Sample records for bank slurry dam

  1. EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA the lower sections of the three fish ladders at Rock Island Dam, 61 km upstream from Wanapum Dam of the center and left-bank fish ladders of Rock Island Dam were rebuilt and a new sequence of spill patterns

  2. Lapping slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, R.F.; Upchurch, V.S.; Leitten, M.E.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina work pieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid. 1 fig.

  3. Lapping slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Upchurch, Victor S. (Powell, TN); Leitten, Michael E. (Frederick, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina workpieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid.

  4. DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES 16.1. A spillway on a flood control dam is designed to pass a flood with an exceedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    · Lead-zinc mine · April 25, 1998, tailings dam failure · 4-5M m3 of tailings slurries into Rio Agrio

  5. Aqueous coal slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berggren, Mark H.; Smit, Francis J.; Swanson, Wilbur W.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An aqueous slurry containing coal and dextrin as a dispersant. The slurry, in addition to containing dextrin, may contain a conventional dispersant or, alternatively, a pH controlling reagent.

  6. Aqueous coal slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berggren, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Smit, Francis J. (Arvada, CO); Swanson, Wilbur W. (Golden, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aqueous slurry containing coal and dextrin as a dispersant. The slurry, in addition to containing dextrin, may contain a conventional dispersant or, alternatively, a pH controlling reagent.

  7. Ultrasound Analysis of Slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soong, Yee and Blackwell, Arthur G.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N, gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  8. Ultrasound Analysis Of Slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Blackwell, Arthur G. (Duquesne, PA)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N.sub.2 gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  9. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  10. Dam Safety Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

  11. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  12. Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

  13. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  14. Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

  15. Dam Safety (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety,...

  16. Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may be subject to periodic inspections. The...

  17. Power Plant Dams (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

  18. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  19. W02106010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-SMA-14.1 5.169 Acres W02106010008 rock check dam W02106010009 rock check dam W02106010010 rock check dam W02106010011 rock check dam W02106010012 rock check dam W02103010018 earthen berm W02103010016 dam Established vegetation Seed and mulch Sediment trap/basin Gabion Cap SWMU boundary SMA drainage

  20. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  1. Dams – Fishways (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.

  2. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Platt, Robert J. (Dover, NJ); Shadbolt, Edward A. (Basking Ridge, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces.

  3. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

    1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF ACCELERATED EROSION IN A SLURRY POT TESTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Achieved on Coal Slurry Pipeline," Materialserosion of aqueous coal slurries, indicating the importancethree materials tested in coal slurries is due to a fluid

  5. Dam Safety Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

  6. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  7. Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water impoundments. The Dam Safety page of the State Water...

  8. Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure....

  9. Coal slurry fuel supply and purge system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDowell, Robert E. (Fairview, PA); Basic, Steven L. (Hornell, NY); Smith, Russel M. (North East, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal slurry fuel supply and purge system for a locomotive engines is disclosed which includes a slurry recirculation path, a stand-by path for circulating slurry during idle or states of the engine when slurry fuel in not required by the engine, and an engine header fluid path connected to the stand-by path, for supplying and purging slurry fuel to and from fuel injectors. A controller controls the actuation of valves to facilitate supply and purge of slurry to and from the fuel injectors. A method for supplying and purging coal slurry in a compression ignition engine is disclosed which includes controlling fluid flow devices and valves in a plurality of fluid paths to facilitate continuous slurry recirculation and supply and purge of or slurry based on the operating state of the engine.

  10. Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It regulates dam construction, operation, and...

  11. Coal-oil slurry preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

  12. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  13. Dams (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork...

  14. Regulation of Dams (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The...

  15. Dam Safety (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

  16. Dam Safety (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from...

  17. Flood Protection and Dam Safety (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All dams in Virginia are subject to the Dam Safety Act and Dam Safety Regulations unless specifically excluded. A dam is excluded if it: (a) is less than six feet high; (b) has a maximum capacity...

  18. Coal slurries: An environmental bonus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basta, N.; Moore, S.; Ondrey, G.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developers and promoters of coal-water slurries and similar CWF (coal-water fuel) technologies have had a hard time winning converts since they unveiled their first commercial processes in the 1970s. The economic appeal of such processes, marginal at best, varies with the price of oil. Nevertheless, the technology is percolating, as geopolitics and environmental pressures drive new processes. Such fuels are becoming increasingly important to coal-rich, oil-poor nations such as China, as they attempt to build an onshore fuel supply. Meanwhile, improvements are changing the way coal-fired processes are viewed. Where air pollution regulations once discouraged the use of coal fuels, new coal processes have been developed that cut nitrous oxides (NOx) emissions and provide a use for coal fines, previously viewed as waste. The latest developments in the field were all on display at the 19th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems, held in Clearwater, Fla., on March 21--24. At this annual meeting, sponsored by the Coal and Slurry Technology Association, (Washington, D.C.) and the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Dept. of Energy (PETC), some 200 visitors from around the work gathered to discuss the latest developments in coal slurry utilization--new and improved processes, and onstream plants. This paper presents highlights from the conference.

  19. Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to settle disputes regarding the construction and operation of dams on non-navigable waters. Dam construction or alteration is...

  20. Coal-CO[subscript 2] Slurry Feed for Pressurized Gasifiers: Slurry Preparation System Characterization and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botero, Cristina

    Gasification-based plants with coal-CO[subscript 2] slurry feed are predicted to be more efficient than those with coal-water slurry feed. This is particularly true for high moisture, low rank coal such as lignite. ...

  1. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON LARGE DAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    FOR ESTIMATION OF THE PROBABILITY OF FAILURE OF DAMS FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT (* ) Robin FELL: · Failure modes identification · Analysis to estimate the probability of failure of the dam · Calculation the methods available for estimating the probability of failure of embankment and concrete dams, for normal

  2. Wim van Dam CURRICULUM VITAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Wim van Dam CURRICULUM VITAE Department of Computer Science Work: +1-805-893 5211 Harold Frank Hall in physics. #12;Curriculum Vitae Wim van Dam, June 2008 2 PUBLICATIONS Journal and Conference Articles [1] "Quantum Algorithms for Algebraic Problems", Andrew M. Childs and Wim van Dam, to appear in Reviews

  3. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sacramento. Graf, W. L. , 1999: Dam Nation: A GeographicCensus of American Dams and Their Large-Scale HydrologicEcological Effects of Dams: A Geomorphic Perspective.

  4. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Arnold D. (Alameda, CA)

    1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  5. ICP analysis of water slurries of ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, J.T.; Renfrow, M.B.; Riley, J.M. Jr.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct injection of solids-water slurries into the torch of an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer offers a rapid and easy method for the analysis of major and minor elements in various solids. In this project aqueous slurries of solids were prepared by milling with a stirred-ball slurry attritor mill and analyzed. Slurries of standard reference materials, prepared in the same manner, were used to calibrate the spectrometer. The best results were obtained with solids having a small particle size (2-5 {mu}m) and a close distribution of particle sizes. The average percent relative error for slurry-ICP analysis of most major and minor elements was generally less than 5% for the materials studied.

  6. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

    1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

  7. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

  8. Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of dams and also establishes requirements to govern the...

  9. Regulations and Permits Related to Dams (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont law requires a permit, or a dam order, for the construction, alteration, or removal of dams impounding more than 500,000 cubic feet of water, including any accumulated sediments. Dam...

  10. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  11. Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

  12. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalCo-Mingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with Different Water tocomingled biomass and coal slurry with a high carbon content

  13. Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all...

  14. DAMS: Distributed Adaptive Metaheuristic Selection Bilel Derbel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DAMS: Distributed Adaptive Metaheuristic Selection Bilel Derbel Université Lille 1 LIFL ­ CNRS Metaheuristic Selection (DAMS) frame- work. DAMS is dedicated to adaptive optimization in distributed environments. Given a set of metaheuristics, the goal of DAMS is to coordinate their local execution

  15. Characterization of melter slurries vitrified by microwave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). In this facility, control of the oxidation/reduction (redox) equilibrium in the glass melter is critical for processing of the nuclear waste. As part of the DWPF process control strategy, the glass redox expected in the melter will be determined by measuring the ratio of ferrous to ferric ions in vitrified slurry from the slurry mix evaporator (SME). Chemical analysis of this vitrified feed will also be used for other process control constraints which are related to glass viscosity, liquidus, and waste component solubility. In addition, the canisters of borosilicate waste glass produced in the DWPF must comply with the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) established by the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Specification 1.1.2 requires that the elemental composition of the glass be reported. The elemental analyses will be performed on vitrified melter feed taken from the melter feed tank (MFT). Conventional vitrification of SME/MFT slurries takes 4 hours at the DWPF melt temperature of 1150{degrees}C. Microwave vitrification of melter feed slurries has been shown to significantly reduce the time required to vitrify slurry samples.

  16. Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may...

  17. Hydraulic fracturing slurry transport in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.N.; Lord, D.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal-well activity has increased throughout the industry in the past few years. To design a successful hydraulic fracturing treatment for horizontal wells, accurate information on the transport properties of slurry in horizontal pipe is required. Limited information exists that can be used to estimate critical deposition and resuspension velocities when proppants are transported in horizontal wells with non-Newtonian fracturing gels. This paper presents a study of transport properties of various hydraulic fracturing slurries in horizontal pipes. Flow data are gathered in three transparent horizontal pipes with different diameters. Linear and crosslinked fracturing gels were studied, and the effects of variables--e.g., pipe size; polymer-gelling-agent concentration; fluid rheological properties; crosslinking effects; proppant size, density, and concentrations; fluid density; and slurry pump rate--on critical deposition and resuspension velocities were investigated. Also, equations to estimate the critical deposition and resuspension velocities of fracturing gels are provided.

  18. Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

  19. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phatak, Ramkrishna G. (San Antonio, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  20. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phatak, R.G.

    1984-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  1. Sedimentation in Coal-Water Slurry Pipelining Fabio Rosso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Fabio

    Sedimentation in Coal-Water Slurry Pipelining Fabio Rosso Dipartimento di Matematica `Ulisse Dini related to the pipelin- ing of a Coal-Water Slurry. The main aspects of the problem are both with experiments finding a remarkable agreement with the available data. 1 #12;1 Slurry handling and pipeline

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

  3. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  4. Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control....

  5. Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Georgia Safe Dams Act is to provide regulation, inspection and permitting of dams to the State. The Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD) is responsible for...

  6. The geomorphic influences of beaver dams and failures of beaver dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The geomorphic influences of beaver dams and failures of beaver dams David R. Butlera,T, George P millions to low billions of cubic meters range. Failure of beaver dams is a more common phenomenon than often assumed in the literature. During the past 20 years, numerous cases of dam failure have been

  7. GATC Flanking Sequences Regulate Dam Activity: Evidence for how Dam Specificity may Influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Norbert O.

    GATC Flanking Sequences Regulate Dam Activity: Evidence for how Dam Specificity may Influence pap coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) plays essential roles in DNA replication, mismatch repair and gene regulation. The differential methylation by Dam of the two GATC sequences in the pap promoter

  8. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

  9. Viscoplastic dam breaks and the Bostwick consistometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Viscoplastic dam breaks and the Bostwick consistometer N. J. Balmforth, a R. V. Craster, b P'Informazione, Universit`a di Milano, Crema, Italy Abstract We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dam the broken dam) that may assist an experimentalist to unravel those dependences. Experiments are conducted

  10. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  11. The design of avalanche protection dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The design of avalanche protection dams Recent practical & theoretical developments://ec.europa.eu/research/research-eu #12;The design of avalanche protection dams Recent practical and theoretical developments Edited by T: Top left: Mounds and catching dam in Neskaupstaður, eastern Iceland, photo: Tómas Jóhannesson. Top

  12. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  13. On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Cate, Balder

    On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam #12;#12;On Quantum Computation Theory #12;ILLC woensdag 9 oktober 2002, te 14.00 uur door Willem Klaas van Dam geboren te Breda. #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. P Dam, 2002 ISBN: 90­5776­091­6 #12;" . . . Many errors have been made in the world which today

  14. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  15. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  16. Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government and (a) have a structural height of more than 6 feet and a maximum storage capacity of 50 acre–feet or more of water, (b)...

  17. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  18. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  19. Coal slurry pipeline based midwest fuel hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huettenhain, H. [Bechtel Technology & Consulting San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is a sought after fuel to comply with the year 2000 emission regulation for utility boilers. PRB coal is presently not competitive East of the Mississippi mainly because of railroad switching requirements and boiler designs not compatible with the PRB fuel characteristics. The use of the Lakes for transportation is an exception. The Lakes shipping lanes however, are only open part of the year. It is proposed to construct a coal slurry pipeline from the center of Wyoming coalfields to a hub near Detroit with access to low cost waste energy from power generation stations. The coal slurry pipeline will transport up to 25 million tons per year of fine PRB coal which has been removed from the conventionally transported coal, namely coal transported by rail. The rail delivered coal will have less dust. The system fits the DOE Vision 21 concept to mine and utilize coal in highly efficient systems and with the least environmental impact. The PRB coal is of subbituminous rank and not directly compatible with the boilers in Michigan/Indiana/Ohio area, which are designed to burn bituminous coal. Upgrading of the PRB coal using the hydrothermal slurry upgrading process can transform the PRB coal into a higher Btu content fuel by removing a large portion of the inherent moisture. Such upgraded PRB coal has proven an excellent reactive fuel when burned conventionally as PC fuel, or even when burned in slurry form as Coal Water Fuel (CWF). The cost of the process can be recovered when the process is combined with a coal slurry pipeline transport system. The result is an upgraded competitive fuel or fuels, which can be used for co-firing or re-burning applications to reduce SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions of utility boilers. The fuels can be powdered for direct fuel injection into boilers or blast furnaces as well as CWF. Depending on the stability of the upgraded PRB coal, the pipeline product could also be dewatered and prepared for export. This paper describes the concept and preliminary cost information. It also reports on reactions of the industries, which could be involved in the complex system, namely, coal mining companies, railroads, pipeline operators, fuel suppliers, and utilities.

  20. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Chris M. (Shakopee, MN); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND); Mann, Michael D. (Thompson, ND); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Richter, John J. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); Willson, Warrack G. (Fairbanks, AK)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  1. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  2. Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last...

  3. Rheological Study of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalPretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, W; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries. The effect of the (15)comingled biomass and coal slurry are improved for use as ain comingled biomass and coal slurry is shown in Figure 7.

  4. Essays on banking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erel, Isil

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of two chapters that investigate two important issues in banking of the past decade: the effect of banking consolidation on the borrowers and the regulatory capital requirements for banks. The first ...

  5. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClaine, Andrew W.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

  6. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Long-profile of York Creek (figure adapted from report byFigure 5. Facies map for York Creek about 100 ft downstreamon Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework

  7. Pumping characteristics of chopped sorghum slurries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Shichuan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simultaneously in a pipeline. Classification of Solids Durand and Condolios (1953) published the following classification of particles in which each mode of particle transport was associated with a specific range of particle size. 1. Particles of a size less... is the settled-bed velocity, or deposition velocity. This is the mean velocity for the pipeline below which solids will settle on the bottom of the pipe (Cave and McElvain, 1983). It is important to know what the settled-bed velocity for a particular slurry...

  8. CST/Water Slurry Mixing and Resuspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baich, M.A.

    2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) was selected as one of the alternatives to the In-Tank Precipitation Process (ITP) for removal of cesium from the salt waste at Savannah River Site. The proposed salt waste treatment process using CST would involve passing a filtered salt waste through a fixed bed of CST. The CST would remove the cesium from the salt waste by ion exchange and the decontaminated salt would be incorporated into the Saltstone Process. This report documents the results of investigations into the mixing and re-suspension characteristics of two 10 wt percent CST slurries.

  9. Method and apparatus for improved wire saw slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costantini, Michael A. (Hudson, NH); Talbott, Jonathan A. (Amherst, NH); Chandra, Mohan (Merrimack, NH); Prasad, Vishwanath (East Setauket, NY); Caster, Allison (Nashua, NH); Gupta, Kedar P. (Merrimack, NH); Leyvraz, Philippe (Nashua, NH)

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A slurry recycle process for use in free-abrasive machining operations such as for wire saws used in wafer slicing of ingots, where the used slurry is separated into kerf-rich and abrasive-rich components, and the abrasive-rich component is reconstituted into a makeup slurry. During the process, the average particle size of the makeup slurry is controlled by monitoring the condition of the kerf and abrasive components and making necessary adjustments to the separating force and dwell time of the separator apparatus. Related pre-separator and post separator treatments, and feedback of one or the other separator slurry output components for mixing with incoming used slurry and recirculation through the separator, provide further effectiveness and additional control points in the process. The kerf-rich component is eventually or continually removed; the abrasive-rich component is reconstituted into a makeup slurry with a controlled, average particle size such that the products of the free-abrasive machining method using the recycled slurry process of the invention are of consistent high quality with less TTV deviation from cycle to cycle for a prolonged period or series of machining operations.

  10. Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, L.E. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.; Hughes, R.W. [Professional Services Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baggett, G. [Genex/Praxair, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

  11. MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

  12. Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.

  13. Fuel injection of coal slurry using vortex nozzles and valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holmes, Allen B. (Rockville, MD)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of atomized coal slurry fuel into an engine combustion chamber is achieved at relatively low pressures by means of a vortex swirl nozzle. The outlet opening of the vortex nozzle is considerably larger than conventional nozzle outlets, thereby eliminating major sources of failure due to clogging by contaminants in the fuel. Control fluid, such as air, may be used to impart vorticity to the slurry and/or purge the nozzle of contaminants during the times between measured slurry charges. The measured slurry charges may be produced by a diaphragm pump or by vortex valves controlled by a separate control fluid. Fluidic circuitry, employing vortex valves to alternatively block and pass cool slurry fuel flow, is disclosed.

  14. Bubble column apparatus for separating wax from catalyst slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neathery, James K.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel methods and devices for production of liquid hydrocarbon products from gaseous reactants are disclosed. In one aspect, a method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon, typically a wax, from a catalyst containing slurry is provided, comprising passing the slurry through at least one downcomer extending from an overhead separation chamber and discharging into the bottom of a slurry bubble column reactor. The downcomer includes a cross-flow filtration element for separating a substantially particle-free liquid hydrocarbon for downstream processing. In another aspect, a method for promoting plug-flow movement in a recirculating slurry bubble column reactor is provided, comprising discharging the recirculating slurry into the reactor through at least one downcomer which terminates near the bottom of the reactor. Devices for accomplishing the above methods are also provided.

  15. DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control in Eastern India ROHAN D, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Drowned and Dammed comprehensively reconsiders the debate with physical infrastructure such as embankments, canal networks, and inevitably the Hirakud Dam. In seeking

  16. Fact Sheet - Myths & Facts about the lower Snake River dams ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Myths and facts about the lower Snake River dams MYTH: The four lower Snake River dams are low value. FACT: It costs about 5 per megawatt-hour to produce power at the dams. The...

  17. Optimal Dam Construction under Climate Change Uncertainty and Anticipated Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron-Loyd, Patricia Jane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    real option theory to irrigation dam investment analysis: an43, 2) 482–498. [40] World Commission on Dams (WCD), 2000.Dams and development: A new framework for decision- making.

  18. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boulder BLDR Bedrock BDRK Dam Rubble DMRB Table B1. 2011pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamRemoval: Dam removal re-opens spring run salmon habitat. US

  19. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. PowerEnerCat was unable to raise their cash contribution for the project, and the work was stopped. This report summarizes some of the progress of the project and the concepts that were intended for experimental tests.

  20. Removal of particulate solids from a hot hydrocarbon slurry oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, J.B.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of treating a hot, refractory hydrocarbon slurry oil having an initial boiling point at atmospheric pressure at least as high as 500{degrees} F and having a gravity of from about 5{degrees} API to about 15{degrees} API, to remove solid particulate material the slurry oil. It comprises mixing with the hot slurry oil, a hot vacuum reduced crude oil having an initial boiling point at atmospheric pressure which is higher than the initial boiling plant at atmospheric pressure of the slurry oil, and having an end point at atmospheric pressure which is higher than the end point at atmospheric pressure of the slurry oil; charging the mixture of hot vacuum reduced crude oil and hot slurry oil to a vacuum flash zone having a pressure of from 1.0 mm Hg to about 10.0 mm Hg and at the selected temperature of less than 700{degrees} F and more than 300{degrees} F to thereby vaporize a major portion of the slurry oil in the mixture, and to thereby transfer substantially all of the solid particulate material into the bottoms liquid remaining in the flash zone following the completion of the vaporization; recovering the overhead; and recovering the liquid bottoms containing the solid particulate material.

  1. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry is carried out using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. Drop size and size distribution are measured using the laser diffraction technique. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. We also found that the atomized drop size, represented by the mass median diameter (MMD) can be described by the wave mechanism-based models in terms of three non-dimensional groups, namely, slurry-to-air mass ratio, the Weber number, and the Ohnesorge number. 11 refs.

  2. Guidewall demolition at Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, R.S. [Kiewit Pacific Co., Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Dam, completed in 1938, included the smallest and busiest lock on the Columbia and Snake River Navigation System. To expedite barge traffic through this restriction, a new larger lock was designed and contracted by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. The project involved drill and shoot, alluvial gravel and rock excavation, dredging, rock support, structural concrete, and assorted demolitions. A large portion of the demolition work was the removal of the existing guidewall to allow barge traffic access to the new lock. Guidewall Demolition was completed using drill and shoot techniques and dredging the debris from the channel. This work involved unique challenges and innovative solutions to produce a successful result.

  3. Modeling the structure of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prithiviraj, Manikandan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a model of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays and presents new experimental data for CWS viscosities. The model is based on the aerodynamic theory of spray atomization which has been successfully used for Diesel sprays. However...

  4. Supercritical extraction of organic mixtures from soil-water slurries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Lynda Ann

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical C02was used to extract orgamc rruxtures from soil-water slurries. The extent of extraction and the equilibrium distribution of the mixture and of the individual components were determined. A single stage batch vessel was used...

  5. Hydraulic and slurry flows through a channel contraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Hydraulic and slurry flows through a channel contraction Onno Bokhove o, Twente #12;Hydraulic flow through channel contraction Outline · 1. Introduction · 2. Experiments · 3. Conclusions · References ISSF 2008 University of Twente Page 2 #12;Hydraulic flow through channel contraction

  6. Ultrasonic techniques for measuring rheological properties of rice slurries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Terry Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems during food processing, resulting in poorly processed foods or production delays in processing plants. This research describes the development of a ultrasonic sensor to measure viscoelastic properties of rice slurries and dough. This inexpensive...

  7. Civil Engineering Explore the environmental impact of dams.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Dams Civil Engineering Objective · Explore the environmental impact of dams. · Discuss the need for dams, and how environmental engineers mitigate some impacts. Standards and Objectives · Earth Systems humans' standard of living and environmental impacts. · The basic concept of constructing a dam

  8. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure of Federal Regulations, Part 230, the Tulsa District has assessed the environmental impacts of modifications

  9. dam logic: qualitative reasoning about benthic macroinvertebrate responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    dam logic: qualitative reasoning about benthic macroinvertebrate responses to dam removal desiree reliability of biotic and abiotic indicators (e.g. responsiveness to dam removal, detectability, feasibility relationships "there appears to be a wide range of ecological responses to dam removal. It is therefore

  10. ImpactsofLarge Dams:agLobaL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    #12;ImpactsofLarge Dams:agLobaL assessment Editors Cecilia Tortajada, Dogan Altinbilek, Asit K of the most controversial issues of the water sector in recent years has been the impacts of large dams and environmental costs of large dams far exceed their benefits, and that the era of construction of large dams

  11. Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish THE HUGETHREE-GORGES DAM (TGD) OFTHE Yangtze River is going and animals, as discussed by J. Wu et al. in their Policy Forum "Three-Gorges Dam-- experiment in habitat). The construction of the Gezhou Dam (38 km downstream from the TGD) in 1981 led to sharp declines in the popula

  12. Effects of mineral fillers in slurry seal mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, William Joe

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rather than a desi~. The current practice among engineers and contractors is to prepare a mixture in ac- cordance with these specifications using local materials. In many cases a mineral filler, usually portland cement, is added to "improve... applied to portland cement concrete pavements to improve the skid resistance and riding qualities of tbe surface. A slurry seal cost does not increase or improve the strength of the pavement structure . The City of Las Vagas, New Mexico, used slurry...

  13. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nodd, Dennis G. (West Mifflin, PA); Walker, Richard J. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

  14. Design, maintenance extend FGD system slurry valve life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMay, B. [St. John`s River Power Park, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Willyard, B. [Grand River Dam Authority, Chouteau, OK (United States); Polasek, S. [Lower Colorado River Authority, Austin, TX (United States); Clarkson, C.W. [Clarkson Co., Sparks, NV (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how power plants in Florida, Oklahoma and Texas adopted improved maintenance techniques and sought better design criteria to gain greater slurry valve reliability. Slurry valves, a vital part of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, are critical to a power plant`s ability to meet or exceed acid rain emission requirements. The performance and reliability of these valves can significantly affect unit operation and load capacity. For example, slurry valves installed on the suction and discharge ends of scrubber tower pumps are a main point of isolation. When these valves malfunction, the scrubber tower must be shut down. Problems with valves that control the feed system and reaction tank alter slurry pH and density, and also affect unit load. In addition, a single valve that serves dual-pumping systems from the slurry storage tank to the reaction tank can cause a system outage. Because of their key role in system operation, specific maintenance approaches were developed at several power plants to improve slurry valve reliability and run times.

  15. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    until 1981 when it was closed due to declining boat traffic. Since the failure of Green River Dam 4 by the dams and the impacts if the pool were to be lost, either by demolition or failure of the lock andGreen River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16

  16. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  17. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supply, flood control, hydropower, and recreation. However,as changes induced by hydropower, flood control, or waterFERC requires private hydropower dams to provide “equal

  18. Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a...

  19. Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction over dams as indicated in the subsections of the law. This...

  20. Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to...

  1. Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Safe Dams Act of 1973 (SDA) gives the Commissioner of the Department of Environment and Conservation the power to issue certificates authorizing the construction, alteration, or operation of a...

  2. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  3. Processes affecting the spatial and temporal variability of methane in a temperate dammed river system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilsley, Nicole A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from large dams as renewable energy resources: Areservoir (Brazil’s Tucuruí Dam) and the energy policyemissions from hydroelectric dams: controversies provide a

  4. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  5. THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosshandler, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral Intensity With 5% Coal (x ::: 86.9 cm) CalculatedPredictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMethanol as the Fuel B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel C.

  6. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

  7. NY Green Bank

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Monday, October 6 th , 2014 Remarks by Nicholas Whitcombe, Managing Director, New York Green Bank Panel 1: Attracting and Maintaining Capital for Energy Transmission, Storage,...

  8. Iowa Energy Bank

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Iowa Energy Bank offers Iowa's public facilities, schools, area education agencies, colleges, universities, hospitals and local governments a 1% financing option for the implementation of cost...

  9. The Phase Inversion-based Coal-CO2 Slurry (PHICCOS) Feeding System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Phase Inversion-based Coal-CO2 Slurry (PHICCOS) Feeding System: Design, Coupled Multiscale. Commercially available feeding systems are based on coal-water slurry or lock hoppers. The earlier penalizes coal feeding system. The proposed Phase Inversion-based Coal-CO2 Slurry (PHICCOS) feeding system uses

  10. THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosshandler, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMETHANOL METHANOL / COAL SLURRY j i Ali. @ i o N I. . , .PURE N METHANOL METHANOL I COAL SLURRY u o Obb~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

  11. Flow of Fiber-Reinforced Cement Slurries at Elevated Temperatures Y. Wang and C. Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Flow of Fiber-Reinforced Cement Slurries at Elevated Temperatures Y. Wang and C. Meyer Dept. of Civil Eng. and Eng. Mech., Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA Abstract Cement slurries for a constant pressure drop of a fiber-reinforced cement slurry through an eccentric annulus at elevated

  12. Channel response to Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Peter; Vizcaino, Pilar

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California Peter Miller and9, 2004 Abstract Clear Creek drains 720 km 2 , joining the2002) Saeltzer Dam on Clear Creek was a good candidate for

  13. Power benefits of the lower Snake River dams - FACT SHEET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I n the 1960s and early 1970s, the federal government built four large dams on the Snake River. This is the last set of major dams to have been built in the Federal Columbia River...

  14. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jason [Lac Courte Oreilles; Meyers, Amy [Kiser Hydro

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  15. Student Competition: Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah Presented By: Kyle Wamser Problem ? Camp Del Webb is Lacking an Onsite Lake ? High Adventure Bases generally need aquatics ? Large lake nearby, but transportation is required ? Possible Solution... hillshade ? Finding Possible Lake Locations ? Added three potential dam sites ? Calculated watersheds ? Extended dams through terrain to prevent runoff on the sides ? Calculated watershed dam elevation, which identified lakes Results...

  16. Corporate governance and banking regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kern

    The globalisation of banking markets has raised important issues regarding corporate governance regulation for banking institutions. This research paper addresses some of the major issues of corporate governance as it relates to banking regulation...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  18. MURTHY, MURTY AND RAGHUPATHY Designing Earth Dams Optimally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    [ 91 ] MURTHY, MURTY AND RAGHUPATHY Designing Earth Dams Optimally G S R Murthy1 , Katta G Murty2 HES Infra Limited, Hyderabad, India Abstract : Engineering design of an earth dam is a crucial issue, it aims at formulating the problem of designing earth dams as an optimization problem. The problem

  19. GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams geomembrane and composite liners under conditions representative of dams. There has been previous work done

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM This brochure describes the flood above Wivenhoe Dam. It includes reference information which will be useful for understanding Flood above Wivenhoe Dam drains an area of approximately 7,000 square kilometres. The Brisbane River rises

  1. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure for the Brisbane River below Wivenhoe Dam to Brisbane City. It includes reference information which will be useful kilometres of which about half is below Wivenhoe Dam. The Lockyer-Laidley Valley drains into the Brisbane

  2. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  3. MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon and Steelhead Trout GERALD B. COLLINS INTRODUCTION on the survival of salmon than the construction of dams. The watershed of the Columbia River presents a critical illustration of the effects of dams on salmon, reflecting events in progress in the entire Pacific Northwest

  4. Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backe, Knut

    Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength, and Shrinkage K.R. Backe oilwell cements. The results show that the curing characteristics are a function of temperature and that there is a correlation between shrinkage and cement content. The paper also introduces a new mechanism for gas migration

  5. RHEOLOGICAL STUDY OF AN HYDRATE SLURRY FOR AIR CONDITIONNING APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    [-] INTRODUCTION In the context of the classical refrigerants phase out, phase change materials (PCM) arouse great interests. Indeed, for very low temperature application such as refrigeration, ice-slurries are spread as secondary refrigerants. Concerning hydrates, they have been used as PCM for cold storage for years

  6. CoalWater Slurry technology: problems and modeling solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Fabio

    ·· Coal­Water Slurry technology: problems and modeling solutions A. Fasano, E. De Angelis, A viscosity reaches extremely high values and the product becomes useless. Sedimentation Firenze - 29 october viscosity reaches extremely high values and the product becomes useless. Sedimentation: it's also a long

  7. A bank management audit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennemer, Hoyt Granville

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bogle Letbetter for their assistance in the preparation of this thesis. Special acknowledgement is also extended to the exec- utives of the Blank Eational Bank foz their time and. co- operation in deueloplnp answers to the questions contained..., ~ ~ ~ 49 X EXECUTIVE EVALUATION w ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 52 XI CCNCLUSION ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ BIBLIOGRAPHY ~ o APPENDIX ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ 6) LIST OP CHAHTS Chart I, Organisation Chart of the Bank Manage- ment...

  8. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  9. Chapter 13 Water Resources Hoover Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    management Water shortage linked to food supply Learning Objectives #12; The global water cycleChapter 13 Water Resources #12;Hoover Dam #12;The Colorado River Basin Population growth Urbanization Climate change #12; Water cycle Water use Surface water and groundwater processes Water

  10. Aerosols generated by spills of viscous solutions and slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, M Y; Hodgson, W H

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop methods for estimating source terms from these accidents. Experiments were run by spilling viscous solutions and slurries to determine the mass and particle-size distribution of the material made airborne. In all cases, 1 L of solution was spilled from a height of 3 m. Aqueous solutions of sucrose (0 to 56%) gave a range of viscosities from 1.3 to 46 cp. The percent of spill mass made airborne from the spills of these solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0.0001. The mass of particles made airborne decreased as solution viscosity increased. Slurry loading ranged from 25 to 51% total solids. The maximum source airborne (0.0046 wt %) occurred with the slurry that had the lightest loading of soluble solids. The viscosity of the carrying solution also had an impact on the source term from spilling slurries. The effect of surface tension on the source term was examined in two experiments. Surface tension was halved in these spills by adding a surfactant. The maximum weight percent airborne from these spills was 0.0045, compared to 0.003 for spills with twice the surface tension. The aerodynamic mass medium diameters for the aerosols produced by spills of the viscous solutions, slurries, and low surface tension liquids ranged from 0.6 to 8.4 ..mu..m, and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.8 to 28.0.

  11. Slurry atomizer for a coal-feeder and dryer used to provide coal at gasifier pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loth, John L. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, William C. (Morgantown, WV); Friggens, Gary R. (Morgantown, WV)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a coal-water slurry atomizer for use a high-pressure dryer employed in a pumping system utilized to feed coal into a pressurized coal gasifier. The slurry atomizer is provided with a venturi, constant area slurry injection conduit, and a plurality of tangentially disposed steam injection ports. Superheated steam is injected into the atomizer through these ports to provide a vortical flow of the steam, which, in turn, shears slurry emerging from the slurry injection conduit. The droplets of slurry are rapidly dispersed in the dryer through the venturi where the water is vaporized from the slurry by the steam prior to deleterious heating of the coal.

  12. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

  13. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

  14. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robben, F.A.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robben, Franklin A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal.

  16. Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

  17. Dynamic model failure tests of dam structures Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    Dynamic model failure tests of dam structures Gao Lin Dalian University of Technology, Dalian failure tests of a number of concrete gravity dams, concrete arch dams and embankment dams have been index for the safety assessment of concrete dams and is predicted through dynamic model failure tests

  18. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 General Motors 2 Variable Height Vehicle Air Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Vehicle Air Dam Overview The fundamental issue with fixed air dams is the bottom edge of the dam needs to be high enough to meet defined vehicle ground clearance and front approach angle criteria. Air dams must a solution to this problem by designing an variable height vehicle air dam. Objectives Our mission

  19. Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands of years dams (>15 m in height) and an estimated 800 000 small dams had been built worldwide (WCD 2000 than 22 000 large dams (but only 22 before 1949), China is the largest dam-building country; by way

  20. Effects of friction factor and slip factor on the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Ketankumar Kantilal

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in dredging operations, chemical plants, power plants, and for handling coal slurries. For higher discharge pressure requirements, centrifugal slurry pumps are operated in series with up to six stages, 800 horsepower on each stage, and discharge pressures...EFFECTS OF FRICTION FACTOR AND SLIP FACTOR ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A CENTRIFUGAL SLURRY PUMP A Thesis by KETANKUMAR KANTILAL SHETH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  1. The role of microorganisms in the production of volatile sulfhydryl compounds in cheddar cheese slurries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce-Trevino, Raul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the role of lac- tic cultures on the production of volatile sulfhydryl com- pounds in the slurries. Hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide were found in the headspace of slurries prepared from curd manufactured... by the culture procedure. Addition of an antibiotic mixture to slurries prepared from curd manufactured by the culture me- thod inhibited bacteria growth and the production of hydro- gen sulfide and dimethyl sulfide. A mixture of antibiotics was added...

  2. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

    1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  4. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

  5. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or Dikes Generally; ExemptionsLegal Abstract Section...

  7. analysis model dam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Image Analysis Erik B. Dam Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: - mentation program, the possible performance improvement due to non-linear diffusion is not unlimited,...

  8. arch dams including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using...

  9. Company shelves dam to avoid agency's conservation edict

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Northern Paper Co. is shelving plans to build a hydroelectric dam because of two stipulations by the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC) requiring the company to fund a comprehensive energy audit of several mills in the area and submit a plan for modernizing outdated paper producing machines. Critics of the dam contend that in-plant conservation would free up more power than the dam would produce. The basis for this was an internal memo citing possible large amounts of wasted energy from motors that need rewinding. Although the company is retaining the option to build, the future of the Big A dam is uncertain.

  10. Horse and Libby dams. VarQ was made permanent at Libby and Hun-gry Horse dams by 2009, after an extensive Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VarQ Horse and Libby dams. VarQ was made permanent at Libby and Hun- gry Horse dams by 2009, afterQ providedecosystembenefitswhilemaintainingthesameFRMbenefits as under standard FRM. How Does VarQ Impact Canada? Above Libby Dam, both U of the border. Below Libby Dam, both U.S. and Canadian fish populations benefit from river flows that more

  11. Potential Geomorphic and Ecological Impacts of Marmot Dam Removal, Sandy River, OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marmot Dam is a 13-meter (42 ft) high hydroelectric diversion dam on the Sandy River that is owned Run Hydroelectric project and began the process of creating a decommissioning plan for the dam

  12. Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    . Removal of the dam would require dredging or release downstream of 0.35 million m3 of sedi- ment to re for keeping the dam. Reasons to remove a dam might include economic obsolescence, safety issues, costs

  13. Review of Studies of Fish Survival in Spill at The Dalles Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review of Studies of Fish Survival in Spill at The Dalles Dam Independent Scientific Advisory BoardThe Dalles Dam Contents Assignment ................................................................................................................................................. 17 Appendix 4. Estimated Total Project Survival at The Dalles Dam at the Two Spill Levels

  14. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gages used and the dates of the pre- and post-dam periods.and its alteration by dams. San Francisco Estuary andof water and sediment on rigid dam, J. Eng. Mech. , 119(7),

  15. High Dams and Marine-Freshwater Linkages: Effects on Native and Introduced Fauna in the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Yoshioka, Beverly Buchanan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in relation to hydroelectric dams in the Amazon Basin.effects of the Kafue Gorge Dam. Transactions of the Americanof fishways and impact of dams on the migration of grayling

  16. Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and Its Alteration by Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. 2005. Creating a comprehensive dam dataset for assessingand its Alteration by Dams STEVEN T. LINDLEY 1 , ROBERT S.Pres- ently, impassable dams block access to 80% of

  17. The distribution of dams in Costa Rica and their hydrologic impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurencio, Laura Richards

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dam construction has increased exponentially over the past century, primarily in temperate environments. While the impacts of dams in temperate regions have been well-documented, a parallel level of research on dam impacts has not been achieved...

  18. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for Interpreting Downstream Effects of Dams onF. and N. Shin, 2001. The downstream effects of dams on theG.P. and M.G. Wolman, 1984. Downstream Effects of Dams on

  19. Distribution of bed sediment on Clear Creek after removal of Saeltzer Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton-Niederman, Z; Gilbreath, Alicia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Saeltzer Dam on Clear Creek: An Update, Water Resources83-138. Brown, Matt. 2004. Clear Creek anadromous salmonidto Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California, Water Resources

  20. Instituto Babcock Pamela Ruegg, Dam Rasmussen, y Doug Reinemann, Universidad de Wisconsin Instituto Babcock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Instituto Babcock © Pamela Ruegg, Dam Rasmussen, y Doug Reinemann, Universidad de Wisconsin. Pamela Ruegg, Dam Rasmussen, and Doug Reinemann Traductor: Matías Fernandez Introducción La producción y

  1. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report was prepared by Argonne Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (Western. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams equipped for power

  2. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Wittmer, Dale E. (Carbondale, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  3. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; Wittmer, D.E.

    1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  4. Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity, reduction of slurry viscosity, and corrosion inhibition. INTRODUCTION Water often forms gas hydrates antiagglomeration (AA) in the natural gas hydrate literature. The main limitation to application has been the need

  5. US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    2 through a comprehensive and integrated consideration of the overall safety of a reservoir and value judgements. ICOLD (2005) ABSTRACT Risk assessment provides an opportunity to manage dam safety and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah State University, Logan

  6. Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

  7. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Lech Nowicki; Jiang Wang; Wen-Ping Ma

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the first year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sup 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we have completed one STSR test with precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany). This catalyst was initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. The catalyst was tested at 13 different sets of process conditions, and had experienced a moderate deactivation during the first 500 h of testing (decrease in conversion from 56% to 50% at baseline process conditions). The second STSR test has been initiated and after 270 h on stream, the catalyst was tested at 6 different sets of process conditions.

  8. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the second year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the second year of the project we completed the STSR test SB-26203 (275-343 h on stream), which was initiated during the first year of the project, and another STSR test (SB-28603 lasting 341 h). Since the inception of the project we completed 3 STSR tests, and evaluated catalyst under 25 different sets of process conditions. A precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany) was used in all tests. This catalyst was used initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. Also, during the second year we performed a qualitative analysis of experimental data from all three STSR tests. Effects of process conditions (reaction temperature, pressure, feed composition and gas space velocity) on water-gas-shift (WGS) activity and hydrocarbon product distribution have been determined.

  9. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst-free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by mixing them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation. 2 figs.

  10. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Curt M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Quiring, Michael S. (Katy, TX); Jensen, Karen L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hickey, Richard F. (Bethel Park, PA); Gillham, Larry D. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by slurring them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation.

  11. The Distribution and Flux of Fish in the Forebay of The Dalles Dam in 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Hanks, Michael E.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Skalski, John R.; Dillingham, Peter W.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In spring and summer 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led a team that conducted mobile and fixed hydroacoustic surveys in the forebay of The Dalles Dam for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District, for the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program. The surveys provided information on the distribution and movement of smolt-sized fish relative to ambient factors such as flow, bathymetry, or diel cycle in the forebay at The Dalles Dam. This information is intended to provide baseline data for the development of a surface bypass alternative for juvenile salmon at The Dalles Dam. We sampled the forebay of The Dallas Dam one day and night each week for six weeks in the spring and another six weeks in the summer. In general, during the day in the spring, the greatest densities of smolt-sized fish were observed in the thalweg of the main channel from the Washington bank, to the east side of the powerhouse, along the powerhouse, and concentrated in the areas next to the sluiceway. Fish density was lower on the Washington side of the river and west of mid-powerhouse (north spillway side). The spring night distribution was similar, with a few notable differences. The density of fish was high on the east side of the powerhouse and along the face of the powerhouse, and more fish were detected on the north spillway side. The distribution of sub-yearling sized fish in summer followed the same general patterns as spring, except that summer fish had a greater presence on the east side of the powerhouse and on the north spillway side. The vertical distribution of fish was also determined. In spring 80% of fish were above 5.6 m of depth during the day and above 4.7 m in the night. The summer fish were similarly distributed in the day and night with 80% of the fish in the upper 4.5 m and 4.7 m of the water column respectively. In general the smolt-sized fish were distributed deeper in the water column in the center of the channel than near the edges. The net movement of smolt-sized fish in the forebay from fixed-point samples appeared to be in a circular pattern, with fish moving with the flow and channel upstream of the powerhouse, and upstream at points near the powerhouse. The rate of fish movement (flux) was greatest at the east end of the powerhouse and on the upstream-north side of the channel.

  12. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  13. TSSGNEO suggestions for refinement of safety criteria for dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savich, A. I.; Gaziev, E. G. [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)] [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of radial-displacements of the dam, measured by direct and inverted plumb lines, indicates that curves of the variation in radial displacements of the dam at different elevations make it possible to plot diagrams of increases in the radial displacement over the entire height of the dam, i.e., inclines of the axis of the dam to the vertical.

  14. On the Modeling and Simulation of Non-Hydrostatic Dam Break Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the failure of the dam structure. The determination of the potential consequences of a dam break requiresOn the Modeling and Simulation of Non-Hydrostatic Dam Break Flows Alexandre Caboussat S´ebastien Boyaval Alexandre Masserey January 1, 2013 Abstract The numerical simulation of three-dimensional dam

  15. Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers Australian National Committee on Large Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Committee on Large Dams LIFESim: A Model for Estimating Dam Failure Life Loss DRAFT by Maged A. Aboelata ABSTRACT Catastrophic events such as dam failures or severe floods are considered to be of low probability linked circumstances surrounding historical dam failure events to actual loss of life and produced

  16. Signature of Rhine Valley sturzstrom dam failures in Holocene sediments of Lake Constance, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Signature of Rhine Valley sturzstrom dam failures in Holocene sediments of Lake Constance, Germany that the hyperpycnite deposits are directly related to the failure of two sturzstrom dams and the draining of the dammed and Schuster, 1988). Landslide-dammed lake failures constitute a major hazard to downstream areas (Eis- bacher

  17. Morphological responses and sediment processes following a typhoon-induced dam failure, Dahan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Morphological responses and sediment processes following a typhoon-induced dam failure, Dahan River gravel and sand was exposed when Barlin Dam failed during Typhoon WeiPa in 2007. The dam was located configuration, and distance from the dam is needed to explain the rate and pattern of morphological changes

  18. Experimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    as a fluid hits the dam (fluid impact load). The former tends to cause partial break of the concrete damExperimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1 lwao Miyoshi2 ABSTRACT When a dam is struck by mud or debris flow, it is put under a great impact load and sometimes is destroyed. To prevent

  19. The horizontal dam break problem for slow non-Newtonian power-law fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The horizontal dam break problem for slow non-Newtonian power-law fluids P. Saramito a C. Smutek bLaboratoire g´eosciences ­ IPGP et universit´e de La R´eunion, France Abstract ­ The dam break problem shallow for the horizontal dam break problem. Keywords ­ viscoplastic fluid; dam break problem; shallow flows. 1

  20. Introduction to the special issue: Understanding and linking the biophysical, socioeconomic and geopolitical effects of dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , socioeconomic and geopolitical effects of dams 1. Introduction Dams have made important contributions to human develop- ment, and the benefits derived from them have been considerable (World Commission on Dams, 2000). With the rising global popu- lation and desire to increase quality of life, dams are prominently staged to deliver

  1. Does Small Dam Removal Affect Local Property Values? An Empirical Analysis Bill Provencher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provencher, R. William

    Does Small Dam Removal Affect Local Property Values? An Empirical Analysis Bill Provencher of small dam removal on property values in south-central Wisconsin. Data on residential property sales were obtained for three categories of sites: those where a dam is intact, those where a dam was recently removed

  2. Thermal Monitoring of Embankment Dams by Fiber Optics Y. L. Beck1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thermal Monitoring of Embankment Dams by Fiber Optics Y. L. Beck1 , A. A. Khan1 , P. Cunat1 , C an embankment dam changes its temperature field. In this regard, fiber optics buried in the structures can of embankment dams. Introduction Erosion of hydraulic embankments like dams and dikes, specially the internal

  3. Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin L. Allan substantial modifications or removal of Englebright Dam, a large dam (86 million m3 capacity) built by the U organizations, therefore, is examining aspects of various dam-treatment scenarios that range from no action

  4. Explores Dam Removal Located in Southwest Ohio, Buck Creek and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    OHIO Researcher Explores Dam Removal Located in Southwest Ohio, Buck Creek and its tributary, Beaver Creek, run through a series of low-head dams in Springfield, Ohio. Historically, the four dams of the four dams. This will help restore the natural flow of sediments and fish along the entire river

  5. Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers William L. Graf including more than 75,000 dams. One hundred thirty-seven of the very large dams, each storing 1.2 km3 (106 effects of these very large dams emerge from an analysis of the stream gage records of 72 river reaches

  6. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall downstream from the dam and in an upstream control reach using aerial photos (1994­2008) and in the field

  7. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal LIquefaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the fourth six month period of this three year grant under the University Coal Research program. During this period, we have begun the synthesis of precipitated catalysts using a bench-top spray dryer. The influence of binders on particle strength was also studied using the ultrasonic fragmentation approach to derive particle breaking stress. A similar approach was used to derive particle strength of catalysts obtained from Mr. Robert Gormley at FETC. Over the next six month period, this work will be continued while the catalysts prepared here will be examined by TPR to determine reducibility and the extent of adverse iron-silica interactions. A fundamental study of Fe/silica interactions has been performed using temperature programmed reaction and TEM to provide understanding of how the silica binders influence the activity of Fe catalysts. To understand differences in the reducibility of the iron phase caused by silica, we have set up a temperature programmed reduction facility. TPR in H, as well as in CO was performed of Fe/ SiO, catalysts prepared by impregnation as well as by precipitation. What is unique about these studies is that high resolution TEM was performed on samples removed from the reactor at various stages of reduction. This helps provide direct evidence for the phase changes that are detected by TPR. We have continued the analysis of catalysts received from slurry reactor runs at Texas A&M university (TAMU) and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) by x-ray diffraction. The purpose of the XRD analysis was to determine the phase composition of catalysts derived from a slurry reaction run using Fe Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. We had previously described how catalyst removed in the hot wax may oxidize to magnetite if the wax is air-exposed. We have now received catalysts from CAER that were removed under a protective inert blanket, and we are in the process of analyzing them, but preliminary work presented here shows very little oxide by XRD. However, the catalyst that was used in these runs at CAER was a different composition than that used in previous runs, so the protective effect of an inert blanket will need further study. Finally, we point out how the interference by the wax can make it difficult in some cases to analyze the phases in a Fe catalyst. Several approaches have been used to remove the interference from the wax and we come to the surprising conclusion that Fe may be present in a working slurry reactor despite the high CO/ H{sub 2} ratio. Further work is underway to corroborate this finding.

  8. A Pipeline Transport Correlation for Slurries with Small but Dense Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Etchells, Arthur W.; Chun, Jaehun; Adkins, Harold E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Minette, Michael J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most correlations/models for minimum transport or critical velocity of slurry were developed for slurries composed of particles greater than ~100-200 ?m diameter with narrow particle-size distributions which is typical of the minerals industry. Many other process industries handle smaller particles. In particular waste slurries at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have broad size distributions and significant fractions of smaller particles. Despite the size of these wastes, recent PNNL studies indicate that the small particles might be of sufficient density to pose a significant risk for pipeline deposition and plugging. To allow predictive assessment of deposition of fine dense particles for waste slurry transport at the U.S. DOE Hanford site, a pipeline-transport correlation for critical velocity was developed using a simple power-law between two dimensionless numbers important for slurry transport, the deposition Froude and Archimedes numbers. The correlation accords well with experimental data for slurries with Archimedes numbers <80 and is an adequate pipeline design guide for processing Hanford waste slurry.

  9. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard A. Toseland

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  10. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard A. Toseland, Ph.D.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column 0reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  11. Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toseland, B.A.

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  12. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100/sup 0/C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 ..mu..m/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions.

  13. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard A. Toseland, Ph.D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors. The past three months of research have been focused on two major areas of bubble column hydrodynamics: (1) pressure and temperature effects on gas holdup and (2) region transition using a sparger as a gas distributor.

  14. Method of burning lightly loaded coal-water slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, C.R.

    1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a preferred arrangement of the method of the invention, a lightly loaded coal-water slurry, containing in the range of approximately 40% to 52% + 2% by weight coal, is atomized to strip water from coal particles in the mixture. Primary combustor air is forced around the atomized spray in a combustion chamber of a combustor to swirl the air in a helical path through the combustion chamber. A flame is established within the combustion chamber to ignite the stripped coal particles, and flame temperature regulating means are provided for maintaining the flame temperature within a desired predetermined range of temperatures that is effective to produce dry, essentially slag-free ash from the combustion process.

  15. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  16. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  17. Kevin Banks | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    friction and wear on machines using engine oils. "What I liked most about my internship experience was really, everything," said Banks. "It gave me a very diverse and...

  18. Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

  19. Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to dams and bridges on or near navigable waters. This statute establishes that the Department of Natural Resources has...

  20. Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for...

  1. aswan high dam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laval, Qubec, Qubec, Canada G1V 0A6 a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f climate change marine sedimentation river damming spectral analysis Gulf of St. Lawrence...

  2. Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications for the Age and Evolution of the Valles Caldera Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  3. Early warning systems: An economic approach to dam safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, B.D. [National Weather Service Colorado River Basin Forecasting Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An early warning system can provide a relatively low-cost method for addressing dam safety issues. Bureau of Reclamation engineers have developed a systematic approach for designing warning systems while effectively balancing safety and economic concerns. Rather than addressing the dam itself, the system addresses the embayment and those meteorological/hydrological factors affecting the embayment. Characteristics of the mathematical model developed are addressed in this paper.

  4. Providing protection: Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Providing protection Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams along with local partners, can apply for grant funds, he said. Construction of the dams began through four federal authorizations..., called floodwater retarding structures and built mostly in rural areas during the 1950s to 1970s, are aging and need repairing. Others now protect urban areas that have developed downstream and need upgrading to meet more stringent safety standards...

  5. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamBrown, M. (2011). 2011 Clear Creek Technical Team Report froAssessment: Lower Clear Creek Anadromous Fish Restoration &

  6. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  7. Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillian, Michael H. (Fairmont, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

  8. Thermal Performance of Microencapsulated Phase Material (MPCM) Slurry in a Coaxial Heat Exchanger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kun

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries and coil heat exchangers had been recently studied separately as enhancers of convective heat transfer processes. Due to the larger apparent heat related to the phase change process...

  9. Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

  10. Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaskill, Travis

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a...

  11. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement...

  12. Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaskill, Travis

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a...

  13. Envir202b Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Envir202b ­ Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams ­ A Case Study Assignment & Schedule for Day 2 We will next work as your group will be asked to answer the following questions: 1) What changes (if any) to the dams

  14. Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    streams, organic debris dams can play an important role inin ?ow velocity when debris dams are hydraulically activecontact time. Therefore, debris dams can have an important

  15. South Carolina Conservation Bank Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The South Carolina Conservation Bank Act establishes a state funding source to acquire property interests for environmental preservation purposes. The Bank's activity draws heavily on the earlier...

  16. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in the slurry phase on iron catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Russell Floyd

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN THE SLURRY PHASE ON IRON CATALYSTS A Thesis by RUSSELL FLOYD BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN THE SLURRY PHASE ON IRON CATALYSTS A Thesis by RUSSELL FLOYD BROWN Approved as to style and content by: Dragomir B. Bukur (Chairman of Committee) A med Gadalla (Member) Michael P...

  17. Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

  19. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. Van der Laan and Beenackers hydrocarbon selectivity model provides a very good fit of the experimental data for hydrocarbons up to about C{sub 20}. However, the experimental data shows higher paraffin formation rates in C{sub 12}-C{sub 25} region which is likely due to hydrocracking or other secondary reactions. The model accurately captures the observed experimental trends of decreasing olefin to paraffin ratio and increasing {alpha} (chain growth length) with increase in chain length.

  20. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYSTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the third year of this research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we utilized experimental data from the STSR, that were obtained during the first two years of the project, to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations and estimate kinetic parameters. We used a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) with estimated values of binary interaction coefficients for the VLE calculations. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Occasional discrepancies (for some of the experimental data) between calculated and experimental values of the liquid phase composition were ascribed to experimental errors. The VLE calculations show that the vapor and the liquid are in thermodynamic equilibrium under reaction conditions. Also, we have successfully applied the Levenberg-Marquardt method (Marquardt, 1963) to estimate parameters of a kinetic model proposed earlier by Lox and Froment (1993b) for FTS on an iron catalyst. This kinetic model is well suited for initial studies where the main goal is to learn techniques for parameter estimation and statistical analysis of estimated values of model parameters. It predicts that the chain growth parameter ({alpha}) and olefin to paraffin ratio are independent of carbon number, whereas our experimental data show that they vary with the carbon number. Predicted molar flow rates of inorganic species, n-paraffins and total olefins were generally not in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values. In the future we'll use kinetic models based on non-constant value of {alpha}.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a collaborative effort between the University of Akron, Illinois Institute of Technology and two industries: UOP and Energy International. The tasks involve the development of transient two and three dimensional computer codes for slurry bubble column reactors, optimization, comparison to data, and measurement of input parameters, such as the viscosity and restitution coefficients. To understand turbulence, measurements were done in the riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. This report summarizes the measurements and simulations completed as described in details in the attached paper, ''Computational and Experimental Modeling of Three-Phase Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor.'' The Particle Image Velocimetry method described elsewhere (Gidaspow and Huilin, 1996) was used to measure the axial and tangential velocities of the particles. This method was modified with the use of a rotating colored transparent disk. The velocity distributions obtained with this method shows that the distribution is close to Maxwellian. From the velocity measurements the normal and the shear stresses were computed. Also with the use of the CCD camera a technique was developed to measure the solids volume fraction. The granular temperature profile follows the solids volume fraction profile. As predicted by theory, the granular temperature is highest at the center of the tube. The normal stress in the direction of the flow is approximately 10 times larger than that in the tangential direction. The <{nu}{prime}{sub z}{nu}{prime}{sub z}> is lower at the center where the <{nu}{prime}{sub {theta}}{nu}{prime}{sub {theta}}> is higher at that point. The Reynolds shear stress was small, producing a restitution coefficient near unity. The normal Reynolds stress in the direction of flow is large due to the fact that it is produced by the large gradient of velocity in the direction of flow compared to the small gradient in the {theta} and r directions. The kinetic theory gives values of viscosity that agree with our previous measurements (Gidaspow, Wu and Mostofi, 1999). The values of viscosity obtained from pressure drop minus weight of bed measurements agree at the center of the tube.

  2. Rules governing the classification of coal slurries for filtering centrifuges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.Y. Gol'berg; Y.B. Rubinshtein; S.A. Osadchii [Institute for Enrichment of Solid Fuel (IOTT), Moscow Oblast (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using filtering centrifuges for the cleaning of a coking-coal slurry is confirmed in principle, and regime operating parameters which ensure the production of a concentrate of conditioned quality are determined on the basis of results of experimental-industrial tests of a new procedure for this operation at the Neryungrinskaya Concentrating Mill. An equation is proposed for determination of solid carry-off in the centrifuge effluent, which completely satisfactorily (with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.8) describes the dependence of the parameter in question on the solid content in the centrifuge feed, and on its content of -0.2-mm material. It is noted that special investigations to determine the effect of the speed of the rotor and shape of the particles on the amount of solid carry-off in the centrifuge effluent are required for construction of a model describing the size reduction of solid-phase particles in the effluent during centrifuge filtration.

  3. Coal slurry combustion optimization on single cylinder engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, GE Transportation System has been conducting a proof of concept program to use coal water slurry (CWS) fuel to power a diesel engine locomotive since 1988. As reported earlier [1], a high pressure electronically controlled accumulator injector using a diamond compact insert nozzle was developed for this project. The improved reliability and durability of this new FIE allowed for an improved and more thorough study of combustion of CWS fuel in a diesel engine. It was decided to include a diesel pilot fuel injector in the combustion system mainly due to engine start and low load operation needs. BKM, Inc. of San Diego, CA was contracted to develop the electronic diesel fuel pilot/starting FIE for the research engine. As a result, the experimental combustion study was very much facilitated due to the ability of changing pilot/CWS injection timings and quantities without having to stop the engine. Other parameters studied included combustion chamber configuration (by changing CWS fuel injector nozzle hole number/shape/angle), as well as injection pressure. The initial phase of this combustion study is now complete. The results have been adopted into the design of a 12 cylinder engine FIE, to be tested in 1992. This paper summarizes the main findings of this study.

  4. Introduction Operations Management of Blood Banking Systems Blood Banking Systems Network Design Supply Chain Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Introduction Operations Management of Blood Banking Systems Blood Banking Systems Network Design Supply Chain Network Operations Management and Design of A Sustainable Blood Banking System Amir Masoumi of Massachusetts Amherst #12;Introduction Operations Management of Blood Banking Systems Blood Banking Systems

  5. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids.

  6. Blood Banking in Living Droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samot, Josh

    Blood banking has a broad public health impact influencing millions of lives daily. It could potentially benefit from emerging biopreservation technologies. However, although vitrification has shown advantages over traditional ...

  7. Fact Sheet - The Snake River Dam Study-Then and Now - November...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2002, evaluated four alternatives to help Snake River fall chinook get through the dams. The independent peer-reviewed study concluded that dam breaching by itself would not...

  8. Merowe Dam and the inundation of paleochannels of the Nile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The course of the Nile in northern Sudan follows a contorted path through bedrocks, creating the Great Bend. Few years ago, the satellite images showed a fertile strip of land with villages, where paleochannels of the river hosted many fields with cultivations and archaeological sites. Now, a huge part of this valley is under the waters of Merowe Dam reservoir. Comparing the images of the region before and after the dam gates were closed, we can see that the reservoir created itself through flooding the paleochannels.

  9. SCOPING STUDIES TO DEVELOP A METHOD TO DETERMINE PARTICLE SIZE IN SIMULANT SLUDGE SLURRIES BY SIEVING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAMON, CLICK

    2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A physical separation method (i.e. sieving) was investigated to determine particle size distribution in non-radioactive sludge slurry simulants with the goal of implementation into the SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) shielded cells for use with radioactive sludge slurries. The investigation included obtaining the necessary experimental equipment, developing accessory equipment for use with the sieve shaker (to be able to sieve simulant slurries with aqueous solutions), sieving three different simulant slurries through a number of sieves and determining the particle size distribution gravimetrically, and developing a sufficient cleaning protocol of the sieves for re-use. The experimental protocol involved successive sieving of a NIST standard (to check the particle size retention of the sieves) and three non-radioactive slurry simulants (Batch 3 Tank 40 Test 3, Tank 40 Drum 3 and CETL Sludge Batch 2, which had been previously characterized by Microtrac analysis) through smaller and smaller sieves (150 microns x 5 microns) via use of the wet sieving system or by hand. For each of the three slurries, duplicate experiments were carried out using filtered supernate and DI water (to check the accuracy of the method versus Microtrac data) to sieve the slurry. Particle size determinations using the wet sieving system with DI water agree well with Microtrac data on a volume basis and in some cases the sieving data may be more accurate particularly if the material sieved had large particles. A correction factor had to be applied to data obtained from experiments done with supernate due to the dissolved solids which dried upon the sieves in the drying stage of the experiments. Upon subtraction of the correction factors, the experimental results were very similar to those obtained with DI water. It should be noted that approximately 250 mL of each of three simulant slurries was necessary to have enough filtered supernate available to carry out the experiments. The experimental results for the slurries are below with Microtrac data. The design of the experimental equipment was sufficient initially, but some pieces of the equipment began failing over time due to the caustic nature of the supernate and the vibrations from the sieve shaker. It is therefore recommended that upgrades to the experimental equipment be done before implementation into the SRNL shielded cells. Theses upgrades include using manipulator friendly connections, changing brass parts for stainless steel parts, using Teflon rather than polycarbonate, and possibly a change of pumps used to re-circulate the sieving fluid.

  10. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  11. Coal liquefaction process utilizing coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); McLean, Joseph B. (S. Somerville, NJ)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal hydrogenation and liquefaction process in which particulate coal feed is pressurized to an intermediate pressure of at least 500 psig and slurried with CO.sub.2 liquid to provide a flowable coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream, which is further pressurized to at least 1000 psig and fed into a catalytic reactor. The coal particle size is 50-375 mesh (U.S. Sieve Series) and provides 50-80 W % coal in the coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream. Catalytic reaction conditions are maintained at 650.degree.-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure and coal feed rate of 10-100 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 reactor volume to produce hydrocarbon gas and liquid products. The hydrogen and CO.sub.2 are recovered from the reactor effluent gaseous fraction, hydrogen is recycled to the catalytic reactor, and CO.sub.2 is liquefied and recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, two catalytic reaction stages close coupled together in series relation can be used. The process advantageously minimizes the recycle and processing of excess hydrocarbon liquid previously needed for slurrying the coal feed to the reactor(s).

  12. The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbottle, David; Fairweather, Michael; Biggs, Simon [Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, UK, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Rhodes, Dominic [Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

  13. Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Mayrai Gindy, University of Rhode.3 Hazard Classification of the Federal Emergency Management Agency .............. 11 2.4 General Dam Design

  14. Evaluation of Seepage from an Embankment Dam Retaining Pedro J. Amaya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    piping is one of the most common and catastrophic failure modes of an earthen dam (Sher ard et al. 1963Evaluation of Seepage from an Embankment Dam Retaining Fly Ash Pedro J. Amaya1 ; John T. Massey of fly ash-laden seepage from the right abutment of an earthen dam are presented herein

  15. Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River February 8, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River Valley February 8, 2005 Abstract We identify and model two possible failure modes for the Saluda Dam: gradual failure due to an enlarging breach and sudden catas- trophic failure due to liqui#12;cation of the dam. For the #12;rst case we de- scribe the breach

  16. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dam breaking seiches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    hazards should the dam break suddenly. Indeed, geological evidence points to a number of recent failures & Evans 2000). One of the principal causes of moraine dam failure is claimed to be catastrophic erosional et al. 2002; Cao et al. 2004). By contrast, the failure of a moraine-dammed lake has never been

  17. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  18. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    and to minimize the potential for catastrophic failure of the dam during such events. Several alternatives wereFinal Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201

  19. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    was assigned a Dam Safety Action Classification (DSAC) rating of II, generally indicating that failure couldRevised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report Prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared

  20. Late Pleistocene earthquake-triggered moraine dam failure and outburst of Lake Zurich, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Late Pleistocene earthquake-triggered moraine dam failure and outburst of Lake Zurich, Switzerland of $20,600 m3 sÀ1 . We also discuss long-term causes and short-term trigger mechanisms of the dam failure of Lake Zurich was initiated as a consequence of the moraine dam failure that either was triggered

  1. STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Six new generating unit.s were added in t.he powerhouse (locat.ed on the left. side of t.he dam returns from below and above dam releases were compared; data failed to show that the dam caused losses

  2. Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and lacustrine December 2006 Abstract. The effects of high-alpine hydropower damming on lacustrine sedimentation impact, such as by hydropower dam construction that form artifi- cial sediment sinks acting as manmade

  3. The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns Ahmed Mohamed Degu,1 February 2011. [1] Understanding the forcings exerted by large dams on local climate is key to establishing formation are identified around the reservoir shoreline for 92 large dams of North America. Our study

  4. AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING Dam and studied t!:te probable causes of death. The estimates of numbers of dead fish were made from ratios of tagged to untagged floating carcasses below the dam. Tagged s!llmon carcasses were released

  5. SANBA Tool: Knowledge Capitalisation and Lessons Learned on Dams and their Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SANBA Tool: Knowledge Capitalisation and Lessons Learned on Dams and their Safety C. Curt 1 , H Aubière Cedex, France E-mail: corinne.curt@irstea.fr Summary Much is known about dam design, construction for dam design, construction and failure and degradation modes (domain knowledge), coupled with a case

  6. Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and its Alteration by Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Bernie

    Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and its Alteration by Dams STEVEN T. Pres- ently, impassable dams block access to 80% of historically available habitat, and block access Steelhead, O. mykiss, endangered species, population structure, dispersal, habitat model, dams, Central

  7. Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b, mountain landscapes where debris flows are common, their deposition commonly forms valley-spanning dams these dams causes alluviation in what would otherwise be bedrock channels. In this paper, the effects

  8. The Dalles Lock and Dam welcomes raptor (and human) visitors during Eagle Watch 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    The Dalles Lock and Dam welcomes raptor (and human) visitors during Eagle Watch 2013 By Amber Tilton, The Dalles Lock and Dam park ranger Nestled between Oregon and Washington is the Columbia River District operates three dams on the Columbia River where visitors and employees alike often spot America

  9. RE-ASSEMBLING HETCH HETCHY: Water Supply Implications of Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    1 RE-ASSEMBLING HETCH HETCHY: Water Supply Implications of Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam Sarah E. Null The Hetch Hetchy System provides San Francisco with much of its water supply. O'Shaughnessy Dam is one of its conveyance. Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam has gained interest for restoring Hetch Hetchy Valley

  10. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave An Application to Diagnose Dam Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave ­ An Application to Diagnose Dam Bodies Noppadol Poomvises it use as a part of geological program to explore an appropriated rock foundation at a proposed dam location, but also use to investigate the condition of dam after water being storage as well

  11. Homogenization of regional river dynamics by dams and global biodiversity implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Homogenization of regional river dynamics by dams and global biodiversity implications N. Le differ- ences in climate and geology. Extensive construction of dams by humans has greatly dampened to regional-scale environmental templates caused by dams is largely unexplored but of critical conservation

  12. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  13. Analyse retard des mesures d'auscultation de barrages Delayed response analysis of dam monitoring data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of dam monitoring data Stéphane Bonelli Cemagref Unité de recherche Ouvrages hydrauliques et équipements. Long series of monitoring data are obtained during the routine operation of a dam. To understand the long term behaviour of a dam, it is essential to carefully interpret the dissipative effects which tend

  14. Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    dams Julia W. Fiedler1 and Clinton P. Conrad2 Received 29 March 2010; revised 12 May 2010; accepted 18 May 2010; published 19 June 2010. [1] Dams have impounded 10,800 km3 of water since 1900, reducing depresses the earth's surface near dams and elevates the geoid, which locally increases relative sea level

  15. New French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Embankment Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    New French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Embankment Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format P in France and in most countries, hydraulic works (dams and levees) have remained excluded from semi rules. In this context, the French Committee on Large Dams ­ FRCOLD - initiated, with a panel of experts

  16. French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Gravity Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Gravity Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format Paul Royet1 the French Committee on Dams and Reservoirs ­ FrCOLD - issued provisional guidelines for structural safety of gravity dams. It was the first attempt to produce a semi-probabilistic limit-state method for the design

  17. The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force and movement Charles L-dependent force production is unknown. Recent work suggests that the Dam1 complex, an essential component assay where beads coated with pure recombinant Dam1 complex were bound to the tips of individual dynamic

  18. Disentangling dam impacts in river networks1 Kris Van Looy, Thierry Tormos and Yves Souchon2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Disentangling dam impacts in river networks1 Kris Van Looy, Thierry Tormos and Yves Souchon2 3 100 VILLEURBANNE Cedex7 +33 (0)4 72 20 89 418 Kris.van-looy@irstea.fr9 10 11 Abstract12 Damming is one the presence and density of dams and biological metrics of river16 health in the context of a variety

  19. Glen Canyon Dam, Fluctuating Water Levels, and Riparian Breeding Birds: The Need for Management Compromise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I ;'. I Glen Canyon Dam, Fluctuating Water Levels, and Riparian Breeding Birds: The Need.--Large water releases from Glen Canyon Dam in May and June are harmful to riparian breeding birds along' INTRODUCTION 100,000,.... COLORAOQ RIVER NEAR GRAND CANYON (PHANTOM RANCHi The completion of Glen Canyon Dam

  20. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  1. TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    21 TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL, the best location for 1 or 3 dry dams). To take into account the spatial variability of the rainfall, we, following subcatchments delineation. A dry dam can be placed at the outlet of any unit. Such a simple model

  2. PREDICTING UNDERSEEPAGE OF MASONRY DAMS Published in Proceedings of 29th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREDICTING UNDERSEEPAGE OF MASONRY DAMS Published in Proceedings of 29th ASDSO Conference (1934) selected conservative values of safe creep ratios because of the small number of dam failures judgment is recommended in designing a dam for safety against piping, and Lane's values are a starting

  3. A dam agem odelwith non-convex freeenergy for quasi-brittlem aterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A dam agem odelwith non-convex freeenergy for quasi-brittlem aterials M arc Francois January 12 isintroduced in a dam age m echanics m odelrele- vantforthe quasi-brittle m aterials.Itisshown thatitdescribesthe large dilatancy ofconcrete undercom pression and the di erentlocalization an- gles and dam age

  4. Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii This page intentionally blank. #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 iii Table Panel Members B-1 Appendix C ­ Charge for IEPR Panel C-1 List of Figures Figure 1. Rough River Dam 4

  5. STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM VICTOR SAOUMA, ERIC HANSEN is composed of two parts. First a statistical analysis of the dam crest displacement is performed, along with a prediction for the years 2000-2001. Then a 3D finite element analysis of Schlegeis dam is performed using

  6. The dynamics of travertine dams . Hammer , D.K. Dysthe, B. Jamtveit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    The dynamics of travertine dams Ø. Hammer , D.K. Dysthe, B. Jamtveit PGP-Physics of Geological 2007 Abstract We present a simple, abstract model for travertine dam formation. The simulation uses, implies a classical pattern formation system with a characteristic dam size, however this wavelength

  7. Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change in anadromous by forming dams, forcing upstream ag- gradation of water and sediment, and generating catastrophic out- burst floods. Less apparent is the effect of large landslide dams on river ecosystems and marine sedimentation

  8. ACCURACY OF ESTIMATION OF BREEDING VALUES FOR BULL DAMS by H. O. GRAVERT K. PABST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACCURACY OF ESTIMATION OF BREEDING VALUES FOR BULL DAMS by H. O. GRAVERT K. PABST Institute for Milk Production, Fedeval Daivy Research Center, Kiel, F.R.G. For 1.229 dams of A.I. bulls with known IN A BULL DAM SELECTION INDEX A. FESTERLING Institut f. Tierzucht Universitlits Bonn, Bonn, B.R.D. The bull

  9. Hugo van Dam and the dynamic adjoint function Imre Pa zsit*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    Hugo van Dam and the dynamic adjoint function Imre Pa´ zsit* Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Go¨teborg, Sweden Dedicated to Prof. Dr. Hugo van Dam into perspective the seminal contribution of Hugo van Dam to the development of neutron noise diagnostics

  10. Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1 , Jan M. H, paleoclimatology (Maher and Thompson, 1995), soil development (Singer et al., 1996; Van Dam et al., 2008 et al., 2011), the detection of unexploded ordnance (UXO) and land mines (Van Dam et al., 2005

  11. Effects of upstream dams versus groundwater pumping on stream temperature under varying climate conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Click Here for Full Article Effects of upstream dams versus groundwater pumping on stream impact of a large upstream dam versus inreach groundwater pumping on stream temperatures was analyzed large dams are present, such as the western United States or eastern Australia. Stream temperatures were

  12. THE DISTRIBUTIONAL IMPACT OF DAMS: EVIDENCE FROM CROPLAND PRODUCTIVITY IN AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    THE DISTRIBUTIONAL IMPACT OF DAMS: EVIDENCE FROM CROPLAND PRODUCTIVITY IN AFRICA Eric STROBL Robert of Dams: Evidence from Cropland Productivity in Africa Eric Strobl*, ** Ecole Polytechnique & Robert the distributional impact of major dams on cropland productivity in Africa. As our unit of analysis we use

  13. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  14. LEARNING FROM DAM REMOVAL MONITORING: CHALLENGES TO SELECTING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ESTABLISHING SIGNIFICANCE OF OUTCOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    LEARNING FROM DAM REMOVAL MONITORING: CHALLENGES TO SELECTING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ESTABLISHING, California, USA ABSTRACT As the decommissioning of dams becomes a common restoration technique, decisions about dam removals must be based on sound predictions of expected outcomes. Results of past and ongoing

  15. Measuring the erodibility of soil materials constituting earth embankments: a key input for dams and levees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Measuring the erodibility of soil materials constituting earth embankments: a key input for dams of hydraulic embankment structures, including earth embankment dams, levees and dykes, is a major concern all over the world. Still today, about one to two large dams fail every year and hundreds, probably

  16. Development of spatial pattern in large woody debris and debris dams in streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Development of spatial pattern in large woody debris and debris dams in streams Clifford E. Kraft years after wood deposition, we surveyed individual pieces of LWD in one stream and surveyed debris dam locations in eight streams within the ice storm area. To examine the linear pattern of debris dams within

  17. Earthquake behavior of arch dams Chuhan Zhang, Yanjie Xu, Guanglun Wang & Feng Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    Earthquake behavior of arch dams Chuhan Zhang, Yanjie Xu, Guanglun Wang & Feng Jin Department millennium, construction of a series of high arch dams up to 250-300m in height is being planned or conducted (Table 1). Table 1. Project data and Design PVA Project Dam height (m) Reservoir capacity (109 m3 ) Power

  18. Dam breaking by wave-induced erosional incision N. J. Balmforth,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Dam breaking by wave-induced erosional incision N. J. Balmforth,1 J. von Hardenberg,2 A. Provenzale displacement wave can lead to catastrophic erosional incision of a moraine damming a glacial lake that a single wave is generally unable to break the dam, but a sufficiently large disturbance in an almost

  19. Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004 ANCOLD 2004 Conference Page 1 TRANSPORTATION MODEL FOR EVACUATION IN ESTIMATING DAM FAILURE and requiring only a reasonable level of effort to #12;Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams

  20. SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE MIXING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 211B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive high-level waste slurries are combined during processing steps that ultimately produce a stable borosilicate glass waste form. Chemically treated waste slurries are combined with each other and with glass frit-water slurries to produce the melter feed. Understanding the evolution of the rheological properties of the slurries is an important aspect of removing and treating the stored waste. To a first approximation, combinations of colloidal waste slurry with {approx}0.1-mm mean diameter glass frit or glass beads act in an analogous matter to slurries of spherical beads in Newtonian liquids. The non-Newtonian rheological properties of the waste slurries without frit, however, add complexity to the hydrodynamic analysis. The use of shear rate dependent apparent viscosities with the modified Einstein equation was used to model the rheological properties of aqueous frit-waste slurries.

  1. Carbon black: A low cost colloidal additive for controlling gas-migration in cement slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calloni, G.; Moroni, N.; Miano, F.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of different additives on the permeability of cement slurries to formation gas has been studied with the aid of a gas flow apparatus. The performance of two commercial additives (polymer latex and silica fume) has been compared to that of a novel additive (carbon black) that has been developed in the authors laboratories with the aim of simplifying the cement slurry composition and reducing field operational costs. Data on the thickening time, fluid loss, rheology and compressive strength are also presented to provide a clear picture of the potential of carbon black as a substitute for silica fume and polymer latex in some field applications. Finally, the paper describes the results of a field application using carbon black as a gas-block additive in the cement slurry.

  2. Utilization of solid wastes from the gasification of coal-water slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Y. Shpirt; N.P. Goryunova [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was found that only fly and bottom ashes are the solid wastes of water-coal slurry gasification in a direct-flow gasifier. The yields and chemical compositions of fly and bottom ashes obtained after the gasification of water-coal slurries prepared using brown (B) and long-flame (D) coals from the Berezovskii and Mokhovskii strip mines (Kansk-Achinsk and Kuznetsk Basins, respectively) were characterized. Based on an analysis of currently available information, the areas of utilization of fly and bottom ashes after water-coal slurry gasification with dry ash removal were summarized. The use of these wastes in the construction of high-ways and earthwork structures (for the parent coals of B and D grades) and in the manufacture of ash concrete (for the parent coal of D grade) is most promising.

  3. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidation material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions has been revised. The model is being built around the method of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986).

  4. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidated material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. A conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions is being developed. This report includes our first approximation of the model. The model is subject to change.

  5. THREE GORGES DAM Matthew Morioka, Alireza Abrishamkar, Yve Kay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    and greenhouse gas emission: 366 grams of coal is used to generate 1 kWh of electricity, therefore the dam Cost: Est. $29 billion ·32 Generators :·32 Generators : Capacity of 700MW EA ·Total electric generating deterioration and epidemics related to the flood #12;Social Benefits (2/3) -Direct reduction of air pollutant

  6. James W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    focus: magnetically confined plasmas #12;Page 5 USBPO What is a "burning" plasma? · "Burning" plasmaJames W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization US ITER Project Office Institute for Fusion Studies Plasmas -- A Tutorial -- Supported by Office of Science #12;Page 2 USBPO The next frontier · Understanding

  7. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  8. INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauhan, Sanjay S.

    on the topic of uncertainty in quantitative risk and policy analysis the reader is referred to Morgan to incorporating input uncertainties into risk analysis model. Input uncertainties are captured by using for uncertainty analysis in dam safety risk assessment, and demonstrates some useful formats for presenting

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Slurry Propylene Polymerization using rac-Et(Ind)2ZrCl2/MAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic Modeling of Slurry Propylene Polymerization using rac-Et(Ind)2ZrCl2/MAO Ramon A. Gonzalez in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). The slurry homopolymerization of propylene catalyzed using a systematic optimization strategy. The model predicts that the insertion of the first propylene

  10. Rheological properties of water-coal slurries based on brown coal in the presence of sodium lignosulfonates and alkali

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Savitskii; A.S. Makarov; V.A. Zavgorodnii [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine). Dumanskii Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the oxidized surface of brown coal on the structural and rheological properties of water-coal slurries was found. The kinetics of structure formation processes in water-coal slurries based on as-received and oxidized brown coal was studied. The effect of lignosulfonate and alkali additives on the samples of brown coal was considered.

  11. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

  12. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a fused iron catalyst in a three phase slurry reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Henry J

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FISCHER-TROPSCH SWi'THESIS OVER A FUSED IRON CATALYST IN A THREE PHASE SLURRY REACTOR A Thesis by HENRY J. BUCK III Submitted to the Graduate College at Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... an (Head of Department) G. Anthony (Member) M. T. Longn er (Member) May ]986 ABSTRACT Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Over Fused Iron Catalyst In a Three Phase Slurry Reactor (May 1986) Henry J. Buck III, B. S. , Old Dominion University; M. S. , Texas...

  13. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  14. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  15. Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Carl D. (Olympia, WA)

    1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

  16. Enlargement of concrete blocks of arch dams with allowance of the formation of radial thermal cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verbetskii, G.P.; Chogovadze, G.I.; Daneliya, A.I.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable acceleration of the construction of arch dams with the use of highly productive continuous concreting mechanisms is possible with enlargement of the blocks and allowance of the formation of thermal radial cracks in them. A theoretical analysis and the results of on-site observations show that under the effect of the hydrostatic head of water, radial joints and cracks in compressed zones of an arch dam close and the dam in these zones works as a solid dam. Thermal cracking in concrete blocks of arch dams enlarged in plan should be controlled by making radial notches to concentrate tensile stresses providing the formation of radial cracks at prescribed places and through the usual methods of thermal regulation. The block size along the face of an arch dam is then no longer limited by the condition of crack resistance but is determined by the rate of concreting. The technical and economic effects from concreting arch dams are cited.

  17. Information externality, bank structure, and growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doh, Bo-Eun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses the question of whether a monopolistic banking system can lead to a higher steady state level of capital stock. Specifically, this research analyzes the comparative advantage of a monopoly banking system. By doing that...

  18. E-Banking Diffusion in the Jordanian Banking Services Sector: An Empirical Analysis of Key Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E-Banking Diffusion in the Jordanian Banking Services Sector: An Empirical Analysis of Key Factors influence e- banking adoption in Jordanian banks. This article added some constructs to (TOE) framework, availability of online revenues, competition intensity or pressure, and regulatory support environment) while e

  19. Competition and Collaboration in Mobile Banking: A Stakeholder Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnia, Sherah

    of mobile technologies offers an opportunity for mobile carriers and banks to offer mobile banking services technology-aware customers. For banks, mobile banking is the next sequence after Internet banking. Thanks to the development of mobile technology which enables the delivery of banking services via mobile devices, mobile

  20. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelin, G.

    1992-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: addition of i-butylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H[sub 2] during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of i-butylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the seventh quarter we continued the shake down experiments for the SBCR and conducted an initial aborted run. We have also re-started experiments on Scheme 1, i.e., the addition of iso-butylene during CO hydrogenation. Using a dual bed arrangement, we have demonstrated the synthesis of MTBE from syngas and iso-butylene.

  1. Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE.sub.10 rectangular mode to TE.sub.01 circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power.

  2. Liquid CO{sub 2}/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marasigan, Jose; Goldstein, Harvey; Dooher, John

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas™ gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration. Liquid CO{sub 2} has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal gasification-based power plants. First, the viscosity of liquid CO{sub 2} is much lower than water. This means it should take less energy to pump liquid CO{sub 2} through a pipe compared to water. This also means that a higher solids concentration can be fed to the gasifier, which should decrease the heat requirement needed to vaporize the slurry. Second, the heat of vaporization of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 80% lower than water. This means that less heat from the gasification reactions is needed to vaporize the slurry. This should result in less oxygen needed to achieve a given gasifier temperature. And third, the surface tension of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than water, which should result in finer atomization of the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry, faster reaction times between the oxygen and coal particles, and better carbon conversion at the same gasifier temperature. EPRI and others have recognized the potential that liquid CO{sub 2} has in improving the performance of an IGCC plant and have previously conducted systemslevel analyses to evaluate this concept. These past studies have shown that a significant increase in IGCC performance can be achieved with liquid CO{sub 2} over water with certain gasifiers. Although these previous analyses had produced some positive results, they were still based on various assumptions for liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry properties. This low-rank coal study extends the existing knowledge base to evaluate the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry concept on an E-Gas™-based IGCC plant with full 90% CO{sub 2} capture. The overall objective is to determine if this technology could be used to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of IGCC plants. The study goes beyond the systems-level analyses and initial lab work that formed the bases of previous studies and includes the following tasks: performing laboratory tests to quantify slurry properties; developing an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2} slurry preparation and feed system; conducting a full IGCC plant techno-economic analysis for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and North Dakota lignite in both water and liquid CO{sub 2} slurries; and identifying a technology development plan to continue the due diligence to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of this technology. The initial task included rheology tests and slurry data analyses that would increase the knowledge and understanding of maximum solids loading capability for both PRB and lignite. Higher coal concentrations have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} over water slurries, and a coal concentration of 75% by weight in liquid CO{sub 2} has been estimated to be achievable in a commercial application. In addition, lower slurry viscosities have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} at the same solids loading, where the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry viscosity has been measured to be about a factor of 10 lower than the comparable water slurry and estimated to be less than 100 centipoise in a commercial application. In the following task, an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and mixing system has been developed for both a batch and continuous system. The capital cost of the design has also been estimated so that it could be used in the economic analysis. An industry search and survey has been conducted to determine if essential components required to construct the feed system are available from commercial sources or if targeted R&D efforts are required. The search and survey concluded that commercial sources are available for selected components that comprise both the batch and continuous type systems. During normal operation, the fuel exits the bottom of the coal silo and is fed to a rod mill fo

  3. Dewatering Fly Ash Slurries Using Geotextile Containers M. E. Kutay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    during its settlement. However, the hydraulic compatibility of a geotextile with the contact soil is also for ensuring hydraulic compatibility is that the geotextile should not be clogged during the dewatering process ash slurries. A testing program that included filter press and hanging bag tests was implemented

  4. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kellogg, L.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

  5. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  6. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

  7. Chris Banks Director of Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Banks Director of Library Services Frances Boyle Assistant Director Library Academic Services Assistant to the Library Leadership Team Susan Howard Assistant Director Library Resource and Innovation Chart 1 Library Leadership Team Ruth Newton Staff Resource Coordinator (0.6 fte) Level 3b #12;Chris

  8. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  9. Dam constructions as sealing systems in rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, H.J.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Fischer, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dam constructions represent an essential component of the multibarrier safety concept in the Federal Republic of Germany for a repository of radioactive waste in salt formations. They enhance safety during the operational phase as well as in the post operational phase of the repository. In the framework of a joint R and D-project between BGR, DBE and GSF the components of a suitable dam have been developed and will be constructed and tested in the GSF-Asse salt mine in Lower-Saxony. The aims of the investigation program, its realization and some results on the development of construction materials will be presented and discussed. Experiences gained during these tests in laboratory and in situ will be described.

  10. Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Technical report, March 1- May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajchel, M.; Ehrlinger, H.P.; Fonseca, A.; Mauer, R.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Williams Technologies, Inc. And Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be, concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and re-mixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology can enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant cost and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. Testing was also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back-filled, eliminating the need for tailings ponds. During the grant period, a laboratory-scale test apparatus (up to 3 GPM feed rate) was assembled and operated to demonstrate process performance over a range of feed temperatures and pressures. A dilute coal/water slurry from Consol, Inc.`s Rend Lake Preparation Plant was concentrated using the process to a maximum recorded solids loading of 61.9% solids by weight. Analytical results from the concentrate were evaluated by Destec Energy for suitability as an IGCC fuel.

  11. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. The intent in this research was to collect cores of unconsolidated material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The gas composition data would provide background data for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Cores of coal slurry were collected on May 16--18, 1994 from four holes in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. There was no unsaturated zone in the coal, so no gas samples can be collected from that zone. The authors installed three samplers in one hole. Two of the samplers are in the saturated zone (in the coal) and the third one might be in the unsaturated zone, but in the soil cover above the coal particles. They plan to collect samples in about mid-June. The water and solids from the cores are being separated for chemical analysis. The computer model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions is being developed. The first portion of code, the calculation of thermodynamic equilibrium without consideration of ionic strength, has been written. The methods of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986) are the basis for the model, however, the model does not follow the matrix solution used by them. Rather, an algebraic solution is used. A matrix similar to the one reported last quarter was used to formulate mass balance and material balance equations.

  12. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Mensik, Fred

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2000 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by lower than average spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased unclipped yearling and subyearling chinook smolts, and 8,300,546 smolts collected and transported compared to 5,882,872 in 1999. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above Lower Granite Dam, we can no longer accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Although some table titles in this report still show ''wild'' column headings, the numbers in these columns for 1999 and 2000 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. The increases over previous years reflect the increased supplementation. A total of 8,300,546 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, 187,862 fish were bypassed back to the river and 7,950,648 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 7,778,853 by barge and 171,795 by truck. A total of 151,344 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 1,361,006 smolts (16.4% of the total collection).

  13. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

  14. Trends in agricultural lending by commercial banks 1964-1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeBerry, David Kendall

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outstanding Held by Branch verses Unit Banks, 1978-1984 21 9. Number of Branch verses Unit Banks, 1978-1984 22 10. Number of Banks Located in Rural Verses Urban Areas, 1964-1984 25 11. Share of Total Bank Farm Loans Outstanding Held by Banks Located... in Rural verses Urban Areas, 1964-1984 26 12. Share of Total Bank Farm Loans Outstanding Held by Ag Banks verses NonAg Banks, 1964-1984 29 13. Share of Total Bank Farm Loans Outstanding Held by Each NonAg Group verses all Ag Banks, 1964-1984 31 14...

  15. Environmental effects of dredging. The value of wing dams for freshwater mussels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, A.C.; Whiting, R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note provides information on the value of wing dams, which reduce dredging requirements in large rivers, for freshwater mussels. Wing dams are longitudinal rock-rubble structures placed in waterways to develop and stabilize channels. Wing dams constrict low flows, which decreases maintenance dredging requirements (Shields 1983). These structures are usually oriented obliquely or at 90 deg to the current. Sediment deposition usually occurs between wing dams where current velocity is reduced relative to that in the unprotected main channel. Wing dams create quiescent areas that are similar to naturally occurring lentic habitats during normal and low flow (Beckett et al. 1983). In addition, wing dams themselves are a coarse-grained substrate used by aquatic insects and fishes (Conner, Pennington, and Bosley 1983; Pennington, Baker, and Bond 1983; and Shields 1983).

  16. Strength Difference between Clam-Shell and Long-Reach Excavator Constructed Cement-Bentonite Self-Hardening Slurry Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and construction of the dam can be found in Lane and Fehrman (1960). The main seismic source zones are the Nemaha

  17. A study of ignition and combustion characteristics of isolated coal water slurry droplet using digital image processing technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhadra, Tanmoy

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diameter and ambient oxygen concentrations. Simplified phenomen ological type models are presented in order to determine the number of particles. interparticle spacing and density of coal water slurry droplet. Finally qualitative relations between ignition...

  18. Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen Ellis

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz...

  19. A not-so-funny thing happened on the way to relicensing the Edwards Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayer, F.J. [Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Isaacson, M. [Edwards Manufacturing Co., Lisbon Falls, ME (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    What started out as a seemingly straightforward and simple exercise, obtaining a new FERC license for the Edwards Dam in Augusta, Maine, turned out to be anything but straightforward and far from simple. This article tells the story of one of the more interesting and possibly precedent setting cases in the {open_quotes}class of 93{close_quotes} and is presented in three sections: (1) the history of the Edwards Dam and the FERC regulatory process through the spring of 1995; (2) Edwards` response to the dam removal campaign; and (3) recommendations for FERC licensees threatened by dam removal during relicensing.

  20. Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam Relicensing Consumers Protection Act (1986), which instructs federal regulators to ``balance'' hydropower

  1. Pilot-scale demonstration of a slurry-phase biological reactor for creosote-contaminated soil. Applications analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosani, M.; Platt, J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IT Corporation in conjunction with ECOVA Corporation (ECOVA) evaluated ECOVA's slurry-phase bioremediation technology under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The purpose of this report is to present information from the SITE demonstration and from three case studies to evaluate the technical and economic applicability of slurry-phase bioremediation technology to the remediation of soil- and sludge-bound hazardous contaminants.

  2. Activation and promotion studies in a mixed slurry reactor with an iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Stencel, J.M.; Diehl, J.R.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas was reacted over a coprecipitated iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst in a slurry reactor. The effect of various activation parameters - temperature, pressure, and gas composition - on subsequent catalyst activity and product selectivity was investigated. The gas composition had the most dramatic effect on the catalyst activation and the ensuing synthesis gas conversion. The effect of potassium promotion on catalyst activity and product selectivity was also studied in slurry reactor tests.

  3. An Approach to Understanding Cohesive Slurry Settling, Mobilization, and Hydrogen Gas Retention in Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. Some of these vessels have mixing-system requirements to maintain conditions where the accumulation of hydrogen gas stays below acceptable limits, and the mixing within the vessels is sufficient to release hydrogen gas under normal conditions and during off-normal events. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries of solid particles suspended in Newtonian fluids that behave as non-Newtonian slurries, such as Bingham yield-stress fluids. When these slurries are contained in the process vessels, the particles can settle and become progressively more concentrated toward the bottom of the vessels, depending on the effectiveness of the mixing system. One limiting behavior is a settled layer beneath a particle-free liquid layer. The settled layer, or any region with sufficiently high solids concentration, will exhibit non-Newtonian rheology where it is possible for the settled slurry to behave as a soft solid with a yield stress. In this report, these slurries are described as settling cohesive slurries.

  4. Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

  5. Experimental reactor system for investigation of indirect liquefaction catalysts in slurry phase operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarochak, M.F.; Pennline, H.W.; Schehl, R.R.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description of the slurry (three-phase) reactor scheme employed at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is reported. Emphasis is placed on materials of construction, equipment operation, and product collection and analysis. The unit's functional limits and safety features are also provided. Operational problems and the resolving remedial action are discussed. The reactor scheme now operates such that near isothermal conditions exist over the reactor internal length. Thus, with excellent temperature control assured, reliable information for evaluation of potential catalyst candidates for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is possible within a wide range of operating conditions. Test results with a fused-iron catalyst suspended in a paraffinic liquid medium are given as an example.

  6. Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, T.L.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE[sub 10] rectangular mode to TE[sub 01] circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power. 4 figures.

  7. Materials and design experience in a slurry-fed electric glass melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, S.M.; Larson, D.E.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a slurry-fed electric gas melter and an examination of the performance and condition of the construction materials were completed. The joule-heated, ceramic-lined melter was constructed to test the applicability of materials and processes for high-level waste vitrification. The developmental Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM) was operated for three years with simulated high-level waste and was subjected to conditions more severe than those expected for a nuclear waste vitrification plant.

  8. A Qualitative Investigation of Deposition Velocities of a Non-Newtonian Slurry in Complex Pipeline Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokuda, Satoru T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Karri, Naveen K.; Luna, Maria; Minette, Michael J.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) has identified the issues relating to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pipe plugging. Per the review’s executive summary, “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” To evaluate the potential for plugging, testing was performed to determine critical velocities for the complex WTP piping layout. Critical velocity is defined as the point at which a moving bed of particles begins to form on the pipe bottom during slurry-transport operations. Pressure drops across the fittings of the test pipeline were measured with differential pressure transducers, from which the critical velocities were determined. A WTP prototype flush system was installed and tested upon the completion of the pressure-drop measurements. We also provide the data for the overflow relief system represented by a WTP complex piping geometry with a non-Newtonian slurry. A waste simulant composed of alumina (nominally 50 ?m in diameter) suspended in a kaolin clay slurry was used for this testing. The target composition of the simulant was 10 vol% alumina in a suspending medium with a yield stress of 3 Pa. No publications or reports are available to confirm the critical velocities for the complex geometry evaluated in this testing; therefore, for this assessment, the results were compared to those reported by Poloski et al. (2008) for which testing was performed for a straight horizontal pipe. The results of the flush test are compared to the WTP design guide 24590-WTP-GPG-M-0058, Rev. 0 (Hall 2006) in an effort to confirm flushing-velocity requirements.

  9. Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

  10. Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, A.H.; Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes and catalysts are disclosed for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided. 1 fig.

  11. Processes and catalysts for conducting fischer-tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Alan H. (Marshall Township, Allegheny County, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Allison Park, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided.

  12. Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajchel, M. [Williams Technologies, Inc. (United States)]|[Clarke Rajchel Engineering, Arvada, CO (United States); Harnett, D. [Williams Technologies, Inc. (United States); Fonseca, A. [CONSOL, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maurer, R. [Destec (United States); Ehrlinger, H.P.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Williams Technologies, Inc. and Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and re-mixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology will enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant coast and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. In addition, testing is also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back-, filled and thus eliminate the need for tailings ponds. This reporting period, September 1, 1995 through November 30, 1995, marked the inception of this project. During this period Task No. 1, Procurement and Set-Up, was completed. The pilot plant apparatus was constructed at the SIU Coal Research Center in Carterville, Illinois. All equipment and feedstock were received at the site.

  13. Experimental Testing of an Electrical Submersible Pump Undergoing Abrasive Slurry Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleh, Ramy Moaness M

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir resources face depletion, the oil and gas explorations turn to offshore, subsea and ultra-deep subsea reservoirs to continue extracting the precious minerals and naturally ESPs followed. Today?s challenges and requirements of ESP systems continue... tester [4] , up to the Mark V Coriolis tester [5]. The evolution of the Coriolis tester allowed the use of flat specimens on both sides of the solid rotor, better specimen clamping, and better measurement of wear. 5 Figure 2. Slurry...

  14. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

  15. Surface and bottom boundary layer dynamics on a shallow submarine bank : southern flank of Georges Bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Sandra R. (Sandra Regina)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis investigates the circulation at a 76-m deep study site on the southern flank of Georges Bank, a shallow submarine bank located between the deeper Gulf of Maine and the continental slope. Emphasis is placed on ...

  16. Effect of iron salts on the carbonization of coal-bitumen slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royce, A.; Silveston, P.L.; Readyhough, P.J.; Fouda, S.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibition of coke fusion by the presence of iron salts in coal-bitumen slurries. A Plastofrost apparatus was used for the above purpose, along with a specially developed procedure to handle the slurry. Three Canadian and one US coals were used along with a heavy bitumen (Cold Lake vacuum bottoms). Plastofrost samples were prepared of the coals with 0, 5 and 20 wt% additive, the vacuum bottoms, and slurries of 30 wt% coal in the vacuum bottoms with additive levels of 0, 5 and 20 wt%. The additive delayed initial fusion of the coal grains and completion of fusion. The anisotropic texture of the semicoke was diminished by the additive. The presence of vacuum bottoms suppressed coal fusion, probably by physically separating the coal grains. Fusion is also slightly suppressed at 20 wt% additive; 5 wt% seemed to have little effect. Dissolution of vitrain in the bitumen was not observed. The coal and vacuum bottom phases carbonize separately yielding distinct, but well bonded semicokes. Anisotropic texture of the vacuum bottoms coke is strongly diminished by the presence of the finely ground coal.

  17. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Final technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal. slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research project we retrieved five drill cores from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment, and installed three samplers in one of the core holes. The solids were chemically and mineralogically analyzed. Display of the mineralogical data on a cross section showed that pyrite was randomly distributed through much of the length of the coal slurry impoundment. Trace concentrations of heavy metals were correlated with pyrite in the core solids. Water samples were collected and analyzed. The water analyses showed that nutrients are insufficient to support plant growth without supplemental fertilization. The analytical data will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the kinetics of pyrite oxidation at near-neutral pH conditions. Programming of a computerized model to simulate pyrite oxidation under near-neutral pH conditions was begun. The program includes ideas from Morel and Hering (1993) and species are calculated in terms of 7 components of known concentrations. The ionic strength of the solution, the species activity coefficients, and the activities are calculated iteratively.

  18. EIS-0352: U.S. 93 Hoover Dam Bypass Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) served as a cooperating agency for this Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) due to WAPA’s role in the relocation of several transmission lines. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for construction of a new segment of U.S. Highway 93 for the purpose of improving congestion and hazardous vehicle/pedestrian conflicts where the highway crosses the Colorado River over Hoover Dam. As a cooperating agency for the EIS, WAPA proposed modifications to its transmission system and facilities to accommodate the construction of the new highway and bridge spanning the Colorado River.

  19. City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City ofBlueChappell,City ofCityCoulee Dam,

  20. An analysis of the bank holding company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facka, David William

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    company exercises more supervision over the investments of each affiliate bank than over any of the other affiliate bank's activities. This service improves the flow of information, thus increasing the productivity of investments . Many of the services...) the conven- ience, needs, and welfare of the communities and the area concerned; and (5) whether or not the effect of such acquisition or merger or consolidation would be to expand the size or extent of the bank holding company system involved beyond...

  1. Building Green in Greensburg: Greensburg State Bank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Greensburg State Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  2. Building Green in Greensburg: Centera Bank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Centera Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  3. Building Green in Greensburg: The Peoples Bank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Peoples Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  4. Economic Efficiency of Texas Country Banks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Virgil P. (Virgil Porter)

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1932. *"In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. 1 $30( ings tive -. "his study shows that most Texas country banks with less than 1,000 to $400,000 in earning assets have comparatively low earn- ;, pay very little interest... to the bank investment. If we take total deposits as a rough measure of earning assets, the aver- age ratio of earning assets to capital and surplus among the banks with less than $50, 000 deposits in 1929 was 2.23 as compared with 5.19 for banks...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron within 3.1 hours, and three rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron within 2.5 hours. (6) If the Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets are drawn through the pump, they will be further reduced in size, with a maximum drop size less than 15 micron.

  6. Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro, Gianna Dee

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

  7. European Working Groupe on Internal Erorion in embankment dams April 12th to 14th 2010, Granada, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Working Groupe on Internal Erorion in embankment dams April 12th to 14th 2010, Granada Working Groupe on Internal Erosion in embankment dams, Granada : Spain (2010)" #12;

  8. Tension applied through the Dam1 complex promotes microtubule elongation: a direct mechanism for length control in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    Tension applied through the Dam1 complex promotes microtubule elongation: a direct mechanism tension to a model of the kinetochore-microtubule interface composed of the yeast Dam1 complex11-13 bound

  9. Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loope, David B.

    Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska that the Nebraska Sand Hills once migrated across the North and South Platte rivers and dammed the largest tributary of the South Platte River, have compositions intermediate between the Nebraska Sand Hills (quartz

  10. Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations) for uncertainty analysis with respect to two major types of risk in river hydrodynamics: flash flood and dam failure. LSA is com- pared to a Global Uncertainty Analysis (GUA) consisting in running Monte Carlo

  11. Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam on voluntary ethanol rats as subjects, we examined effects of exposure during weaning to a dam consuming ethanol on adolescents' later affinity for ethanol. In a preliminary experiment, we offered rat pups a choice between 8

  12. A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO, and restoration efforts. Cochiti Dam was constructed on the main stem of the Rio Grande in 1973 for flood control minnow. Recent restoration strategies include removal of non-native riparian vegetation, mechanical

  13. Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment Saheeb, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad-44000, Pakistan saheebk@ceme.nust.edu.pk Abstract. INTRODUCTION Pakistan has recently successfully completed the raising of Mangla dam, a major water works system

  14. Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado Victor G. deWolfe a May 2007 Abstract To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs

  15. Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 106119 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Mei

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 106­119 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Trees of extremal. Tian). 0166-218X/$ - see front matter © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2004

  16. Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 840856 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 840­856 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Integer linear/$ - see front matter © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2005.09.021 #12;G.W. Klau

  17. Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in topologically new massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in the topologically new massive gravity (TNMG). The reduction from 2 degrees of freedom to one is interpreted as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity appeared when going from anti-de Sitter spacetime to Minkowski spacetime in the linearized TNMG.

  18. Discrete Applied Mathematics 157 (2009) 982990 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 157 (2009) 982­990 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Hamiltonian-218X/$ - see front matter c 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2008.02.005 #12;H

  19. Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 831839 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Frederick

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 831­839 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Binary templates Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2005.07.015 #12;832 O.D. King, P. Gaborit

  20. Continuous Monitoring of an Ice Sheet in a Reservoir Upstream of Beaumont Dam, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santerre, Rock

    conducted at the Beaumont hydroelectric dam owned and operated by Hydro-Québec. This power plant has six find- ings will help to harmonize the different standards that are used to manage hydroelectric power considerable economic savings related to minimizing production losses, optimizing dam reinforcement works

  1. ADtrees for Sequential Data and N-gram Counting Rob Van Dam and Dan Ventura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    ADtrees for Sequential Data and N-gram Counting Rob Van Dam and Dan Ventura Abstract-- We consider Ventura are with the Department of Com- puter Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (email: rvan- dam00@gmail.com, ventura@cs.byu.edu) the best smoothing techniques utilize some (often linear

  2. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

  3. Synthesis of octane enhancer during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelin, G.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

  4. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelin, G.

    1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

  5. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelin, G.

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butytl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; (2) addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and, (3) addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

  6. Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam SafetyICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

  7. RISK-BASED EVALUATION OF OPERATING RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAM FAILURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    and consequences of an Earthquake-induced dam failure. The potential for both a sudden overtopping failure-induced dam failure, and the estimated residual risk and degree of risk-based justification for the Existing into the relationship between pool elevation and dam failure risk, provided important inputs for the decision

  8. Received 8 Jul 2014 | Accepted 8 Aug 2014 | Published 19 Sep 2014 Kinetochores require oligomerization of Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    -deficient Dam1 complex is unable to support stable bipolar alignment of sister chromatids, indicating failure oligomerization of Dam1 complex to maintain microtubule attachments against tension and promote biorientation Neil-cell imaging, we find that oligomerization of the Dam1 complex is required for its ability to form microtubule

  9. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  10. Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple but consistent rainfall-runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple Lyon, FRANCE Abstract We investigate the assessment of the overall efficiency of a set of dry dams of the best locations for a set of dams was previously studied using a simplistic rainfall-runoff model

  11. August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Dams are structures designed by humans to capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Articles Dams are structures designed by humans to capture water and modify the magnitude and timing of its movement downstream. The damming of streams, dams have reduced flood hazard and allowed humans to settle and farm pro- ductive alluvial soils

  12. Experiments on upstream-migrating erosional narrowing and widening of an incisional channel caused by dam removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola, Chris

    by dam removal Alessandro Cantelli Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Genova, Italy on a laboratory investigation of the erosion of a deltaic front induced by the removal of a dam. We built a laboratory model of a dam, and observed both the sedimentation in the reservoir due to the downstream

  13. An adaptive time-space dual algorithm for shallow non-Newtonian power-law fluids: the horizontal dam break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dam break problem revisited P. Saramito a C. Smutek b B. Cordonnier b aLJK ­ CNRS et Universit´es de´eunion, France Abstract ­ The dam break problem shallow approximation for laminar flows of viscoplastic non equations for non-Newtonian fluids subject to the horizontal dam break problem. Keywords ­ viscoplastic

  14. Effects of Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River and its floodplain, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marston, Richard A.

    Effects of Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River and its floodplain, Grand Teton National Park In 1906, the Bureau of Reclamation created Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River in what later became Grand Teton National Park. The geomorphic, hydrologic and vegetation adjustments downstream of the dam have

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  16. Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Karun 3 Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i ­ CEE 491University of Hawai`i ­ CEE;Location #12;Description/Background Hydroelectric dam on Karun River Help with national energy needs #12;Social & Economic Benefits Flood Control Dam reservoirs help to control floods Mitigate high peak

  17. INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION OF SOCKEYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION Reach Dam, constructed on the Columbia River 7 miles above Wenatchee, Wash.· in 1957-61, has not appreciably increased the time required for adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) to mi~rate to Zosel Dam

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE R. Lacasse #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia 140-ft CASSEGRAIN BAa

  19. active germplasm bank: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement Name: Address: City: State: Zip by the University of Kentucky on my bank account...

  20. affect foreign bank: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement Name: Address: City: State: Zip by the University of Kentucky on my bank account...

  1. allied irish bank: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: University of Kentucky Automatic Bank Draft Donation Agreement Name: Address: City: State: Zip by the University of Kentucky on my bank account...

  2. Making Development Climate Resilient: A World Bank Strategy for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Making Development Climate Resilient: A World Bank Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy,...

  3. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

  4. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  5. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelin, G.

    1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

  6. Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

  7. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  8. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  9. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  10. Synthesis gas conversion in a mixed slurry reactor with iron-manganese catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Schehl, R.R.; Tischer, R.E.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas was reacted over different compositions of iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in a slurry reactor. The reactor operates in a back-mixed mode with a continuous flow of feed gas through the catalyst suspended in the liquid medium. Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90 were investigated at identical process conditions after a standard activation procedure. With time on stream for each catalyst system, hydrogenation of olefins occurred, along with olefin isomerization reactions. Activity, selectivity, and stability are discussed in general. Analyses of used catalyst samples are also reported.

  11. Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

  12. Effects of friction factor and slip factor on the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Ketankumar Kantilal

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , mass, or volume flow. 3. 2. 4 Recirculating Pump small centrifugal pump (Figure 9) was used to keep the slurry agitating within the tank by discharging in the Q w, pg+p~w '=A ~ fl p rr f f+4;. '"2 '. . . &f -. P'. . !' ' g- ' ?y 25 bottom... elbow hav ing pressure taps 0 at 45 as shown in figure 10 was used for a flowmeter. Two 1/8" diameter holes were drilled on the inner and outer side of the elbow and 1/8" diameter pipe nipples were welded for pressure transducer connection. 3. 2. 6...

  13. Volatile sulfhydryl compounds produced in Cheddar cheese slurries upon the addition of whey protein and casein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Amelia Rose

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . 16 19 19 20 21 23 23 25 26 26 31 32 40 Page Concentration of Reactive Sulfhydryl Groups in Slurries. . . . . 43 Effects of Added Milk Proteins on VSH Production. . . CONCLUSIONS. APPENDIX. VITA. 47 66 69 78 132 LIST OF TABLES... and pH of the milk (Table 1), 5 ml of frozen culture (Redi Set DVS ?980, Chr. Hansen' s Laboratory, Inc. , Milwaukee, WI) and rennet (Standard Calf Rennet, 100% high strength, Chr. Hansen's Laboratory) were added directly to the cheese vat and gently...

  14. Characterization of coal water slurry sprays from a positive displacement fuel injection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar Seshadri, Ajoy

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Diaphragm Pump/Jerk Pump Assembly. Injector Nozzle Schematic Nozzle Tip Schematic SEM of a Nozzle Tip Hole. Pressure Chamber Vessel Schematic. . . Block Diagrams of the Apparatus and 10 12 14 15 16 18 20 Instrumentation. 22 Figure 10 Figure... 50% Coal, 48-. water, 1% lignosulphonate, and 1% Triton X-114. The coal used was a high volatile subbituminous which was cleaned to less than 0. 8% ash (on a dry coal basis). Table 2 lists the slurry characteristics. 24 projector Lamps Injector...

  15. Thorium oxide slurries as blankets in fissile producing fusion- fission hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geer, Thomas Charles

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. T. A. Parish An alternative to fixed-fertile and molten salt fissile producing fusion-fission hybrid blankets was developed. The neutronic feasibility of a thorium oxide-heavy water slurry as a blanket was tested for a Catalyzed... of continuous fission product and fissile material removal, thus limiting the in-situ burnup of the product. A natural consideration for such a fluid fuel system is a molten salt. Fluorides of either uranium of thorium can be dissilved in molten flouride...

  16. Plant response to FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmody, R.G.; Dunker, R.E. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steel, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to test the feasibility of stabilizing coal slurry solids (CSS) wastes by directly seeding plants into the waste. This is not done conventionally because the waste can generate toxic amounts of sulfuric acid. Our approach is to neutralize the potential acidity by mixing fluidized bed combustion (FBC) waste into the slurry. If successful, this approach would both help dispose of FBC wastes while providing a more economical slurry stabilization technique. The project involves growing forage plants in CSS-FBC mixtures in the greenhouse. This is the first quarter of the project. We have designed the experiment, secured greenhouse space, purchased the seeds, collected and dried the FBC and CSS samples. The samples represent a typical range of properties. We retrieved two FBC and two CSS samples. One CSS sample appears to have a higher pyrite content than the other.

  17. Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

  18. Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

  19. Electrical conductivity is a parameter that can be used to monitor the entire hardening process of oilwell cement slurries. The theo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backe, Knut

    process of oilwell cement slurries. The theo- retical relationship among conductivity, porosity, cement and that rapid hydration will reduce the risk of gas migration. Introduction The main purposes of oilwell cements hardening process of oilwell cement slurries is important for successful cementing operations. Several

  20. Impact of finite-rate kinetics on carbon conversion in a single-stage entrained flow gasifier with coal-CO2 slurry feed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract Coal-CO2 slurry Botero) #12;Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, June 3-7, 2012 Botero et al. operating costs related with coal-CO2 slurry feed Cristina Botero , Randall P. Field, Howard J. Herzog, Ahmed F. Ghoniem

  1. Prototyping of a real size air-conditioning system using a tetra-n-butylammonium bromide semiclathrate hydrate slurry as secondary two-phase refrigerant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    semiclathrate hydrate slurry as secondary two-phase refrigerant ­ Experimental investigations and modelling). Abstract Among innovative processes developed in the field of refrigeration systems, technologies) is used as secondary refrigerant. The production of the slurry can be smoothed over day and night. Upon

  2. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to S0{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The final goal of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be used as a satisfactory growing medium in slurry pond reclamation. The chemical analyses of the 8 starting solids (5 FBC wastes, 2 Css samples, and 1 agricultural limestone sample) were completed.

  3. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

  4. SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE PROCESSING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 205E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Slurries of inorganic solids, containing both stable and radioactive elements, were produced during the cold war as by-products of the production of plutonium and enriched uranium and stored in large tanks at the Savannah River Site. Some of this high level waste is being processed into a stable glass waste form today. Waste processing involves various large scale operations such as tank mixing, inter-tank transfers, washing, gravity settling and decanting, chemical adjustment, and vitrification. The rheological properties of waste slurries are of particular interest. Methods for modeling flow curve data and predicting the properties of slurry blends are particularly important during certain operational phases. Several methods have been evaluated to predict the rheological properties of sludge slurry blends from the data on the individual slurries. These have been relatively successful.

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  6. Thickening of ultrafine coal-water slurries in a solid-bowl centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkerton, A.P.; Klima, M.S.; Morrison, J.L.; Miller, B.G.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a study being conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) to evaluate ultrafine coal dewatering technologies, testing was carried out to investigate the use of a solid-bowl (high-g) centrifuge for thickening ultrafine coalwater slurries. The objective of this study was to increase the solids concentration to a level suitable for use as a coal-water slurry fuel, while maximizing overall solids recovery. Feed material was collected from the combined discharge (centrate) streams from several screen-bowl centrifuges. These devices are currently being used in a commercial coal cleaning facility to dewater the clean coal product from a froth flotation circuit. Current plant practice is to discharge the centrate to settling ponds. The screen bowl centrate averages 5% solids by weight and contains nearly 60% material finer than 10 {mu}m. The current study examined the effects of operating conditions on centrifuge performance. The test conditions included centrifuge bowl and scroll speeds and volumetric feed rate. In addition to thickening, some cleaning was also achieved, because the finest particles (e.g. < 3 {micro}m), which contained a large percentage of liberated clays, were removed with the bulk of the water. The centrifuge products were analyzed for solids concentration, particle size distribution, and ash content. Size selectivity curves were also used to evaluate centrifuge performance.

  7. Resuspension of non-Newtonian slurries by submerged jet-nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshma, Reshma [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Florida International University, Engineering Center 3676, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Daas, Mutaz; Srivastava, Rajiv [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Tansel, Berrin [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Florida International University, Engineering Center 3676, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to determine the fluid velocity required for resuspension and removal of the radioactive waste sludge, which is characterized as a non-Newtonian fluid, from the tanks at the Savannah river site (SRS) (Georgia, USA) to accelerate the closure of the tanks with high level waste (HLW). Five different non-Newtonian fluids, which simulated the actual waste characteristics, were used to investigate the resuspension of the slurries with a jet-nozzle mixer. The laboratory tests were conducted at different flow rates and jet-nozzle orientations in a cylindrical tank with 0.3-m diameter and 0.46 m in height. Resuspension of the slurries was achieved by the submerged jets produced by two horizontal discharge nozzles located under the liquid level and positioned at 180 from each other. The fluids exhibited Bingham plastic behavior; therefore, the mixing power depends not only on the Reynolds number but also on the yield stress and high shear viscosity. A similarity analysis was performed to determine the effective cleaning radius (ECR) of the jet. The mixing efficiency was evaluated by visual analysis of the images during the experiments conducted at three nozzle orientations at 0 , 45 , and 90 and two nozzle exit velocities of 2.33 m/s and 0.56 m/s. The centerline velocity decayed with the distance from the jet-nozzle. The experimental results were compared with other mixing models. (author)

  8. Andrew G Haldane: Banking on the state Paper by Mr Andrew G Haldane, Executive Director, Financial Stability, Bank of England,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Stability, Bank of England, and Mr Piergiorgio Alessandri, based on a presentation delivered at the Federal

  9. Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  10. Post-project appraisal of lower Ritchie Creek dam removal, Napa County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jubilee; Pagano, Laura

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appraisal of Lower Ritchie Creek Dam Removal, Napa CountyApril 2004 Abstract Ritchie Creek drains 2.6 square milesdam was built in 1912 on Ritchie Creek to facilitate water

  11. Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muncrief, G.E.; Lacewell, R. D.; Cornforth, G. C.; Pena, J. G.

    TR- 123 1983 Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden G.E. Muncrief R.D. Lacewell G.C. Cornforth J.G. Pena Texas Water Resources Institute...

  12. The costs of breaching the four lower Snake River dams - BPA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shing groups recently released their analysis of breaching the four lower Snake River dams. The authors of "Revenue Stream" did not seek input from BPA or other federal agencies...

  13. SKA Organisation Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    SKA Organisation Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics Room 3.116 Alan Turing Building. The SKA Organisation is based in the Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester and will move

  14. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  15. Factors affecting calf and dam weights and their effects on breeding programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, Lawrence Allen

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FACTORS AFFECTING CALF AND DAM WEIGHTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BREEDING PROGRAMS A Thesis By LAMRENCE ALLEN MADDOX, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulf illment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964 Major Subject: Animal Breeding FACTORS AFFECTING CALF AND DAM WEIGHTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BREEDING PROGRAMS A Thesis By IAWRENCE ALLEN MADDOX, JR Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commit ee) (Head...

  16. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

  17. Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

  18. EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

  19. Hydropower and the environment: A case study at Glen Canyon Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, D.L. [Denver Technical Service Center, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of hydroelectric resources in the Colorado River requires a balancing of hydrologic, social, natural and cultural resources. The resulting management often has to deal with inherently conflicting objectives, short and long-term goals, time frames and operational flexibility. Glen Canyon Dam, AZ, on the Colorado River, controls the release of water into the Grand Canyon. The dam has been under intense public scrutiny since it was completed in 1963. An Environmental Impact Statement evaluating the future operations and options for Glen Canyon Dam was initiated by the Department of the Interior in 1989 and completed in 1995. An Adaptive Management approach to future operational management has been developed as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement process. Future operations at Glen Canyon Dam will take into consideration the need to balance water movement and hydroelectricity development with natural, recreation, Native American and cultural needs. Future management of rivers requires acknowledgement of the dynamic nature of ecosystems and the need to link scientific information into the decision-making process. Lessons learned and programs developed at Glen Canyon Dam may be applied to other river systems.

  20. Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Jerrel R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

  1. PROGRESS TOWARDS MODELING OF FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The model includes heat generation due to the exothermic chemical reaction, as well as heat removal from a constant temperature heat exchanger. Results of the CMFD simulations (similar to those shown in Figure 1) will be presented.

  2. Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank Background Overview T The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply researchers with highly uniform, well-protected coal samples unexposed to oxygen. Researchers investigating coal structure, properties, and behavior can benefit greatly from these samples

  3. Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajchel, M.; Ehrlinger, H.P.; Harnett, D.; Fonseca, A.; Maurer, R.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Williams Technologies, Inc. And Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and remixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology can enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant cost and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. Testing was also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back- filled, eliminating the need for tailings ponds. During the grant period, a laboratory-scale test apparatus (up to 3 GPM feed rate) was assembled and operated to demonstrate process performance over a range of feed temperatures and pressures. A dilute coal/water slurry from Consol, Inc.`s Rend Lake Preparation Plant was concentrated with the process to a maximum recorded solids loading of 61.9% solids by weight. Analytical results from the concentrate were evaluated by Destec Energy for suitability as an IGCC fuel.

  4. Resin-coated sand slurry pack gas deliverabilities: Field and laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, B.; Nelson, C.; Stadleman, J.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although through-tubing resin-coated sand slurry packs (RCSSP's) are significantly less expensive than conventional gravel packs, they have not been widely used as a sand control completion technique. This low usage is mainly due to two inherent problems. The first is the high risk of localized pack failure in the perforation tunnels when the RCSSP casing plug is milled out. The second problem is the difficulty associated with predicting flow rates (and therefore economics) of RCSSP completed wells, especially if the casing plug is not milled out. This paper presents a modified velocity coefficient correlation for gas turbulence, an innovative RCSSP completion configuration with an associated simulation technique, and supporting field results that demonstrate an expanded application for RCSSP's in the area of gas well through-tubing plugbacks where, until recently, their general application was thought to be uneconomical.

  5. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D.

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by the Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work discussed in this report (Phase III) address the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. The objective of the demonstrations performed in Phase III was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using 1/22{sup nd} scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative. The batch transfers were made by pumping the simulants from the Mixing Demonstration Tank (MDT) to six Receipt Tanks (RTs), and the consistency in the amount of seed particles in each batch was compared. Tests were conducted with non-Newtonian cohesive simulants with Bingham yield stress ranging from 0.3 Pa to 7 Pa. Kaolin clay and 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles were used for all the non-Newtonian simulants. To specifically determine the role of the yield stress on mixing and batch transfer, tests were conducted with a Newtonian mixture of glycerol and water with at viscosity of 6.2 cP that was selected to match the Bingham consistency (high shear rate viscosity) of the higher yield stress kaolin slurries. The water/glycerol mixtures used the same 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles. For the transfer demonstrations in Phase III, the mixer jet pumps were operated either at 10.0 gpm (28 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.63 ft{sup 2}/s) or 8.0 gpm (22.4 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.504 ft{sup 2}/s). All batch transfers from the MDT to the RTs were made at 0.58 gpm (MDT suction velocity 3.95 ft/s). The demonstrations that used simulants that ranged from 1.6 Pa to 7 Pa yield stress had the most successful batch transfer of solids to the RTs in terms of the total quantity of seed particles transferred. Testing suggest that when mixing water/seed particles and transferring, water provides the least desired batch transfer of solids based on the total quantity transferred. For the water tests, large dead zones of solids formed in the MDT and fewer solids get transferred to the RTs. For simulants with a yield stress of 0.3 Pa and below, the batch transfer behavior in terms of total transfer of seed particles was slightly higher than water test results. The testing did show somewhat more batch-to-batch variation in the transfer of seed particles with the slurries in comparison to water. A comparison of batch transfers with the kaolin slurries that had Bingham consistencies (viscosities) that wernearly the same as the Newtonian glycerol/water mixtures showed that the kaolin slurries with Bingham yield stresses of 1.6 and 7 Pa gave better batch transfer of seed particles based on the total quantities transferred. Overall, the batch transfer testing results show that testing with water is conservative, since using a simulant with a yield stress and/or elevated viscosity always resulted in a better total transfer of solids.

  7. and 19% of the stomachs of late-lifted fish were Food of the striped bass at Holyoke Dam was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan turbine at a low-head hydroelectric dam. North Am. J. Fish. Manage. 5:33-38. HOLLIS, E. H. 1952

  8. The Dalles Dam, Columbia River: Spillway Improvement CFD Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that were applied to The Dalles spillway for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The models have been successfully validated against physical models and prototype data, and are suitable to support biological research and operations management. The CFD models have been proven to provide reliable information in the turbulent high-velocity flow field downstream of the spillway face that is typically difficult to monitor in the prototype. In addition, CFD data provides hydraulic information throughout the solution domain that can be easily extracted from archived simulations for later use if necessary. This project is part of an ongoing program at the Portland District to improve spillway survival conditions for juvenile salmon at The Dalles. Biological data collected at The Dalles spillway have shown that for the original spillway configuration juvenile salmon passage survival is lower than desired. Therefore, the Portland District is seeking to identify operational and/or structural changes that might be implemented to improve fish passage survival. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) went through a sequence of steps to develop a CFD model of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The first step was to identify a preferred CFD modeling package. In the case of The Dalles spillway, Flow-3D was as selected because of its ability to simulate the turbulent free-surface flows that occur downstream of each spilling bay. The second step in development of The Dalles CFD model was to assemble bathymetric datasets and structural drawings sufficient to describe the dam (powerhouse, non-overflow dam, spillway, fish ladder entrances, etc.) and tailrace. These datasets are documented in this report as are various 3-D graphical representations of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The performance of the CFD model was then validated for several cases as the third step. The validated model was then applied to address specific SIS design questions. Specifically, the CFD models were used to evaluate flow deflectors, baffle block removal and the effects of spillwalls. The CFD models were also used to evaluate downstream differences at other locations, such as at the Highway 197 bridge piers and Oregon shore islands, due to alterations in spill pattern. CFD model results were analyzed to quantitatively compare impacts of the spillwall that has subsequently been constructed between bays 6 and 7. CFD model results provided detailed information about how the spillwall would impact downstream flow patterns that complemented results from the 1:80 scale physical model. The CFD model was also used to examine relative differences between the juvenile spill pattern used in previous years and the anticipated spill pattern that will be applied once the wall is complete. In addition, the CFD model examined velocity magnitudes over the downstream basalt shelf to investigate potential for erosion under high flow conditions (e.g., 21 kcfs/bay for bays 1 through 6) with the spillwall in place. Several appendices follow the results and discussion sections of this report. These appendices document the large number of CFD simulations that have been performed by PNNL; both spillway improvement study (SIS) related and those performed for related biological tests.

  9. Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  10. automated blood bank: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Blood Banking in Living Droplets MIT - DSpace Summary: Blood banking has a broad public health impact...

  11. Essays on Bank Optimal Portfolio Choice under Liquidity Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eul Jin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    portfolio choices under liquidity constraints. Our theory predicts that liquidation plays an important role in a bank's portfolio model. Even though liquidation is an off-equilibrium phenomenon, banks can have rich loan portfolios due to the possibility...

  12. Essays on banking and corporate finance in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gormley, Todd A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three essays that examine banking and corporate finance in developing countries. Specifically, it explores the theoretical and empirical implications of open capital markets, foreign bank ...

  13. SS-shifted architecture Run roadfinder with default bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SS-shifted architecture Run roadfinder with default bank Run roadfinder with ss-shifted bank track fitter DONE DONE #12;SCT-first architecture Run full chain in SCT-only configuration ­ Road

  14. Synchronized droplet size measurements of intermittent coal-water slurry diesel sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terracina, Dwayne Paul

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been completed to characterize atomization of intermittent coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel fuel engine. A synchronized laser diffraction particle analyzer...

  15. Characteristics of rural bank acquisitions: a logit analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applewhite, Jennifer Lynn

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interstate acquisition of their banks, the rate of acquisitions soared. In 1978, Maine enacted legislation permitting interstate banking on a reciprocal basis. Until mid-1982, Maine was the only state with such a law. In 1982, both New York and Alaska... of U. S. banks using comparative performance profiles and logit analysis. Characteristics of acquired and acquiring banks are compared for five years before the acquisitions and found to have significantly different rates of return on assets...

  16. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Banking and International Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weyde, Tillman

    1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name Banking and International Finance Award BSc The BSc (Hons) Banking and International Finance degree provides you with the academic knowledge skills and knowledge in the key areas of banking and international finance, including Financial

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 159 INTERFERENCE POTENTIAL FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA CRAIG ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA Craig R. Moore and James L. Dolan Introduction

  18. Credit Risk Systems Topics in Banking and Finance -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmek, Markus

    (securitization vs. credit derivatives) - Change in bank valuations, RoC · Project costs estimated at around 5 bps impact on the banking industry. · Strategic effects - Risk-sensitive capital requirements - Focus - How can the bank position itself strategically well and allocate the scarce resources where

  19. Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department Environment Division Forest Correa Pertti Veijalainen Harri Ahveninen Inter-American Development Bank Washington, D.C. Sustainable. At the IDB the work was supervised by Kari Keipi of the Sustainable Development Department (SDS). Bank staff

  20. Effects of the Georgia flood of `94 on Lake Blackshear Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, R.C.; Northrop, J.H. [Northrop, Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Crisp, R.L. Jr. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical Storm Alberto produced record rainfall in central Georgia in early July, 1994. The area drains into Lake Blackshear, formed in the Flint River by Lake Blackshear Dam. The level of the lake rose 3.5 m (11.5 ft) above normal and caused the worst flooding of the area in recorded history. The north embankment of the dam was overtopped, causing a 215 m (700 ft) breach. Prior to the breach, a few concentrated boils were observed in the tailwater downstream of the non-breached portion of the dam. This portion remained intact through the flood, but the presence of the boils raised questions regarding its integrity. The effects of the flood on the north embankment are discussed, as well as the geotechnical investigation conducted to assess subsurface conditions at the breach and intact portions and the plan for remediation.

  1. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

  3. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

  4. Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

  5. An Evaluation of a Dual Coriolis Meter System for In-Line Monitoring of Suspended Solids Concentrations in Radioactive Slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hylton, T.D.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes stored in underground tanks at several of its sites. In order to comply with various regulations and to circumvent potential problems associated with tank integrity, these wastes must be retrieved from the tanks, transferred to treatment facilities (or other storage locations), and processed to stable waste forms. The sludge wastes will typically be mobilized by some mechanical means (e.g., mixer pump, submerged jet) and mixed with the respective supernatants to create slurries that can be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. Depending on the DOE site, these slurries may be transferred up to six miles. Since the wastes are radioactive, it is critically important for the transfers to be made without plugging a pipeline. To reduce such a risk, the relevant properties of the slurry (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, and particle size distribution) should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be continuously monitored and controlled within specified limits while the transfer is in progress. The baseline method for determining the transport properties of slurries involves sampling and analysis; however, this method is time-consuming, and costly, and it does not provide real-time information. In addition, personnel who collect and analyze the samples are exposed to radiation. It is also questionable as to whether a laboratory analyst can obtain representative aliquots from the sample jar for these solid-liquid mixtures. The alternative method for determining the transport properties is in-line analysis. An in-line instrument is one that is connected to the process, analyzes the slurry as it flows through or by the instrument, and provides the results within seconds. This instrument can provide immediate feedback to operators so that, when necessary, the operators can respond quickly to counteract conditions that could lead to pipeline pluggage (e.g., backflushing the pipeline with water). One of the highest priorities is to determine the concentration of suspended solids in each of the slurries. In the project described in this report, two Coriolis meters were used simultaneously to create a suspended solids monitoring system that would provide accurate results with high precision. One Coriolis meter was used to measure the density of the slurry, while the other meter was used to measure the density of the carrier fluid (i.e., after filtration to remove the solid particles). The suspended solids concentration was then calculated from the density relationships between the slurry, the carrier fluid, and the dry solid particles. The latter density was determined by laboratory analysis and was assumed to be constant throughout the periods that grab samples were collected.

  6. Can a bank crisis break your heart?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuckler, David; Meissner, Christopher M; King, Lawrence P

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to 2002 Results A system-wide banking crisis increases population heart disease mortality rates by 6.4% (95% CI: 2.5% to 10.2%, p < 0.01) in high income countries, after controlling for economic change, macroeconomic instability, and population age...

  7. Master of Science in Banking and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Luxembourg School of Finance ­ Master of Science in Banking and Finance ­ FACULTYOFLAW School of Finance. In its seven years of existence, the University of Luxembourg has earned a place in Luxembourg's intellectual, economic and cultural life. This is particularly so in the area of finance

  8. Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brarmann, G. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of both the 30-year old, 265,000 square foot facility and the new 156,000 square foot Fred L. Hartley Research Center. The energy and demand savings resulting from the installation of the ice-bank system are significant. Large commercial and industrial...

  9. Essays on Banking Crises and Deposit Insurance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wen-Yao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................... 16 2.3.3 The Partial Deposit Insurance System ......................... 18 2.3.3.1 Depositors? Monitoring.................................... 18 2.3.3.2 Banks? Gambling Behavior.............................. 22 2... of the Gambling Return .......................................................................... 38 viii CHAPTER Page 2.6 Conclusions .............................................................................. 40 III FINANCIAL FRAGILITY...

  10. Sam Madden Basically Everyone Except My Bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Sam Madden Physicists Biologists Basically Everyone Except My Bank #12;· Benefit(DBMS) DBMS? · DBMS setup & boundary crossings painful ­ Especially if you have to do it multiple times! MATLAB a fleet of 40 cabs on Boston streets · Pipeline ­ Raw data in DBMS ­ Trajectories with Matlab ­ Queries

  11. December 9, 2013 DAVID L. BANKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolpert, Robert L

    . Aug. 1987 - May, 1993 Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics Carnegie Mellon University. Sept. 1986 - July 1987 Visiting Assistant Lecturer, Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical, Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, FL. 2. D. Banks and E. P. Smith (2010). The Good Book: Thirty Years

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  13. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  14. Do impassable dams and flow regulation constrain the distribution of green sturgeon in the Sacramento River, California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    , American River, and Yuba River. While dams block access to about 9% of historically available habitatDo impassable dams and flow regulation constrain the distribution of green sturgeon in the Sacramento River, California? By E. A. Mora1 , S. T. Lindley2 , D. L. Erickson3 and A. P. Klimley4 1 Joint

  15. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  16. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  17. Estimating Overall Risk of Dam Failure: Practical Considerations in Combining Failure Probabilities ANCOLD 2003 Risk Workshop Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    combination of probabilities in quantitative risk analysis. Keywords: dam safety, risk analysis, risk for estimating probabilities in dam safety risk analysis both for assessing the risks associated with an existing in the risk analysis model can have a significant influence on the magnitudes of key inputs to decisions about

  18. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  19. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure. 25 figs.

  20. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

  1. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

  2. A biometrical evaluation of relationships between dam weight and progeny preweaning performance in beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gerald Max

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A BIDMETRICA' EVALUA11ON Oi. RELATIONSV, IPS BFT'AEENI DAM W. IGHT AND PROGENY nREIfEANING PERFORMANCE IN BEEF CATILE A Thesis by GFRALD MAX SMITH Suf&mitfed to the Cradua'te Colleae of Texas Aiild University in pardial f. . lfillmen...& I TH App oved as Io style and content by: (Head of Doper t nant ) I Pie p1 be I' ) AoGnst ISSB ABS'IRAC) A P&ometricaI Bvaluation o~ Relationships Betweor Dam lrieight and Progeny Preweaning Performance in Beef Cattle. (Augusl I"GB) Gerald...

  3. Reaction of the dams behind the Toktoguol and Kurpsa hydroelectric power plants to repeated earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchuk, A.N.; Umralin, K.B.; Moldebehov, Z.I. [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The region where the chain of Naryn hydroelectric power plants are located in the Kyrgyzstan Republic is a seismically active area of Central Tien-Shan and is comparatively well known in seismological respects. No means of measuring the dams themselves, however, were ever incorporated as an instrumental base of investigation. The seismometric possibilities of embedded monitoring-measuring apparatus were disclosed by O.Yu. Schmidt Institute of Earth Physics and have made is possible to evaluate the reactions of dams to seismic effects and of excited seismicity, when residual deformations due to repeated tremors of different force and direction are accumulated over an extended period of time.

  4. The effect of raft removal and dam construction on the lower Colorado River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartopo

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF RAFT REMOVAL AND DAM CONSTRUCTION ON THE LOWER COLORADO RIVER, TEXAS A Thesis by HARTOPO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Geology TIIE EFFECT OI RAII' REMOVAL AND DAM CONSTRUCTION ON TI-IE LOWER COLORADO RIVER, TEXAS A Thesis by I IARTOPO Approved as to styic and content by: Christ her C. Mathewson (Chair of Committee) John R...

  5. Relationship of the weaning weight of beef calves to the size of their dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, James Edward

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1964 Major Subject; Animal Breeding REIATIONSHIP OF THE WEANING WEIGHT OF BEEF CALVES TO THE SIZE OF THEIR DAMS A Thesis By JAMES EDWARD TANNER Approved as to style and content by: ';/ . (Chatrman o Committee) (Head... of age of dam within weight groups of Angus cows 20 Analyses of covariance of 200-day weight (lb. ? of Angus calves. Estimated least-squares constants for 200-day weight (lb. ) of Angus calves Least-squares means of 200-day weight (lb. ) of Angus...

  6. Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

  7. Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  8. Development of rapid methods for estimating the fertilizing ability (nitrogen and potassium) of pig slurry and its changes during storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The digester output expressed as ml biogas/M3 tank/day ranged from 0.4 to 1.3 m"11' m3. d over a period of 9 should lead to a better use of pig slurry in agriculture. Swine waste anaerobic digesters : technical More than 120 animal waste anaerobic digesters exist in France. They were built bet- ween 1979 and 1983

  9. Risk Assessment Required In The Framework Of New French Regulation hhdTTjjhkljdjjsgshjhfsdkjhskslsl;s;s;;s;;s;;sjsjkjffffrtttttttfggjfgjgkfkjkjf fffffjfjjfkkfjjjOn Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to carry out a risk analysis to identify all failure modes that may occur on dam structure and hydraulic on the single dam are identified and managed. The risk of a dam failure must be studied, for example duringTTjjhkljdjjsgshjhfsdkjhskslsl;s;s;;s;;s;;sjsjkjffffrtttttttfggjfgjgkfkjkjf fffffjfjjfkkfjjjOn Dams 2(14pt) Methodology Developed By INERIS T. Balouin, A. Lahoz, C. Bolvin & Y. Flauw

  10. 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage. 2. What is the storage in the dam (in cu.m.)? 3. What is the length and depth of the dam? What is its structure and cost? How much time did it take to build the dam? 4. Where

  11. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries (including shape characterization). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, H.P.; Goetz, P.J.; Sharma, A.; Han, W; Bliss, T.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) sensor projects was to develop and commercialize a sensor system capable of particle analysis, in terms of size distributions, using concentrated suspensions at high solids concentrations. The early research was focused on application of ultrasonic spectroscopy of inorganic pigment slurries (e.g. titanium dioxide) commonly encountered on paper industry. During the project prototypes were tested in both academic and industrial laboratories. Work also involved successful field tests of the on-line prototype at a pigment manufacturing facility. Pen Kem continued the work at its cost beyond the initial funded period from March `92 to September `94. The first project (DE- FC05-88CE40684), which began in September 1988, culminated in a commercial laboratory instrument, Pen Kem AcoustoPhor {trademark} 8000, put on the market in June 1993. The follow-on project was aimed at investigation of shape and orientation effects on ultrasonic spectroscopy. A new cooperative agreement was awarded in September 1994 (DE-FC05-94CE40005) to develop shape characterization capabilities deemed critical by the clay industry. This follow-on project achieved following successes: A theoretical model was developed to account for the effects of size-dependent aspect ratios of spheroid particles under different orientations on ultrasound attenuation spectra of concentrated slurries. The theoretical model was confirmed by laboratory tests on kaolin slurries. An algorithm was developed to simulate evolution of particle orientation fields in simple squeezing flows.

  12. Plant response to FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmody, R.G. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Dunker, R.E. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Agronomy; Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steel, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to test the feasibility of stabilizing coal slurry solids (CSS) wastes by directly seeding plants into the waste. This is not done conventionally because the waste can generate toxic amounts of sulfuric acid. Our approach is to neutralize the potential acidity by mixing fluidized bed combustion (FBC) waste into the slurry. If successful this approach would both help dispose of FBC wastes while providing a more economical slurry stabilization technique. The project involves growing forage plants in CSS-FBC mixtures in the greenhouse. This is the second quarter of the project. We have designed the experiment, secured greenhouse space, purchased the seeds, collected, dried, and are analyzing the FBC and CSS samples. The samples represent a typical range of properties. We retrieved two FBC and two CSS samples. One CSS sample had a relatively high CaCO{sub 3} content relative to the pyrite content and will require no FBC to neutralize the potential acidity. The other CSS sample will require from 4.2 to 2.7% FBC material to neutralize its potential acidity.

  13. Geochemistry of FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three tasks are being conducted in this research project, all related to understanding the chemistry and mineralogy of the co-disposal of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) wastes with coal slurry solid (CSS) from a coal preparation plant. During coal cleaning, pyrite, other heavy minerals, and rock materials are rejected from the coal and discharged in an aqueous slurry to a slurry pond. After dewatering and abandonment of the pond, the pyrite may oxidize and produce acid that may migrate into the underlying groundwater system. If an alkaline product, such as FBC waste, is mixed with the CSS, then the acid will be effectively neutralized as it is produced. In Task 1, soluble components and acid-base reaction products from mixtures of FBC waste and CSS are being extracted for up to 180 days in a series of aqueous batch experiments. The final two sets of extractions, 90- and 180-days, were completed. The extracts and solids from these experiments were submitted for analysis of cations, anions, and mineralogy. In Task 2, 10 L of extracts from three mixtures of FBC waste and CSS were prepared for use in experiments to determine the adsorption/desorption reactions that occur between components of the extracts and three commonly occurring Illinois soils.

  14. The Implications of Horizontal and Complete Dam Removals on the Downstream Channel Bed Joanna Crowe Curran (curran@virginia.edu) and Kristen Cannatelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    accessible by reducing or eliminating the costs associated with unnecessary dredging of uncontaminated stakeholder concerns, and reduce the economic expenditure of dredging that is associated with dam removal stage II ­ scour filled in Flow Woolen Mills (VA): dredging with dam removal Embrey Dam (VA): Complete

  15. d:\\activepdf\\uploadfolder\\$asq1rr04-4144-212200461042pm.doc Page 1 Erosional narrowing after dam removal: Theory and numerical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    of a dam that is filled with sediment. A channel incises into the deposit after failure of the leadingd:\\activepdf\\uploadfolder\\$asq1rr04-4144-212200461042pm.doc Page 1 Erosional narrowing after dam phenomenon herein called "erosional narrowing". This occurs immediately after the sudden removal of a dam

  16. The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force and Charles L. Asbury, Daniel R. Gestaut, Andrew F. Powers, Andrew D. Franck, and Trisha N. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    movement The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force and Charles L.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce are uncertain, and the mechanism of MT-dependent force production is unknown. Recent work suggests that the Dam1

  17. The day the Dam Busters returned... in Canada Tom Chivers learns why Channel 4 asked engineers to rebuild Barnes Wallis's bouncing bomb.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    The day the Dam Busters returned... in Canada Tom Chivers learns why Channel 4 asked engineers to rebuild Barnes Wallis's bouncing bomb. Explosive: a scene from Channel 4?s new documentary about the Dam, at scale, under a plane, building a dam and blowing it up, is much more of an engineering exercise than

  18. Avalanche protection dam of Cialancier in Saint Etienne de Tine : From 2D digital modeling to the start of the onsite work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Avalanche protection dam of Cialancier in Saint Etienne de Tinée : From 2D digital modeling to design and build an avalanche protection dam. KEYWORDS Avalanche protection ­ Modeling ­ Work Adresse de. SEGEL, M. SCHMITT, E. MICHEL VILLAZ, T. EME, S. ROUDNITSKA, M. NAAIM. Avalanche protection dam

  19. ABSTRACT: The Hetch Hetchy System provides San Francisco with most of its water supply. O'Shaughnessy Dam is one com-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    'Shaughnessy Dam is one com- ponent of this system, providing approximately 25 percent of water storage for the Hetch Hetchy System and none of its con- veyance. Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam has gained interest for restoring Hetch Hetchy Valley. The water supply feasibility of removing O'Shaughnessy Dam is analyzed

  20. BANDO DI PARTECIPAZIONE al PREMIO TESI "ADRIANA CAVA" Adriana Cava Jazz Ballet in collaborazione con il DAMS di Torino, in occasione del

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    con il DAMS di Torino, in occasione del trentennale di attività della coreografa Adriana Cava (docente di Storia della danza e del mimo del DAMS di Torino), valuterà le tesi di laurea di argomento vincitore, avvisato nella stessa data 8 aprile tramite mail e segnalato sui siti ufficiali del DAMS di