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Alternatives for physically modifying John Sevier detention dam to allow fish passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies conducted in the vicinity of John Sevier Steam-Electric Plant (JSF) indicated some modification of the fish assemblage from that expected. By blocking movements of fish between Cherokee Reservoir and the upper Holston River, John Sevier detention dam has affected the fisheries in both systems. Providing passage for river-spawning fish at John Sevier detention dam might improve fish communities and fisheries in Cherokee Reservoir as well as upstream habitats. This would include enhanced reproductive success of river-spawning species found in Cherokee Reservoir (e.g., white bass and possibly striped bass and paddlefish) and repopulation of John Sevier Reservoir and the upper Holston River by several species presently found only downstream of the detention dam. TVA has identified and studied several alternatives that alone or in combination might improve the fisheries. Cost estimates were developed for three alternatives. These three alternatives with cost estimates are discussed briefly along with two other alternatives for which cost estimates have not been made. Merits of the three alternatives which have at least some possibility to improve migratory fish stocks are discussed in detail. 5 references.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2003 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam Juvenile Fish Facility (LGR) was characterized by water temperatures, total flows and spill that were below the five year average, low levels of debris, and increased smolt collection numbers compared to 2002 with the exception of unclipped sockeye/kokanee. There were 6,183,825 juvenile salmonids collected. Of these, 6,054,167 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,957,885 by barge and 96,282 by truck. An additional 102,340 fish were bypassed back to the river, primarily due to research projects with another 62,122 bypassed through the PIT-tag bypass system. According to the PTAGIS database, 152,268 PIT-tagged fish were detected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, Smolt Monitoring Staff recorded 345 PIT-tagged raceway and sample mortalities. Of the 6,183,825 total fish collected, 113,290 were PIT-tagged or radio tagged and 380 were sacrificed by researchers. The collection included 836,885 fish that had hatchery marks other than clipped fins (elastomer, freeze brands or Coded Wire Tags). An estimated 54,857 incidental fish were collected with an additional 8,730 adult salmonids removed from the separator.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Unsteady flow model of Priest Rapids Dam releases at Hanford Reach, Columbia River, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model was developed to simulate water levels at three locations on the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam River Mile 396.1 (River Kilometer 639.0) and River Mile 361.50 (River Kilometer 581.7). The model was calibrated and verified over a range of flows. The results of calibration and verification indicate that the model, with reasonable accuracy, simulates stages to within +-0.08 m (+- 0.25 ft) and surface wave timing to within +-20 min. The model can be used by researchers, river system managers, planners, and decision makers as a tool to predict fluctuating water levels at locations downstream of dams. Data produced by the model can be used to evaluate and quantify possible impacts on aquatic organisms, water supply, navigation, irrigation, recreation, and additional hydropower enhancement. Although the results of this model calibrationand the model simulations presented are site-specific, the methodology is generic. Therefore, the model can be adapted to reflect dam discharges and resulting river flows at other river systems affected by water-level fluctuations.

Sneider, S.C.; Skaggs, R.L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY VIA OPTIMIZED CHARGE MOTION AND SLURRY FLOW IN PLANT SCALE SAG MILLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. mining industry operates approximately 80 semi-autogenesis grinding mills (SAG) throughout the United States. Depending on the mill size the SAG mills draws between 2 MW and 17 MW. The product from the SAG mill is further reduced in size using pebble crushers and ball mills. Hence, typical gold or copper ore requires between 2.0 and 7.5 kWh per ton of energy to reduce the particle size. Considering a typical mining operation processes 10,000 to 100,000 tons per day the energy expenditure in grinding is 50 percent of the cost of production of the metal. A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and others. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling and operators had to learn more. Now the power consumption is 0.3-1.3 kWh/ton lower than before. The actual SAG mill power draw is 230-370 kW lower. Mill runs 1 rpm lesser in speed on the average. The re-circulation to the cone crusher is reduced by 1-10%, which means more efficient grinding of critical size material is taking place in the mill. All of the savings have resulted in reduction of operating cost be about $0.023-$0.048/ ton.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Sravan K. Prathy; Trilokyanath Patra

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of Hanford's feed delivery of high level waste (HLW) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), pilot-scale testing and demonstrations with simulants containing cohesive particles were performed as a joint collaboration between Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants, and the resulting non-Newtonian rheology, have on tank mixing and batch transfer of large and dense seed particles. The work addressed the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance in a pilot-scale system. Kaolin slurries with a range of wt% concentrations to vary the Bingham yield stress were used in all the non-Newtonian simulants. To study the effects of just increasing the liquid viscosity (no yield stress) on mixing and batch transfers, a glycerol/water mixture was used. Stainless steel 100 micron particles were used as seed particles due to their density and their contrasting color to the kaolin and glycerol. In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work addresses the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. This work is follow-on to the previous tasks 'Demonstration of Mixer Jet Pump Rotational Sensitivity on Mixing and Transfers of the AY-102 Tank' and 'Demonstration of Simulated Waste Transfers from Tank AY-102 to the Hanford Waste Treatment Facility'. The cohesive simulants were investigated and selected jointly by SRNL and PNNL and a white paper was written on this evaluation. The testing and demonstrations of cohesive simulants was a joint effort performed as collaboration between SRNL and PNNL staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using the 1/22nd scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. Seed particles are particles of contracting color added to mixing tank for visual inspection and an indicator of how well the contents of the tank are mixing. Also the seed particles serve as a measuring stick for how well the contents of the tank are transferred from the mixing tank during batch transfers. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative.

Adamson, D.; Gauglitz, P.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

416

Why Are Banks Paying So Little UK Corporation Tax?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the ten biggest in the world (HSBC, ranked 3; Barclays, 7; and RBS 8); and the other three are all in the top half of the world 150 (Lloyds, 20; Standard Chartered, 41; Nationwide, 74). Four of them operate across most areas of banking, from retail... ’ annual reports are expressed in US dollars (HSBC, Standard Chartered), they are converted to pounds using average exchange rates for the year from UKFOREX (2013). 2. Bank profits and taxation Banks operating in the UK are taxed on their income net...

Meeks, G.; Meeks, J. G.

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. • Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. • During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish ± 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. • Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. • Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 ± 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. • Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). • Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. • The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. • Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. • The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Elec-xonics Division Internal Report 140 MV The battery voltage as a function of temperature was also measured. The voltage was extremely

Groppi, Christopher

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421

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report with the calculator. It is constructed from CMOS logic for lowest power consumption and has a NiCad battery back

Groppi, Christopher

422

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report an opposition battery, a DC Null Voltmeter and a recorder. With this set-up a variation in temperature of .02 °C

Groppi, Christopher

423

Category 1: World's best journals Journal of Banking and Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Category 1: World's best journals Journal of Banking and Finance Journal of Finance Journal: Leading specialist journals Financial Analysts Journal Financial Management Journal of Business Finance and Accounting Journal of Empirical Finance Journal of Financial Econometrics Journal of Financial Education

Zhang, Zhengjun

424

Standardization of information systems development processes and banking industry adaptations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the current system development processes of three major Turkish banks in terms of compliance to internationally accepted system development and software engineering standards to determine the common process problems of banks. After an in-depth investigation into system development and software engineering standards, related process-based standards were selected. Questions were then prepared covering the whole system development process by applying the classical Waterfall life cycle model. Each question is made up of guidance and suggestions from the international system development standards. To collect data, people from the information technology departments of three major banks in Turkey were interviewed. Results have been aggregated by examining the current process status of the three banks together. Problematic issues were identified using the international system development standards.

Tanrikulu, Zuhal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A dynamic term structure model of Central Bank policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the implications of explicitly modeling the monetary policy of the Central Bank within a Dynamic Term Structure Model (DTSM). We follow Piazzesi (2005) and implement monetary policy by including ...

Staker, Shawn W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Transformation at Bank of America : an enterprise systems analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of Bank of America's change management initiatives has shifted away from acquiring and integrating new businesses, a process it calls transition, and towards internal enterprise transformation through a process ...

Wallance, Daniel Isaac

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Final report for 1.7 megajoule prototype bank testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

American Control Engineering is pleased to submit to LLNL this Final Report describing the final assembly and preliminary testing of the 1.7 megajoule prototype capacitor bank that is located at our facility. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate and characterize the performance of this capacitor bank. These tests were necessary in order to proceed with the design of a final building block module that is to be used to create a reliable and cost effective multi-hundred megajoule energy storage system. The period of performance covered by this contract is from January 1, 1991 through August 31, 1992. American Control Engineering has provided all of the necessary facilities, personnel and materials that were required to perform this testing effort (except for the existing capacitor bank, the LLNL provided flashlamp assembly and E-size ignitron switch tube), An overall view of the assembled capacitor bank system as it appeared at the completion of this subcontract is shown. The initial statement-of-work for the testing and characterization of the capacitor bank was as follows: (1) Measure all of the principal electrical parameters for the 1.7 megajoule prototype capacitor bank at low voltage before proceeding to high voltage testing. This low voltage testing is to include measurement of both normal and fault current and voltage waveforms, starting with the smallest building block grouping and proceeding systematically through to the capacitor bank load. (2) Assemble and attach each of the major subsystem elements to the capacitor bank as they are required for low voltage testing including the ignition output switch structure, coaxial transmission line and load assembly. (3) Make comparison of the test results collected through low voltage testing with those forecasted by the computer mode. Evaluate and resolve any discrepancies between the two results until the computer model achieves reasonable agreement with the actual measured test results.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Introduction to duration concepts: application to bank management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limitations due to over- simplifications. The balance sheet used in DGame is far too simpli- fied to use in understanding duration analysis in the real world. -24- First, banks carry many more different types of liabilities than just CD deposits. Other...INTRODUCTION TO DURATION CONCEPTS: APPLICATION TO BANK MANAGEMENT A Professional Paper by Alison J. Meyers Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Meyers, Alison J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Weiland, Mark A.

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

The local knowledge bank : uncovering the processes and networks of social innovation at Brazil's first community bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I apply a case study method to examine the processes of knowledge management both within the neighborhood, and in institutional partnerships, by Banco Palmas, Brazil's first community development bank, as ...

Gao, Ying, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: addition of i-butylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of i-butylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the seventh quarter we continued the shake down experiments for the SBCR and conducted an initial aborted run. We have also re-started experiments on Scheme 1, i.e., the addition of iso-butylene during CO hydrogenation. Using a dual bed arrangement, we have demonstrated the synthesis of MTBE from syngas and iso-butylene.

Marcelin, G.

1992-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The model includes heat generation due to the exothermic chemical reaction, as well as heat removal from a constant temperature heat exchanger. Results of the CMFD simulations (similar to those shown in Figure 1) will be presented.

Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Durability testing of medium speed diesel engine components designed for operating on coal/water slurry fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 200 operating cylinder hours were run on critical wearing engine parts. The main components tested included cylinder liners, piston rings, and fuel injector nozzles for coal/water slurry fueled operation. The liners had no visible indication of scoring nor major wear steps found on their tungsten carbide coating. While the tungsten carbide coating on the rings showed good wear resistance, some visual evidence suggests adhesive wear mode was present. Tungsten carbide coated rings running against tungsten carbide coated liners in GE 7FDL engines exhibit wear rates which suggest an approximate 500 to 750 hour life. Injector nozzle orifice materials evaluated were diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, and thermally stabilized diamond. Based upon a total of 500 cylinder hours of engine operation (including single-cylinder combustion tests), diamond compact was determined to be the preferred orifice material.

McDowell, R.E.; Giammarise, A.W.; Johnson, R.N.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Design of slurry bubble column reactors: novel technique for optimum catalyst size selection contractual origin of the invention  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining optimum catalyst particle size for a gas-solid, liquid-solid, or gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor such as a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) for converting synthesis gas into liquid fuels considers the complete granular temperature balance based on the kinetic theory of granular flow, the effect of a volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the liquid and the gas, and the water gas shift reaction. The granular temperature of the catalyst particles representing the kinetic energy of the catalyst particles is measured and the volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the gas and liquid phases is calculated using the granular temperature. Catalyst particle size is varied from 20 .mu.m to 120 .mu.m and a maximum mass transfer coefficient corresponding to optimum liquid hydrocarbon fuel production is determined. Optimum catalyst particle size for maximum methanol production in a SBCR was determined to be in the range of 60-70 .mu.m.

Gamwo, Isaac K. (Murrysville, PA); Gidaspow, Dimitri (Northbrook, IL); Jung, Jonghwun (Naperville, IL)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development of age of dam and sex adjustment factors for preweaning traits of Brangus cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplied on Brangus cattle enrolled in the BHIR by the IBBA. The data consisted of 103, 620 preweaning records from 1962 through 1988. Variables pertinent to the analyses were sire, age of dam, sex of calf, month of birth, year of birth, age at weaning... calf records reduced the data set size to approximately 55, 000 records. Further editing included records with birth weights less than 18. 14 kg and greater than 63. 50 kg, because calves outside of this weight range would be very rare or would...

Cravey, Matthew David

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Simulation analysis of within-day flow fluctuation effects on trout below flaming Gorge Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to being renewable, hydropower has the advantage of allowing rapid load-following, in that the generation rate can easily be varied within a day to match the demand for power. However, the flow fluctuations that result from load-following can be controversial, in part because they may affect downstream fish populations. At Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in northeastern Utah, concern has been raised about whether flow fluctuations caused by the dam disrupt feeding at a tailwater trout fishery, as fish move in response to flow changes and as the flow changes alter the amount or timing of the invertebrate drift that trout feed on. Western Area Power Administration (Western), which controls power production on submonthly time scales, has made several operational changes to address concerns about flow fluctuation effects on fisheries. These changes include reducing the number of daily flow peaks from two to one and operating within a restricted range of flows. These changes significantly reduce the value of the power produced at Flaming Gorge Dam and put higher load-following pressure on other power plants. Consequently, Western has great interest in understanding what benefits these restrictions provide to the fishery and whether adjusting the restrictions could provide a better tradeoff between power and non-power concerns. Directly evaluating the effects of flow fluctuations on fish populations is unfortunately difficult. Effects are expected to be relatively small, so tightly controlled experiments with large sample sizes and long study durations would be needed to evaluate them. Such experiments would be extremely expensive and would be subject to the confounding effects of uncontrollable variations in factors such as runoff and weather. Computer simulation using individual-based models (IBMs) is an alternative study approach for ecological problems that are not amenable to analysis using field studies alone. An IBM simulates how a population responds to environmental changes by representing how the population's individuals interact with their environment and each other. IBMs represent key characteristics of both individual organisms (trout, in this case) and the environment, thus allowing controlled simulation experiments to analyze the effects of changes in the key variables. For the flow fluctuation problem at Flaming Gorge Dam, the key environmental variables are flow rates and invertebrate drift concentrations, and the most important processes involve how trout adapt to changes (over space and time) in growth potential and mortality risk. This report documents simulation analyses of flow fluctuation effects on trout populations. The analyses were conducted in a highly controlled fashion: an IBM was used to predict production (survival and growth) of trout populations under a variety of scenarios that differ only in the level or type of flow fluctuation.

Railsback, S. F.; Hayse, J. W.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division; EPRI

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Survival Rates of Juvenile Salmonids Passing Through the Bonneville Dam and Spillway in 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a 2008 acoustic telemetry survival study conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study estimated the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead passing Bonneville Dam (BON) and its spillway. Of particular interest was the relative survival of smolts detected passing through end spill bays 1-3 and 16-18, which had deep flow deflectors immediately downstream of spill gates, versus survival of smolts passing middle spill bays 4-15, which had shallow flow deflectors.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Johnson, Gary E.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.; McComas, Roy L.; Everett, Jason

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

445

The configuration and sediments of Stetson Bank, northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 5 BATHYMETRY OF STETSON BANK, 5A. ? FROM DATA OF U. S. C. L G. S. , 5B ? FROM DATA OF PRESENT SURVEY 43 FIG. 6 STETSON BANK: BATHYMETRIC PROFILES 45 FIG. 7 STETSON BANK: LITHOLOGY, SEDIMENTS AND BATHYMETRY 48 FIG. 8 A SANDSTONE FRAGMENT... ANALYSIS OF ROCK MATERIAL FROM STE1%ON BANK 50 TABLE 3 CLAY MINERAIS INCLUDED IN ROCK AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES FROM STETSON BANK 60 TABLE 4 PARTICLE SIZE GRADES AND MEDIAN DIAllKTERS OF SEDIMENT SAMPLES FROM STETSON BANK TABLE 5 MACROFAUNAL ASSEMBLAGES...

Neumann, Andrew Conrad

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT NORTH FORK SKOKOMISH POWERHOUSE AT CUSHMAN NO. 2 DAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to add generating capacity on an in-stream flow release at Tacoma Power's Cushman hydroelectric project, Cushman No. 2 Dam, FERC Project P-460. The flow that is being used to generate additional electricity was being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam without recovery of the energy. A second objective to the project was to incorporate upstream fish passage by use of a fish collection structure attached to the draft tubes of the hydroelectric units. This will enable reintroduction of native anadromous fish above the dams which have blocked fish passage since the late 1920's. The project was funded in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Department of Energy, Office of Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program.

Fischer, Steve; Wilson, Matthew

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

448

Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL] [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation] [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2004 through March 2005 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rien, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir. Prolonged wave overtopping or a combination of wave the actions of wind generated waves and wave overtopping. The uneven elevations of the dam crest

Bowles, David S.

452

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines. The side of the river in which kelts approached the dam and dam operations also affected route of passage. Dam operations and the size and condition of kelts were found to have the greatest effect on route-specific survival probabilities for fish that passed via the spillway at LGS. That is, longer kelts and those in fair condition had a lower probability of survival for fish that passed via the spillway weir. The survival of spillway weir- and deep-spill passed kelts was positively correlated with the percent of the total discharge that passed through turbine unit 4. Too few kelts passed through the traditional spill, JBS, and turbine units to evaluate survival through these routes. The information gathered in this study describes Snake River steelhead kelt passage behavior, rates, and distributions through the FCRPS as well as provide information to biologists and engineers about the dam operations and abiotic conditions that are related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Trends in agricultural lending by commercial banks 1964-1984  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) represents the lowest percent- age held by any group of hanks in any year. The effects of inflation and real economic growth in the banking industry played a vital role in the changes that have occurred over the 20 year period. 8owever, it does... Adjusting the data with the GNF implicit price deflator does not add much more insight to the study. One can still observe the effects of real economic growth in the asset size of commercial banks ? this time without the effects of general inflation...

DeBerry, David Kendall

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Waste Management Fault Tree Data Bank (WM): 1992 status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Risk Assessment Methodology Group (RAM) of the Nuclear Process Safety Research Section (NPSR) maintains a compilation of incidents that have occurred in the Waste Management facilities. The Waste Management Fault Tree Data Bank (WM) contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM data bank including: availability, training, source of data, search options, and usage, to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

Baughman, D.F.; Hang, P.; Townsend, C.S.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Patterns of coral recruitment at the East Flower Garden Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PA~ OF CORK RECRUITMENZ AT THE EAST ~ GARDEN BANK A Thesis LARRY SCOTT BAGGEIT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requireaents for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major... Subject: Oceanography PA~ OF CORAL RZCRUI11%2% AT THE EAST FLCKKB GARDEN BANK A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by: Thomas J. Bri t (Chairman of Ccxnmittee) Eric N. Pcwell (~r) A. B. Smith (Member ) R. O. Reid (Head of Department...

Baggett, Larry Scott

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Multi-scale texture analysis of remote sensing images using gabor filter banks and wavelet transforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to texture information extraction and utilization. This research focuses on the use of multi-scale image texture analysis techniques using Gabor filter banks and Wavelet transformations. Gabor filter banks model texture as irradiance patterns in an image over...

Ravikumar, Rahul

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Did Residential Mortgages Help Banks and Hurt Credit Unions During the Financial Crisis?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Did Residential Mortgages Help Banks and Hurt Credit UnionsDid Residential Mortgages Help Banks and Hurt Credit Unionsrisk of failure, but do not help to answer whether either

Wilcox, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Integrative Innovation Strategy : a case study of Guaranty Trust Bank plc (GTBank)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since starting in 1990, Guaranty Trust Bank plc (GTBank) has emerged as one of the strongest players in the African Banking space despite the challenging business climate. Firms operating in similar conditions - geographies, ...

Adeyeri, Modupe Oludare

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The effect of alternative tree representations on tree bank Mark Johnson*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Johnson (1998) The effect of alternative tree representations on tree bank grammars. In D.M.W. Powers (ed

462

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE HUMPBACK WHALE, MEGAPTERA NOVAEANGLIAE, ON GEORGES BANK AND IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Silver and Navidad Banks which lie north ofthe Dominican Republic (Winn et al. 1975; Balcomb and Nichols

463

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

464

Political connections, bank deposits, and formal deposit insurance: Evidence from an emerging economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Political connections, bank deposits, and formal deposit insurance: Evidence from an emerging the impact of banks' political connections on their ability to collect deposits under two different deposit, regardless of their type (state-owned or private entities), politically connected banks are able to attract

Boyer, Edmond

465

OVERSAMPLING COMPLEX-MODULATED DIGITAL FILTER BANK PAIRS SUITABLE FOR EXTENSIVE SUBBAND-SIGNAL AMPLIFICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subband-signals by a synthe- sis filter bank (SFB). Due to low battery energy available in hear- ing aidsOVERSAMPLING COMPLEX-MODULATED DIGITAL FILTER BANK PAIRS SUITABLE FOR EXTENSIVE SUBBAND@nt.rub.de, web: www.dsv.rub.de ABSTRACT Oversampling, complex-modulated digital subband coder filter banks

Göckler, Heinz G.

466

Pamela Campa University of Calgary Christina Hkanson Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Pamela Campa ­ University of Calgary Christina Håkanson ­ Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden (Bank of Sweden) Virginia Queijo von Heideken ­ Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden) Mirco Tonin ­ School ­ University of Lausanne #12;2005 Thomas Eisensee ­ Ministry of Finance, Sweden Natalie Pienaar ­ National

467

Pamela Campa University of Calgary Christina Hkanson Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Pamela Campa ­ University of Calgary Christina Håkanson ­ Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden (Bank of Sweden) Virginia Queijo von Heideken ­ Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden) Mirco Tonin Favara ­ University of Lausanne #12;2005 Thomas Eisensee ­ Ministry of Finance, Sweden Natalie Pienaar

468

E-Business Value Creation in Jordanian Banking Services Industry: An Empirical Analysis of Key Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E-Business Value Creation in Jordanian Banking Services Industry: An Empirical Analysis of Key an extended conceptual research model for assessing the value of e-business at the bank level environment) that may affect value creation of carrying out e- business in Jordanian banking sector. Survey

469

Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia From Charleston Roanoke, VA: Via I-64 West, exit at White Sulphur Springs (Exit 181) and take Rt. 92 North to Green Bank, then take Rt. 92 South to Green Bank. From Washington DC: Via I-66 West to I-81 South. Option 1: Take I-81

Groppi, Christopher

470

The Construction and Maintenance Plan for a Grand Banks Multi-Purpose Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Construction and Maintenance Plan for a Grand Banks Multi-Purpose Pipeline D.W. (Don) Wilson, Director, North Atlantic Pipeline Partners, L.P. NOIA 2000 Conference June, 2000 #12;Grand Banks Multi-Purpose Pipeline Route January 2000 Grand Banks of Newfoundland Newfoundland Come by Chance St. John's Argentia 50o

Bruneau, Steve

471

The front on the Northern Flank of Georges Bank in spring: 1. Tidal and subtidal variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(supercritical flow) and slower than the lowest internal modes in deeper water to the north (subcritical flow of cool, fresh Scotian Shelf Water (SSW), stratifying the otherwise vertically well-mixed outer bank that contributes to its assimilation with ambient bank water. The off-bank- propagating internal tide is dominated

Kurapov, Alexander

472

Exploring the Potential Impact of Reforestation on the Hydrology of the Upper Tana River Catchment and the Masinga Dam, Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catchment and the Masinga Dam, Kenya Jennifer Jacobs, Jay Angerer, Jeff Vitale Raghavan Srinivasan, Robert of the most critical resource areas of Kenya. The Masinga Reservoir, at the outlet of the basin, provides, collaborating technical policy analysts working for key government institutions in Kenya identified the need

473

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report line. A 12 V stor- e battery may be attached to the battery connector with pin 1 ground and pin 2 +12 V DC nominal. When the primary power fails, the battery will supply power to the clock. About 1 1/2 amp

Groppi, Christopher

475

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE .:41; CLOCK INFORMATION FOR AST 286 COMPUTERS Ronald B. Weimer The battery backed clock is only read (which does not set the battery clock) the AST keeps time from a second crystal oscillator. A rough block

Groppi, Christopher

476

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report No. 109 BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD Michael Balister OCTOBER 1971 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD

Groppi, Christopher

477

DOE Hosts Festival to Collect Items for Area Food Banks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman and a representative of the Capital Area Food Bank are among the guest speakers at an event this Tuesday, July 31, to collect food items for the DOE Feeds Families drive.

478

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT the earth's axis and perpendic- ular to the Greenwich Meridian, call it the east-west plane. A telescope's rectangular cordinate components (x,y,z) are X = 882880.0208m Distance from the east-west plane, Greenwich

Groppi, Christopher

479

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report which has been used on all systems mounted in the past at the 300-foot telescope. The East and West 14 are so made to allow the East and West 1410 MHz feeds to be positioned 2. 63, 5.24, 7.88 and 10. 52

Groppi, Christopher

480

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report (Polarization) Focus Declination Beam East on Sky (Feed West of Center) Beam North to West on Sky (Feed North to West on Sky) Feed moves down toward surface Beam South on Sky Position Read- out Sign 300-FOOT

Groppi, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bank slurry dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Banking on Solar: New Opportunities for Lending (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. solar industry is a $13.7 billion market with roughly 450,000 systems in place. Bank and credit union lending for solar system deployment represents a valuable new opportunity for lenders to expand their consumer and commercial customer relationships, bring on new relationships and open a new asset class category.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Thomas Banks Santa Cruz Institue for Particle Physics (SCIPP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION Reed College Physics/Math B.A. 1969 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Physics PhThomas Banks Santa Cruz Institue for Particle Physics (SCIPP) UC Santa Cruz Department of Physics of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz 1989-present Professor of Physics, Rutgers University 1986

California at Santa Cruz, University of

483

RESEARCH ARTICLE Seed bank persistence of genetically modified canola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Seed bank persistence of genetically modified canola in California Douglas J-Verlag 2012 Abstract Introduction Canola, which is genetically modified (GM) for tolerance to glyphosate, has of glyphosate. Methods Volunteer from dormant canola seeds produced thousands of plants per hectare

California at Davis, University of

484

The Green Bank Interference Protection Group: Policies for RFI Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible access to the spectrum for Observers at Green Bank. Our general philosophy regarding this task has delegated to members of the IPG. The general philosophy for interference mitigation in Zone1 it if it happens to cause interference. At risk of stating the obvious, we note here that the equipment of visiting

Groppi, Christopher

485

Oxidation of Slurry Aluminide Coatings on Cast Stainless Steel Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC in Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, has been developed for a wide range of high temperature applications, including diesel exhaust components, turbine casings and turbocharger housings. CF8C-Plus offers significant improvements in creep rupture life and creep rupture strength over standard CF8C steel. However, at higher temperatures and in more aggressive environments, such as those containing significant water vapor, an oxidation-resistant protective coating will be necessary. The oxidation behavior of alloys CF8C and CF8C-Plus with various aluminide coatings were compared at 800oC in air plus 10 vol% water vapor. Due to their affordability, slurry aluminides were the primary coating system of interest, although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation coatings were also compared. Additionally, a preliminary study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminized CF8C-Plus was conducted at 800oC. Each type of coating provided substantial improvements in oxidation behavior, with simple slurry aluminides showing very good oxidation resistance after 4,000 h testing in water vapor. Preliminary low cycle fatigue results indicated that thicker aluminide coatings degraded high temperature fatigue properties of CF8C-Plus, whereas thinner coatings did not. Results suggest that appropriately designed slurry aluminide coatings are a viable option for economical, long-term oxidation protection of austenitic stainless steels in water vapor.

Haynes, James A [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Synthesis of Biological Reports on Juvenile Fish Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam through 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a review of available literature on juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam from 1939 through 2005. Studies of interest included project-wide fish-passage efficiency (FPE) studies by radio telemetry and fixed-aspect hydroacoustics, fish survival studies (direct and indirect), FGE studies, powerhouse and unit (by netting, hydroacoustics, and radio telemetry), predation studies in the forebay and tailrace, behavioral studies on forebay approach and egress, and surface-bypass studies. The FPE effort will include a review of available distribution data (horizontal, diel, and vertical) for juvenile salmon. This study does not repeat the results of previous review and synthesis studies but cites them. Where no previous review exists for a subject area, all reports were reviewed and synthesized. The report includes an annotated bibliography summarizing each of the documents reviewed and a DVD disk containing all of the original papers and reports along with an HTML index to the documents.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Johnson, Richard L.; Stevenson, John R.; Schilt, Carl R.; Johnson, Peter N.; Patterson, Deborah S.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

489

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt sur