National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for balls bran ch

  1. Biomass Rapid Analysis Network (BRAN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    Helping the emerging biotechnology industry develop new tools and methods for real-time analysis of biomass feedstocks, process intermediates and The Biomass Rapid Analysis Network is designed to fast track the development of modern tools and methods for biomass analysis to accelerate the development of the emerging industry. The network will be led by industry and organized and coordinated through the National Renewable Energy Lab. The network will provide training and other activities of interest to BRAN members. BRAN members will share the cost and work of rapid analysis method development, validate the new methods, and work together to develop the training for the future biomass conversion workforce.

  2. Ball valve extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herndon, Charles; Brown, Roger A.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for removing a ball valve is provided. The ball valve removal tool provides a handle sliding along the length of a shaft. One end of the shaft is secured within an interior cavity of a ball valve while the opposite end of the shaft defines a stop member. By providing a manual sliding force to the handle, the handle impacts the stop member and transmits the force to the ball valve. The direction of the force is along the shaft of the removal tool and disengages the ball valve from the ball valve housing.

  3. Ping Pong Ball Anemometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ping Pong Ball Anemometer Objective: To find the relationship between wind speed and the angle measured on a ping-pong ball anemometer. Materials: * 2 Protractors * String * Straws * Ping-pong ball * Fan * Digital Anemometer Investigative Question: How does the angle of the ping-pong ball anemometer change as the speed of the wind changes. Hypothesis: Justification/Explanation Data: Wind Speed (mph) Angle of Ping-Pong Ball (°) Create a Scatter Plot of Power vs. Angle below: Analysis: 1) Draw a

  4. Brans-Dicke cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2010-10-15

    Static axisymmetric thin-shell wormholes are constructed within the framework of the Brans-Dicke scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Examples of wormholes associated with vacuum and electromagnetic fields are studied. All constructions must be threaded by exotic matter, except in the case of geometries with a singularity of finite radius, associated with an electric field, which can have a throat supported by ordinary matter. These results are achieved with any of the two definitions of the flare-out condition considered.

  5. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  6. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  7. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, A.L.; Pasieka, D.F.

    1983-11-15

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball. 6 figs.

  8. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, Allen L. (Los Alamos, NM); Pasieka, Donald F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball.

  9. Inflation and dark energy from the Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artymowski, Michał; Lalak, Zygmunt; Lewicki, Marek

    2015-06-17

    We consider the Brans-Dicke theory motivated by the f(R)=R+αR{sup n}−βR{sup 2−n} model to obtain a stable minimum of the Einstein frame scalar potential of the Brans-Dicke field. As a result we have obtained an inflationary scalar potential with non-zero value of residual vacuum energy, which may be a source of dark energy. In addition we discuss the probability of quantum tunnelling from the minimum of the potential. Our results can be easily consistent with PLANCK or BICEP2 data for appropriate choices of the value of n and ω.

  10. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  11. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  12. Multifractal properties of ball milling dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budroni, M. A. Pilosu, V.; Rustici, M.; Delogu, F.

    2014-06-15

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a ball inside the reactor of a ball mill. We show that the distribution of collisions at the reactor walls exhibits multifractal properties in a wide region of the parameter space defining the geometrical characteristics of the reactor and the collision elasticity. This feature points to the presence of restricted self-organized zones of the reactor walls where the ball preferentially collides and the mechanical energy is mainly dissipated.

  13. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  14. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  15. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  16. Thermal Analysis of Ball Type Fuel Element for PBR. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Thermal Analysis of Ball Type Fuel Element for PBR. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Analysis of Ball Type Fuel Element for PBR. Authors: ...

  17. BaroBall - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contaminants from soil in the vadose zone, above the water table. The BaroBall control valve increases the efficiency of barometric pumping and allows natural soil gas to flow out ...

  18. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos...

  19. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  20. Ball State building massive geothermal system

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ball State University is building America’s largest ground source district geothermal heating and cooling system. The new operation will save the school millions of dollars, slash greenhouse gases and create jobs. The project will also “expand how America will define the use of geothermal technology on a district-wide scale,” and provide health benefits such as reducing asthma rates for Indiana residents, says Philip Sachtleben, Ball State’s associate vice president of governmental relations. The system will cool and heat nearly 50 buildings on Ball State’s Muncie, Ind., campus, replace four coal-burning boilers and span more than 600 acres. The switch to geothermal will save the university $2.2 million in fuel costs and cut its carbon footprint in half.

  1. Bucky20Ball.png | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information Bucky20Ball.png

  2. Construction of the noncommutative complex ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhituo

    2014-09-15

    We describe the construction of the noncommutative complex ball whose commutative analog is the Hermitian symmetric space D = SU(m, 1)/U(m), with the method of coherent state quantization. In the commutative limit, we obtain the standard manifold. We also consider a quantum field theory model on the noncommutative manifold.

  3. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, H.

    1997-07-15

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined. 5 figs.

  4. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, Hans

    1997-01-01

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined.

  5. Confidential balls minimizing in mean convex functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminsky, V.

    1994-12-31

    Let H be a Hilbert space, H{sub 0} {contained_in} H be a subspace in it; {Sigma}i{sigma}-algebra of Borel subsets from H{sub 0}, s = s(x, r) is the bal of radius r with the center at the point x {element_of} H and t = t(x, r) is its boundary, a sphere. Let measure {mu} defined on {Sigma} be finite nonnegative and satisfy the following condition: {mu}(H{sub 0}) = 1. By fixing two nonnegative numbers {mu}{sub 0}, where 0 < {mu}{sub 0} < 1, and R > 0, we indicate from {sigma}-algebra {Sigma} the class S = {l_brace}s,(x, r) {element_of} {Sigma}: {mu}(s) {>=} {mu}{sub o}, r {<=} R{r_brace}. Let {var_phi}(x) be a convex eigen functional on H such that it is bounded on each ball s {element_of} S{sub 0}. It is possible to introduce an averaging functional for each ball s {element_of} S {Phi}(s) = {sub {mu}(s)}{sup 1} {integral}{sub s(x, r)} {var_phi}(y){mu}(dy) = {sub {mu}(s(x, r))}{sup 1} {integral}{sub s({theta}, r)} {var_phi}(x + {xi}){mu}(d{xi}) = F(x, r) and to consider the following extremal problem {Phi}(s) {yields} inf{sub s{epsilon}S}. We can interpret such a formulation of the problem as an extremal problem with confidential condition ({mu}s) {>=} {mu}{sub 0}. It is possible to consider the formulations of problem of such type in order to generalize the classical problems in mathematical programming in which now we find an extremal subset of an extremal element. The following results are obtained: theorems about existence of an extremal ball, necessary condition for a ball to be extremal in problems of such types, sufficient conditions of extremality of the ball by stronger restrictions on functional and measure in the problem.

  6. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps Citation Details In-Document ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM ...

  7. Charmonium studies with the crystal ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oreglia, M.

    1980-06-01

    The Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR is used to analyze the decays psi' ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..psi and psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi,chi ..-->.. ..gamma gamma... Values are obtained for the branching ratios of psi' ..-->.. eta/..mu../sup 0/psi and psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi,chi ..-->.. ..gamma..psi. No evidence is found for a 2/sup 1/S/sub 0/(eta'c) state in the mass range 3129 ..-->.. 3644 MeV/c/sup 2/. Analysis of the angular distributions in the cascade chi decays yields spin and multipole assignments for the chi(3.51) and chi(3.55).

  8. {gamma} parameter and Solar System constraint in chameleon-Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saaidi, Kh.; Mohammadi, A.; Sheikhahmadi, H.

    2011-05-15

    The post Newtonian parameter is considered in the chameleon-Brans-Dicke model. In the first step, the general form of this parameter and also effective gravitational constant is obtained. An arbitrary function for f({Phi}), which indicates the coupling between matter and scalar field, is introduced to investigate validity of solar system constraint. It is shown that the chameleon-Brans-Dicke model can satisfy the solar system constraint and gives us an {omega} parameter of order 10{sup 4}, which is in comparable to the constraint which has been indicated in [19].

  9. Ball State Completes Largest U.S. Ground-Source Geothermal System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ball State Completes Largest U.S. Ground-Source Geothermal System Ball State Completes Largest U.S. Ground-Source Geothermal System April 4, 2012 - 3:19pm Addthis Ball State ...

  10. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-06-26

    Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

  11. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chungkao Hsieh.

    1993-11-02

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection. 5 figures.

  12. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Hsieh, Chung-Kao

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection.

  13. Neutron detection using a crystal ball calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martem’yanov, M. A. Kulikov, V. V.; Krutenkova, A. P.

    2015-12-15

    The program of experiments of the A2 Collaboration performed on a beam of tagged photons of the MAMI electron microtron in Mainz (Germany) includes precision measurements of the total and differential cross sections of the pion photoproduction on neutrons of a deuterium target. The determination of the detector ability to detect neutrons is undoubtedly one of the important problems of the experiment. The calorimetric system of the detector contains a segmented NaI Crystal Ball detector, which gives information about the position, energy, and detection time of neutral and charged particles in a wide angular range. In this work, we describe the measurement of the neutron detection efficiency in the energy range from 20 to 400MeV. The results are compared with BNL data obtained on a pion beam and proton target.

  14. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Solution A new, non-electrical, remote radiation mapping device known as RadBall ... the extent and distribution of gamma radiation in a given hot cell, glovebox or room. ...

  15. Gas turbine igniter with ball-joint support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steber, C.E.; Travis, R.J.; Rizzo, J.A.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a support for an igniter for a combustor of a gas turbine, the combustor being of a type including a casing and a liner within the casing. It comprises: a ball joint; means for supporting the ball joint disposed a substantial distance outward from the casing; a body section of the igniter affixed in the ball joint; means for permitting the ball joint, and the body section to rotate through a substantial range; an igniter tip on the body section; and a hole in the liner. The igniter tip entering through the hole and into an interior of the liner. The hole being a tight fit to the igniter tip, whereby leakage past the igniter tip through the hole is limited. The substantial range being sufficient to permit fitting the igniter tip in the hole in the presence of manufacturing tolerances, and to permit the igniter tip to track the hole in the presence of differential thermal expansion during operation.

  16. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2008, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Dr. Glen Wurden Los Alamos National Laboratory Presentation: PDF icon Free...

  17. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  18. Areal array jetting device for ball grid arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frear, D.R.; Yost, F.G.; Schmale, D.T.; Essien, M.

    1997-08-01

    Package designs for microelectronics devices have moved from through-hole to surface mount technology in order to increase the printed wiring board real estate available by utilizing both sides of the board. The traditional geometry for surface mount devices is peripheral arrays where the leads are on the edges of the device. As the technology drives towards high input/output (I/O) count (increasing number of leads) and smaller packages with finer pitch (less distance between peripheral leads), limitations on peripheral surface mount devices arise. A solution to the peripheral surface mount issue is to shift the leads to the area under the device. This scheme is called areal array packaging and is exemplified by the ball grid array (BGA) package. In a BGA package, the leads are on the bottom surface of the package in the form of an array of solder balls. The current practice of joining BGA packages to printed wiring boards involves a hierarchy of solder alloy compositions. A high melting temperature ball is typically used for standoff. A promising alternative to current methods is the use of jetting technology to perform monolithic solder ball attachment. This paper describes an areal array jetter that was designed and built to simultaneously jet arrays of solder balls directly onto BGA substrates.

  19. CH-TRUCON Rev. 21, January 2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOEWIPP 01-3194 Rev. 21 CH-TRU WASTE CONTENT CODES (CH-TRUCON) Revision 21 January 2008 ... 01-3194 2 DOEWIPP 01-3194 Rev. 21 CH-TRU WASTE CONTENT CODES (CH-TRUCON) Revision 21 ...

  20. A Look Through the Crystal Ball at the Future of Automobile Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Look Through the Crystal Ball at the Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Title A Look Through the Crystal Ball at the Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Publication Type...

  1. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization A new, non-electrical, remote radiation mapping device known as RadBall has been developed by the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) in the United Kingdom. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization (198.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 CX-005512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report

  2. VOC compliance on the ball: Aluminum can manufacturer rolls to California VOC compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, R.

    1997-07-01

    Since entering the North American beverage can market in 1969, Ball Corp., has increased its market share at a pace more than double the growth of the market itself. In addition to holding numerous patented advancements in can-making technology, Ball prides itself as an environmentally responsible company. When Ball decided to increase production capacity in its Fairfield, California, plant, the challenge was to produce more cans, while still complying with the state`s stringent air emissions regulations. As with other aluminum can manufacturing facilities, Ball`s coating and curing operations generate volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Ball`s permit from the state of California allows only limited amounts of VOC discharges into the atmosphere. With proposed increases in production capacities, however, the Bay Area`s Air Quality Management District--a local US EPA authority--required Ball to incinerate far more VOCs than the existing recuperative abatement system could handle. According to California regulations, facilities that wish to increase VOC emissions must install some type of VOC-control system or provide technological offsets. This regulatory pressure led Ball to seek a solution that would not only comply with emissions regulations, but would not compromise the company`s production process. Ball engineers selected a regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) for the Fairfield, Calif., plant. Considering the success Ball has encountered in previous experiences with this type of oxidation unit, the company immediately selected an RTO instead of catalytic oxidizers or other types of pollution control equipment.

  3. Thermodynamics of charged rotating black branes in Brans-Dicke theory with quadratic scalar field potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pakravan, J.; Hendi, S. H.

    2006-11-15

    We construct a class of charged rotating solutions in (n+1)-dimensional Maxwell-Brans-Dicke theory with flat horizon in the presence of a quadratic potential and investigate their properties. These solutions are neither asymptotically flat nor (anti)-de Sitter. We find that these solutions can present black brane, with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black brane or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitably. We compute the finite Euclidean action through the use of counterterm method, and obtain the conserved and thermodynamic quantities by using the relation between the action and free energy in grand-canonical ensemble. We find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics, and the entropy does not follow the area law.

  4. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  5. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  7. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  8. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-05-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  9. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-18

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  10. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-02-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  13. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  14. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-11-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  15. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  16. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-06-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  17. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-09-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  18. CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-10-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  19. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-10-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-03-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  2. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-30

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  4. NOPR CH2M | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M NOPR CH2M NOPR CH2M (62.16 KB) More Documents & Publications NOPR NEI NEI Statement DOE Workshop 02 20 FINAL NOPR CIGNL

  5. Three-dimensional Plasmas R. L. Dewar; P. Cuthbert; R. Ball 70...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Three-dimensional Plasmas R. L. Dewar; P. Cuthbert; R. Ball 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY;...

  6. Measurements of the Motion of Plasma Filaments in a Plasma Ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campanell, M.; Laird, J.; Provost, T.; Vasquez, S.; Zweben, S. J.

    2010-01-26

    Measurements were made of the motion of the filamentary structures in a plasma ball using high speed cameras and other optical detectors. These filaments traverse the ball radially at ~106 cm/sec at the driving frequency of ~26 kHz, and drift upward through the ball at ~1 cm/sec. Varying the applied high voltage and frequency caused the number, length, and diameter of the filaments to change. A custom plasma ball was constructed to observe the effects of varying gas pressure and species on the filament structures.

  7. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  8. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Frederick G.; Frear, Darrel R.; Schmale, David T.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users.

  9. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, F.G.; Frear, D.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-05

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users. 7 figs.

  10. Coupling for joining a ball nut to a machine tool carriage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved coupling for joining a lead screw ball nut to a machine tool carriage. The ball nut is coupled to the machine tool carriage by a plurality of laterally flexible bolts which function as hinges during the rotation of the lead screw for substantially reducing lateral carriage movement due to wobble in the lead screw.

  11. Expanding (n+1)-dimensional wormhole solutions in Brans-Dicke cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahimi, E.; Riazi, N.

    2010-01-15

    We have obtained two classes of (n+1)-dimensional wormhole solutions using a traceless energy-momentum tensor in the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. The first class contains wormhole solutions in an open geometry, while the second contains wormhole solutions in both open and closed universes. In addition to wormhole geometries, naked singularities and maximally symmetric space-time also appear among the solutions as special cases. We have also considered the traversability of the wormhole solutions and have shown that they are indeed traversable. Finally, we have discussed the energy-momentum tensor which supports this geometry and have checked for the energy conditions. We have found that wormhole solutions in the first class of solutions violate the weak energy condition (WEC). In the second class, the wormhole geometries in a closed universe do violate the WEC, but in an open universe with a suitable choice of constants the supporting matter energy-momentum tensor can satisfy the WEC. However, even in this case the full effective energy-momentum tensor including the scalar field and the matter energy-momentum tensor still violates the WEC.

  12. CH-TRUCON Rev. 21, January 2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE/WIPP 01-3194 Rev. 21 CH-TRU WASTE CONTENT CODES (CH-TRUCON) Revision 21 January 2008 This document supercedes DOE/WIPP 01-3194, Revision 20 CH-TRUCON, Rev. 21, January 2008 DOE/WIPP 01-3194 2 DOE/WIPP 01-3194 Rev. 21 CH-TRU WASTE CONTENT CODES (CH-TRUCON) Revision 21 January 2008 Approved by: [Signature on File] Date:____________ D. Casey Gadbury, National TRU Program Director CH-TRUCON, Rev. 21, January 2008 DOE/WIPP 01-3194 3 This document has been submitted as required to: Office of

  13. Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure studies above 6Mbar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  14. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  15. Red & Black Ball raises nearly $82,000 for youth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Red & Black Ball raises $81,000 for youth Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Red & Black Ball raises nearly $82,000 for youth The Family YMCA receives windfall for Española and Los Alamos teen centers. April 4, 2016 From left: LANL Government Affairs Office Director Patrick Woehrle, LANL Community Programs Office Director Kathy Keith, Laboratory Director Charles

  16. CH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signal is readily suppressed using time-delay methods enabled by femtosecond laser pulses. ... in situ, without the need of labels and without damage to the carbon substrates. ...

  17. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-06

    This document provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

  18. Control design and robustness analysis of a ball and plate system by using polynomial chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coln, Diego; Balthazar, Jos M.; Reis, Clia A. dos; Bueno, tila M.; Diniz, Ivando S.; Rosa, Suelia de S. R. F.

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model of a ball and plate system, a control law and analyze its robustness properties by using the polynomial chaos method. The ball rolls without slipping. There is an auxiliary robot vision system that determines the bodies' positions and velocities, and is used for control purposes. The actuators are to orthogonal DC motors, that changes the plate's angles with the ground. The model is a extension of the ball and beam system and is highly nonlinear. The system is decoupled in two independent equations for coordinates x and y. Finally, the resulting nonlinear closed loop systems are analyzed by the polynomial chaos methodology, which considers that some system parameters are random variables, and generates statistical data that can be used in the robustness analysis.

  19. Structural and microstructural changes in monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} during the ball-milling with stainless steel assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanic, G. . E-mail: stefanic@irb.hr; Music, S.; Gajovic, A.

    2006-04-13

    High-energy ball-milling of monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} was performed in air using the planetary ball mill with a stainless steel milling assembly. Structural and microstructural changes during the ball-milling were monitored using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results of line broadening analysis indicated a decrease in the crystallite size and an increase in the microstrains with the ball-milling time increased up to {approx}150 min. The results of quantitative phase analysis indicated the presence of a very small amount of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} phase in this early stage of ball-milling. The onset of m-ZrO{sub 2} {sup {yields}} t-ZrO{sub 2} transition occurred between 10 and 15 h of ball-milling, which resulted in a complete transition after 20 h of ball-milling. Further ball-milling caused a decrease of the t-ZrO{sub 2} lattice parameters followed by a probable transition into c-ZrO{sub 2}. It was concluded that the stabilization of t- and c-ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs at RT can be attributed to the incorporation of aliovalent cations (Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+}) introduced into the sample due to the wear and oxidation of the milling media.

  20. Geologic investigation of roof and floor strata: longwall demonstration, Old Ben Mine No. 24. Prediction of coal balls in the Herrin Coal. Final technical report: Part 2. [Mineralized peat balls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMaris, P.J.; Bauer, R.A.; Cahill, R.A.; Damberger, H.H.

    1983-04-01

    Coal-ball areas, large deposits of mineralized peat in the coal seam, obstructed longwall mining in the Herrin Coal at Old Ben Mine No. 24. In-mine mapping located coal balls under transitional roof - areas where the roof lithology alternates between the Energy Shale and the Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone. Specifically, coal balls occur under eroded exposures or windows of the marine Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone in the Energy Shale. Two types of coal-ball areas have been identified, based on stratigraphic position in the coal seam: type I is restricted to the top of the seam, and type II occurs at midseam and below. To predict the distribution of coal balls, as well as explain their formation, a depositional model was developed: First, freshwater sediments buried the Herrin peat. Decomposition of the sealed peat continued, producing high CO/sub 2/ partial pressures; then selective erosion took place as a river removed the cover along sinuous paths, cutting through to the peat in some places. With the seal broken, CO/sub 2/ was released, and freshwaters that contained Ca and Mg ions flushed out organic acids. Later, marine mud buried both the freshwater sediments and the exposed peat, which accounts for the transitional roof over the Herrin Coal and the coal balls under the marine shale windows in the Energy Shale. The depositional model was supported by the first comprehensive set of geochemical data for coal balls. Coal balls generally contained less than 4 percent organic carbon and very low levels of detrital minerals. Although individual sites of concentrated coal balls cannot be predicted, the specific linear roof exposures associated with these coal-ball areas can be identified by mapping. Based on previously mapped areas, the trends of these linear exposures can be projected.

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  2. Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesnewport-news-review-ch-47-segment-includes-tedf-groundbreaking-event Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking event...

  3. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 November 2012 Review of the...

  4. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Contact-Handled (CH) TRU...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contact-Handled (CH) TRU Waste Certification and Waste Information SystemWaste Data System (WWISWDS) Data Entry Central Characterization Program (CCP) Contact-Handled (CH) TRU...

  5. Ball State Completes Largest U.S. Ground-Source Geothermal System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ball State University has completed its campus-wide ground-source geothermal system, the nation's largest geothermal heating and cooling system, DOE announced on March 20. DOE played a part in the project by providing a $5 million grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  6. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal System with Support from Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above approach to American energy, the Energy Department today congratulated Ball State University for its campus-wide ground-source geothermal system, the nation's largest geothermal heating and cooling system.

  7. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr11ch4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ch4 Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

  8. ARM - Datastreams - fullavhrr16ch4

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  9. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr16ch4

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  12. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr17ch4

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  15. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr17ch2

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  16. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr14ch2

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  4. ARM - Datastreams - fullavhrr11ch2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. ARM - Datastreams - fullavhrr15ch4

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  15. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki

    2014-02-03

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles.

  16. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contracting CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Contracting ORP Contracts and Procurements RL Contracts and Procurements CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Mission Support Alliance Washington Closure Hanford HPM Corporation (HPMC) Wastren Advantage, Inc. Bechtel National, Inc. Washington River Protection Solutions CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CH2M CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is the prime

  17. A Ball Lightning Model as a Possible Explanation of Recently Reported Cavity Lights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, David; /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    The salient features of cavity lights, in particular, mobile luminous objects (MLO's), as have been experimentally observed in superconducting accelerator cavities, are summarized. A model based upon standard electromagnetic interactions between a small particle and the 1.5 GHz cavity excitation field is described. This model can explain some features of these data, in particular, the existence of particle orbits without wall contact. While this result is an important success for the model, it is detailed why the model as it stands is incomplete. It is argued that no avenues for a suitable extension of the model through established physics appear evident, which motivates an investigation of a model based upon a more exotic object, ball lightning. As discussed, further motivation derives from the fact that there are significant similarities in many of the qualitative features of ball lightning and MLO's, even though they appear in quite different circumstances and differ in scale by orders of magnitude. The ball lightning model, which incorporates electromagnetic charges and currents, is based on a symmetrized set of Maxwell's equations in which the electromagnetic sources and fields are characterized by a process called dyality rotation. It is shown that a consistent mathematical description of dyality rotation as a physical process can be achieved by adding suitable (phenomenological) current terms to supplement the usual current terms in the symmetrized Maxwell's equations. These currents, which enable the conservation of electric and magnetic charge, are called vacuum currents. It is shown that the proposed ball lightning model offers a good qualitative explanation of the perplexing aspects of the MLO data. Avenues for further study are indicated.

  18. Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches to Predicting the Gasoline Price at the Pump

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches to Predicting the Gasoline Price at the Pump Christiane Baumeister, Bank of Canada Lutz Kilian, University of Michigan Thomas K. Lee, U.S. Energy Information Administration April 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of

  19. Effect of antisymmetric CH stretching excitation on the dynamics of O({sup 1}D) + CH{sub 4} ? OH + CH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Huilin; Yang, Jiayue; Zhang, Dong; Shuai, Quan; Jiang, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn; Yang, Xueming, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-04-21

    The effect of antisymmetric CH stretching excitation of CH{sub 4} on the dynamics and reactivity of the O({sup 1}D) + CH{sub 4} ? OH + CD{sub 3} reaction at the collision energy of 6.10 kcal/mol has been investigated using the crossed-beam and time-sliced velocity map imaging techniques. The antisymmetric CH stretching mode excited CH{sub 4} molecule was prepared by direct infrared excitation. From the measured images of the CH{sub 3} products with the infrared laser on and off, the product translational energy and angular distributions were derived for both the ground and vibrationally excited reactions. Experimental results show that the vibrational energy of the antisymmetric stretching excited CH{sub 4} reagent is channeled exclusively into the vibrational energy of the OH co-products and, hence, the OH products from the excited-state reaction are about one vibrational quantum hotter than those from the ground-state reaction, and the product angular distributions are barely affected by the vibrational excitation of the CH{sub 4} reagent. The reactivity was found to be suppressed by the antisymmetric stretching excitation of CH{sub 4} for all observed CH{sub 3} vibrational states. The degree of suppression is different for different CH{sub 3} vibrational states: the suppression is about 40%60% for the ground state and the umbrella mode excited CH{sub 3} products, while for the CH{sub 3} products with one quantum symmetric stretching mode excitation, the suppression is much less pronounced. In consequence, the vibrational state distribution of the CH{sub 3} product from the excited-state reaction is considerably different from that of the ground-state reaction.

  20. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill- October 4, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill related to at a Lapse in Dosimetry Accreditation at the Separations Process Research Unit

  1. Remotely maintainable top-loading captive ball valve system for ICPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    A program was undertaken for the remote maintenance of valve boxes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The remote adaptive features developed for a 3-in. top-loading captive ball valve have been fabricated and thoroughly tested on a prototype 3-in. valve unit located at the RRMTF. Remote disassembly/assembly has been successfully demonstrated on numerous occasions by the RSA group at WINCO. In addition, the remotely detachable valve actuator rod has also been successfully demonstrated on this prototype unit. Approximately 150 valves of several sizes with remote adaptive features based on WINCO`s prototype development by the RSA group are currently being manufactured.

  2. Modeling of an adsorption unit packed with amidoxime fiber balls for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morooka, S.; Kato, T.; Inada, M.; Kago, T.; Kusakabe, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Amidoxime fiber adsorbents are prepared by treating commercial poly(acrylonitrile) fibers with NH{sub 2}OH in methanol and then with an aqueous NaOH solution. The rate of adsorption of uranium from seawater is 0.1-0.3 (g of U/kg of dry fiber)/day. The fiber is placed in 2-cm-diameter spherical shells of plastic net, and these fibrous balls are packed in a column. Seawater is assumed to flow through the packed bed by the kinetic force of the ocean current. The permeation velocity of liquid in each ball is evaluated with a small electrode that detects the electrochemical limiting current. When the permeation velocity is slow, most uranyl ions are adsorbed only in the peripheral part of the ball. In this paper a model of the packed bed absorption unit is proposed and a numerical calculation gives optimum values of design parameters.

  3. The crystallization of the nanometersized amorphous ceramic powders by ball milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, G.J.; Song, X.P.; Li, Y.L.

    1995-12-31

    The nanometersized amorphous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Si-N-C powders are subjected by high-energy ball milling in order to induce a crystallization process. It was found that after initial 4 seconds of milling a-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} may rapidly crystallize into a mixture of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} whereas amorphous Si-N-C powders remain in the amorphous state. These results cannot be interpreted with the local effective temperature rise at the collision sites and the increase of the impurity levels which drive the crystallization. The observed structural changes occurring in a-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} can be attributed to the mechanical deformation which alters the bonding nature of a-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. It was concluded that ball milling is an effective tool to induce the crystallization of some amorphous metallic systems.

  4. Hydro-ball in-core instrumentation system and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tower, Stephen N.; Veronesi, Luciano; Braun, Howard E.

    1990-01-01

    A hydro-ball in-core instrumentation system employs detector strings each comprising a wire having radiation sensitive balls affixed diametrically at spaced positions therealong and opposite tip ends of which are transportable by fluid drag through interior passageways. In the passageways primary coolant is caused to flow selectively in first and second opposite directions for transporting the detector strings from stored positions in an exterior chamber to inserted positions within the instrumentation thimbles of the fuel rod assemblies of a pressure vessel, and for return. The coolant pressure within the detector passageways is the same as that within the vessel; face contact, disconnectable joints between sections of the interior passageways within the vessel facilitate assembly and disassembly of the vessel for refueling and routine maintenance operations. The detector strings may pass through a very short bend radius thereby minimizing space requirements for the connections of the instrumentation system to the vessel and concomitantly the vessel containment structure. Improved radiation mapping and a significant reduction in potential exposure of personnel to radiation are provided. Both top head and bottom head penetration embodiments are disclosed.

  5. Non-stationary dynamics in the bouncing ball: A wavelet perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Abhinna K., E-mail: abhinna@iiserkol.ac.in; Panigrahi, Prasanta K., E-mail: pprasanta@iiserkol.ac.in [Department of Physical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur 741246 (India); Sekar Iyengar, A. N., E-mail: ansekar.iyengar@saha.ac.in [Plasma Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP), Sector 1, Block-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-12-01

    The non-stationary dynamics of a bouncing ball, comprising both periodic as well as chaotic behavior, is studied through wavelet transform. The multi-scale characterization of the time series displays clear signatures of self-similarity, complex scaling behavior, and periodicity. Self-similar behavior is quantified by the generalized Hurst exponent, obtained through both wavelet based multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier methods. The scale dependent variable window size of the wavelets aptly captures both the transients and non-stationary periodic behavior, including the phase synchronization of different modes. The optimal time-frequency localization of the continuous Morlet wavelet is found to delineate the scales corresponding to neutral turbulence, viscous dissipation regions, and different time varying periodic modulations.

  6. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-03-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

  7. Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report: Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation...

  8. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-04-04

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

  9. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-04-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

  10. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Chicago Operations Office (CH...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Annual Planning Summary for Chicago Operations Office (CH) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within ...

  11. Experimental Confirmation of CH Mandrel Removal from Be Shells...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experimental Confirmation of CH Mandrel Removal from Be Shells Citation Details ... Although the plastic mandrel may not be a design issue, it is a fielding issue because at ...

  12. Ch. I, Report on Waunita Hot Springs Project, Gunnison County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report: Ch. I, Report on Waunita Hot Springs Project, Gunnison County, Colorado Author K. W. Nickerson and Associates Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological...

  13. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Plateau...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Analytical Technical...

  14. Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance Oxygen Functional Groups for Biaryl Construction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-...

  15. Description of a solder pulse generator for the single step formation of ball grid arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmale, D.T.; Frear, D.R.; Yost, F.G.; Essien, M.

    1997-02-01

    The traditional geometry for surface mount devices is the peripheral array where the leads are on the edges of the device. As the technology drives towards high input/output (I/O) count (increasing number of leads) and smaller packages with finer pitch (less distance between peripheral leads), limitations on peripheral surface mount devices arise. The leads on these fine pitch devices are fragile and can be easily bent. It becomes increasingly difficult to deliver solder past to leads spaced as little as 0.012 inch apart. Too much solder mass can result in bridging between leads while too little solder can contribute to the loss of mechanical and electrical continuity. A solution is to shift the leads from the periphery of the device to the area under the device. This scheme is called areal array packaging and is exemplified by the ball grid array (BGA) package. A system has been designed and constructed to deposit an entire array of several hundred uniform solder droplets onto a printed circuit board in a fraction of a second. The solder droplets wet to the interconnect lands on a pc board and forms a basis for later application of a BGA device. The system consists of a piezoelectric solder pulse unit, heater controls, an inert gas chamber and an analog power supply/pulse unit.

  16. Experimental study of residence time distributions of ball-mill circuits grinding coal-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoji, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Ohtake, A.; Austin, L.G.

    2008-08-15

    Residence time distributions (RTDs) were estimated by water tracing in a number of wet overflow ball mills (diameters 0.38 to 4.65 m) producing dense, coal-water slurries. In open-circuit mills of 0.38 m diameter and various length-diameter (LID) ratios, the mean residence times of solid were also determined from measured mill holdups. Holdup increased with increased mill feed rate, but the mean residence times of coal and water were still equal to each other. The experimental residence time distributions were fitted to the Mori-Jimbo-Yamazaki semi-infinite, axial mixing model, and the dimensionless mixing coefficient was determined for each of 25 tests in single- and two-compartment mills. This coefficient was found to be independent to the feed rate but linearly proportional to the D/L ratio. The mixing coefficient was smaller for two-compartment mills than for single-compartment mills, showing that there was reduced mixing introduced by the diaphragm separating the compartments. Equations are given to scale residence time distributions for changes in mill diameter and length.

  17. Temperature modeling for analysis and design of the sintering furnance in HTR fuel type of ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saragi, Elfrida; Setiadji, Moch

    2013-09-09

    One of the factors that determine the safety of the operation of the sintering furnace fuel HTR ball is the temperature distribution in the ceramic tube furnace. The temperature distribution must be determined at design stage. The tube has a temperature of 1600 C at one end and about 40 C at the other end. The outside of the tube was cooled by air through natural convection. The tube is a furnace ceramic tube which its geometry are 0.08, 0.09 and 0.5 m correspondingly for the inner tube diameter, outer tube diameter and tube length. The temperature distribution of the tube is determined by the natural convection coefficient (NCF), which is difficult to be calculated manually. The determination of NCF includes the Grasshoff, Prandtl, and Nusselt numbers which is a function of the temperature difference between the surrounding air with the ceramic tube. If the temperature vary along the tube, the complexity of the calculations increases. Thus the proposed modeling was performed to determine the temperature distribution along the tube and heat transfer coefficient using a self-developed software which permit the design process easier.

  18. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland

  19. CH2M Hill Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in consulting, design, engineering, procurement, construction, and operations and maintenance. References: CH2M Hill Ltd1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  20. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Analytical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL Analytical Technical Services is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. The Team conducted its review during...

  1. On the amorphization behavior and hydrogenation performance of high-energy ball-milled Mg{sub 2}Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Hongchao; Hou, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Tiebang, E-mail: tiebangzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Hu, Rui; Li, Jinshan; Xue, Xiangyi

    2013-06-15

    Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy was prepared by high energy ball-milling starting with polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni which was prepared with the help of a metallurgy method by using a SPEX 8000D mill. The microstructural and phase structure characterization of the prepared materials was performed via scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The thermal stabilities were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The apparent activation energies were determined by means of the Kissinger method. The first and second crystallization reactions take place at ? 255 C and ? 410 C, and the corresponding activation energy of crystallization is E{sub a1} = 276.9 and E{sub a2} = 382.4 kJ/mol, respectively. At 3 MPa hydrogen pressure and 250 C, the hydrogen absorption capacities of crystalline, partially and fully amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy are 2.0 wt.%, 3.2 wt.% and 3.5 wt.% within 30 min, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: We mainly focus on the amorphization behavior of crystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in the high energy ball-milling process and the crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in a follow-up heating process. The relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties is established and explained by models. - Highlights: Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni has been obtained by high energy ball milling the as-cast alloy. The amorphization behavior of polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni is presented. The crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy is illustrated. Establish the relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties.

  2. Amorphization and crystallization processes of the ball-milled Al-Y-Fe-TM alloys (TM=Ni, Co, Cu, and Fe) (Prop. 2003-037)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Timothy W.; Choo, Hahn; Porter, Wallace D; Speakman, Scott A; Fan, Chang; Liaw, Peter K

    2006-01-01

    High-energy ball milling was used to synthesize aluminum-based alloys containing amorphous and nanocrystalline phases to investigate the compositional effects of transition metals (TM) on the amorphization and crystallization processes of the ball-milled Al{sub 85}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}TM{sub 3} alloys (TM = Ni, Co, Cu, and Fe) were investigated. The crystallization kinetics of the ball-milled Al-Y-Fe-TM nanocomposite powders were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC results of Al{sub 83}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} show that the crystallization temperature and the activation energy of crystallization are 668 K and 310 kJ/mol, respectively. In-situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction showed that the crystallization was a complex process involving growth of the nanocrystalline phase along with crystallization of the amorphous matrix phase.

  3. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-05-06

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

  4. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-08-28

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

  5. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-03-21

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

  6. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-10-17

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

  7. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-12-18

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

  8. Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Modification No. 0171 Section B i PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. B.1 - SERVICE BEING ACQUIRED B-1 B.2 - OBLIGATION OF FUNDS AND FINANCIAL LIMITATIONS B-1 B.3 - PERFORMANCE AND OTHER INCENTIVE FEES B-1 B.4 - ALLOWABILITY OF SUBCONTRACTOR FEE B-3 B.5 - PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF PERFORMANCE FEE B-3 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Modification No. 0171 Section B B-1 PART I SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS

  9. Electronic structure, transport, and phonons of SrAgChF (Ch = S,Se,Te): Bulk superlattice thermoelectrics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gudelli, Vijay Kumar; Kanchana, V.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Singh, David J.; Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Mahanti, Subhendra D.

    2015-07-15

    Here, we report calculations of the electronic structure, vibrational properties, and transport for the p-type semiconductors, SrAgChF (Ch = S, Se, and Te). We find soft phonons with low frequency optical branches intersecting the acoustic modes below 50 cm–1, indicative of a material with low thermal conductivity. The bands at and near the valence-band maxima are highly two-dimensional, which leads to high thermopowers even at high carrier concentrations, which is a combination that suggests good thermoelectric performance. These materials may be regarded as bulk realizations of superlattice thermoelectrics.

  10. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06 November 16, 2006 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological Contamination Events ...

  11. DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its ...

  12. Letter from DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for April to September 2015 Letter from DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for April to September ...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC,...

  14. Selectivity of Chemisorbed Oxygen in C-H Bond Activation and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selectivity of Chemisorbed Oxygen in C-H Bond Activation and CO Oxidation and Kinetic ... Title: Selectivity of Chemisorbed Oxygen in C-H Bond Activation and CO Oxidation and ...

  15. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - July 8, 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc - July 8, 2005 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - July 8, 2005 July 8, 2005 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Neutron Exposure at the Hanford...

  16. Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I, OMe and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X Cl, Br, I, OMe and NMe2 byMonomeric ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X Cl, ...

  17. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company- January 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003

  18. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc- EA-2005-01

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms

  19. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.- April 24, 2001

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety Management at the Hanford Site Tank Farms

  20. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc,- September 6, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Hanford Tank Farms

  1. Dielectric and photocatalytic properties of sulfur doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by ball milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalalah, Mohammed; Faisal, M.; Bouzid, Houcine; Ismail, Adel A.; Al-Sayari, Saleh A.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Designing of visible light responsive photocatalyst utilizing ball milling. Sulphur used as dopant in commercial TiO{sub 2} P25 at different atomic percentage. S doping resulted in an intense increase in absorption in the visible light region. Newly design photocatalyst exhibited excellent photocatalytic performance. 0.11 at.% S-doped TiO{sub 2} shows 3-times higher activity than that of TiO{sub 2} P25. - Abstract: Sulfur (S) doped commercial TiO{sub 2} P-25 has been achieved by changing the amount of thiourea using ball milling technique. The results of XRD clearly reveal biphasial anatase and rutile mixtures for all prepared samples and doping of S does not change the morphology of the TiO{sub 2}. The optical absorption edge of S-doped TiO{sub 2} was red shifted with indirect bandgap energy of 2.8 eV. The dielectric studies confirm that the dielectric constant of TiO{sub 2} increases after doping, however it becomes more conductive. Newly designed S-doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts exhibited excellent photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light. The overall photocatalytic activity of 0.11 at.% S-doped TiO{sub 2} was significantly 3-times higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} P-25 and complete degradation of MB has taken place after 90 min of irradiation under visible light while only 35% dye degraded when the reaction has been carried out in the presence of undoped TiO{sub 2}.

  2. Decomposition and vibrational relaxation in CH{sub 3}I and self-reaction of CH{sub 3} radicals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X.; Goldsmith, C. F.; Tranter, R. S.

    2009-07-01

    Vibrational relaxation and dissociation of CH{sub 3}I, 2-20% in krypton, have been investigated behind incident shock waves in a diaphragmless shock tube at 20, 66, 148, and 280 Torr and 630-2200 K by laser schlieren densitometry. The effective collision energy obtained from the vibrational relaxation experiments has a small, positive temperature dependence, {Delta}E{sub down} = 63 x (T/298){sup 0.56} cm{sup -1}. First-order rate coefficients for dissociation of CH{sub 3}I show a strong pressure dependence and are close to the low-pressure limit. Restricted-rotor Gorin model RRKM calculations fit the experimental results very well with {Delta}E{sub down} = 378 x (T/298){sup 0.457} cm{sup -1}. The secondary chemistry of this reaction system is dominated by reactions of methyl radicals and the reaction of the H atom with CH{sub 3}I. The results of the decomposition experiments are very well simulated with a model that incorporates methyl recombination and reactions of methylene. Second-order rate coefficients for ethane dissociation to two methyl radicals were derived from the experiments and yield k = (4.50 {+-} 0.50) x 10{sup 17} exp(-32709/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, in good agreement with previous measurements. Rate coefficients for H + CH{sub 3}I were also obtained and give k = (7.50 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup 13} exp(-601/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, in reasonable agreement with a previous experimental value.

  3. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujan, G.K. Haseeb, A.S.M.A. Afifi, A.B.M.

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping

  4. SAPO-34 Membranes for N-2/CH4 separation: Preparation, characterization, separation performance and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, SG; Zong, ZW; Zhou, SJ; Huang, Y; Song, ZN; Feng, XH; Zhou, RF; Meyer, HS; Yu, M; Carreon, MA

    2015-08-01

    SAPO-34 membranes were synthesized by several routes towards N-2/CH4 separation. Membrane synthesis parameters including water content in the gel, crystallization time, support pore size, and aluminum source were investigated. High performance N-2-selective membranes were obtained on 100-nm-pore alumina tubes by using Al(i-C3H7O)(3) as aluminum source with a crystallization time of 6 h. These membranes separated N-2 from CH, with N-2 permeance as high as 500 GPU with separation selectivity of 8 at 24 degrees C. for a 50/50 N-2/CH4 mixture. Nitrogen and CH, adsorption isotherms were measured on SAPO-34 crystals. The N-2 and CH, heats of adsorption were 11 and 15 kJ/mol, respectively, which lead to a preferential adsorption of CE-H-4 over N-2 in the N-2/CH4 mixture. Despite this, the SAPO-34 membranes were selective for N-2 over CH4 in the mixture because N-2 diffuses much faster than CH4 and differences in diffusivity played a more critical role than the competitive adsorption. Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that the required N-2/CH4 selectivity would be 15 in order to maintain a CH4 loss below 10%. For small nitrogen-contaminated gas wells, our current SAPO-34 membranes have potential to compete with the benchmark technology cryogenic distillation for N-2 rejection. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  5. Melting process of nanometer-sized in particles embedded in an Al matrix synthesized by ball milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, H.W.; Xu, J.; Yu, L.G.; Sun, X.K.; Hu, Z.Q.; Lu, K.

    1996-11-01

    Dispersions of nanometer-sized In particles embedded in an Al matrix (10 wt.{percent} In) have been synthesized by ball milling of a mixture of Al and In powders. The as-milled product was characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), respectively. It was found that In and Al are pure components immiscible with each other, with nanometer-sized In particles dispersively embedded in the Al matrix. The melting behavior of In particles was investigated by means of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The calorimetric measurements indicate that both the melting point and the melting enthalpy of the In nanoparticles decrease with increasing milling time, or refinement of the In particles. Compared to its bulk melting temperature, a melting point depression of 13.4 K was observed when the mean grain size of In is 15 nm, and the melting point depression of In nanoparticles is proportional to the reciprocal of the mean grain size. The melting enthalpy depression was interpreted according to the two-state concept for the nanoparticles. Melting of the interface was deduced to be an exothermal process due to its large excess energy/volume. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  6. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  7. Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

    2012-05-06

    This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

  8. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project March 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  9. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc- December 22, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at the Miamisburg Closure Project

  10. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.- NEA-2008-02

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to a Radioactive Waste Spill at the Hanford Site Tank Farms

  11. Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.- EA-2000-09

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Problems at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, (EA-2000-09)

  12. Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 October 6, 2011 Issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to a Hoisting Incident that occurred at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory On October 6, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight issued a Consent Order to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) for deficiencies in CWI's oversight of its construction

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the Hanford Site Tank Farms On August 29, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (EA-2003-06) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for violations of 10 C.F.R. 830 related to numerous nuclear safety quality assurance issues

  14. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules March 10, 2005 - 10:44am Addthis Hanford Tank Farm Contractor Faces Fine of more than $300,000 WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified the CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M Hill) - that it will fine the company $316,250 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. CH2M Hill is the department's contractor responsible for storage of highly

  15. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Intermolecular interactions involving C-H bonds, 3, Structure and energetics of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Williams, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    On the basis of SCF and single reference MP2 calculations, the full potential energy surface of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}} was studied using extended basis sets of up to near Hartree-Fock limit quality. Colinear arrangements C-N{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} and N-C{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} are found to be the only two energy minima. The binding energies of these two structures are calculated to be 2.5 and 2.1 kcal/mol, respectively, at the MP2 level. The full vibrational analyses of two structures show a red shift of about 30 cm{sup {minus}1} for the v{sub s} C-H stretching.

  17. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO?+?h?{sub 248nm} ? CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 3}?+?HCO??{sub 1a} = 0.125??0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 3}?+?H?+?CO??{sub 1e} = 0.205??0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}?{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO?+?HO{sub 2}??{sub 1f} = 0.07??0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ?{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 4}?+?CO??{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be consistently explained with absence of the formerly considered

  18. Method of preparing (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and byproducts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1984-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy.

  19. Influence of ball milling on atomic structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: Amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stoica, Mihai [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Politehnica University of Timisoara, P-ta Victoriei 2, Timisoara (Romania); Bednar?ik, Jozef [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kaban, Ivan [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fr Werkstoffwissenschaft, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Shahabi, Hamed Shakur; Khoshkhoo, Mohsen Samadi [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Janghorban, Kamal [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eckert, Jrgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fr Werkstoffwissenschaft, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The influence of ball milling on the atomic structure and magnetic properties of the Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} metallic glass with a high thermal stability and excellent soft magnetic properties has been investigated. After 14 h of milling, the obtained powders were found to consist mainly of an amorphous phase and a small fraction of the (Co,Fe){sub 21}Ta{sub 2}B{sub 6} nanocrystals. The changes in the reduced pair correlation functions suggest noticeable changes in the atomic structure of the amorphous upon ball milling. Furthermore, it has been shown that milling is accompanied by introduction of compressive and dilatational sites in the glassy phase and increasing the fluctuation of the atomic-level hydrostatic stress without affecting the coordination number of the nearest neighbors. Ball milling has decreased the thermal stability and significantly affected the magnetic properties through increasing the saturation magnetization, Curie temperature of the amorphous phase and coercivity. - Highlights: Ball milling affected the atomic structure of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} metallic glass. Mechanically-induced crystallization started after 4 h milling. Milling increased the fluctuation of the atomic-level hydrostatic stress in glass. Ball milling influenced the thermal stability and magnetic properties.

  20. Ping Pong Ball Anemometers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science: High School Standard 3: Earth Systems Science 5. There are costs, ... High School Standard: 3. Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability 1. Visual displays and ...

  1. Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance- April 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations

  2. Synthesis of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and iron oxides/SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites by long-term ball milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pozo Lpez, G.; Cond, A.M.; Urreta, S.E.; Silvetti, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Ironiron oxides/silica composites are synthesized by long term dry ball-milling. Bcc iron and ?-quartz powders are used as precursors. Surface effects enhance coercivity in iron/silica nanocomposites. In spite of their small size, about 10 nm, iron particles are ferromagnetic. Ferro and superparamagnetic particles are found in maghemite/silica composites. - Abstract: Iron oxide/SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites are synthesized by dry ball-milling a mixture of bcc Fe and ?-quartz powders for prolonged times. A sequence of nanocomposites is obtained, with small magnetic particles dispersed in a non magnetic, amorphous matrix. The powders are characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The magnetic hysteresis properties are investigated in the range 50300 K. After 120 h milling, deformed, non-spherical, ?-Fe nanocrystallites of about 10 nm in size and very few small (<10 nm) maghemite particles are found. At room temperature, iron particles are ferromagnetic and a large effective magnetic anisotropy is estimated, which is mainly attributed to surface effects. Between 160 and 200 h milling, maghemite nanoparticles are observed while after 220 h grinding, hematite phase appears; after 340 h milling, the sample consists of ferromagnetic hematite particles with a broad size distribution (550 nm) embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2015 | Department of Energy URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC - April 2015 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC - April 2015 April 2015 UCOR is admitted to the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program as a Star Participant. This report summarizes the results from the evaluation of URS | CH2M OAK RIDGE LLC (UCOR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during the period of April 14-23 2015, and provides the Associate Under Secretary for AU with the necessary information

  4. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, NEL-2014-01

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - New Materials for CH4 Capture-slide_AM [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We have discovered a handful of zeolite structures that have sufficient methane (CH 4 ) adsorption capacity as well as appropriate CH 4 /CO 2 and CH 4 /N 2 selectivity to be technologically promising for methane capture from dilute and medium-concentration sources. J Kim, A Maiti, L-C Lin, J Stolaroff, B Smit, R Aines, Nat. Commun. (2013). Doi: 10.1038/ncomms2697 New Materials for Methane Capture from Dilute and Medium-concentration Sources Significance and Impact Methane is an important

  6. DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contract at its Hanford Site | Department of Energy CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington

  7. ChIMES: "Limited only by our imaginations" | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex ChIMES: "Limited only by ... ChIMES: "Limited only by our imaginations" Posted: March 26, 2015 - 4:18pm The ChIMES team's investigators each brought unique expertise to the project. A three-year collaboration of scientists from Y-12 National Security Complex and The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, resulted in the innovation of a patented chemical sensor that is unique in several aspects: it's inexpensive, tiny and portable; it promises virtually limitless

  8. Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0200

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attachment J.5, Appendix E J-E-1 ATTACHMENT J.5 APPENDIX E AMES LABORATORY DEPARMENT OF ENERGY (LESSEE) INGRANTS Applicable to the Operation of AMES Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0200 Section J.5, Appendix E CONTRACT NO. BUILDING NAME(s) LESSOR CITY STATE PURPOSE COST EFFECT DATE EXP DATE ACRE DE-RL02-76CH00144* (formerly AT(11-1) 1309) Land Lease Construction Storage Shed Mechanical Maintenance Campus Warehouse Maintenance

  9. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major ... One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ...

  10. Direct Dynamics Simulation of Dissociation of the [CH3--I--OH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ion-Molecule Complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Direct Dynamics Simulation of Dissociation of the CH3--I--OH- Ion-Molecule Complex Direct dynamics ...

  11. Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. US Nuclear...

  12. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4-CO2- H20) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under ReservoirSAND2o 1T-20" if4pe Yifeng Wang, Yongliang Xiong & Louise ...

  13. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...Water (CH4-CO2-H2O) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under Reservoir Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water ...

  14. Quantitative Visualization of ChIP-chip Data by Using Linked...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Most analyses of ChIP-chip in vivo DNA binding have focused on qualitative descriptions of ... analyze and explore in vivo DNA binding data of multiple transcription factors. ...

  15. Contract DE-AC02-07CH11358 Modifications Language Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AC02-07CH11358 Modifications Language Changes Modification 183 October 23, 2015 Part I, Section H - Special Contract Requirements (replace Mod 171) Part II, Section I - Contract...

  16. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4-CO2-H2O) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under Reservoir Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  17. Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    , - May 20, 2009 May 20, 2009 Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, for Electrical Safety Deficiencies at the Idaho National Laboratory On May 20, 2009, the U.S. Department...

  18. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - ...

  19. 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B must meet the applicable electrical safety codes and standards referenced in 851.23. 11. NANOTECHNOLOGY SAFETY-RESERVED The ...

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

  1. Cp* Iridium Precatalysts for Selective C-H Oxidation via Direct...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The nature of the active species was investigated by TEM, UV-vis, microfiltration, and control experiments. DFT calculations showed that the C-H oxidation of cis-decalin by ...

  2. Hindering effects in diffusion of CO2/CH4 mixtures in ZIF-8 crystals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hindering effects in diffusion of CO2CH4 mixtures in ZIF-8 crystals Previous Next List C. Chmelik, J. van Baten, and R. Krishna, J. Membr. Sci. 397, 87 (2012) DOI: 10.1016...

  3. Molecular Simulation Studies of Separation of CO2/N2, CO2/CH4...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    do this, we first identified a suitable force field for describing CO2, N2, and CH4 adsorption in ZIFs. On the basis of the validated force field, adsorption selectivities of the...

  4. Microsoft Word - Ce-CH3X ms-revised.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH 3 X, X Cl, Br, I, OMe and NMe 2 by ... in a 1 H NMR spectrum in which a single hydrogen atom is statistically distributed into ...

  5. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group for Price-Anderson Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) that it will fine the company $82,500 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. ...

  6. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) for nuclear safety violations.  CHG is the tank...

  7. Electronic structure, transport, and phonons of SrAgChF (Ch = S,Se,Te): Bulk superlattice thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudelli, Vijay Kumar; Kanchana, V.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Singh, David J.; Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Mahanti, Subhendra D.

    2015-07-15

    Here, we report calculations of the electronic structure, vibrational properties, and transport for the p-type semiconductors, SrAgChF (Ch = S, Se, and Te). We find soft phonons with low frequency optical branches intersecting the acoustic modes below 50 cm–1, indicative of a material with low thermal conductivity. The bands at and near the valence-band maxima are highly two-dimensional, which leads to high thermopowers even at high carrier concentrations, which is a combination that suggests good thermoelectric performance. These materials may be regarded as bulk realizations of superlattice thermoelectrics.

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of rovibrational temperatures in atmospheric pressure He/CH{sub 4} plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Se Youn; Kim, D. B.; Gweon, B.; Choe, W.

    2008-10-15

    Atmospheric pressure of helium (He) and methane (CH{sub 4}) mixture discharge characteristics are investigated using emission spectroscopic methods. Plasmas are produced in a radio frequency capacitively coupled device at atmospheric pressure in the ambient air. Without the CH{sub 4} gas introduced in the plasma, the emission spectrum exhibits typical helium discharge characteristics showing helium atomic lines with nitrogen molecular bands and oxygen atomic lines resulting from air impurities. Addition of a small amount (<1%) of CH{sub 4} to the supplied He results in the emission of CN (B{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}-X{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}: violet system) and CH (A{sup 2}{delta}-X{sup 2} product : 430 nm system) molecular bands. Analyzing the CN and CH diatomic molecular emission spectra, the vibrational temperature (T{sub vib}) and rotational temperature (T{sub rot}) are simultaneously obtained. As input power levels are raised from 20 W to 200 W, T{sub vib} and T{sub rot} are increased from 4230 K to 6310 K and from 340 K to 500 K, respectively. On the contrary, increasing the CH{sub 4} amount brings about the decrease of both temperatures because CH{sub 4} is harder to ionize than He. The emission intensities of CN and CH radicals, which are important in plasma processing, are also changed along with the temperature variation. From the results, the atmospheric pressure plasma shows strong nonequilibrium discharge properties, which may be effectively utilized for thermal damage free material treatments.

  9. UV absorption spectrum of the C2 Criegee intermediate CH{sub 3}CHOO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Mica C.; Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2014-08-21

    The UV spectrum of CH{sub 3}CHOO was measured by transient absorption in a flow cell at 295 K. The absolute absorption cross sections of CH{sub 3}CHOO were measured by laser depletion in a molecular beam to be (1.06 ± 0.09) × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 308 nm and (9.7 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 352 nm. After scaling the UV spectrum of CH{sub 3}CHOO to the absolute cross section at 308 nm, the peak UV cross section is (1.27 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 328 nm. Compared to the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO, the UV absorption band of CH{sub 3}CHOO is similar in intensity but blue shifted by 14 nm, resulting in a 20% slower photolysis rate estimated for CH{sub 3}CHOO in the atmosphere.

  10. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  11. Noncentrosymmetric rare-earth copper gallium chalcogenides RE{sub 3}CuGaCh{sub 7} (RE=La–Nd; Ch=S, Se): An unexpected combination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyer, Abishek K.; Rudyk, Brent W.; Lin, Xinsong; Singh, Harpreet; Sharma, Arzoo Z.; Wiebe, Christopher R.; Mar, Arthur

    2015-09-15

    The quaternary rare-earth chalcogenides RE{sub 3}CuGaS{sub 7} and RE{sub 3}CuGaSe{sub 7} (RE=La–Nd) have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1050 °C and 900 °C, respectively. They crystallize in the noncentrosymmetric La{sub 3}CuSiS{sub 7}-type structure (hexagonal, space group P6{sub 3}, Z=2) in which the a-parameter is largely controlled by the RE component (a=10.0–10.3 Å for the sulfides and 10.3–10.6 Å for the selenides) whereas the c-parameter is essentially fixed by the choice of Ga and chalcogen atoms within tetrahedral units (c=6.1 Å for the sulfides and 6.4 Å for the selenides). They extend the series RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7}, previously known for divalent metal atoms (M=Mn–Ni), differing in that the Cu atoms in RE{sub 3}CuGaCh{sub 7} occupy trigonal planar sites instead of octahedral sites. Among quaternary chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MM′Ch{sub 7}, the combination of monovalent (M=Cu) and trivalent (M′=Ga) metals is unusual because it appears to violate the condition of charge balance satisfied by most La{sub 3}CuSiS{sub 7}-type compounds. The possibility of divalent Cu atoms was ruled out by bond valence sum analysis, magnetic measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electron deficiency in RE{sub 3}CuGaCh{sub 7} is accommodated through S-based holes at the top of the valence band, as shown by band structure calculations on La{sub 3}CuGaS{sub 7}. An optical band gap of about 2.0 eV was found for La{sub 3}CuGaSe{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: The chalcogenides RE{sub 3}CuGaCh{sub 7} contain monovalent Cu in trigonal planes and trivalent Ga in tetrahedra; they are electron-deficient representatives of La{sub 3}CuSiS{sub 7}-type compounds, which normally satisfy charge balance. - Highlights: • Quaternary chalcogenides RE{sub 3}CuGaCh{sub 7} (RE=La–Nd; Ch=S, Se) were prepared. • Bond valence sums, magnetism, and XPS data give evidence for monovalent Cu. • Crystal structures reveal high anisotropy of Cu displacement.

  12. Experimental and theoretical rate constants for CH{sub 4} + O{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, N.K.; Michael, J.V.; Harding, L.B.; Klippenstein, S.J.

    2007-04-15

    In this study, rate constants for the primary initiation process in low to moderate temperature CH{sub 4} oxidation CH{sub 4} + O{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2} have been measured in a reflected shock tube apparatus between 1655 and 1822 K using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. After rapid dissociation of HO{sub 2} yielding H atoms, which are instantaneously converted to OH by H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O, the temporal concentration of OH radicals was observed as the final product from the rate-controlling title reaction. The present work utilizes 18 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of 1.6 m. This configuration gives a signal to noise ratio of unity at {proportional_to}3 x 10{sup 12} radicals cm{sup -3}. Hence, kinetics experiments could be performed at conditions of low [CH{sub 4}]{sub 0} (60-70 ppm), thereby substantially reducing secondary chemistry. Possible implications of CH{sub 4} dissociation contributing to the OH formation rates were considered. The present experimental results agree with a priori variational transition state theoretical (VTST) calculations, k{sub th}=3.37 x 10{sup -19}T{sup 2.745} exp (-26,041K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, clearly showing overlap of experiment and theory, within experimental error. The new rate constant values obtained in this study are 8-10 times higher than the values used in the popular mechanisms GRI-Mech 3.0 and Leeds Methane Mechanism, version 1.5. (author)

  13. Photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of CH{sub 2}=CHCHO in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Weiqiang; Yang Chunfan; Zhao Hongmei; Liu Kunhui; Su Hongmei

    2010-03-28

    By means of time-resolved Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, we have investigated the 193 nm photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of the prototype molecule of {alpha},{beta}-enones, acrolein (CH{sub 2}=CHCHO) in CH{sub 3}CN solution. The primary photolysis channels and absolute branching ratios are determined. The most probable reaction mechanisms are clarified by control experiments monitoring the product yields varied with the triplet quencher addition. The predominant channel is the 1,3-H migration yielding the rearrangement product CH{sub 3}CH=C=O with a branching ratio of 0.78 and the less important channel is the {alpha} cleavage of C-H bond yielding radical fragments CH{sub 2}=CHCO+H with a branching ratio of only 0.12. The 1,3-H migration is strongly suggested to correlate with the triplet {sup 3}({pi}{pi}{sup *}) state rather than the ground S{sub 0} state and the {alpha} cleavage of C-H bond is more likely to proceed in the singlet S{sub 1} {sup 1}(n{pi}{sup *}) state. From the solution experiments we have not only acquired clues clarifying the previous controversial mechanisms, but also explored different photochemistry in solution. Compared to the gas phase photolysis which is dominated by photodissociation channels, the most important channel in solution is the photoisomerization of 1,3-H migration. The reason leading to the different photochemistry in solution is further ascribed to the solvent cage effect.

  14. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; Tulk, Christopher A.; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J.; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; et al

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  15. Insights into the structure of mixed CO2/CH4 in gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Keffer, David J.; Huq, Ashfia; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2015-01-01

    The exchange of CO2 for CH4 in natural gas hydrates is an attractive approach to methane for energy production while simultaneously sequestering CO2. In addition to the energy and environmental implications, the solid solution of clathrate hydrate (CH4)1-x(CO2)x 5.75H2O provides a model system to study how the distinct bonding and shapes of CH4 and CO2 influence the structure and properties of the compound. High-resolution neutron diffraction was used to examine mixed CO2/CH4 gas hydrates. CO2-rich hydrates had smaller lattice parameters, which were attributed to the higher affinity of the CO2 molecule interacting with H2O molecules that form the surrounding cages, and resulted in a reduction in the unit cell volume. Experimental nuclear scattering densities illustrate how the cage occupants and energy landscape change with composition. These results provide important insights on the impact and mechanisms for exchanging CH4 and CO2.

  16. Insights into the structure of mixed CO2/CH4 in gas hydrates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Everett, S. Michelle; Rawn, Claudia J.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Keffer, David J.; Huq, Ashfia; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-05-12

    The exchange of carbon dioxide for methane in natural gas hydrates is an attractive approach to harvesting CH4 for energy production while simultaneously sequestering CO2. In addition to the energy and environmental implications, the solid solution of clathrate hydrate (CH4)1-x(CO2)x·5.75H2O provides a model system to study how the distinct bonding and shapes of CH4 and CO2 influence the structure and properties of the compound. In this paper, high-resolution neutron diffraction was used to examine mixed CO2/CH4 gas hydrates. CO2-rich hydrates had smaller lattice parameters, which were attributed to the higher affinity of the CO2 molecule interacting with H2O molecules thatmore » form the surrounding cages, and resulted in a reduction in the unit-cell volume. Experimental nuclear scattering densities illustrate how the cage occupants and energy landscape change with composition. Finally, these results provide important insights on the impact and mechanisms for the structure of mixed CH4/CO2 gas hydrate.« less

  17. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    52 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-1 Attachment J.6 APPENDIX F Contractor Resources, Commitments, and Agreements Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Modification No. 0152 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-2 This page intentionally blank Modification No. 0152 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-3 RESOURCES, SERVICES, AND SUPPORT PROVIDED TO PPPL Princeton University has committed substantial resources and services over the first

  18. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Co., Inc., Hanford – Jan 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Co., Inc., Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  19. Investigation on thermal evaporated CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Youzhen; Xu, Xuemei; Yang, Junliang; Wang, Chenggong; Wang, Congcong; Gao, Yongli; Xie, Fangyan

    2015-09-15

    CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I, PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} films were fabricated by evaporation and characterized with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XPS results indicate that the PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} films are more uniform and stable than the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I film. The atomic ratio of the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I, PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} films are C:N:I=1.00:1.01:0.70, Pb:I= 1.00:1.91 and C: N: Pb: I = 1.29:1.07:1.00:2.94, respectively. The atomic ratio of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} is very close to that of the ideal perovskite. Small angle x-ray diffraction results demonstrate that the as evaporated CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} film is crystalline. The valence band maximum (VBM) and work function (WF) of the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} film are about 0.85eV and 4.86eV, respectively.

  20. The states of carbon and nitrogen atoms after photodissociation of CN, CH, CH(+), C2, C3, and CO in comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, P.D.; De almeida, A.A.; Huebner, W.F. Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX )

    1991-03-01

    The photodissociation of carbon compounds by solar UV radiation at a heliocentric distance of 1 AU is examined, comparing published observational data with the predictions of theoretical models and results from laboratory experiments. It is shown that species other than CO, including CN, CH, CH(+), C2, and C3, can contribute to the observed brightness of the VUV lines of C I (156.1, 165.7, and 193.1 nm) and C II (133.5 nm) in comet comae. CN photodissociation is also found to produce metastable 2D0 and 2P0 N I atoms, possibly leading (at heliocentric distances less than 0.25 AU) to 143.9-nm emission via resonance fluorescence. 37 refs.

  1. Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J.; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Vereecken, Luc; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-12-05

    The reactions of the methylidyne radical (CH) with ethylene, acetylene, allene, and methylacetylene are studied at room temperature using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and time-resolved mass spectrometry. The CH radicals are prepared by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr3 at 298 K and react with the selected hydrocarbon in a helium gas flow. Analysis of photoionization efficiency versus VUV photon wavelength permits isomer-specific detection of the reaction products and allows estimation of the reaction product branching ratios. The reactions proceed by either CH insertion or addition followed by H atom elimination from the intermediate adduct. In the CH + C2H4 reaction the C3H5 intermediate decays by H atom loss to yield 70(+-8)percent allene, 30(+-8)percent methylacetylene and less than 10percent cyclopropene, in agreement with previous RRKM results. In the CH + acetylene reaction, detection of mainly the cyclic C3H2 isomer is contrary to a previous RRKM calculation that predicted linear triplet propargylene to be 90percent of the total H-atom co-products. High-level CBS-APNO quantum calculations and RRKM calculation for the CH + C2H2 reaction presented in this manuscript predict a higher contribution of the cyclic C3H2 (27.0percent) versus triplet propargylene (63.5percent) than these earlier predictions. Extensive calculations on the C3H3 and C3H2D system combined with experimental isotope ratios for the CD + C2H2 reaction indicate that H-atom assisted isomerization in the present experiments is responsible for the discrepancy between the RRKM calculations and the experimental results. Cyclic isomers are also found to represent 30(+-6)percent of the detected products in the case of CH + methylacetylene, together with 33(+-6)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 37(+-6)percent vinylacetylene. The CH + allene reaction gives 23(+-5)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 77(+-5)percent vinylacetylene, whereas cyclic isomers are produced below the detection limit

  2. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only

  3. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store

  4. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 | Department of Energy B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Octover 24, 2013 Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review,

  5. Joint DOE-CH2M News Release Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint DOE-CH2M News Release Media Contact: For Immediate Release: Destry Henderson, CH2M, (509) 376-8644, April 20, 2015 destry_j_henderson@rl.gov Mark Heeter, DOE, (509)373-1970, mark.heeter@rl.doe.gov WORKERS REMOVE LAST PENCIL TANK FROM KEY AREA OF HANFORD'S PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT Removal of contaminated pencil tanks brings facility one step closer toward demolition RICHLAND, Wash. - More than 50 pencil tank assemblies - some two stories tall - contaminated with chemical and radiological

  6. DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations June 14, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M-Washington Group Idaho (CWI) that it will fine the company $55,000 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CWI is the prime contractor responsible for managing the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory site.

  7. Contract No.: DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0159

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0159 Section J, Appendix C ATTACHMENT J.3 APPENDIX C SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION ACCOUNT AGREEMENT Applicable to the Operation of AMES Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 AMENDMENT 8 TO SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION ACCOUNT Page 1 of 2 AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE PAYMENTS CLEARED FINANCING ARRANGEMENT between BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, N.A. (hereinafter referred to as the "Financial Institution"), and IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY of Science and

  8. X-ray Thomson scattering measurements of temperature and density from multi-shocked CH capsules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A.; Pak, A.; Ma, T.; Doppner, T.; Fortmann, C.; Divol, L.; Landen, O. L.; Vorberger, J.; et al

    2013-05-24

    Proof-of-principle measurements of the electron densities, temperatures, and ionization states of spherically compressed multi-shocked CH (polystyrene) capsules have been achieved using spectrally resolved x-ray Thomson scattering. A total energy of 13.5 kJ incident on target is used to compress a 70 μm thick CH shell above solid-mass density using three coalescing shocks. Separately, a laser-produced zinc He-α x-ray source at 9 keV delayed 200 ps-800 ps after maximum compression is used to probe the plasma in the non-collective scattering regime. The data show that x-ray Thomson scattering enables a complete description of the time-dependent hydrodynamic evolution of shock-compressed CH capsules,more » with a maximum measured density of ρ > 6 g cm–3. Additionally, the results demonstrate that accurate measurements of x-ray scattering from bound-free transitions in the CH plasma demonstrate strong evidence that continuum lowering is the primary ionization mechanism of carbon L-shell electrons.« less

  9. Turbulence and combustion interaction: High resolution local flame front structure visualization using simultaneous single-shot PLIF imaging of CH, OH, and CH{sub 2}O in a piloted premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.S.; Li, B.; Sun, Z.W.; Alden, M. [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bai, X.S. [Division of Fluid Mechanics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    High resolution planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was applied to investigate the local flame front structures of turbulent premixed methane/air jet flames in order to reveal details about turbulence and flame interaction. The targeted turbulent flames were generated on a specially designed coaxial jet burner, in which low speed stoichiometric gas mixture was fed through the outer large tube to provide a laminar pilot flame for stabilization of the high speed jet flame issued through the small inner tube. By varying the inner tube flow speed and keeping the mixture composition as that of the outer tube, different flames were obtained covering both the laminar and turbulent flame regimes with different turbulent intensities. Simultaneous CH/CH{sub 2}O, and also OH PLIF images were recorded to characterize the influence of turbulence eddies on the reaction zone structure, with a spatial resolution of about 40 {mu}m and temporal resolution of around 10 ns. Under all experimental conditions, the CH radicals were found to exist only in a thin layer; the CH{sub 2}O were found in the inner flame whereas the OH radicals were seen in the outer flame with the thin CH layer separating the OH and CH{sub 2}O layers. The outer OH layer is thick and it corresponds to the oxidation zone and post-flame zone; the CH{sub 2}O layer is thin in laminar flows; it becomes broad at high speed turbulent flow conditions. This phenomenon was analyzed using chemical kinetic calculations and eddy/flame interaction theory. It appears that under high turbulence intensity conditions, the small eddies in the preheat zone can transport species such as CH{sub 2}O from the reaction zones to the preheat zone. The CH{sub 2}O species are not consumed in the preheat zone due to the absence of H, O, and OH radicals by which CH{sub 2}O is to be oxidized. The CH radicals cannot exist in the preheat zone due to the rapid reactions of this species with O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the inner-layer of the

  10. MW and FTFIR transitions of {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH revisited and review of MW spectra of CH{sub 3}OH and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Walsh, M.S.; Lees, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Microwave (MW), millimeter-wave (MMW) and Fourier-transform far-infrared (FTFIR) transitions in the first two torsional states (v{sub t} = 0 below the barrier and v{sub t} = 1 straddling the barrier) of the ground vibrational state of C-13 methanol have been globally treated and successfully fitted to within assigned measurement uncertainties using a program (I. Kleiner and M. Godefroid private communication) originally designed for acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) based on the formalism of Herbst et al. The {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH data set (v {sub t} {le} 1, J {le} 20, K{sub max} {le} 14) contains 725 MW and MMW lines, assigned a {+-}50 kHz measurement uncertainty apart from a few K-doublet lines, and 6283 FTFIR lines each assigned an uncertainty of {+-}0.0002 cm{sup -1} = {+-}6 MHz. A very satisfactory convergent fit has been achieved using 55 adjustable and 2 fixed parameters, yielding an overall weighted standard deviation of 0.962. Calculations employing the parameters from the final fit reveal possible C-13 assignments for 28 lines appearing in natural abundance in the newly-measured methanol microwave atlas from 7 to 200 GHz compiled by the group of K. Takagi at Toyama University.

  11. Communication: Photodissociation of CH{sub 3}CHO at 308 nm: Observation of H-roaming, CH{sub 3}-roaming, and transition state pathways together along the ground state surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hou-Kuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hung, Kai-Chan; Kasai, Toshio; Lin, King-Chuen

    2015-01-28

    Following photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) at 308 nm, the CO(v = 1–4) fragment is acquired using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The CO(v = 1) rotational distribution shows a bimodal feature; the low- and high-J components result from H-roaming around CH{sub 3}CO core and CH{sub 3}-roaming around CHO radical, respectively, in consistency with a recent assignment by Kable and co-workers (Lee et al., Chem. Sci. 5, 4633 (2014)). The H-roaming pathway disappears at the CO(v ≥ 2) states, because of insufficient available energy following bond-breaking of H + CH{sub 3}CO. By analyzing the CH{sub 4} emission spectrum, we obtained a bimodal vibrational distribution; the low-energy component is ascribed to the transition state (TS) pathway, consistent with prediction by quasiclassical trajectory calculations, while the high-energy component results from H- and CH{sub 3}-roamings. A branching fraction of H-roaming/CH{sub 3}-roaming/TS contribution is evaluated to be (8% ± 3%)/(68% ± 10%)/(25% ± 5%), in which the TS pathway was observed for the first time. The three pathways proceed concomitantly along the electronic ground state surface.

  12. Rare-earth transition-metal gallium chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7} (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudyk, Brent W.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Oliynyk, Anton O.; Mar, Arthur

    2014-02-15

    Six series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7} (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se), comprising 33 compounds in total, have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1050 °C (for the sulphides) or 900 °C (for the selenides). They adopt noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structures (ordered Ce{sub 3}Al{sub 1.67}S{sub 7}-type, space group P6{sub 3}, Z=2) with cell parameters in the ranges of a=9.5–10.2 Å and c=6.0–6.1 Å for the sulphides and a=10.0–10.5 Å and c=6.3–6.4 Å for the selenides as refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Single-crystal structures were determined for five members of the sulphide series RE{sub 3}FeGaS{sub 7} (RE=La, Pr, Tb) and RE{sub 3}CoGaS{sub 7} (RE=La, Tb). The highly anisotropic crystal structures consist of one-dimensional chains of M-centred face-sharing octahedra and stacks of Ga-centred tetrahedra all pointing in the same direction. Magnetic measurements on the sulphides reveal paramagnetic behaviour in some cases and long-range antiferromagnetic behaviour with low Néel temperatures (15 K or lower) in others. Ga L-edge XANES spectra support the presence of highly cationic Ga tetrahedral centres with a tendency towards more covalent Ga–Ch character on proceeding from the sulphides to the selenides. Band structure calculations on La{sub 3}FeGaS{sub 7} indicate that the electronic structure is dominated by Fe 3d-based states near the Fermi level. - Graphical abstract: The series of chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaS{sub 7}, which form for a wide range of rare-earth and transition metals (M=Fe, Co, Ni), adopt highly anisotropic structures containing chains of M-centred octahedra and stacks of Ga-centred tetrahedra. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Six series (comprising 33 compounds) of chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7} were prepared. • They adopt noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structures with high anisotropy. • Most compounds are paramagnetic; some show antiferromagnetic ordering. • Ga L

  13. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  14. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  16. New directions for QA in basic research: The Fermilab/DOE-CH experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-09-01

    This paper addresses the underlying problems involved in developing institution-wide QA programs at DOE funded basic research facilities, and suggests concrete ways in which QA professionals and basic researchers can find common ground in describing and analyzing those activities to the satisfaction of both communities. The paper is designed to be a springboard into workshop discussions which can define a path for developing institution-wide QA programs based on the experience gained with DOE-CH and Fermilab.

  17. The U.S. Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 . The U.S. Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company manage the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility Background The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides safe and compliant underwater storage for 1,936 highly radioactive capsules containing the elements cesium and strontium. In the 1970s, radioactive isotopes of the chemical elements cesium and

  18. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  19. 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B must meet the applicable electrical safety codes and standards referenced in § 851.23. 11. NANOTECHNOLOGY SAFETY-RESERVED The Department has chosen to reserve this section since policy and procedures for nano- technology safety are currently being devel- oped. Once these policies and procedures have been approved, the rule will be amended to include them through a rulemaking con- sistent with the Administrative Procedure Act. 12. WORKPLACE

  20. Communication: Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Li, Hongwei; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2013-10-14

    The velocity and angular distributions of O {sup 1}D photofragments arising from UV excitation of the CH{sub 2}OO intermediate on the B {sup 1}A??X {sup 1}A? transition are characterized using velocity map ion imaging. The anisotropic angular distribution yields the orientation of the transition dipole moment, which reflects the ?*?? character of the electronic transition associated with the COO group. The total kinetic energy release distributions obtained at several photolysis wavelengths provide detail on the internal energy distribution of the formaldehyde cofragments and the dissociation energy of CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? to O {sup 1}D + H{sub 2}CO X {sup 1}A{sub 1}. A common termination of the total kinetic energy distributions, after accounting for the different excitation energies, gives an upper limit for the CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? dissociation energy of D{sub 0}? 54 kcal mol{sup ?1}, which is compared with theoretical predictions including high level multi-reference ab initio calculations.

  1. Mode-selective chemistry on metal surfaces: The dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on Pt(111)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Han; Jackson, Bret

    2016-05-13

    A quantum approach based on an expansion in vibrationally adiabatic eigenstates is used to explore CH4 dissociation on Pt(111). Computed sticking probabilities for molecules in the ground, 1v3 and 2v3, states are in very good agreement with the available experimental data, reproducing the variation in reactivity with collision energy and vibrational state. As was found in similar studies on Ni(100) and Ni(111), exciting the 1v1 symmetric stretch of CH4 is more effective at promoting the dissociative chemisorption of CH4 than exciting the 1v3 antisymmetric stretch. This behavior is explained in terms of symmetry, mode-softening, and nonadiabatic transitions between vibrationally adiabaticmore » states. We find that the efficacies of the bending modes for promoting reaction are reasonably large, and similar to the 1v3 state. The vibrational efficacies for promoting reaction on Ni(111) are larger than for reaction on Pt(111), due to the larger nonadiabatic couplings. As a result, our computed sticking probabilities are in good agreement with results from recent ab initio molecular dynamics and reactive force field studies.« less

  2. Aerobic C-H Acetoxylation of 8-Methylquinoline in PdII-Pyridinecarboxylic Acid Systems: Some Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Daoyong; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Vedernikov, Andrei N.

    2013-09-09

    Catalytic oxidative CH acetoxylation of 8-methylquinoline as a model substrate with O2 as oxidant was performed using palladium(II) carboxylate catalysts derived from four different pyridinecarboxylic acids able to form palladium(II) chelates of different size. A comparison of the rates of the substrate CH activation and the O2 activation steps shows that the CH activation step is rate-limiting, whereas the O2 activation occurs at a much faster rate already at 20 C. The chelate ring size and the chelate ring strain of the catalytically active species are proposed to be the key factors affecting the rate of the CH activation.

  3. ch_11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 11.0 Response Response to to P P ublic ublic Comment Comment 11-1 DOE/EIS-0287 11.1 Introduction This chapter provides responses from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho to public comments on the Draft Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (HLW & FD EIS) and identifies where those public comments led to changes to the EIS. The State of Idaho, a cooperating agency in the preparation of the EIS, participated in the process of

  4. ch_12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .0 12.0 Distribution Distribution List List - New Information - 12-1 DOE/EIS-0287 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) pro- vided copies of this Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Federal, state, and local elected and appointed officials and agencies of government; Native American groups; national, state, and local environmental and public interest groups; and other organizations and individuals list- ed below. In addition, DOE sent copies of the Final EIS to all persons who comment-

  5. ch_13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .0 13.0 Index Index 13-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 13-2 Index A aesthetics - 3-54, 4-18, 4-35, 5-17, 5-18, 5-214, 5-232, 5-233, 9-9, 10-3, 10-7, C.2-4, C.8-13, C.8-32, C.8-46 airborne releases - 4-32, 4-71, 4-72, 5-48, 5-74, 5-87, 5-184, 5-225, C.2-13, C.2-17, C.8-16, C.8-36 aquifer - 2-30, 2-32, 2-33, 4-40, 4-47, 4-48, 4-49, 4-50, 4-51, 4-53, 4-54, 4-55, 4-56, 4-57, 4-72, 4-79, 5-2, 5-20, 5-44, 5-45, 5-107, 5-121, 5-122, 5-161, 5-165, 5-180, 5-212, 5-221, 5-222, 5-225, 5-227, 5-233, 5-234,

  6. ch_2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Background 2.1.3 CURRENT MISSION The current INEEL mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced engineering technology and systems to improve national competitiveness and security, to make the pro- duction and use of energy more efficient, and to improve the quality of the environment. Areas of primary emphasis at INEEL include waste management and waste minimization, environ- mental engineering and restoration, energy effi- ciency, renewable energy, national security and defense,

  7. ch_2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Background 2.2 High-Level Waste Overview 2.2.1 HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DESCRIPTION According to Section 2(12) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (42 USC 10101), high-level radioac- tive waste means: In July 1999, DOE issued Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management. This Order and its associated Manual and Guidance set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and requirements for the management of DOE's inventory of HLW, transuranic waste, and low-level waste. Specific to HLW, DOE uses the Nuclear Waste

  8. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 3.0 Alterna Alterna tiv tiv es es 3-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter describes the alternatives for waste processing and facility disposi- tion analyzed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) as well as alter- natives eliminated from detailed analy- sis. As required by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regula- tions implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a No Action alternative is also included. This chapter identifies the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's)

  9. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS except the pillar and panel tanks) would be full of mixed transuranic waste in approximately 2017. Other facilities depending on the capacity of the Tank Farm for operation eventually would be shut down due to their inability to discharge liquid waste. Under this alternative, DOE would not meet its commitment to cease use of the Tank Farm by 2012 or to make its mixed HLW road ready by 2035. Facilities required for the No Action Alternative include the bin

  10. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-34 Alternatives transuranic waste/SBW. The EIS also presents the impacts for a grout facility (see Project P2001 in Appendix C.6) that could be used to treat the waste generated after 2005. For pur- poses of assessing transportation impacts, DOE assumed the grouted waste would be character- ized as remote-handled transuranic waste and transported to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal (see Appendix C.5). 3.2 Facility Disposition Alternatives The waste processing alternatives described