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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hybrid electronic ballast operating the HPS lamp at constant power  

SciTech Connect

A hybrid solid-state ballast that operates high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps at main frequency with constant power through rated life is described. The system utilizes two inductors connected in series and a bidirectional semiconductor switch connected in parallel to one of them. A lamp-starting circuit has also been included in the ballast. The static switch, with phase angle control provided by power feedback, actuates on lamp current compensating variations of the main voltage and increases of lamp arc voltage. The system offers the following: (1) increase of lamp life and system lumen maintenance; (2) power factor and total harmonic distortion of line current comparable to conventional lag ballast; and (3) operating cost savings, both in terms of energy cost and lamp replacement cost.

Kaiser, W. [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improved performance of a ballast resistance helical transversely excited CO/sub 2/ laser with water vapor and low ionization potential additives instead of helium  

SciTech Connect

Increased laser energy, peak power, and number of lasing rotational lines are reported in a ballast resistance TE CO/sub 2/ laser, with small amounts of water vapor and low ionization potential additives in place of helium.

Nath, A.K.; Biswas, D.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Operation of a cw CO/sub 2/ laser without a ballast resistance  

SciTech Connect

A cw CO/sub 2/ laser has been successfully operated without using any ballast resistance. For stabilizing the discharge, the principle of a constant-current source employing the ac resonance technique is used. The stability of the laser output power has been very good and its fluctuation has been reduced to a value as low as 1% using only passive components.

Bhadani, P.K.; Biswas, D.J.; Nundy, U.; Kukreja, L.M.; Chatterjee, U.K.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Capacitor ballast  

SciTech Connect

The specification discloses a capacitive ballast for operating a gas discharge lamp from a conventional low frequency power source. The effective restart voltage during each cycle is enhanced by a trigger capacitor or pulse transformer which functions to produce a short duration reignition current. Properly timed, the reduced lamp voltage caused by the injection of the reignition current will be approximately equal to the difference between the instantaneous potential of the power source at the time of reignition and the instantaneous magnitude of the voltage across the ballast capacitor. The proper magnitude of lamp current is thus re-established during each half cycle and thereafter sustained at a value which equals the rate of change of voltage across the ballast capacitor.

Jimerson, B.D.

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Pulsed operation of a segmented longitudinal discharge CO/sub 2/ laser without ballast impedance  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that a longitudinal CO/sub 2/ laser with two discharge tubes electrically coupled in parallel can be operated in pulsed mode without ballast impedance. This scheme not only yields much higher efficiency (up to 13% at the maximum output energy) and eliminates component failure at high pulse repetition frequency (prf) but also facilitates short pulse availability. In the absence of ballast, current and laser pulse width decrease on increasing the voltage applied to the discharge tubes but these quantities remain unaffected on varying the value of the energy storage capacitor. This enables an independent control of the laser pulse duration and energy. Threshold energy for the onset of nonuniformities in the glow discharge reduces almost exponentially on increasing the discharge current pulse duration but rises on decreasing the operating value of E/N, the electric field to neutral gas density ratio. The maximum output laser energy of about 1 J/pulse, adjustable pulse duration from 30 ..mu..s to about 2 ms, and prf up to 50 Hz have been obtained.

Kukreja, L.M.; Sehgal, S.K.; Chatterjee, U.K.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Experimental methodology for determining the system performance of fluorescent lamp, ballast, fixture combinations operating under realistic application conditions  

SciTech Connect

To meet the need for accurate performance data, an experimental method for determining the performance of lamp, ballast, and luminaire combinations operating under a broad range of realistic conditions was developed. The methodology employs a two-part experimental procedure. The first part uses a temperature-controlled luminous flux integrator to characterize the thermal performance of each lamp/ballast combination. This performance characterization is expressed in terms of light output and efficacy as a function of variations in minimum lamp wall temperature (MLWT) and is generated for the range of temperatures typically encountered in interior lighting applications. The second procedure uses a luminaire/plenum simulator to determine the specific MLWT that exists in a particular luminaire application as a function of luminaire type, mounting configuration, plenum integration, and room air temperature. The MLWTs thus measured may be used in conjunction with the lamp/ballast performance data to determine application-specific values of light output and efficacy for a given lamp/ballast/luminaire system.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Verderber, R.R.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Central ballast tanker design  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

OPERATIONAL TESTS OF EBWR VAPOR RECOVERY SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A description of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor vapor-recovery system is given. The seal air operating pressures, temperatures, and moisture content were measured. Air flow through the seals was measured and seal wear was assessed. Assuming direct-cycle D/sub 2/ operation, the seals were evaluated relative to the amount of D/sub 2/ leakage that would be controlled (C.J.G.)

Gariboldi, R.J.; Jacobson, D.R.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electronic screw-in ballast and improved circline lamp phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A solid state ballast has been designed for the efficient operation of a 10 in circline fluorescent lamp. The circuit can be manufactured using power hybrid technology. Eight discrete component versions of the ballasts have been delivered to LBL for testing. The results show the solid state fluorescent ballast system is more efficient than the core-coil ballasted systems on the market.

Kohler, T.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Electronic ballast improves efficiency  

SciTech Connect

As part of a DOE program, the performance of various electronic ballasts for fluorescent lamps have been evaluated relative to high quality core-coil ballasts under similar ambient conditions. The results of this investigation are reported. Real energy savings can exceed 40% while comfort and quality of illumination are improved. A detailed comparison of two types of ballast is presented. Voltage effects and temperature effects as well as dimming features are discussed. Light levels, power energy consumption, and daylighting are also treated. It is concluded that, with the electronic ballast, an annual payback of $8.20/yr is possible as compared to the core-coil ballasted fluorescent lamp. Further, much greater flexibility in use is possible with the electronic ballast equipped lamp. (MJJ)

Verderber, R.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Monolithic ballasted penetrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

Hickerson, Jr., James P. (Cedar Crest, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Baldwin, Michael D. (Albuquerque, NM); Maguire, Michael C. (Worcester, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fluorescent fixtures and ballasts  

SciTech Connect

The basic parameters of a fluorescent lighting system that affect the illumination level are discussed. The parameters include the thermal performance of the fixture and the ballast factor, voltage regulation, and thermal regulation of the ballast/lamp system. Fixtures determine the minimum lamp-wall temperature of the lamps and are described as hot or cold. That is, the lamp-wall temperatures can vary from 39 to 61/sup 0/C. In general, cool fixtures tend to provide higher light levels and are more efficacious for a given ballast/lamp system. Solid-state fluorescent ballast/lamp systems have been measured and show a variation in light output from 6170 to 3780 lumens for the two-lamp, F-40, T-12, rapid-start lamps. Lighting designers must obtain this information in order to accurately predict illumination levels in a space.

Verderber, R.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Design and analysis of an electronic ballast with a secondary DC output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electronic ballast circuit for a high-frequency operated fluorescent lamp, which uses switched-capacitor techniques, is presented in this paper. A part of energy in the electronic ballast is derived to a secondary DC output as a power supply. All ... Keywords: DC power supply, electronic ballast, energy recovery, resonant converter

K. W. E. Cheng; H. Y. Wang; D. K. W. Cheng

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ballast is described having at least a first and second terminal for engaging the filaments of at least one fluorescent lamp which requires a breakdown voltage to ignite the lamp and a maintaining voltage for maintaining ionization therewithin, the electronic ballast comprising: a direct current voltage source; a transistor; a transformer having a primary winding separated into a first winding, a second winding, a third winding, and a fourth winding; the first winding connected between the voltage source and the first terminal; the second winding connected between the two terminals; the third winding connected between the second terminal and to both the transistor and to ground; the fourth winding connected between ground and the transistor; the lamp being parallel to the second winding when the lamp filaments engages the ballast terminals.

Ureche, A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy efficiency and performance of solid state ballasts  

SciTech Connect

A project was undertaken to test the energy efficiency of ballasts. Two ballast types were used and retrofitted into existing fixtures on 3 floors in an office building in San Francisco. A core-coil energy efficient ballast was demonstrated also. The demonstration ballasts proved to be more efficient than the standard core-coil ballasts they replaced. Their energy demand reduction has resulted in a lower weekly peak demand. Operating above 20 KHz they have produced less audible noise. They also have lower heat dissipation. RFI radiation, although increased, has caused no apparent difficulties. Light output has been reduced slightly by all three demonstration ballasts. Ballast energy usage has been measured successfully with standard utility metering but there remain doubts as to the effects of the harmonics associated with solid-state circuitry. While no adverse effects have been observed, research must continue on the accuracy of electrical metering and on the effect on utility systems. The demonstration project has shown that solid-state fluorescent ballasts providing high frequency operation can be installed successfully in large numbers without adverse effects and with substantial energy saving.

Jewell, J.E.; Selkowitz, S.; Verderber, R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Date: February 14, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Fluorescent lamp ballasts are subject to DOE appliance standards and rulemaking. But currently, only ballasts for older fluorescent lamp types, such as T-12 lamps are subject to minimum efficacy limits. The majority of fluorescent lamps now being shipped (T-8 and T-5 types) type are operated by ballasts that will not be subject to DOE rule until 2011. The metric used by DOE for characterizing the electrical efficiency of the fluorescent lamp-ballast system is called Ballast Efficacy Factor (BEF). Because BEF is not normalized, it is of limited utility for rulemaking and is useless for procurement. But by normalizing BEF to the total lamp power, I have

17

Energy efficiency and performance of solid state ballasts  

SciTech Connect

The performance of solid state ballasts for operating fluorescent lamps measured in a controlled laboratory environment are described and compared to the performance of typical core-coil type ballasts. Parameters of interest include efficiency, conducted and radiated EMI and results of some accelerated lamp life tests. The experimental design of the demonstration to retrofit three floors of an office building with solid state ballasts to evaluate their reliability and energy savings in a variety of applications is described. The most recent experimental results are presented.

Verderber, R.; Selkowitz, S.; Berman, S.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

EETD's Early Technological Successes-Electronic Ballasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to develop with lighting industry partners in the mid-1970s. Electronic ballasts replaced magnetic ballasts, substantially reducing the energy use of fluorescent lights. To learn...

19

Compatibility testing of fluorescent lamp and ballast systems  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in the use of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems, and the corresponding increase in the number of new products and new manufacturers in the market, has raised a number of questions regarding the compatibility of the lamps and ballasts used in fluorescent systems. Because many of the new products start and operate lamps differently than previous products, the relevant American National Standards Institute requirements may no longer be adequate for addressing compatibility concerns. The impacts on system performance of the newer products of a parametric study designed to test key hypotheses regarding the impact of ballast parameters on fluorescent lamp life. In this study, samples of 4-ft T8 fluorescent lamps were operated on duty cycles of 5 min on and 5 min off, using seven different ballast types. The results of the study indicate which parameters seem to have the biggest effect on lamp life, and can be used in establishing new performance standards for fluorescent systems.

Ji, Y.; Davis, R.; O' Rourke, C.; Chui, E.W.M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses parameters for selecting the most suitable auxiliary lighting device to operate and control gas-discharge lamps. The devices tested in this study include solid-state, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts; current limiters; and dynamic lighting controls. They have been evaluated when operating the standard, 40-W, F-40, T-12, rapid-start, cool-white fluorescent lamps. Solid-state ballast performance varied widely, from 68 to 79 lumens per watt (1m/W) in efficacy, and from 0.83 to 0.98 in ballast factor. System efficacy was measured at up to 26% higher than standard core-coil ballast efficacy.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast.

Schultz, William Newell (Niskayuna, NY); Thomas, Robert James (Rexford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

New three-phase electronic ballasts said to save 25-32%  

SciTech Connect

Triad-Utrad offers a three-phase electronic ballast for new commercial buildings that saves 25-32% in lighting costs and yields a payback of less than one year. The Triad B-27551208 at $44 can lower new construction costs 30% because it uses less expensive wiring and circuit breakers than single-phase circuits. Each ballast handles one or two standard fluorescent lamps, and saves energy by operating at a higher frequency than conventional ballasts to achieve the same light level. Service life should be 20% longer because the Triad ballast operates at about 20% cooler temperatures.

1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Underwater tanker ballast water/oil separation  

SciTech Connect

The invention contemplates tranferring ballast water contaminated with entrained or emulsified oil to an underwater disengagement zone operating on the water displacement principle, as exemplified by an underwater storage tank having an upwardly convex shell with an opening in its bottom through which water can move into and out of the shell as the volume of oil enclosed within the storage zone fluctuates. The ballast mixture of water and oil is introduced into the disengagement zone, where it separates under the influence of gravity into separate oil and water phases. The oil layer rises to a point from which it can be recovered, while the separated water flows out of the open bottom of the zone into the body of water. (2 claims)

McCabe, J.S.

1973-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic ballast unit for a fluorescent lamp comprising: a circuit assembly having a pair of voltage input terminal and a first inductor and a capacitor in series relationship with each other to form a series resonant circuit. The circuit is adapted to be coupled to a fluorescent lamp to provide a starting voltage for the lamp; and a second inductor connected in shunt relationship to the first inductor and connected to the other input terminal. There is a core on which the first inductor and the second inductor are mounted. The core inductively couples the inductors with each other and are shaped to reduce core losses to minimize the increase of temperature of the core; the core is of a generally H-shaped configuration, and means of opposite ends of the H-shaped core to complete the magnetic flux path for each inductor, respectively.

Boyd, G.D.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses parameters for selecting the most suitable auxiliary lighting device to operate and control gas-discharge lamps. The devices tested in this study include solid-state fluorescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts; current limiters; and dynamic lighting controls. They have been evaluated in combination with the standard 40-W, F-40, T-12, rapid-start, cool-white fluorescent lamps. Solid-state ballast performance varied widely- from 68 to 79 lumens per watt (lm/W) in efficacy and from 0.83 to 0.98 in ballast factor. System efficacy was up to 26% higher than standard core-coil ballast efficacy. Current limiters used with standard core-coil ballast reduce light output and input power by 30 to 50% and may be suitable as retrofit devices to reduce light in overilluminated spaces. When operated at a constant lamp wall temperature, these devices either maintain or reduce system efficacy.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water  

SciTech Connect

Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions.

Goldman, M. (Camp Dresser McKee, Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast. 4 figs.

Schultz, W.N.; Thomas, R.J.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

An improved charge pump power factor correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

An improved charge pump power factor correction (CPPFC) electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is proposed in this paper. Circuit derivation, principle of operation, and the conditions for achieving unity power factor are discussed. The proposed electronic ballast is implemented and tested with two 40-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that 84% of overall efficiency and 1.6 of crest factor can be achieved with 200-V line input voltage. The measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements. The lamp power variation range is automatically limited within {+-}15% for {+-}10% line input voltage variation without feedback control.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.; Yamauchi, T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop an indirectly heated gasification system that converts switchgrass into hydrogen-rich gas suitable for powering fuel cells. The project includes investigations of the indirectly-heated gasifier, development of particulate removal equipment, evaluation of catalytic methods for upgrading producer gas, development of contaminant measurement and control techniques, modeling of the thermal performance of the ballasted gasifier, and estimation of the cost of hydrogen from the proposed gasification system. Specific technologies investigated include a thermally ballasted gasifier, a moving bed granular filter, and catalytic reactors for steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction. The approach to this project was to employ a pilot-scale (5 ton per day) gasifier to evaluate the thermally ballasted gasifier as a means for producing hydrogen from switchgrass. A slipstream from the gasifier was used to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. Other tests were conducted with laboratory-scale equipment using simulated producer gas. The ballasted gasifier operated in conjunction with a steam reformer and two-stage water-gas shift reactor produced gas streams containing 54.5 vol-% H2. If purge gas to the feeder system could be substantially eliminated, hydrogen concentration would reach 61 vol-%, which closely approaches the theoretical maximum of 66 vol-%. Tests with a combined catalyst/sorbent system demonstrated that steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction could be substantially performed in a single reactor and achieve hydrogen concentrations exceeding 90 vol-%. Cold flow trials with a laboratory-scale moving bed granular filter achieved particle removal efficiencies exceeding 99%. Two metal-based sorbents were tested for their ability to remove H2S from biomass-derived producer gas. The ZnO sorbent, tested at 450? C, was effective in reducing H2S from 200 ppm to less than 2 ppm (>99% reduction) while tests with the MnO sorbent were inconclusive. A computer model was developed that successfully predicted the thermal performance of the ballasted gasifier. An economic comparison of an air-blown gasification plant and a ballasted gasifier plant found that operating costs for ballasted gasification plant are about 31% higher than for the air blown gasifier plant. Hydrogen from the ballasted gasification plant and air blown gasification plant are projected to be $2.43/kg and $1.85/kg, respectively. This is lower than U.S. DOE’s 2010 target price of $2.90/kg and comparable to U.S. DOE’s 2015 target price of $2.00/kg.

Robert C. Brown

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Analysis and experimental results of a single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on flyback converter  

SciTech Connect

A new single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on a flyback converter is presented in this paper. The ballast is able to supply a fluorescent lamp assuring a high-input power factor for the utility line. Other features are lamp power regulation against line voltage variations and low lamp current crest factor, both assuring long lamp life. The ballast is analyzed at steady-state operation, and design equations and characteristics are obtained. Also, a procedure for the ballast design is presented. Finally, simulation and experimental results from a laboratory prototype are shown.

Calleja, A.J.; Alonso, J.M.; Lopez, E.; Ribas, J.; Martinez, J.A.; Rico-Secades, M.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground—Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote ...

D. D. Turner; W. F. Feltz; R. A. Ferrare

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

On-site demonstration procedure for solid-state fluorescent ballast  

SciTech Connect

The report was presented to plant engineers and managers who were involved in an on-site demonstration of EETech solid-state ballasts for two 40-watt T12 fluorescent lamps. The report includes a brief review of the operating principles of solid-state fluorescent ballasts and the status of development achieved during the LBL program. The remainder of the test describes the techniques of managing and instrumenting a test area for assessing the performance of solid-state fluorescent ballasts at an occupied site.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis, design, and experiments of a high-power-factor electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

A charge pump power-factor-correction (CPPFC) converter is first derived, and its unity power factor condition is then reviewed. A single-stage power-factor-correction electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is analyzed. The design criteria are derived to optimize the electronic ballast based on the steady-state analysis. Constant lamp power operations associated with its control are also discussed. Large signal simulation and experimental results verify the theoretical analysis. It is shown that the designed electronic ballast has 0.995 power factor and 5% total harmonic distortion (THD) with lamp power variation within {+-}15% when the line input voltage changes {+-}10%.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, T. [Matsushita Electric Works, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ballast technique for laser cathode pins  

SciTech Connect

The discrete ballast resistors associated with the multiple pin array of laser cathode structures are replaced by a bulk resistive material in the form of an integral bar or slab which is maintained in contact with the plurality of pin electrodes comprising the laser cathode assembly to provide a stable ballast means. The bulk resistive member employed to provide the ballast for the pin electrodes can exhibit non-linear resistive characteristics to provide greater laser discharge stability with less power dissipation.

Hundstad, R.L.; Wutzke, S.A.

1979-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ballast Accidents Analysis and Evaluation of Urban Rail Transit Based on Method of Causality Analysis and Faulty Tree Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ballast casualty often incurs severe sequence once takes place, such as abnormal operation,, personnel injury or even death accident , especially for lines below grade. Causality Analysis and Fault Tree analysis method is applied to research of personnel ... Keywords: ballast accident, causality analysis, faulty tree analysis, urban rail transit

Jing He; Zhi-gang Liu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Section 5.4.2 Electronic Ballasts: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006, and electronic ballasts for most replacement applica- tions after July 1, 2010. Ballast specifications include: * Input voltage (usually 277 or 120 VAC) * Number and type of...

38

Refurbishment of the ballast-water system of the gravity-based structure Beryl Alpha  

SciTech Connect

In Sept. 1985, the Beryl Alpha platform in the North Sea experienced a leak in its ballast-water system in the utility shaft 328 ft (100m) below sea level. The importance of the ballast-water system for platform operations and the particular location of the leak led to the development and implementation of unique and extensive repair procedures. These procedures are detailed by the authors.

Seume, K.; Gilchrist, J.M. (Mobil Oil (US))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Product guide: energy-efficient ballasts  

SciTech Connect

The product guide covers the energy-efficient ballasts of seven manufacturers as a representative sample. The guide provides directory information on the companies, describes models, and lists price ranges and payback estimates. A summary of ballast features includes estimated life and output. Other sections cover lead and installation times and arrangements for warranties and service.

1985-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation of Incompatibility Between Electronic Ballasts and a Hearing Aid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study evaluates the incompatibility between electronic ballasts and a hearing aid.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Phase II report on energy efficient electronic ballasts for a two-40 watt fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a project aimed at accelerating the commercialization of electronic ballasts. During the Phase I portion of the project a small quantity of ballasts and other hardware were delivered for independent testing. Results verified the claims for energy savings and other unique and advantageous features of the electronic ballast. Phase II, a large scale field demonstration, is reported. The demonstration is being conducted by LBL and the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in the PG and E headquarters building in downtown San Fracisco. The test demonstration hardware is being procured. Included are two models of energy saving ballasts; two dimmer systems that show the potential for additional power savings; and, two models of Automatic Emergency Light Systems. Installation of ballasts and the beginning of actual test operations were originally scheduled for February 1978. However, slippages in hardware deliveries have caused a three-month delay. Testing at PG and E is now scheduled to begin in June 1978. Even though broad scale results from the Phase II demonstration at PG and E are not yet available, performance and versatility advantages of the electronic ballast have been demonstrated. They offer a clear incentive to the industry for development and production of reliable hardware that will be competitively saleable on a long term cost-of-lighting basis.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A new optimized fluorescent lamp and ballast for low-energy general lighting applications  

SciTech Connect

A new fluorescent lamp and ballast system has been developed which minimizes system input power while maintaining light output close to values provided by conventional lamps and ballasts. The 28-WT-12 lamp designed for the new system utilizes a redesigned electrode structure which allows the lamp to be started in the rapid start manner but operated in an instant start mode to maximize the discharge efficacy (lumens/watt) while reducing lamp cathode power requirements. A matching two-lamp ballast incorporates a solid-state switching device to turn off the cathode heating circuit automatically once the lamps have started. Both lamps and ballasts are physically interchangeable with conventional equipment so that existing luminaires can be converted without luminaire, lampholder, and wiring modifications. This new lamp/ballast system can achieve efficacy values exceeding 80 lm/W--more than 25 percent better than the performance of conventional fluorescent systems of the early 1970's-along with the excellent life and reliability characteristics typical of electromagnetically ballasted systems. Economic analyses indicate that the new system is appropriate for many new commercial general lighting installations, although it is particularly suitable as a retrofit system for installations where power reductions are essential but where conversion costs must be minimized and illumination levels preserved.

Hammer, E.E.; McGowan, T.K.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Posters Toward an Operational Water Vapor Remote Sensing System Using the Global Positioning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters Toward an Operational Water Vapor Remote Sensing System Using the Global Positioning System S. I. Gutman, (a) R. B. Chadwick, (b) and D. W. Wolf (c) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado A. Simon Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Boulder, Colorado T. Van Hove and C. Rocken University Navstar Consortium Boulder, Colorado Background Water vapor is one of the most important constituents of the free atmosphere since it is the principal mechanism by which moisture and latent heat are transported and cause "weather." The measurement of atmospheric water vapor is essential for weather and climate research as well as for operational weather forecasting. An important goal in modern weather prediction is to improve the accuracy of short-term

44

Ballast-mounted PV arrays: Phase 2 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expansive flat rooftops of industrial and commercial buildings across America offer the largest, most secure, and potentially least-cost real estate opportunity to install massive amounts of solar photovoltaic generation in the building sector. Unfortunately, mechanical penetration of roofing membranes is very expensive and perceived by building owners and operators to increase the likelihood of leaking. In response Ascension Technology has pioneered the development of low-cost ballasted approaches for mounting PV arrays. Recently, however, we have experienced our first two instances in which strong winds have moved our arrays on rooftops and heightened our interest, and the PV industries' need, to develop zero-penetration mounting techniques that are more secure, yet remain low in cost. In this PV BONUS project, Ascension Technology and its partners addressed wind loading on solar panels and the suitability of using frictional forces between ballast trays and roofing materials to resist PV arrays sliding on rooftops. The primary goal of the project is to capture the potential cost savings made possible by ballast-mounting by showing under what conditions it can satisfy wind loading concerns. A secondary goal is to address a more geographically constrained concern regarding withstanding seismic forces.

Edward C. Kern

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ballast-mounted PV arrays: Phase 2 final report  

SciTech Connect

The expansive flat rooftops of industrial and commercial buildings across America offer the largest, most secure, and potentially least-cost real estate opportunity to install massive amounts of solar photovoltaic generation in the building sector. Unfortunately, mechanical penetration of roofing membranes is very expensive and perceived by building owners and operators to increase the likelihood of leaking. In response Ascension Technology has pioneered the development of low-cost ballasted approaches for mounting PV arrays. Recently, however, we have experienced our first two instances in which strong winds have moved our arrays on rooftops and heightened our interest, and the PV industries' need, to develop zero-penetration mounting techniques that are more secure, yet remain low in cost. In this PV BONUS project, Ascension Technology and its partners addressed wind loading on solar panels and the suitability of using frictional forces between ballast trays and roofing materials to resist PV arrays sliding on rooftops. The primary goal of the project is to capture the potential cost savings made possible by ballast-mounting by showing under what conditions it can satisfy wind loading concerns. A secondary goal is to address a more geographically constrained concern regarding withstanding seismic forces.

Edward C. Kern

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Performance of electronic ballasts and lighting controllers with 34-W fluorescent lamps: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamps are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the system efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

IBECS network/ballast interface: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed to design, develop, and demonstrate an IBECS network/ballast interface that is useful for economically dimming controllable ballasts in commercial buildings. The first section of the report provides the general background of the IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) research and development work as well as the context for the development of the network/ballast interface. The research and development effort that went into producing the first proof-of-concept circuit and the physical prototype of that concept is detailed in the second section. In the third section of the report, we describe the lessons learned from the first demonstration of the network/ballast interface at an office at LBNL. The fourth section describes how electrical noise interference encountered with the first generation of interface led to design changes for a refined prototype that hardened the interface from electrical noise generated by the ballast. The final section of the report discusses the performance of refined prototype after we replaced the proof-of-concept prototype with the refined prototypes in the demonstration office at LBNL.

Rubinstein, Francis; Pettler, Pete

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

New and Underutilized Technology: HID Electronic/Dimming Ballasts |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HID Electronic/Dimming Ballasts HID Electronic/Dimming Ballasts New and Underutilized Technology: HID Electronic/Dimming Ballasts October 7, 2013 - 8:51am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for HID electronic/dimming ballasts within the Federal sector. Benefits Most HID electronic/dimming ballasts, typically metal halide or high-pressure sodium lamps, are currently driven by magnetic ballasts. Several manufacturers now offer electronic ballasts for these lamps, which promise better efficiency, longer lamp life, and faster startup and re-strike. Application HID electronic/dimming ballasts are applicable in exterior/security lighting and facilities with high bay areas. Key Factors for Deployment Federal agencies must evaluate relative costs, benefits, and application of

49

SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar Photovoltaic Racking System on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics

50

A test synthesis approach to reducing BALLAST DFT overhead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a test synthesis approach which integratesBALLAST (BALAnced structure Scan Test) withan enhanced test point insertion (TPI) algorithm to functionallyscan the flip-flops chosen by BALLAST.BALLASTis an attractive partial scan ...

Douglas Chang; Mike Tien-Chien Lee; Malgorzata Marek-Sadowska; Takashi Aikyo; Kwang-Ting Cheng

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Indirectly heated fluidized bed biomass gasification using a latent heat ballast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to improve the heating value of gas produced during gasification of biomass fuels using an indirectly heated gasifier based on latent heat ballasting. The latent heat ballast consists of lithium fluoride salt encased in tubes suspended in the reactor. The lithium fluoride has a melting point that is near the desired gasification temperature. With the ballast a single reactor operating in a cyclic mode stores energy during a combustion phase and releases it during a pyrolysis phase. Tests were carried out in a fluidized bed reactor to evaluate the concept. The time to cool the reactor during the pyrolysis phase from 1,172 K (1,650 F) to 922 K (1,200 F) increased 102% by use of the ballast system. This extended pyrolysis time allowed 33% more biomass to be gasified during a cycle. Additionally, the total fuel fraction pyrolyzed to produce useful gas increased from 74--80%. Higher heating values of 14.2 to 16.6 MJ/Nm{sup 3} (382--445 Btu/scf) on a dry basis were obtained from the ballasted gasifier.

Pletka, R.; Brown, R.; Smeenk, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Center for Coal and the Environment

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Single-state electronic ballast with dimming feature and unity power factor  

SciTech Connect

Analysis, design, and practical consideration of a single-stage electronic ballast with dimming feature and unity power factor are presented in this paper. The proposed single-stage ballast is the combination of a boost converter and a half-bridge series-resonant parallel-loaded inverter. The boost semistage working in the discontinuous conduction mode functions as a power factor corrector and the inverter semistage operated above resonance are employed to ballast the lamp. Replacing the lamp with the plasma model, analysis of the ballast is fulfilled. The dimming feature is carried out by pulse-width modulation (PWM) and variable-frequency controls simultaneously. The proposed single-stage ballast is suitable for applications with moderate power level and low-line voltage while requiring a high-output voltage. It can save a controller, an active switch and its driver, reduce size, and possibly increase system reliability while requiring two additional diodes over a conventional two-stage system. A prototype was implemented to verify the theoretical discussion. The hardware measurements have shown that the desired performance can be achieved feasibly.

Wu, T.F.; Yu, T.H.; Chiang, M.C. [National Chung Cheng Univ., Chia-Yi (Taiwan, Province of China)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy-efficient H. I. D. solid-state ballast. Phase I. Final report. [High pressure sodium  

SciTech Connect

The average efficiency of the six prototype ballasts when operated with G.E. and Sylvania lamps is 84.8%. The average efficiency of conventional high reactance autotransformer core/coil ballasts is 80%. With plus or minus 10% rated input voltage the ballast output power varied from -11.9% to +0.7%. Standard core/coil ballasts have a +-11% regulation with a +-5% rated input voltage. Power factor increases from 85% at 60 Hz to 100% at approximately 15,000 Hz. However, resonant frequencies occur above 1000 Hz which will cause destruction of the lamp. For safe operation, ballast output frequencies below 1000 Hz are recommended. The standard core/coil ballast operates at 90% power factor. Analysis of the Phase I data and circuit design indicates that additional efficiency can be obtained through improved circuit design, i.e., eliminating inherent internal losses by improved component selection, redesigning portions of the circuit, and selection of the frequency for optimum efficiency and power factor.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Problems continue to plague electronic ballast industry  

SciTech Connect

Problems of unreliable components, poor quality due to the lack of performance testing standards, and electromagnetic radiation are preventing the electronic ballast industry from achieving the anticipated 40% electricity savings and have led several manufacturers to drop out of the market. The National Association of Lighting Maintenance Contractors (NALMCO) recognized the problem, and the remaining manufacturers plan to reduce the number of components to improve reliability until standards are developed. Many potential users are waiting for a larger selection and better product before they invest in electronic ballasts. A directory of major lighting equipment manufacturers accompanies the article. (DCK)

Warrock, A.M.

1983-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Selecting effective fluorescent lamp and ballast for retrofit in the continental United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Electrical lighting is a major contributor to daytime peak energy demand, accounting for about 30 percent of total electricity consumption in most Army facilities. Some of this energy may be wasted because many existing lighting systems at Army Installations use outmoded technologies. While recent technology has improved the energy efficiency of all lighting systems, fluorescent lighting-the most widely used interior building lighting-has shown the greatest efficiency gains. Retrofits using high-efficiency fluorescent lamps and ballasts can yield significant operating cost savings. High-efficiency fluorescent lighting systems are widely available, but current information on their performance characteristics is highly technical and not easily accessible to Army facility managers considering retrofit options. This report provides a single, accessible source that summarizes fluorescent lamp and ballast performance characteristics and outlines selection procedures. Fluorescent lamp, Retrofit, Ballast, Lighting. Energy conservation.

Taylor, W.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

New continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

Continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction (CIC-CPPFC) electronic ballasts are proposed in this paper. The CPPFC circuit and unity power factor condition using the charge pump concept are derived and analyzed. The average lamp current control with switching frequency modulation was developed so that the low crest factor and constant lamp power operation can be achieved. The developed electronic ballast has continuous input current, so that a small line input filter can be used. The proposed CIC-CPPFC electronic ballast was implemented and tested with two 45-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that the measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, Tokushi [Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Lighting Research and Development Center

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Current-source charge-pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

A current-source charge-pump power-factor-correction (CS-CPPFC) electronic ballast is presented in this paper. Unity-power-factor condition and principle of operation using the CP concept are derived and analyzed. Based on the steady-state analysis, the design considerations are discussed in detail. It is shown that the power switch only deals with the resonant load current, which is the same as in the two-stage approach so that small-current rating devices can be used. The developed CS-CPPFC electronic ballast can save one inductor and has a potentially low cost. The CS-CP electronic ballast with switching frequency modulation to improve crest factor is developed, implemented, and tested. It is shown that 0.99 power factor, 11.3% total harmonic distortion (THD), and 1.54 crest factor can be achieved for 85-W fluorescent lamps.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.Y. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, Tokushi [Matsushita Electric Works, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy efficient fluorescent ballasts. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect

The development of a high-frequency electronic (Stevens) ballast for fluorescent lamps is described. It is claimed that use of this ballast could reduce use energy consumption by 1.2 to 2.5 percent. The Stevens ballast has a basic efficiency of 29 percent when used with conventional lamps. With the more efficient lamps, the efficiency increases drastically. The conventional ballast and lamp has an efficiacy of approximately 60 to 63 lumens per watt (LPW). With the Stevens ballast the efficiacy raises to between 75 and 80 lumens per watt. When the Stevens ballast is utilized with the newer high efficiency lamps the efficiacy increases to 90 to 95 lumens per watt or a full 51 percent improvement over conventional coil and core ballasts and 25 percent over the best high efficiency premium coil and core ballasts. In addition to its energy savings capabilities, this high frequency fluorescent lamp ballast has the advantages that it is a true retrofit device that is directly interchangeable with the conventional coil core ballast, and it is dimmable over a wide and continuous range. (LCLC)

Stevens Luminoptics Corporation

1978-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Integrated-circuit control for two-lamp electronic ballast. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Circuitry is described for a solid-state, high-frequency fluorescent ballast designed to operate two F40 T-12 rapid-start lamps. The circuits are designed to be produced by hybrid integrated circuit (IC) technology. The signal components are produced on a single IC chip; the power transistors are attached to an alumina substrate. The initial IC version reduces the component count by about 50%. The cost of each IC in 500K lots is $0.70, replacing discrete parts costing $2.25. Additional savings of more than $1.00 per unit are realized by the decreased assembly time and improved reliability of the ICs. The system performance (two-lamp F40) was compared to the discrete version of the ballast and to an efficient core-coil ballast and found to be 6% less and 20% more efficient, respectively. The decrease in efficiency relative to the discrete version of the ballast is due to retaining some power to the filaments during operation in order to maintain normal lamp life.

Kohler, T.P.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

incorporating LEDs into tomorrows task lights, to reducing light entrapment within the LED, to fundamental research into how Organic Lighting Emitting Diodes operate. LED and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

M/e update: lighting fixtures, ballasts  

SciTech Connect

A review of the factors influencing the selection of a lighting system is presented and the components that each type requires are considered. The energy conservation in lighting systems through the proper choice of fixtures and energy-efficient ballasts is explained. Actual retrofit installations are given as examples of the cost savings and reduced energy consumption realized when a proper indoor lighting system has been specified.

Plankenhorn, J.H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: HID Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Systems Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and Related Controls for HID Lighting Systems Objective HID ballast The goal of this project is to evaluate the potential of electronic ballasts and related controls for HID lighting systems to improve the efficiency of current technology. The specific objectives of this project are to: Test, analyze and determine the potential of electronic ballasts for HID lighting systems in cooperation with manufacturers as an emerging energy efficient technology to reduce lighting loads in commercial, industrial and municipal applications. Identify control strategies to further improve the energy efficiency of these systems with a municipal partner. Provide appropriate recommendations for incorporating these technologies into current state codes and regulations.

63

Automated Retrievals of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles from an Operational Raman Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated routines have been developed to derive water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient, and linear depolarization profiles, as well as total precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical ...

D. D. Turner; R. A. Ferrare; L. A. Heilman Brasseur; W. F. Feltz; T. P. Tooman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lumber-Wood Products - ASDs and Lighting Ballasts Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of equipment damage to adjustable speed drives (ASDs) and lighting ballasts at a hardwood floor manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Electronic high frequency fluorescent ballasts (past, present and future)  

SciTech Connect

Based upon the years of development and manufacture as well as a documented three and one-half year life test the reliability of the electronic high frequency ballast concept has been established. There are several characteristics that can be used to assess a ballast's performance with respect to cost effectiveness, lamp life and power quality. The higher cost of the electronic ballast is due to the demand exceeding the supply. With more competition in an expanding market the price of ballasts will be significantly reduced. 4 refs.

Verderber, R.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Important design parameters for solid-state ballasts  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state ballasts represent a significant new business opportunity for many companies. While at first glance the development of a ballast or electronic power supply to light a fluoresent or high-intensity discharge lamp does not present major technical hurdles, these are established standards which must be met for a ballast to be techinically viable. Some of the issues which may no be apparent to an engineer with little or no lighting industry experience are highlighted, and appropriate standards which are helpful when contemplating a high-frequency solid-state ballast design are documented.

Alling, W.R. (Diablo Scientific Labs Ltd., Danville, CA (US))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High-reliability high-efficiency electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic ballast adapted to connect with the AC voltage on an ordinary electric utility power line and to power a gas discharge lamp. The AC voltage is electrically referenced to ground, the ballast comprising: full-wave rectifier means connected with the AC voltage and operable to provide a DC output across a pair of DC output terminals; push-pull inverter means connected in series with an inductor means to form a series-combination, the series-combination being connected across the DC output terminals; the inverter means being operable to provide a current-limited substantially sinusoidal output voltage between a first output terminal and a second output terminal; the magnitude of the voltage existing between the first output terminal and ground being is substantially equal to that of the voltage existing between the second output terminal and ground, the phasing of the voltage existing between the first terminal and ground being substantially equal and opposite with respect to the phasing of the voltage existing between the second terminal and ground; the frequency of the output voltage is substantially higher than that of the AC voltage; connect means to permit connection of a gas discharge lamp across the output terminals; and safety means connected in circuit between the output terminals and the inverter means, operable to cause substantial reduction in the magnitude of the output voltage; in case the magnitude of current flowing out of the first output terminal is substantially different from that of the current flowing into the second output terminal, the safety means is then non-responsive to any current flowing in the power lines.

Nilssen, O.K.

1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ballast users plug life span, cooling savings into paybacks  

SciTech Connect

Energy-efficient ballasts are saving fluorescent lamp users energy expenses by reducing cooling as well as lighting costs and by extending bulb life. Retrofit calculations should include the cost of installing new ballasts with union labor. Three users describe their installations and their use of either simple payback or simple payback including replacement savings. (DCK)

Duffy, J.

1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 5.2 Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribution of ballast for evaluation in this project: Advance Transformer, Aromat, Aurswald, Delta Power

70

Tank 241-AZ-101 and Tank 241-AZ-102 Airlift Circulator Operation Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of the tank 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 airlift circulators (ALCs) and during the initial operation (''bump'') of the tank 241-AZ-101 mixer pumps. The purpose of the ALC operation is to support portions of the operational test procedure (OTP) for Project W-030 (OTP-W030-001) and to perform functional test in support of Project W-151. Project W-030 is the 241-A-702 ventilation upgrade project (241-142-702) and Project W-151 is the 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test. The functional tests will check the operability of the tank 241-AZ-101 ALCs. Process Memo's No. 2E98-082 and No. 2E99-001 (LMHC 1999a, LMHC 1999b) direct the operation of the ALCs and the Industrial Hygiene monitoring respectively. A series of tests will be conducted in which the ALCs in tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 will be operated at different air flow rates. Vapor samples will be obtained to determine constituents that may be present in the tank headspace during ALC operation at tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 as the waste is disturbed. During the testing, vapor samples will be obtained from the headspace of tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 via the unused port on the standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS). In addition the last two vapor samples will be collected from the headspace of tank 241-AZ-101 during the operation of the mixer pumps. Each mixer pump will be operated for approximately 5 minutes. Results will be used to provide the waste feed delivery program with environmental air permitting data for tank waste disturbing activities. Because of radiological concerns, the samples will be filtered for particulates. It is recognized that this may remove some organic compounds. The following sections provide the general methodology and procedures to be used in the preparation, retrieval, transport, analysis, and reporting of results from vapor samples retrieved during the ALC testing.

TEMPLETON, A.M.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Identification of lamp ballasts containing PCBs. Revised edition. Report no. EPS 2/CC/2  

SciTech Connect

Fluorescent lamp ballast capacitors are among the products that may contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Questions about lamp ballasts concern the potential for leakage, the risk of heating and exploding, how to identify a ballast which contains PCBs, and the risk to human health. This study identifies those ballasts containing PCB-filled capacitors; the domestic and foreign manufacturers of PCB-containing ballasts; the total quantity of PCBs used in ballasts; and any potential problems. The study does not identify the risks of human health arising from the use of PCB-ballasts in fluorescent lamps.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts July 29, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis Many incandescent lightbulbs can be replaced with more energy efficient options. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ClarkandCompany. Many incandescent lightbulbs can be replaced with more energy efficient options. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ClarkandCompany. What does this mean for me? For the greatest energy efficiency, use new fixtures with new lightbulbs. Replace A-type lightbulbs with more energy-efficient options such as CFLs, LEDs, and energy-saving (halogen) incandescents. Matching replacement lightbulbs to existing fixtures and ballasts can be tricky, especially with older fixtures. Using new fixtures made for new

73

Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts July 29, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis Many incandescent lightbulbs can be replaced with more energy efficient options. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ClarkandCompany. Many incandescent lightbulbs can be replaced with more energy efficient options. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ClarkandCompany. What does this mean for me? For the greatest energy efficiency, use new fixtures with new lightbulbs. Replace A-type lightbulbs with more energy-efficient options such as CFLs, LEDs, and energy-saving (halogen) incandescents. Matching replacement lightbulbs to existing fixtures and ballasts can be tricky, especially with older fixtures. Using new fixtures made for new lightbulbs gives you the greatest energy savings, reliability, and

74

Electronic Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts Used in 4-Foot Fixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents tests performed at the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC) Power Quality Test Facility to characterize ballast energy performance, emissions, and immunity from a PQ perspective.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Refurbishment of ballast water system of the gravity base structure - Beryl 'A'  

SciTech Connect

The Beryl Alpha Gravity Base Platform has operated satisfactorily for the past 11 years and is expected to stay in operation until the year 2017. The Ballast Water System is a vital part of the platform's oil storage and export equipment. In 1986, during routine pipe inspections in the lower part of the utility shaft, significant defects were discovered which resulted in major refurbishment work. Innovative designs and working procedures were employed for replacement and reinforced grout encasement of line pipe sections. This paper details the important aspects of this refurbishment work.

Seume, K.; Gilchrist, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, T.L.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

111111111111111111111 OpenEIUtilityRateDescription Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast ... Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures attached...

79

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment: (Phase 2, The 34-watt F40 rapid start T-12 fluorescent lamp): Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamp systems are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the systems efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

High-intensity discharge (HID) solid-state ballast program: engineering development report. Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A high frequency (28 to 31/sup 0/K Hz) electronic current source (ballast) designed to drive a 200 watt 100 volt sodium vapor gas discharge lamp is described. A resonant switching power amplifier system utilizing a novel constant power feedback loop is employed to maintain the lamp input power constant within two percent via changes due to lamp aging etc. The lamp input power and therefore the light output is adjustable from 50 to 100 percent of rated power. A input (electronic filter) inverter, changes the 277 volts alternating voltage input to a regulated direct current (DC) voltage used to power the output stage. The inverter reflects, a essentially unity power factor load to the power input source at all times.

Carlson, R.S.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High frequency electronic ballast for HID lamps. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Electronic Ballast Systems Corp. has been working on the development of highly efficient (94%) electronic ballast for HID lamps (35W,...,400W) providing energy savings of up to thirty five percent (35%) as compared to the only available alternative, the standard core and coil HID ballasts currently on the market.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

System Compatibility Test Data Radiated EMI Between Electronic Ballasts and Sensitive Electronic Medical Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This system compatibility test data describes how one model of electronic ballast interacted with a hearing aid. Also included in this set of system compatibility test data is an example of how ballast manufacturers can solve the system compatibility problem of radio frequency electromagnetic interference with other equipment by ballast design modifications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier DOE Hydrogen Program Contractors biomass #12;Approach Outline Gasifier Pilot Plant· Develop subsystems for the hydrogen production system heated gasifier Q Air N2 H2O CO2 O2 Steam H2 CO CO2 CmHn Biomass 45 kg/hr Biomass 180 kg/hr Sand Bed: 43

84

Developing an Operational, Surface-Based, GPS, Water Vapor Observing System for NOAA: Network Design and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for a reliable, low-cost observing system to measure water vapor in the atmosphere is incontrovertible. Experiments have shown the potential for using Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to measure total precipitable water vapor ...

Daniel E. Wolfe; Seth I. Gutman

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Compact Fluorescent Plug-In Ballast-in-a-Socket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this program was to develop a ballast system for plug-in CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that will directly replace standard metal shell, medium base incandescent lampholders (such as Levition No. 6098) for use with portable lamp fixtures, such as floor, table and desk lamps. A secondary goal was to identify a plug-in CFL that is optimized for use with this ballast. This Plug-in CFL Ballastin-a-Socket system will allow fixture manufacturers to easily manufacture CFL-based high-efficacy portable fixtures that provide residential and commercial consumers with attractive, cost-effective, and energy-efficient fixtures for use wherever portable incandescent fixtures are used today. The advantages of this proposed system over existing CFL solutions are that the fixtures can only be used with high-efficacy CFLs, and they will be more attractive and will have lower life-cycle costs than screw-in or adapter-based CFL retrofit solutions. These features should greatly increase the penetration of CFL's into the North American market. Our work has shown that using integrated circuits it is quite feasible to produce a lamp-fixture ballast of a size comparable to the current Edison-screw 3-way incandescent fixtures. As for price points for BIAS-based fixtures, end-users polled by the Lighting Research Institute at RPI indicated that they would pay as much as an additional $10 for a lamp containing such a ballast. The ballast has been optimized to run with a 26 W amalgam triple biax lamp in the base-down position, yet can accept non-amalgam versions of the lamp. With a few part alterations, the ballast can be produced to support 32 W lamps as well. The ballast uses GE's existing L-Comp[1] power topology in the circuit so that the integrated circuit design would be a design that could possibly be used by other CFL and EFL products with minor modifications. This gives added value by reducing cost and size of not only the BIAS, but also possibly other integral CFL and future dimmable integral and plug-in versions of the EFL products.

Rebecca Voelker

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Remotely Operated Lidar for Aerosol, Temperature, and Water Vapor Profiling in the High Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar has been installed and is operating in the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory at Eureka in the High Arctic (79°59?N, 85°56?W) as part of the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change. The ...

G. J. Nott; T. J. Duck; J. G. Doyle; M. E. W. Coffin; C. Perro; C. P. Thackray; J. R. Drummond; P. F. Fogal; E. McCullough; R. J. Sica

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Tanker ballast water treating plant meets tough specs  

SciTech Connect

Sumed, a joint company of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Dubai, and Kuwait, contracted for a system that would reduce the oil content of discharged ballast water from as much as 2000 ppm to 6 ppm. The oil-water separation plant was installed at Sidi Kerir on the Egyptian coast along the Mediterranean. The plant has five double rows, with each row containing seven concrete tank units (70 units total). Each unit has four plate packs to clean 8000 cu m/hr. The proving trial began on May 3, 1978, and lasted for 32 days. During the period, 14 tankers discharged their ballast water into the plant and the plant removed all but an average of 1.46 ppm of oil, with the highest oil content being 4.0 ppm. (1 diagram, 1 drawing, 1 graph, 3 photos, 4 references, 1 table)

De Kok, a.F.; Marson, H.W.

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Analysis and design of a high power factor, single-stage electronic dimming ballast  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the analysis, design, and practical consideration of a single-stage electronic dimming ballast with unity power factor. The power stage of the ballast is derived from combining a buck-boost converter and a half-bridge series-resonant parallel-loaded inverter (SRPLI). With the plasma model of the lamp, the analysis of the ballast is carried out, from which the key equations used for dimming control are derived. Starting performance and dimming consideration are also addressed in the paper. In this dimming ballast, both pulsewidth modulation (PWM) and variable-frequency control strategies are employed. The discussed ballast with the controls can save a controller and a switch driver, reduce size and cost, and possibly increase system reliability over conventional two-stage systems in the applications with moderate power level. Simulated and experimental results of the ballast for an OSRAM T8 32-W lamp are used to verify the discussion.

Wu, T.F.; Yu, T.H. [National Chung Cheng Univ., Chia-Yi (Taiwan, Province of China)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Magnetic fluorescent ballasts: Market data, market imperfections, and policy success  

SciTech Connect

Many economists have strongly questioned engineering-economic studies aimed at demonstrating anomalously slow diffusion of energy-efficient technology and the benefits of regulations to promote such technology. One argument against such studies is that standard techniques of engineering-economics are either inappropriate for or are routinely misapplied in assessing the performance of the market for energy efficiency. This paper presents engineering-economic evidence on the diffusion of energy efficiency improvements that takes account of such critiques. The authors examine the engineering and economic characteristics of standard and energy-efficient magnetic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Efficient magnetic ballasts represented an excellent investment for 99% of the commercial building floor stock, and a moderately good investment for 0.7% of the commercial floor stock. Still, these ballasts were only being adopted in the 1980s at a rate commensurate with the enactment of appliance efficiency standards in various states. In this case, there is solid empirical evidence for skepticism about the effectiveness of the market mechanism in promoting cost-effective energy efficiency improvements as well as evidence of the benefits of regulation to counteract this shortcoming.

Koomey, J.G.; Sanstad, A.H.; Shown, L.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ON-SITE DEMONSTRATION PROCEDURE FOR SOLID-STATE FLUORESCENT BALLAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state ballast supplies electrical power to the lamp at acan transform the input electrical power to the lamp morethe measurement of electrical power, voltage, and current if

Verderber, Rudy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and assessment of market impact (1992 - 1997)  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present national estimates of utility Demand-Side Management (DSM) rebates for electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts during the period of 1992 - 1997. We then compare these trends with developments in the fluorescent ballast market from 1993 - 1998. The analysis indicates that DSM rebates for electronic ballasts peaked in the mid-1990s and declined sharply in 1996 and 1997. In a parallel trend, electronic ballast sales and market share both increased significantly during 1993 - 1994 and increased more slowly in 1996 -1997.

Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

High-intensity-discharger 400-W sodium ballast. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of an energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid-State 400 Watt Ballast lighting system was undertaken. Under Phase I of the project, the existing ballast was modified, performance characteristics were measured, efficiency was compared with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis. Six (6) prototype 400 W High Pressure Sodium Ballasts were built, for verification tests by an independent test facility prior to follow-on performance and life tests. This report covers Phase II of the project which was designed to make test data comparisons on results received from the independent test laboratory, determine methods to increase ballast efficiency, determine the importance of power factors, conduct bulb life tests, perform specification review, performance versus cost analysis, investigate the ballast to determine compliance with new FCC requirement, and determine a line transient specification in respect to solid state ballasting. In addition, Phase II required reliability testing, a manufacturing test plan, a marketing study for solid-state ballast, and the manufacture and delivery of fifteen (15) demonstration ballast units to LBL. These requirements are discussed.

Felper, G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

High intensity discharge 400-watt sodium ballast. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid State 400-Watt Ballast lighting system are reported. Phase I of the project which was designed to modify the existing Datapower ballast to LBL configuration, measure performance characteristics, and compare efficiency with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis is covered. In addition, Datapower was tasked to build six (6) prototype 400-Watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts for verification tests by an independent test facility and follow-on performance and life tests at LBL.

Felper, G.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mobile marine operations structure  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes the process of installing a marine operations structure in a pre-determined sea floor location. The structure has a central core and a support base having at least two differently sloped ice wall surfaces for achieving fracturing of ice features, and having at least two series of circumferentially arranged ballast tanks. It consists of positioning the structure over a selected sea floor location by the use of at least three tug boats connected to the structure by tension cables arranged radially with respect to the structure; flooding a first series of lower ballast tanks in a sequential ballasting operation; flooding a second series of ballast tanks located at a higher elevation within the structure than the first series of ballast tanks; maintaining radial forces along the tension cables during the flooding steps; and after the structure has become founded on the bottom of the sea, pumping sea waver into fluid tanks some of which are located at an elevation above the water level.

Bhalaik, A.; Braddick, P.W.; Brittin, D.S.; Johnson, G.L.

1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: OLED Cathodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OLED Cathodes OLED Cathodes Development of New Cathodes for OLED's Objective The objective of this project is to develop improved cathodes for use in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Approach A major challenge for organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology is to improve electron injection into the organic electroluminescent layer, which limits the efficiency of the device and the luminous flux per unit area. This project aims at overcoming such barriers by developing “structured cathodes” based on functional materials (nanotubes and nanoclusters) with characteristic size smaller than the optical wavelength. The incorporation of such nanostructured cathodes in OLEDs can significantly improve device efficiency by lowering operating voltage, and increase device stability and light extraction.

96

Research on Active Power Factor Correction of the Electronic Ballast for High-Pressure Sodium Lamps Based on L6563  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent years, there has been a growing interest in the design of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballast. Two measures are proposed to improve the power factor of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballasts from the definition of harmonic ... Keywords: high-pressure sodium lamps, electronic ballast, active power factor correction, L6563

Sun Jing

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

First-Year Operation of a New Water Vapor Raman Lidar at the JPL Table Mountain Facility, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new water vapor Raman lidar was recently built at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California and more than a year of routine 2-h-long nighttime measurements 4–5 times per week have been completed. The ...

Thierry Leblanc; I. Stuart McDermid; Robin A. Aspey

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Obstacles and opportunities in the commercialization of the solid-state-electronic fluorescent-lighting ballast  

SciTech Connect

The Solid State Ballast (SSB) Program, aimed at improving the efficiency of fluorescent lights, is described. The first generation of solid state electronic ballasts has been developed and the technology has been transferred to the private sector. This report examines the opportunities for rapid dissemination of this technology into the marketplace. It includes a description of product characteristics and their influence on the commercialization of the SSB, a description of the technology delivery system presently used by the ballast industry, an analysis of the market for SSB, and identification of some high-leverage opportunities to accelerate the commercialization process. (MCW)

Johnson, D.R.; Marcus, A.A.; Campbell, R.S.; Sommers, P.; Skumatz, L.; Berk, B.; Petty, P.; Eschbach, C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

PHASE I FINAL REPORT SUBCONTRACT NO. 2019702 "ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT BALLASTS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilize ballast at 235 volts input AC for 60 seconds withI Sec. (Lamp) E Cathode Ckt Volt: Yel Dum. Load Full. L.O.Factor Same lamps used = Watts/Volt-Amps, Approx. accuracy +

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An accurate model for seaworthy container vessel stowage planning with ballast tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seaworthy container vessel stowage plans generated under realistic assumptions are a key factor for stowage decision support systems in the shipping industry. We propose a linear model with ballast tanks for generating master plans, the first phase of ...

Dario Pacino; Alberto Delgado; Rune Møller Jensen; Tom Bebbington

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Proposed procedure for exemption from the requirement for segregated ballast tanks (SBT), dedicated clean ballast tanks (CBT), or a crude oil washing (COW) system for existing tank vessels  

SciTech Connect

A proposed procedure for exemption from the requirement for segregated ballast tanks (SBT), dedicated clean ballast tanks (CBT), or a crude oil washing (COW) system for existing tank vessels of 40,000 dwt and over, in domestic trade has been issued by the US Coast Guard under the Port and Tanker Safety Act. Exemption would be allowed if shore-based reception facilities are a preferred method of handling dirty ballast and if such facilities are adequate and readily available. Adoption of the proposal would recognize that in certain trades where existing tank vessels have set loading locations, it is as effective to use shore-based reception facilities for the treatment of oil residues as it is to use SBT, CBT, or COW. The proposal requires, among others, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits for the reception facilities, and contains a provision for revocation of exemptions upon noncompliance with regulations. Comments must be received by 7/7/80.

1980-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fault analysis of a semisubmersible's ballast control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a practical ballast system for a twinhull design semisubmersible as an answer to the problems which could result from faults both interior and exterior to the system. The design presented is then examined through a fault analysis technique common to other industries and applicable to the life-sustaining ballast system. This examination confirms the design philosophy that a single fault or reasonable multiple faults should not lead to destabilization of the vessel.

Hock, C.J.; Balaban, E.G.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The effects of fixture type and HVAC integration on fluorescent lamp/ballast performance  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the effects of fixture type and lamp compartment air extract characteristics on lamp/ballast performance. A luminaire/plenum/HVAC simulator was used to measure minimum lamp wall temperature inside four fixture types while varying lamp-compartment extract conditions. Experimental data show that the lumen output of the lamp/ballast system varies by 20% and system efficacy by 10%, depending on the type of fixture and lamp-compartment extract technique employed.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Verderber, R.R.; Clark, T.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

105

Data:54991866-36b9-43eb-8f61-1ee2446254f1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

106

Data:548ab109-bb95-4b9c-82f8-984a1dd171fa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

107

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEIUtilityRateDescription Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

108

Data:1168228a-4e41-4952-8201-ba7ab2f08aff | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

109

Data:0e129a41-6138-400e-be60-7742cbe9ab2b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

110

Data:2aaaf198-bc2b-4f93-b24e-08832c8dabeb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

111

Data:445d426e-8503-4331-82d7-db5b8d07dd8f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MV without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

112

Data:0a6c2e98-8dea-4cae-866f-00ab1c7eebca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

113

Data:65c9cfff-dc25-4b05-9ee9-d5d70bb2e905 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

114

Data:847d6419-dcc8-4499-bc82-52909c8067ca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

115

Data:4383f60e-b140-4087-b642-a716217c9927 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

W MV with Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

116

Data:A36f0169-8028-4fc9-954c-071b63d0811c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

W HPS with Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

117

Data:61e088da-48b3-4281-bdce-f853b04f1158 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

118

Data:8e0f826a-f18e-4268-9546-bbfba87ef44e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

119

Data:889ea768-5e4c-4971-9181-82a9bbad721a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

120

Data:468fda37-fb88-408b-a804-bcdacd6f23aa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

W HPS with Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Data:3e340fd3-e49a-44bd-8c4a-16fa47debe51 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

122

Data:626f5c89-8472-46ef-9820-ed97fcd4b993 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

123

Data:130e1e71-8f88-46ee-a6b3-08b8a8a3baef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

124

Data:9f63edce-619a-4ae5-acbc-06d752f31d2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

125

Data:A97d4360-0ad8-4d10-ad37-23a878a1e3f7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MV without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

126

Data:4eaf1cf2-f582-4075-b384-7cc106820b25 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

127

Data:5e86a75d-90dd-42c6-89a3-7b0bb24b1a10 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

128

Data:D02e240e-0b03-4a55-a0cb-2fb21d990680 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

W HPS with Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

129

Data:3ec3603d-e52f-446b-b5cf-43b6fbc63a62 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

130

Data:4df36a5c-1301-4c53-9017-92328028cfe4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MV without Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

131

Data:221de333-3873-4734-b181-c11216c90a85 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

132

Data:Bf2519c7-759c-4e83-80ef-406e0a5f00d9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHHPS 400 W) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

133

Data:820e509f-d2b1-4345-bf6d-240d05d98b17 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPSMV with Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either Mercury Vapor, Pressure Sodium, or Metal Halide....

134

Data:952570ab-ec99-45bf-8577-d5592104c307 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

135

Data:348ad73a-6234-4eef-bcf9-e533ff0d9c66 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or a local government or any of their agencies. Applicable only to outdoor lighting ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures, either mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS)...

136

Circuit arrangement for starting and operating a gas discharge laser  

SciTech Connect

A circuit arrangement is described for starting and operating a gas discharge laser having a starting phase and an operating phase. It consists of two supply lines for supplying a direct current to the gas discharge laser, a ballast resistor connected in at least one of the supply lines, and circuit means in shunt with the ballast resistor through which a starting current flows during the starting phase of the gas discharge laser.

Bolhuis, P.J.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

Laboratory evaluation of the emulsifying characteristics of pumps. [Bilge and ballast water oily wastes  

SciTech Connect

The program was devoted to a laboratory investigation of the emulsifying characteristics of different pumps suitable for shipboard pumping of bilge and ballast water oily wastes. The tests were designed to investigate the effect of several parameters, such as oil type, input oil concentration, detergent, pump operating characteristics (pressure and flow rate), and salt versus fresh water, on emulsification. Tests were conducted on the Foster-Miller tests loop. No. 2 fuel oil, lubricating oil and No. 6 fuel oil were the oils tested at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10%. The oils were tested with and without the addition of 10% Gamlen D surfactant. The pumps used were a Parker Diaphragm pump, a Blackmer Sliding Vane pump, an Ingersoll Rand Centrifugal pump and a Deming Centrifugal pump. Pump pressure ranged from 10 to 60 psi and flow rate from 10 to 100 gpm. A total of 270 tests were conducted covering 198 different operating points, 108 concerning pump comparison, 54 concerning oil concentration and surfactant, and 45 concerning salt water.

Harvey, A.C.; Guzdar, A.R.; Fiswell, D.R.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Water pollution: EPA controls over ballast water at Trans-Alaska Pipeline Marine Terminal  

SciTech Connect

The Alyeska Pipeline Service Company at Valdez, Alaska, operates a water treatment plant at the terminal to treat ballast water, oily sea water that is carried in tankers to provide stability, before it is discharged into the bay. The Environmental Protection Agency is nearly 4 years late in issuing a new permit to Alyeska which regulates the types and amounts of pollution that can be discharged. Alyeska has been operating under an extension of its old permit whose conditions may be less stringent than the new permit will require. Prior to 1984, EPA monitored Alyeska's permit and identified instances of noncompliance with permit conditions, but its enforcement actions were limited to discussions and correspondence with Alyeska. In contrast, since 1984, EPA has begun taking enforcement actions as well as investigating allegations of other environmental problems. EPA should have acted sooner and until the new permit is issued, questions about the protection of marine life and water quality in Valdez Bay will remain unanswered.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy-efficient H. I. D. solid-state ballast: Phase II final report. [150 watt high pressure sodium lamp  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents the results of Phase II, Development of Solid State 150 watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts. Basically, the objectives of the development program were accomplished, i.e., greater than 90% efficiency, greater than 90% power factor, regulation equivalent to ferro-magnetic ballasts, and energy savings sufficient to warrant the further development of the solid-state HPS ballast for commercial production and marketing. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Vapor Degreasing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Applications of vapor degreasing by vapor-spray-vapor systems...hardware Brass 2270 5000 Buffing compound; rouge Lacquer spray Racked work on continuous monorail Acoustic ceiling tile Steel 2720 6000 Light oil (stamping lubricant) Painting Monorail conveyor Gas meters Terneplate 4540 10,000 Light oil Painting Monorail conveyor Continuous strip, 0.25â??4.1 mm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vapor Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... thermodynamics (that is, vapor liquid equilibrium) as ... of solids and low volatility liquids is extraordinarily ... such situations is the gas saturation method ...

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nature of the effect of the ballast volumes of flash lamps on their emission  

SciTech Connect

The cause of the decrease in laser efficiency during pumping by flash lamps with increased ballast volumes is the unproductive loss of radiation, originating from the ballast volumes, and the associated change in the radiation brightness distribution along the length of the lamp. The increase radiation brightness at the electrodes of the light source is not the result of constriction of the discharge or the luminescence of the electrode plasma erosion, but is due to the slowing down of the plasma flows by the surface of the electrodes and to the slowing down of the ionized gas moving from the ballast volumes when it meets the denser plasma of the discharge zone. The profile of the current lines at the electrodes is established and the frequency of the axial oscillations of the plasma in the lamp is determined.

Basov, Yu.G.; Makarov, V.N.; Narkhova, G.I.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High intensity discharge lamp self-adjusting ballast system sensitive to the radiant energy or heat of the lamp  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a self-adjusting ballast system for mercury vapor, high intensity discharge lamps having outputs of 100 watts or greater, comprising: a direct current source; a lamp circuit containing a high intensity discharge lamp; sensing means for sensing the radiant energy output of the lamp; a pulse width modulator which, in response to the output of the sensing means, varies the width of the pulses that power the lamp during warm-up of the lamp; a high frequency oscillator; a DC to AC converter that converts current from the direct source to pulses of alternating current for powering the lamp, the converter comprising: at least one switch for gating current to the lamp; a switch control means, responsive to the high frequency oscillator, for controlling the switch and controlling the frequency of the alternating current pulses that power the lamp; current sensing means for sensing the current being supplied to the lamp; and current control means for limiting the current through the lamp to a predetermined safe level when the current sensed by the current sensing means exceeds a reference value.

Kuhnel, D.S.; Ottenstein, S.A.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Testing of energy conservation of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Review of recent results and recommendations for design goals  

SciTech Connect

The performance of two 40-watt T-12 fluorescent lamps driven by both standard core-coil, and electronic ballasts has been measured over a range of temperatures and input voltages that simulate conditions they would experience in typical building installations. When using new energy-efficient lamps and electronic ballasts, an efficiency of 90 lumens/watt has been achieved, which represents an efficiency improvement of over 37% relative to standard lamps and core-coil ballasts. From these results, several design targets are suggested for ballast developers. Additional features of the electronic ballasts, (low noise, no flicker, and light level control), have potential to increase the use of efficient light sources (gas discharge types) as well as permit less costly luminaire construction. The dimming feature should also conserve energy whenever applied.

Verderber, R.R.; Cooper, D.; Ross, D.K.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of ballast life-cycle cost and payback period  

SciTech Connect

The paper introduces an innovative methodology for evaluating the relative significance of energy-efficient technologies applied to fluorescent lamp ballasts. The method involves replacing the point estimates of life cycle cost of the ballasts with uncertainty distributions reflecting the whole spectrum of possible costs, and the assessed probability associated with each value. The results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses will help analysts reduce effort in data collection and carry on analysis more efficiently. These methods also enable policy makers to gain an insightful understanding of which efficient technology alternatives benefit or cost what fraction of consumers, given the explicit assumptions of the analysis.

McMahon, James E.; Liu, Xiaomin; Turiel, Ike; Hakim, Sajid; Fisher, Diane

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Operating Instructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The system operation is center around 3 areas of the equipment 1) Deposition chamber 2) Vaporizer 3) Chiller/cold finger ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy Performance and Emissions of Electronic Ballasts Powering 4-Foot Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents tests performed at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in contract with the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC) to determine the average efficacy (lumens per watt), displacement power factor, total power factor, and current harmonic distortion of modern electronic ballasts powering fluorescent lamps.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Atomic-absorption analysis in a graphite furnace fitted with a metal ballast collector  

SciTech Connect

One reason for the deterioration in sensitivity in the electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy of petroleum products is the uncontrolled spread and diffusion of the liquid throughout the furnace. This paper describes a metal ballast collector whose wettability and sorptive properties contain the sample and allow for its uniform and controlled evaporation and atomization.

Katskov, D.A.; Vasil' eva, L.A.; Grinshtein, I.L.; Savel' eva, G.O.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A dimmable (1000:1 range) fluorescent ballast for instrument panel lighting  

SciTech Connect

A 1000:1 wide range continuously dimmable ballast is designed for fluorescent lighting of aircraft instrument panels. High voltage, low energy, 800 Hz starting pulses reliably start the lamps at all light level settings. The starting pulses alone produce the illumination at the minimum light control setting.

Lauritzen, P.O.; Jorgensen, J.A.; Meyer, S.D.; Osborn, J.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Stratified vapor generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, Vahab (Golden, CO)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

INTERCOMPARISON OF WATER VAPOR CALIBRATION CONSTANTS DERIVED FROM IN-SITU AND DISTANT SOUNDINGS FOR A RAMAN-LIDAR OPERATING IN THE AMAZON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERCOMPARISON OF WATER VAPOR CALIBRATION CONSTANTS DERIVED FROM IN-SITU AND DISTANT SOUNDINGS such measurements on tropical regions. Indeed, there were important field campaigns in the Amazon that explored some

Barbosa, Henrique

152

Water Vapor Fields Deduced from METEOSAT-1 Water Vapor Channel Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-operational process for the determination of water vapor fields from METEPSAT-1 water vapor channel data is described. Each count of the WV picture is replaced by the corresponding mean relative humidity value using both the calibration ...

M. M. Poc; M. Roulleau

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

111111111111111111111 OpenEIUtilityRateDescription Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

154

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable only to outdoor lighting by bal ... Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

155

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEIUtilityRateBasicInformationComments Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures, either high pressure sodium (HPS) or metal halide (MH),...

156

Data:Ad01c9a3-4c67-42d5-82c2-64f1a4bbe60c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS 100w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

157

Data:05596484-9033-48bc-bb94-d54ded624907 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS 400w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

158

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to consumers for dusk to dawn outdoor lighting by means of photoelectric controlled ballast operated mercury, sodium, or other vapor type luminaries, and where applicable, poles...

159

Data:A7cdaff8-e308-4a6b-90ac-720914114d3e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MH 400w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

160

Data:81081762-3842-4bb7-9158-759d2c2b4c6f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MH 175w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APPLICABILITY Applicable only to outdoor lighting by means of photoelectric controlled ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications and...

162

Data:2133e8ac-5d0e-4182-8646-085b999228f5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MH 250w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

163

Data:35e70786-134f-4c6a-8b9a-44f514d7682f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LS (250 W HPS-Dir) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

164

Data:4b7a924c-0946-49cc-b6f6-c59af19db4d4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Pressure Sodium Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures attached to poles conforming to the City's...

165

Data:3e0ea544-5e14-45e7-807e-eb8c14ca262d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to consumers for dusk to dawn outdoor lighting by means of photoelectric controlled ballast operated mercury, sodium, or other vapor type luminaries, and where applicable, poles...

166

Data:16306243-470d-45c7-9a2d-9644a4f91c72 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS 1000w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

167

Data:Dec830b0-ab8d-463e-b5de-2f0f2d096fbc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LS (100 W HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

168

Data:0f93ff69-0b94-480c-9545-917cb9544ef0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to consumers for dusk to dawn outdoor lighting by means of photoelectric controlled ballast operated mercury, sodium, or other vapor type luminaries, and where applicable, poles...

169

Data:D6bbc514-9a53-4164-8390-3bb6bb13e7bf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LS (250 W HPS-CH) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

170

Data:D7f0a1b2-0ae3-4077-8b0d-bb3e773bfcdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LS (175 W MHMV) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to outdoor lighting by ballast-operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

171

Data:87b747db-a60a-468b-9521-eb9546bc74ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS 150w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

172

Data:3ef4b959-7885-4af5-af75-087da93bb5ac | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to consumers for dusk to dawn outdoor lighting by means of photoelectric controlled ballast operated mercury, sodium, or other vapor type luminaries, and where applicable, poles...

173

Data:D887d73e-2188-4935-b127-cdc12e538882 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MH 1000w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

174

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier Robert C. Brown, Glenn Norton, Andy Suby, Jerod Smeenk, Keith Cummer, and Josh Nunez  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier Robert C. Brown, Glenn Norton, Andy fuel cells. We have developed a thermally ballasted gasifier that uses a single reactor for both compared to conventional gasifiers. The carbon monoxide, along with steam used to fluidize the reactor, can

175

Exploration of illumination concepts for underground coal mines. Appendix E. Electronic ballast for the Lucalox high pressure sodium lamp. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the results of an investigation to develop solid-state ballasts for Lucalox high-pressure sodium lamps. The ballasts were to be used in the modified and new portable and machine-mounted lighting systems designed by the Crouse-Hinds Co., per tasks I through IV of Contract No. H022065.

1976-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

A nozzle array and ballast resistance for producing a glow discharge in a gas flow  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a design for a nozzle-anode array equipped with a system of cathodes fitted at the axis of each nozzle together with liquid ballast resistors. The system is designed to produce a glow discharge in a supersonic gas flow. The circuit resistance is adjusted via the contact area between the electrode and the liquid. The nominal values of the resistances can be varied over the range 10/sup 1/-10/sup 4/..cap omega.., or set values can be produced with an accuracy of + or - 2%.

Alferov, V.I.; Bushmin, A.S.; Dmitriev, L.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

Ball, D.G.; Miller, J.L.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Means and method for vapor generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of a gravity type oil separator for tanker operations  

SciTech Connect

The need to control the oil content in ballast and tank-cleaning discharges to meet increasingly stringent seawater pollution standards has led to the development of a gravity-type separator capable of handling up to 300 tons/hr of oily ballast water. When properly handled, these separators enable the tanker operator to clean tanks and process oily ballast with an oil content of up to 100% without fear of contamination of the seas. This continuous and automatic operation is unaffected by normal movements. The recovered oil is available for burning as fuel aboard ship, load-on-top or disposal ashore. Separators of this type have been in use on three 70,000 dwt ships, for periods of 1 to 3 yr. On typical voyages, a ship of this size can recover enough slop oil to provide one day or more of bunkers, if the ship is equipped to burn the recovered oil. The ship's crew is trained to carry out analysis of the oil to determine if the oil can be burned onboard immediately following separation or must be treated to drop out salt and/or water prior to burning. Several typical ballast voyages using the separator are discussed. The overboard discharge of water from the separator is analyzed to assure compliance with current pollution regulations.

Lockwood, W.H.; Norris, R.O.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mercury Vapor Pressure Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparent difference between the historical mercury vapor concentration equations used by the mercury atmospheric measurement community ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

High frequency transformerless electronics ballast using double inductor-capacitor resonant power conversion for gas discharge lamps  

SciTech Connect

A novel high frequency LCLC double resonant electronic ballast has been developed for gas discharge lamp applications. The ballast consists of a half-bridge inverter which switches at zero voltage crossing and an LCLC resonant circuit which converts a low ac voltage to a high ac voltage. The LCLC resonant circuit has two LC stages. The first LC stage produces a high voltage before the lamp is ignited. The second LC stage limits lamp current with the circuit inductance after the lamp is ignited. In another embodiment a filament power supply is provided for soft start up and for dimming the lamp. The filament power supply is a secondary of the second resonant inductor. 27 figs.

Lai, J.S.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

LNG fire and vapor control system technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Vapor spill monitoring method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA); McRae, Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Vapor phase heat transport systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor phase heat-transport systems are being tested in two of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The systems consist of an active fin-and-tube solar collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by a pump or by a self-pumping scheme. In one of the test cells the liquid was self-pumped to the roof-mounted collector 17 ft above the condenser. A mechanical valve was designed and tested that showed that the system could operate in a completely passive mode. Performance comparisons have been made with a passive water wall test cell.

Hedstrom, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 1996.09.10 - 1996.09.30 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Summary SCHEDULE This IOP will be conducted from September 10 - 30, 1996 (coincident with the Fall ARM-UAV IOP). Instruments that do not require supervision will be operated continuously during this period. Instruments that do require supervision are presently planned to be operated for 8-hour periods each day. Because it is necessary to cover as broad a range of environmental conditions as possible, the daily 8-hour period will be shifted across the diurnal cycle as deemed appropriate during the IOP (but will be maintained as a contiguous 8-hour block).

189

An analytical study and systematic monitoring procedure developed for the load-out operation of the North Rankin Jacket 'A'  

SciTech Connect

The loadout of the 22,000 tonnes North Rankin Jacket 'A' onto a floating barge was successfully accomplished in April, 1982. During the loadout the barge ballast was continually adjusted to compensate for both jacket weight transfer onto the barge and full tide variation. The preparation for the loadout and the operation itself was characterized by newly developed integrated techniques. The techniques included: the development of a barge, jacket and quayside three-dimensional computer model to check the validity of conventional and simple ballast system software. The model was also used to evaluate the control parameters of the operation in a series of analyses which determine the sensitivity of critical steps of the operation to human or equipment errors: the development and operation of an integrated control system for jacket load transfer that relates jacket position to barge level and ballast pump requirements; the development and operation of a tide-expectation computer programme and associated ballast pump time scheduling software to compensate for differences between actual water level and that determined from standard tide tables, and to minimize the effect of short-term, local tide variations that are not forecast; and the incorporation of fail-safe concepts and measures into the operation.

Ferguson, N.; Inokoshi, O.; Kitani, T.; Masuda, S.; Zarate, H.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor IOP Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Summary The Water Vapor IOP was conducted as a follow-up to a predecessor IOP on water vapor held in September 1996. This IOP relied heavily on both ground-based guest and CART instrumentation and in-situ aircraft and tethered sonde/kite measurements. Primary operational hours were from 6 p.m. Central until at least midnight, with aircraft support normally from about 9 p.m. until midnight when available. However, many daytime measurements were made to support this IOP. The first Water Vapor IOP primarily concentrated on the atmosphere's lowest

191

The Arm Program's Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of water vapor intensive observation periods (WVIOPs) were conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma between 1996 and 2000. The goals of these WVIOPs are to characterize the accuracy of the operational ...

H. E. Revercomb; D. D. Turner; D. C. Tobin; R. O. Knuteson; W. F. Feltz; J. Barnard; J. Bösenberg; S. Clough; D. Cook; R. Ferrare; J. Goldsmith; S. Gutman; R. Halthore; B. Lesht; J. Liljegren; H. Linné; J. Michalsky; V. Morris; W. Porch; S. Richardson; B. Schmid; M. Splitt; T. Van Hove; E. Westwater; D. Whiteman

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process for environmentally safe disposal of used fluorescent lamp potted ballast assemblies with component part reclamation and/or recycling  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for the environmentally safe and economical disposal of used fluorescent lamp potted ballast housing assemblies comprising removing from the housing the potted assembly with its embedded electrical component assemblies including a component capacitor containing environmentally hazardous material PCB's; after or before such removing, immersing the potted assembly in a cryogenic bath and freezing the same to reader the potting sufficiently brittle to fragment into small pieces upon being impacted; impacting the potting thoroughly to crush and fragment the same into small pieces and to cleanly remove substantially all traces of the potting from all the electrical components and parts embedded therein and without imparting damage to the components and parts; disconnecting the component containing the environmentally hazardous material; and incinerating only the component containing the environmentally hazardous material, leaving all other components and parts including the housing and potting fragments for salvage, re-use and/or recycling.

Nardella, A.; Norian, B.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Electrolyte vapor condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

1983-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electrolyte vapor condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

Sederquist, Richard A. (Newington, CT); Szydlowski, Donald F. (East Hartford, CT); Sawyer, Richard D. (Canton, CT)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Definition: Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Mercury Vapor Mercury is discharged as a highly volatile vapor during hydrothermal activity and high concentrations in...

197

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Stacked vapor fed amtec modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

Sievers, Robert K. (North Huntingdon, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor Mercury Vapor Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Mercury Vapor Details Activities (23) Areas (23) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Anomalously high concentrations can indicate high permeability or conduit for fluid flow Hydrological: Field wide soil sampling can generate a geometrical approximation of fluid circulation Thermal: High concentration in soils can be indicative of active hydrothermal activity Dictionary.png Mercury Vapor: Mercury is discharged as a highly volatile vapor during hydrothermal

200

Fuel vapor canister  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses an improved fuel vapor storage canister for use in a vehicle emission system of the type utilizing an enclosure with an interior communicated with a source of fuel vapor. The improved canister comprises: the enclosure having a mixture including particles of activated charcoal and many pieces of foam rubber, the pieces of foam rubber in the mixture being randomly and substantially evenly dispersed whereby substantially all the charcoal particles are spaced relatively closely to at least one foam rubber piece; the mixture being packed into the enclosure under pressure so that the pieces of foam rubber are compressed enough to tightly secure the charcoal particles one against another to prevent a griding action therebetween.

Moskaitis, R.J.; Ciuffetelli, L.A.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.

Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advanced Chemical Heat Pumps Using Liquid-Vapor Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical heat pumps utilizing liquid-vapor reactions can be configured in forms analogous to electric drive vapor-compression heat pumps and heat activated absorption heat pumps. Basic thermodynamic considerations eliminate some heat pumps and place restrictive working fluid requirements on others, but two thermodynamically feasible systems have significant potential advantage over conventional technology. An electric drive reactive heat pump can use smaller heat exchangers and compressor than a vapor-compression machine, and have more flexible operating characteristics. A waste heat driven heat pump (temperature amplifier) using liquid-vapor chemical reactions- can operate with higher coefficient of performance and smaller heat exchangers than an absorption temperature amplifying heat pump. Higher temperatures and larger temperature lifts should also be possible.

Kirol, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ON-SITE DEMONSTRATION PROCEDURE FOR SOLID-STATE FLUORESCENT BALLAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the correct voltage range. 240-volt models usually worksatisfactorily on 277 volts. Check the manufacturer•to see if a given 240-volt model can operate on 277 volts.

Verderber, Rudy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Impact of Kalpana-1-Derived Water Vapor Winds on Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclone Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor winds from the operational geostationary Indian National Satellite (INSAT) Kalpana-1 have recently become operational at the Space Applications Centre (SAC). A series of experimental forecasts are attempted here to evaluate the ...

S. K. Deb; C. M. Kishtawal; P. K. Pal

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Industrial Heat Pumps Using Solid/Vapor Working Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial heat pumps have the potential to reduce the operating costs of chemical and heat treating processes in the chemical, petroleum, paper, dairy, and many other industries. The cost development of fossil fuel and other prime energy require excellent efficiency/cost ratios and hardware designs adaptable to specific process needs, in order to compete with vapor re-compression recovery systems. The state-of-the-art heat pump equipment employing liquid/vapor working fluids fulfills the requirements only in some applications. The employment of solid/vapor complex compounds leads to more cost effective heat recovery, which is due to simple hardware with no moving parts, extraordinary low maintenance effort, excellent temperature lifts avoiding the need of two-stage systems, and low first cost. This paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of solid/vapor working media.

Rockenfeller, U.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, and D. D. Turner University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction An overview of the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) is given. This field experiment was conducted during November-December 2000 near the central ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma, and was sponsored jointly by the ARM, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE), and the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) programs. Its primary goal was to collect accurate measurements of upper-level (~8 to 12 km) water vapor near the ground-based ARM site. These data are being used to determine the accuracy of measurements that are

212

First year's operation experience of the deepest SPM (Single Point Mooring) in the world  

SciTech Connect

The British National Oil Corp. had a Single Anchor Leg Mooring (SALM) installed at the Thistle Field in Apr. 1977 for export loading of tankers pending completion of the Brent System 36 in. pipeline to Sullom-Voe, which became operational in Dec. 1978; the SALM will continue to be maintained in good condition as a standby alternative export outlet. Modification of the original three 80,000 dwt tankers during 1977 provided the original design capacity of an 80,000 dwt tanker, but with added clean ballast capacity to eliminate tank cleaning and treatment of dirty ballast water. A fully integrated tanker/SALM/platform instrumentation system monitors mooring loads, buoy and riser angles, and tanker status; the latter being radio telemetered to the nearby block platform. Operation of the system and necessary modifications are described.

Millar, J.L.; Hughes, H.; Dyer, R.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH&Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations.

MOORE, T.L.

2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

214

Ethanol production by vapor compression distillation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a one gallon per hour vapor compression distillation unit for fuel ethanol production that can be profitably manufactured and economically operated by individual family units. Vapor compression distillation is already an industrially accepted process and this project's goal is to demonstrate that it can be done economically on a small scale. Theoretically, the process is independent of absolute pressure. It is only necessary that the condenser be at higher pressure than the evaporator. By reducing the entire process to a pressure of approximately 0.1 atmosphere, the evaporation and condensation can occur at near ambient temperature. Even though this approach requires a vacuum pump, and thus will not represent the final cost effective design, it does not require preheaters, high temperature materials, or as much insulation as if it were to operate a near ambient pressure. Therefore, the operation of the ambient temperature unit constitutes the first phase of this project. Presently, the ambient temperature unit is fully assembled and has begun testing. So far it has successfully separated ethanol from a nine to one diluted input solution. However the production rate has been very low.

Ellis, G.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Vapor adsorption process  

SciTech Connect

The removal of undesirable acid components from sour natural gas is often accomplished by a vapor adsorption process wherein a bed of solid adsorbent material is contacted with an inlet gas stream so that desired components contained in the gas stream are adsorbed on the bed, then regenerated by contact with a heated regeneration gas stream. Adsorbed components are desorbed from the bed and the bed is cooled preparatory to again being contacted with the inlet gas stream. By this process, the bed is contacted, during the regeneration cycle, with a selected adsorbable material. This material has the property of being displaced from the bed by the desired components and has a heat of desorption equal to or greater than the heat of adsorption of the desired components. When the bed is contacted with the inlet gas stream, the selected adsorbable material is displaced by the desired components resulting in the temperature of the bed remaining relatively constant, thereby allowing the utilization of the maximum bed adsorption capacity. (4 claims)

Snyder, C.F.; Casad, B.M.

1973-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Atmospheric Water Vapor over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese radiosonde data from 1970 to 1990 are relatively homogeneous in time and are used to examine the climatology, trends, and variability of China’s atmospheric water vapor content. The climatological distribution of precipitable water (PW) ...

Panmao Zhai; Robert E. Eskridge

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Vapor deposition of hardened niobium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vapor-Liquid Partitioning of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing operating cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This study focused on the partitioning of sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate between the liquid and vapor phases.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

None

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Modified Tracer Selection and Tracking Procedure to Derive Winds Using Water Vapor Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remotely sensed upper-tropospheric water vapor wind information has been of increasing interest for operational meteorology. A new tracer selection based on a local image anomaly and tracking procedure, itself based on Nash–Sutcliffe model ...

S. K. Deb; C. M. Kishtawal; P. K. Pal; P. C. Joshi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Global Observations of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Derived from TOVS Radiance Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a physically based method for the retrieval of upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) and upper-tropospheric column water vapor (UTCWV) based an the use of radiance data collected by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Darren L. Jackson; Ian Wittmeyer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A Satellite-Based Assessment of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consistency of upper-tropospheric water vapor measurements from a variety of state-of-the-art instruments was assessed using collocated Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-8 (GOES-8) 6.7-?m brightness temperatures as a common ...

Eui-Seok Chung; Brian J. Soden

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Low-Level Water Vapor Fields from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) “Split Window” Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple physical algorithm is developed which calculates the water vapor content of the lower troposphere from the 11 and 12 ?m (split window) channels on the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental ...

Dennis Chesters; Louis W. Uccellini; Wayne D. Robinson

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Development of a Scanning Raman Water Vapor Lidar for Boundary Layer and Tropospheric Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning, ultraviolet, Raman water vapor lidar designed primarily for boundary layer measurements has been built and operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Ground-Based Earth Observing Network team. The system provides high temporal and ...

W. E. Eichinger; D. I. Cooper; P. R. Forman; J. Griegos; M. A. Osborn; D. Richter; L. L. Tellier; R. Thornton

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Water Vapor Profiling Using a Widely Tunable, Amplified Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for automated profiling of water vapor in the lower troposphere has been designed, tested, and is in routine operation at Montana State University. The laser transmitter for the DIAL instrument ...

Amin R. Nehrir; Kevin S. Repasky; John L. Carlsten; Michael D. Obland; Joseph A. Shaw

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Engineering Task Plan for Preparing the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Samplers (ISVS) for Use  

SciTech Connect

The DOE has identified a need to sample vapor space and exhaust ducts of several waste tanks The In-Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) Type IV vapor sampling cart has been identified as the appropriate monitoring tool. The ISVS carts have been out of service for a number of years. This ETP outlines the work to be performed to ready the type IV gas sampler for operation Characterization Engineering will evaluate the Type IV gas sampler carts to determine their state of readiness and will proceed to update procedures and equipment documentation to make the sampler operationally acceptable.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Image Storage in Hot Vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

Zhao, L; Xiao, Y; Yelin, S F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Image Storage in Hot Vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

L. Zhao; T. Wang; Y. Xiao; S. F. Yelin

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

Distribution of Tropical Tropospheric Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilizing a conceptual model for tropical convection and observational data for water vapor, the maintenance of the vertical distribution of the tropical tropospheric water vapor is discussed. While deep convection induces large-scale subsidence ...

De-Zheng Sun; Richard S. Lindzen

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Atmospheric Water Vapor Characteristics at 70°N  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an extensive rawinsonde archive, characteristics of Arctic water vapor and its transports at 70°N are examined for the period 1974–1991. Monthly-mean profiles and vertically integrated values of specific humidity and meridional vapor fluxes ...

Mark C. Serreze; Roger G. Barry; John E. Walsh

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Vapor Pressure Measurement of Supercooled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new dewpoint hygrometer was developed for subfreezing temperature application. Vapor pressure of supercooled water was determined by measuring temperatures at the dew-forming surface and the vapor source ice under the flux density balance, and ...

N. Fukuta; C. M. Gramada

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

LOW PRESSURE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF POLYSILICON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THEORY The mass transport processes in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) are similar to those occuring in catalytic reactors

Gieske, R.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Vapor Pressures and Heats of Vaporization of Primary Coal Tars  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

/ PC92544-18 / PC92544-18 VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS FINAL REPORT Grant Dates: August, 1992 - November, 1996 Principal Authors: Eric M. Suuberg (PI) and Vahur Oja Report Submitted: April, 1997 Revised: July, 1997 Grant Number: DE-FG22-92PC92544 Report Submitted by: ERIC M. SUUBERG DIVISION OF ENGINEERING BROWN UNIVERSITY PROVIDENCE, RI 02912 TEL. (401) 863-1420 Prepared For: U. S. DEPT. OF ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PA 15236 DR. KAMALENDU DAS, FETC, MORGANTOWN , WV TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER "US/DOE Patent Clearance is not required prior to the publication of this document" ii United States Government Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

238

Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Davis, W. Jr. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA)); Cochran, H.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler (ISVS) system. This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This ABU documents items for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Analysis of crude oil vapor pressures at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crude oil storage caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are solution-mined from subsurface salt domes along the U.S. Gulf Coast. While these salt domes exhibit many attractive characteristics for large-volume, long-term storage of oil such as low cost for construction, low permeability for effective fluids containment, and secure location deep underground, they also present unique technical challenges for maintaining oil quality within delivery standards. The vapor pressures of the crude oils stored at SPR tend to increase with storage time due to the combined effects of geothermal heating and gas intrusion from the surrounding salt. This presents a problem for oil delivery offsite because high vapor-pressure oil may lead to excessive atmospheric emissions of hydrocarbon gases that present explosion hazards, health hazards, and handling problems at atmospheric pressure. Recognizing this potential hazard, the U.S. Department of Energy, owner and operator of the SPR, implemented a crude oil vapor pressure monitoring program that collects vapor pressure data for all the storage caverns. From these data, DOE evaluates the rate of change in vapor pressures of its oils in the SPR. Moreover, DOE implemented a vapor pressure mitigation program in which the oils are degassed periodically and will be cooled immediately prior to delivery in order to reduce the vapor pressure to safe handling levels. The work described in this report evaluates the entire database since its origin in 1993, and determines the current levels of vapor pressure around the SPR, as well as the rate of change for purposes of optimizing both the mitigation program and meeting safe delivery standards. Generally, the rate of vapor pressure increase appears to be lower in this analysis than reported in the past and, problematic gas intrusion seems to be limited to just a few caverns. This being said, much of the current SPR inventory exceeds vapor pressure delivery guidelines and must be degassed and cooled in order to meet current delivery standards.

Rudeen, David Keith (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Verification of NWP Model Analyses and Radiosonde Humidity Data with GPS Precipitable Water Vapor Estimates during AMMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the performance of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts-Integrated Forecast System (ECMWF-IFS) operational analysis and NCEP–NCAR reanalyses I and II over West Africa, using precipitable water vapor (PWV) ...

O. Bock; M. Nuret

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Surface soil-mercury surveys are an inexpensive and useful exploration tool for geothermal resources. ---- Surface geochemical surveys for mercury were conducted in 16 areas in 1979-1981 by ARCO Oil and Gas Company as part of its geothermal evaluation program. Three techniques used together have proved satisfactory in evaluating surface mercury data. These are contouring, histograms and cumulative frequency plots of the data. Contouring geochemical data and constructing histograms are standard

246

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, B.K.

1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Thermoplastic Composite with Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) is a new class of highly graphitic carbon nanofiber and offers advantages of economy and simpler processing over continuous-fiber composites.… (more)

Lee, Jaewoo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO) In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor...

249

METHOD OF OPERATING A CALUTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating an electromagnetic isotope separator of the calutron class is reported whereby uranium tetrachloride is produced at a controlled rate within the source rather than betng introduced therein as was formerly practiced. This is accomplished by placing a uranium-bearing material, such as uranium metal, uranium trichloride, or uranium carbide in the charge receptacle of the calutron, heating this material to about to produce uranium tetrachloride vapor at a rate controlled by the chlorine gas flow into the source. The vapor is subsequently ionized by an electric arc and mass separated by conventional calutron methods.

Davidson, P.H.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A New Global Water Vapor Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive and accurate global water vapor dataset is critical to the adequate understanding of water vapor's role in the earth's climate system. To begin to satisfy this need, the authors have produced a blended dataset made up of global, 5-...

David L. Randel; Thomas J. Greenwald; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Graeme L. Stephens; Mark A. Ringerud; Cynthia L. Combs

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

� � Glossary of Common Terms � Appendix A Glossary of Common Terms Absorption chiller - A refrigeration machine using heat as the power input to generate chilled water. Adjustable speed drive - A means of changing the speed of a motor in a step-less manner. In the case of an AC motor, this is accomplished by varying the frequency. Aerator - A device installed in a faucet or showerhead that adds air to the water flow, thereby maintaining an effective water spray while reducing overall water consumption. Air changes - Replacement of the total volume of air in a room over a period of time (e.g., 6 air changes per hour). Ambient temperature - The temperature of the air surrounding an object. Ballast - A device used to supply the proper voltage and limit the current to operate one or more

255

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 2000.09.18 - 2000.10.08 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb Data Availability Yes For data sets, see below. Description Scientific hypothesis: 1. Microwave radiometer (MWR) observations of the 22 GHz water vapor line can accurately constrain the total column amount of water vapor (assuming a calibration accuracy of 0.5 degC or better, which translates into 0.35 mm PWV). 2. Continuous profiling by Raman lidar provides a stable reference for handling sampling problems and observes a fixed column directly above the site only requiring a single height- independent calibration factor. 3. Agreement between the salt-bath calibrated in-situ probes, chilled

257

Analysis, design and optimization of the LCC resonant inverter as a high-intensity discharge lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

A complete study of the clamped-mode (CM) series-parallel (LCC) resonant inverter together with some of the control-to-output characteristics are presented in this paper. Also, a new control method for the CM LCC resonant inverter is introduced. With this method, the inverter is forced to operate with optimum commutations and without handling reactive energy, thus minimizing both switching and conduction losses. The corresponding design procedure is illustrated with a design example. Finally, some experimental results obtained from a prototype at the laboratory are also shown to validate the analysis and evaluate the proposed control method.

Alonso, J.M.; Blanco, C.; Lopez, E.; Calleja, A.J.; Rico, M. [Univ. de Oviedo, Gijon (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Electrica y Electronica

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Applications of Mechanical Vapor Recompression to Evaporation and Crystallization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past 10-15 years, mechanical vapor recompression (MVR) has become the preferred system in many industrial evaporation and crystallization applications, because of its economy and simplicity of operation. In most instances, the need for steam to provide heat for the evaporation and cooling water for condensing the overhead vapors is virtually eliminated; and, at the same time, a wide range of turndown is available. An MVR is generally found to be the most economical choice when there is no boiler plant available or when electrical power is priced competitively in comparison to steam. Vapor recompression is accomplished using centrifugal, axial-flow, or positive displacement compressors and these compressors can be powered by electricity, steam turbine or a gas turbine. The use of an MVR Evaporator/Crystallizer provides a comparatively low cost means of expanding the production capability of an existing evaporation plant either by adding a "stand alone" unit or by reconfiguring a multiple-effect system into several single-effect MVR's.

Outland, J. S.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area (Kooten, 1987) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area (Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area...

262

Abstract: Apparatus for Measuring Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurements of the vapor pressures and saturated liquid densities of ethanol and the vapor pressure of an ethanol water mixture (ethanol=0.6743 ...

263

Mercury Vapor At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not...

264

Energy Saving in Distillation Using Structured Packing and Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Distillation is a big consumer of energy in process plant operations. A first step to energy cost savings is the use of high efficiency structured packing in place of trays or dumped packings in conventionally operated distillation columns. Larger savings, as much as 80%, may be obtained by using a direct vapor recompression (VRC) heat pump instead of the conventional column operation with a steam heated reboiler. A main criterion of the suitability of a distillation for VRC is a low temperature difference across the column. VRC uses hot compressed overhead vapors, instead of steam, to heat the reboiler. Cost savings are highest when the pressure ratio for the compressor is low. The pressure ratio depends on the boiling point difference of top and bottom products, the reboiler-condenser driving force temperature and the column pressure drop. Structured packing has a low pressure drop; thus increasing the savings obtained with VRC - for retrofits or new columns - and increasing the range of applications where VRC is suitable for distillations. For low pressure distillation application, a column with a small pressure drop is especially important. An example of a vacuum distillation which is made suitable for VRC with use of structured packing is separation of styrene and ethyl benzene. "

Hill, J.H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Release of LNG vapor from large-volume, low-pressure LNG storage. Letter report, September 30, 1981-September 30, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involves development of practical release prevention measures by developing design and operating procedures beyond current practice. The objective of the program is to obtain the quantitative field data necessary to model the physics of the tank vapor space pressure response to boil-off compressor operation and atmospheric pressure changes. This work will lead to the development of guides to LNG storage tank operation and equipment specification that will limit the possibility of vapor venting or rollover of the stored LNG.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Passive space heating with a self-pumping vapor system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this system, which should be useful for space or water heating, a refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed within thermal storage located in the building below the collector. The vapor pressure generated in the collector periodically forces the condensed liquid upward to the location of the collector. This paper reports results of an operational test, in which this system provided passive space heating for an outdoor test cell during a winter season. The daily average energy yield and the elevation of collector temperature caused by self-pumping are reported, as well as observations on failure modes, system reliability, and suggestions for a practical configuration.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Water vapor retrieval over many surface types  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a study of of the water vapor retrieval for many natural surface types which would be valuable for multi-spectral instruments using the existing Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) for the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature. An atmospheric code (6S) and 562 spectra were used to compute the top of the atmosphere radiance near the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature in steps of 2.5 nm as a function of precipitable water (PW). We derive a novel technique called ``Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption`` (APDA) and show that APDA performs better than the CIBR over many surface types.

Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.C.; Johnson, J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Modeling engine oil vaporization and transport of the oil vapor in the piston ring pack on internal combustion engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption… (more)

Cho, Yeunwoo, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

JGI - Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations The Operations Department sees to it that JGI has the best possible facilities and support, ensuring that its operations are conducted in accordance with the...

270

Power Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations Power Operations Western's Sierra Nevada Region...

271

Analysis of binary vapor turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect the binary mixture has on the turbine is examined in terms of design and cost. Several flow theories for turbines and turbine blading are reviewed. The similarity method, which uses dimensionless parameters, is used in determining rotative speeds and diameters for a variety of inlet temperatures and exit pressures. It is shown that the ratio of exit to inlet specific volume for each component in the mixture is the same for each specie. The specific volume ratio constraints are combined with the temperature equalities, the condenser pressure, and the total inlet entropy to form the constraints necessary to determine the exit state uniquely in an isentropic expansion. The non-isentropic exit state is found in a similar manner. The expansion process is examined for several cases and compared with the expansion of a single component vapor. Finally, in order to maintain high efficiency and to meet the criteria which makes the similarity method valid at high inlet temperatures, turbine multistaging is examined and a sample case is given for a two stage turbine.

Bliss, R.W.; Boehm, R.F.; Jacobs, H.R.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

Dietz, Russell N. (Shoreham, NY); Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators  

SciTech Connect

A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

1981-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration Title Aerogel composites using chemical vapor infiltration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1995 Authors Hunt, Arlon J., Michael R. Ayers, and Wanqing Cao Journal Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids Volume 185 Pagination 227-232 Abstract A new method to produce novel composite materials based on the use of aerogels as a starting material is described. Using chemical vapor infiltration, a variety of solid materials were thermally deposited into the open pore structure of aerogel. The resulting materials possess new and unusual properties including photoluminescence, magnetism and altered optical properties. An important characteristic of this preparation process is the very small size of the deposits that gives rise to new behaviors. Silicon deposits exhibit photoluminescence, indicating quantum confinement. Two or more phases may be deposited simultaneously and one or both chemically or thermally reacted to produce new structures.

275

Chemical vapor depositing of metal fluorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Purity BeF2 and BeF2–AlF3glasses have been deposited by the chemical vapor deposition technique using beryllium and aluminum 1

A. Sarhangi; J. M. Power

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is large and growing interest in making a wide variety of materials and surfaces antimicrobial. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers ...

Martin, Tyler Philip, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

Olsson, Ylva Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Tropospheric Water Vapor and Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates are made of the effect of changes in tropospheric water vapor on the climate sensitivity to doubled carbon dioxide (CO2), using a coarse resolution atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The ...

Edwin K. Schneider; Ben P. Kirtman; Richard S. Lindzen

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Chemical vapor infiltration using microwave energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for producing reinforced ceramic composite articles by means of chemical vapor infiltration and deposition in which an inverted temperature gradient is utilized. Microwave energy is the source of heat for the process.

Devlin, D.J.; Currier, R.P.; Laia, J.R.; Barbero, R.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

Torres, D. J. (David J.); O'Rourke, P. J. (Peter J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Urania vapor composition at very high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Due to the chemically unstable nature of uranium dioxide its vapor composition at very high temperatures is, presently, not sufficiently studied though more experimental knowledge is needed for risk assessment of nuclear reactors. We used laser vaporization coupled to mass spectrometry of the produced vapor to study urania vapor composition at temperatures in the vicinity of its melting point and higher. The very good agreement between measured melting and freezing temperatures and between partial pressures measured on the temperature increase and decrease indicated that the change in stoichiometry during laser heating was very limited. The evolutions with temperature (in the range 2800-3400 K) of the partial pressures of the main vapor species (UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}{sup +}) were compared with theoretically predicted evolutions for equilibrium noncongruent gas-liquid and gas-solid phase coexistences and showed very good agreement. The measured main relative partial pressure ratios around 3300 K all agree with calculated values for total equilibrium between condensed and vapor phases. It is the first time the three main partial pressure ratios above stoichiometric liquid urania have been measured at the same temperature under conditions close to equilibrium noncongruent gas-liquid phase coexistence.

Pflieger, Rachel [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marcoule Institute for Separation Chemistry (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-UMII-ENSCM, Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Colle, Jean-Yves [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Iosilevskiy, Igor [Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Science, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, State University, 141700 Moscow (Russian Federation); Extreme Matter Institute (EMMI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Sheindlin, Michael [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Science, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Simulation and Optimization of the Stabilizer Tower Operation at Catalytic Reforming of Esfahan Oil Refining Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of gasoline with low RVP specifications have made the operators of the catalytic reforming unit of Esfahan Oil refining company in Iran to apply new operating conditions. RVP is an abbreviation for Reid Vapor Pressure which is the vapor pressure ... Keywords: RVP, platformate, initial boiling point, catalytic reforming, distillation curve

Ali Izadyar; Bahram Hashemi Shahraki; Ahmad Shariati

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of a variable speed vapor compression system using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An artificial neural network (ANN) is a mathematical model that is inspired by the operation of biological neural networks. However, this is typically considered a computational model. An ANN can easily adapt to multiple situations and extract information ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Energetic performance, Hidden neurons, Mapping configuration, Simulated annealing, Vapor compression system

J. M. Belman-Flores; S. E. Ledesma; M. G. Garcia; J. Ruiz; J. L. RodríGuez-MuñOz

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

Andrews, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Ecosystem–Scale Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Flux Densities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FLUXNET is a global network of micrometeorological flux measurement sites that measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere. At present over 140 sites are operating on a long–term and ...

Dennis Baldocchi; Eva Falge; Lianhong Gu; Richard Olson; David Hollinger; Steve Running; Peter Anthoni; Ch Bernhofer; Kenneth Davis; Robert Evans; Jose Fuentes; Allen Goldstein; Gabriel Katul; Beverly Law; Xuhui Lee; Yadvinder Malhi; Tilden Meyers; William Munger; Walt Oechel; K. T. Paw; Kim Pilegaard; H. P. Schmid; Riccardo Valentini; Shashi Verma; Timo Vesala; Kell Wilson; Steve Wofsy

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Operations & Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

287

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

288

atmoshperic water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmoshperic water vapor atmoshperic water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for China. Source NREL Date Released April 12th, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmoshperic water vapor China GEF GIS NREL solar SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 625.6 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 704.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 01/01/1985 - 12/31/1991 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access

289

Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

LOCKREM, L.L.

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself.

Alger, Terry (Tracy, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Low Temperature Direct Growth of Graphene Films on Transparent Substrates by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Few- Layer Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition",Liu, W. , et al. (2010). "Chemical vapor deposition of large5 1.3.3. Chemical Vapor

Antoine, Geoffrey Sandosh Jeffy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Profiling Atmospheric Water Vapor by Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended Kaiman-Bucy filter ...

J. R. Wang; J. L. King; T. T. Wilheit; G. Szejwach; L. H. Gesell; R. A. Nieman; D. S. Niver; B. M. Krupp; J. A. Gagliano

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Polynomial Fits to Saturation Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe eighth- and sixth-order polynomial fits to Wexler's and Hyland-Wexler's saturation-vapor-pressure expressions. Fits are provided in both least-squares and relative-error norms. Error analysis is presented. The authors show ...

Piotr J. Flatau; Robert L. Walko; William R. Cotton

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Vaporization of synthetic fuels. Final report. [Thesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problem of transient droplet vaporization in a hot convective environment is examined. The main objective of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the droplet vaporization which is simple enough to be feasibly incorporated into a complete spray combustion analysis and yet will also account for the important physics such as liquid-phase internal circulation, unsteady droplet heating and axisymmetric gas-phase convection. A simplified liquid-phase model has been obtained based on the assumption of the existence of a Hill's spherical vortex inside the droplet together with some approximations made in the governing diffusion equation. The use of the simplified model in a spray situation has also been examined. It has been found that droplet heating and vaporization are essentially unsteady and droplet temperature is nonuniform for a significant portion of its lifetime. It has also been found that the droplet vaporization characteristic can be quite sensitive to the particular liquid-phase and gas-phase models. The results of the various models are compared with the existing experimental data. Due to large scattering in the experimental measurements, particularly the droplet diameter, no definite conclusion can be drawn based on the experimental data. Finally, certain research problems which are related to the present study are suggested for future studies.

Sirignano, W.A.; Yao, S.C.; Tong, A.Y.; Talley, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Water Vapor Index from Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for deriving a water vapor index is presented. An important feature of the index is the fact that it does not rely on radiosondes. Thus, it is not influenced by problems associated with radiosondes and the extent to which the horizontal ...

Larry M. McMillin; David S. Crosby; Mitchell D. Goldberg

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite CPt thin-films Title Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite CPt thin-films Publication Type Journal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Depositon of Nano-Structured...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma Chemical Vapor Depositon of Nano-Structured SnC Composite Thin-Film anodes for Li-ion Battteries Title Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Depositon of Nano-Structured SnC...

302

The Effect of vapor subcooling on film condensation of metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents an analysis of the interfacial "vapor-condensate" temperature distribution, which includes the effect of subcooling (supersaturation) in the vapor. Experimental data from previous investigators for ...

Fedorovich, Eugene D.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Waste tank headspace gas and vapor characterization reference guide  

SciTech Connect

This document is to serve as a reference guide for gas and vapor sample results presented in tank characterization reports. It describes sampling equipment, devices, and protocols, and sample collection and analysis methods common to all vapor samples.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Atmospheric Solar Heating Rate in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmosphere is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Estimating the Atmospheric Water Vapor Content from Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The differential absorption technique for estimating columnar water vapor values from the analysis of sunphotometric measurements with wide- and narrowband interferential filters centered near 0.94 ?m is discussed and adapted. Water vapor line ...

Artemio Plana-Fattori; Michel Legrand; Didier Tanré; Claude Devaux; Anne Vermeulen; Philippe Dubuisson

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Improved Retrieval of Integrated Water Vapor from Water Vapor Radiometer Measurements Using Numerical Weather Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor radiometer (WVR) retrieval algorithms require a priori information on atmospheric conditions along the line of sight of the radiometer in order to derive opacities from observed brightness temperatures. This paper's focus is the mean ...

Steven R. Chiswell; Steven Businger; Michael Bevis; Fredrick Solheim; Christian Rocken; Randolph Ware

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating nuclear wastes, and in the drying of porous materials. Geothermally oriented studies were presented by Chicoine et al. (1977), Hsieh and Ramey (1978, 1981), Herkelrath et al. (1983), and Nghiem and Ramey (1991). Nuclear waste-related work includes papers by Herkelrath and O'Neal (1985), Pollock (1986), Eaton and Bixler (1987), Pruess et al. (1990), Nitao (1990), and Doughty and E'ruess (1991). Applications to industrial drying of porous materials have been discussed by Hamiathy (1969) arid Whitaker (1977). This paper is primarily concerned with evaluating the impact of vapor pressure lowering (VPL) effects on the depletion behavior of vapor-dominated reservoirs. We have examined experimental data on vapor adsorption and capillary pressures in an effort to identify constitutive relationships that would be applicable to the tight matrix rocks of vapor-dominated systems. Numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the impact of these effects on the depletion of vapor-dominated reservoirs.

Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Soil vapor-extraction technology: Reference handbook. Final report, Jun 89-Mar 90  

SciTech Connect

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are being used in increasing numbers due to many advantages these systems hold over other soil treatment technologies. SVE systems appear to be simple in design and operation, yet the fundamentals governing subsurface vapor transport are quite complex. In view of the complexity, an expert workshop was held to discuss the state-of-the-art of the technology, the best approach to optimize systems application, and process efficiency and limitations. As a result of the workshop, an SVE Technology Assessment report was produced. The report discusses the basic science of the subsurface environment and subsurface monitoring, emission control, and costs. The report also serves as the proceedings of the expert workshop. Additional research activities being conducted include a field demonstration of a structured SVE system design approach; a laboratory column study to determine and characterize residuals following vapor extraction; an assessment of secondary emissions and regulations governing releases from SVE systems; cost of SVE implementation and operation; and a survey of techniques to enhance vapor removal.

Pedersen, T.A.; Curtis, J.T.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling engine oil vaporization and transport of the oil vapor in the piston ring pack on internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption that the multi-grade oil can be modeled as a compound of several ...

Cho, Yeunwoo, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

OPERATIONS (OPS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPS) OPS) OBJECTIVE OPS.1 The formality and discipline of operations is adequate to conduct work safely and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. (CR 13) Scope: The Conduct of Operations Program was evaluated during the recent KE Basin FTS ORR and was found to be adequately implemented. Based on this result and the subsequent program enhancements, the scope of the review is to be limited to the SWS operating and maintenance evolutions. Criteria * Programmatic elements of conduct of operations are in place for SWS operations. (DOE Order 5480.19) * The SWS operations personnel adequately demonstrate the principles of conduct of operations requirements during the shift performance period. (DOE Order 5480.19)

312

Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore, comparability to the true ambient concentrations of tritium.

Eberhart, C.F.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study covering Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. and its membrane vapor processor that recovers fuel vapors from gasoline refueling.

314

Vapor-pressure lowering in geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect

The water vapor-pressure lowering phenomenon in porous media was investigated for a range of temperatures by measuring vapor pressure vs. mass of water adsorbed in consolidated sandstone cores and unconsolidated silica sands. Experimental results showed that the mass of water adsorbed on the rock surface is much more than the amount of pore steam. Results also revealed that the water adsorption is caused mainly by micropores in the porous medium. Measurement of the mass of methane and ethane adsorbed on dry rocks showed that the amount of adsorption is not great in comparison with the pore gas. It was found that adsorption data for water/sandstone core studies could be normalized with respect to temperature. Although this appears not to have been reported previously, it does agree in principle with findings for solid powders with micropores. Another interesting result was that reanalysis of previous studies of capillarity in sandstones indicates that experimental data probably were influenced mostly by adsorption.

Hsieh, C.H.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hydrocarbon pool and vapor fire data analysis  

SciTech Connect

The flame geometry and thermal radiation data from a series of large scale experiments involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and gasoline spills on water were analyzed. The experiments were conducted at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. Two types of fires have been studied; namely, pool fires and vapor fires. The spill quantity varied from 4 m/sup 3/ to approximately 6 m/sup 3/. The LPG pool fire flame height to diameter ratio were between 3.5 and 4.5. The gasoline flame height was about 2. The flame emissive powers for LPG pool fires ranged from 78 kW/m/sup 2/ to 115 kW/m/sup 2/. The average surface emissive power for gasoline pool fire was 40 kW/m/sup 2/. The LPG vapor fire emissive power ranged from 159 to 269 kW/m/sup 2/. 63 figures, 13 tables.

Mudan, K.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transport properties of fission product vapors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kinetic theory of gases is used to calculate the transport properties of fission product vapors in a steam and hydrogen environment. Provided in tabular form is diffusivity of steam and hydrogen, viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gaseous mixture, and diffusivity of cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide, diatomic tellurium and tellurium dioxide. These transport properties are required in determining the thermal-hydraulics of and fission product transport in light water reactors.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Apparatus and method for photochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical vapor deposition apparatus includes a reactor housing having a window in one wall above a reaction chamber in the housing. A transparent curtain divides the reaction chamber into a reaction zone and a flush zone. At least one substrate is mounted in the reaction zone in light communication with the window so that ultraviolet radiation may penetrate through the window into the reaction zone. The window is kept clear by a gas flowing through the flush zone.

Jackson, Scott C. (Wilmington, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Passive vapor transport solar heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

An advanced vapor-compression desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, the two dominant desalination methods are reverse osmosis (RO) and multi-stage flash (MSF). RO requires large capital investment and maintenance, whereas MSF is too energy intensive. An innovative vapor-compression desalination system is developed in this study. A comprehensive mathematical model for the heat exchanger/evaporator is described. The literature indicates that extraordinarily high overall heat transfer coefficients for the evaporator are possible at selected operating conditions that employ dropwise condensation in the steam side and pool boiling in the liquid side. A smooth titanium surface is chosen to promote dropwise condensation and to resist corrosion. To maximize energy efficiency, a combined-cycle cogeneration scheme is employed composed of a gas turbine, a heat recovery boiler, and a steam turbine that drive a compressor. The combined-cycle power source is oversized relative to the needs of the compressor. The excess power is converted to electricity and sold to the open market. A three-effect evaporator is employed. It is fed with seawater, assumed to be 3.5% salt. Boiling brine (7% salt) is in the low pressure side of the heat exchanger and condensing steam is in the high-pressure side of the heat exchanger. The condensing steam flows at 1.52 m/s (5 ft/s), which maximizes the heat transfer coefficient. The plant is sized to produce 37,854 m3/d (10 mill gal/day) and is assumed to be financed with a 5%, 30-yr municipal bond. Two economic cases were emphasized: the United States and the Middle East. For the United States, the fuel costs $5/GJ ($5.27/mill Btu) with the latent heat exchanger at ( ) 1.11 K 2.00 F T � = ° . The required compressor energy is 14 MJ/m3 (14.7 kW h/thous gal). The capital cost for the U.S. is $884 d/m3 ($3,342/thous gal) and the delivered water selling price is $0.47/m3 ($1.79/thous/gal). For the Middle East, the fuel costs $0.5/GJ ($0.53/mill Btu) with the latent heat exchanger at K T 33 . 3 = � ( ) F 00 . 6 ° . The required compressor energy is 26 MJ/m3 (27.3 kW h/thous gal). ). The capital cost for the Middle East is $620 d/m3 ($2,344/thous gal), and the delivered water selling price is $0.25/m3 ($0.95/thous/gal). In all cases, the water selling price is attractive relative to competing technologies.

Lara Ruiz, Jorge Horacio Juan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A molecular view of vapor deposited glasses  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel organic glassy materials that exhibit remarkable stability have been prepared by vapor deposition. The thermophysical properties of these new ''stable'' glasses are equivalent to those that common glasses would exhibit after aging over periods lasting thousands of years. The origin of such enhanced stability has been elusive; in the absence of detailed models, past studies have discussed the formation of new polyamorphs or that of nanocrystals to explain the observed behavior. In this work, an atomistic molecular model of trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is used to examine the properties of vapor-deposited stable glasses. Consistent with experiment, the model predicts the formation of stable glasses having a higher density, a lower enthalpy, and higher onset temperatures than those of the corresponding ''ordinary'' glass formed by quenching the bulk liquid. Simulations reveal that newly formed layers of the growing vapor-deposited film exhibit greater mobility than the remainder of the material, thereby enabling a reorganization of the film as it is grown. They also reveal that ''stable'' glasses exhibit a distinct layered structure in the direction normal to the substrate that is responsible for their unusual properties.

Singh, Sadanand; Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Government Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use Cases from NBD(NIST Big Data) Requirements WG V1.0. http://bigdatawg. nist.gov/home.php. Contents. Blank Template. Government Operation ...

2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Operations Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2005 ... Operations Research. Report 2005-01. On a closedness theorem. Miklós Ujvári. Marc 2005. Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences. Department ...

323

Inhibition of Pitting and Crevice Corrosion by Filming Amines and Vapor Phase Corrosion Inhibitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of fossil units that are being removed from service for indeterminate periods due to economic dispatch, seasonal conditions of excess generating capacity, or temporary decommissioning of generating assets necessitates alternative protective measures to prevent and reduce deterioration of the system components during these periods of idle operation. Preservation methods and techniques using vapor phase corrosion inhibitors and film-forming hydrophobic amines may provide an effective alternati...

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 run resolution. This data includes information on constituents of the earth`s surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various rationing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. This work testS the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of tropospheric water vapor.

Schlaepfer, D. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography; Borel, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Operations research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Evita, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice wrote: Politics, the Art of the Possible. To those of us in the operations research community, we postulate: Operations Research, the Science of Better - (i.e. better processes, better systems and better decisions). ...

William P. Pierskalla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Operation crosscheck  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of three sections covering the three major areas of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory`s participation in Operation Crosscheck. These areas are: Diagnostic Aircraft; Radiochemical Sampling; and Device Assembly and Handling, Barbers Point. The information contained in these sections has been extracted from Crosscheck post-operation reports.

Gilbert, F. C.

1964-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.  

SciTech Connect

Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

Watson, A.P.

2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt-based commercial alloys. The corrosion rates in these tests are reported and how they may or may not relate to the corrosion behavior in an operating thermochemical cycle is discussed.

Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Operation Terminology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Conservation Magnets require a large amount of power to control a particle beam. In order to conserve energy and money when a beam line is down, Operations will install a...

330

Solar Stray Light Effects in Meteosat Radiances Observed and Quantified Using Operational Data Monitoring at ECMWF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiances in the water vapor (WV) and infrared channels of the Meteorological Satellite (Meteosat)-5 and -7 are being continuously monitored in the form of clear-sky radiances using the operational European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

Christina Köpken

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

Galkowski, J.J.

1986-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

Photochemical studies of alkali halide vapors  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. An apparatus has been constructed for studying the photodissociation of alkali halides to produce excited alkali metal atoms. The key component is a low pressure H/sub 2/ arc continuum uv source. Radiation from this source, modulated by a chopping wheel and analyzed by a monochromator, enters a cell containing the alkali halide vapor. In the appropriate wavelength range, photodissociation occurs to produce the alkali atom in an excited /sup 2/p state, the flourescence from which is detected by a photomultiplier-lock-in amplifier combination. (auth)

Earl, B.L.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

Jang, J.H.; Faghri, A. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Chang, W.S. [Wright Research and Development Center, Wright-Patterson, OH (United States)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method and apparatus for concentrating vapors for analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pre-concentration device and a method are disclosed for concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the pre-concentration device are thermally desorbed, achieving at least partial separation of the vapor mixtures. The pre-concentration device is suitable, e.g., for pre-concentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable.

Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

Interfacial instability induced by lateral vapor pressure fluctuation in bounded thin liquid-vapor layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study an instability of thin liquid-vapor layers bounded by rigid parallel walls from both below and above. In this system, the interfacial instability is induced by lateral vapor pressure fluctuation, which is in turn attributed to the effect of phase change: evaporation occurs at the hotter portion of the interface and condensation at the colder one. The high vapor pressure drives the liquid away and the low one pulls it up. A set of equations describing the temporal evolution of the interface of the liquid-vapor layers is derived. This model neglects the effect of mass loss or gain at the interface and guarantees the mass conservation of the liquid layer. The result of linear stability analysis of the model shows that the presence of the pressure dependence of the local saturation temperature suppresses the growth of long-wave disturbances. We find the stability criterion, which suggests that only slight temperature gradients are sufficient to overcome the stabilizing gravitational effect for a water an...

Kanatani, Kentaro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Simulation and Validation of Vapor Compression System Faults and Start-up/Shut-down Transients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistics from the US Department of Energy show that about one-third of the total consumption of electricity in the households and industries is due to the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (AC & R) systems. This wide usage has prompted many researchers to develop models for each of the components of the vapor compression systems. However, there has been very little information on developing simulation models that have been validated for the conditions of start-up/shutdown operations as well as vapor compression system faults. This thesis addresses these concerns and enhances the existing modeling library to capture the transients related to the above mentioned conditions. In this thesis, the various faults occurring in a vapor compressor cycle (VCC) have been identified along with the parameters affecting them. The transients of the refrigerant have also been studied with respect to the start-up/shutdown of a vapor compression system. All the simulations related to the faults and start-up/shutdown have been performed using the vapor compression system models developed in MATLAB/Simulink environment and validated against the 3-ton air conditioning unit present in the Thermo-Fluids Control Laboratory at Texas A & M University. The simulation and validation results presented in this thesis can be used to lay out certain rules of thumb to identify a particular fault depending on the unusual behavior of the system thus helping in creating certain fault diagnostic algorithms and emphasize the importance of the study of start-up/shutdown transient characteristics from the point of actual energy efficiency of the systems. Also, these results prove the capability and validity of the finite control volume models to describe VCC system faults and start-up/shutdown transients.

Ayyagari, Balakrishna

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mercury Vapor At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mercury Vapor At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to: navigation,...

342

Mercury Vapor At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Exploration Activity...

343

Mercury Vapor At Vale Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mercury Vapor At Vale Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search...

344

Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

345

Measurements of Vapor Pressures and PVT Properties for n ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Measurements of Vapor Pressures and PVT Properties for n-Butane from 280 to 440 K at Pressures to 200 MPa ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Interaction of sodium vapor and graphite studied by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of the reaction between graphite and sodium vapor is analyzed with support ... High temperature compression test to determine the anode paste ...

347

Optimal Control of Vapor Extraction of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vapor extraction (Vapex) process is an emerging technology for viscous oil recovery that has gained much attention in the oil industry. However, the oil production… (more)

Muhamad, Hameed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM-FIRE Water Vapor Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Order Data Browell, Edward LASE Order Data Gutman, Seth GPS Order Data Richardson, Scott Chilled Mirror Order Data Sachse, G. Water Vapor Order Data Schmidlin, Francis CM Sondes...

349

Molecular restrictions for human eye irritation by chemical vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reactive airborne chemicals. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 1998;WL. Chemesthesis: The Common Chemical Sense. In: Finger TE,MH. Quantification of chemical vapors in chemosensory

Cometto-Muniz, J. Enrique; Cain, William S.; Abraham, Michael H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton,...

351

Cesium vapor cycle for an advanced LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

A review indicates that a cesium vapor topping cycle appears attractive for use in the intermediate fluid circuit of an advanced LMFBR designed for a reactor outlet temperature of 1250$sup 0$F or more and would have the following advantages: (1) it would increase the thermal efficiency by about 5 to 10 points (from approximately 40 percent to approximately 45 to 50 percent) thus reducing the amount of waste heat rejected to the environment by 15 to 30 percent. (2) the higher thermal efficiency should reduce the overall capital cost of the reactor plant in dollars per kilowatt. (3) the cesium can be distilled out of the intermediate fluid circuit to leave it bone-dry, thus greatly reducing the time and cost of maintenance work (particularly for the steam generator). (4) the large volume and low pressure of the cesium vapor region in the cesium condenser-steam generator greatly reduces the magnitude of pressure fluctuations that might occur in the event of a leak in a steam generator tube, and the characteristics inherent in a condenser make it easy to design for rapid concentration of any noncondensibles that may form as a consequence of a steam leak into the cesium region so that a steam leak can be detected easily in the very early stages of its development. (auth)

Fraas, A.P.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reactions of atmospheric vapors with lunar soil  

SciTech Connect

Detailed experimental data have been acquired for the hydration of the surfaces of lunar fines. Inert vapor adsorption has been employed to measure the surface properties (surface energy, surface area, porosity, etc.) and changes wrought in the hydration-dehydration processes. Plausible mechanisms have been considered and the predominant process involves hydration of the metamict metallosilicate surfaces to form a hydrated laminar structure akin to terrestrial clays. Additional credence for this interpretation is obtained by comparison to existing geochemical literature concerning terrestrial weathering of primary metallosilicates. The surface properties of the hydrated lunar fines are compared favorably to those of terrestrial clay minerals. In addition, experimental results are given to show that fresh disordered surfaces of volcanic sand react with water vapor in a manner virtually identical to the majority of the lunar fines. The results show that ion track etching and/or grain boundary attack are minor contributions in the weathering of lunar fines in the realm of our microgravimetric experimental conditions. 14 references. (auth)

Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Agron, P.A.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

SSA Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Operations (SSA-Ops) Area Operations (SSA-Ops) "BOREAS Ops" was located at the Snodrifters Lodge, in Candle Lake, Saskatchewan. Radiosonde balloon launch at Ops The NASA Helicopter lands at Ops A meeting at the Snodrifter's Lodge Release of a radiosonde at the SSA operations center in Candle Lake. Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help | User Services - Tel: +1 (865) 241-3952 or E-mail: uso@daac.ornl.gov

354

BOREAS Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study Area Operations/Thompson Airport (NSA-Ops) Study Area Operations/Thompson Airport (NSA-Ops) NSA Operations (NSA-Ops) The Keewatin Air Hanger: site of BOREAS Ops 1994 Dr. Piers Sellers working in Ops, 1994 BOREAS "Air Force" The NASA C-130 The University of Wyoming King Air The NASA Helicopter The NRC Twin Otter The NCAR Electra The Ontario Chieftain Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help |

355

Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-201: Results from samples collected on 06/19/96  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-201 (Tank C-201) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary, of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-202: Results from samples collected on 06/25/96  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-202 (Tank C-202) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A NORMETEX MODEL 15 M3/HR WATER VAPOR PUMPING TEST  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed using a Model 15 m{sup 3}/hr Normetex vacuum pump to determine if pump performance degraded after pumping a humid gas stream. An air feed stream containing 30% water vapor was introduced into the pump for 365 hours with the outlet pressure of the pump near the condensation conditions of the water. Performance of the pump was tested before and after the water vapor pumping test and indicated no loss in performance of the pump. The pump also appeared to tolerate small amounts of condensed water of short duration without increased noise, vibration, or other adverse indications. The Normetex pump was backed by a dual-head diaphragm pump which was affected by the condensation of water and produced some drift in operating conditions during the test.

Klein, J.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Vapor vacuum extraction treatability study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

During the 1960s and early 1970s, barreled mixed waste containing volatile organic compounds (VOCS) and radioactive waste was buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Over time, some of the barrels have deteriorated allowing, VOC vapors to be released into the vadose zone. The primary VOC contaminates of concern are CCl{sub 4} and trichloroethylene; however, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane have also been detected. Vapor Vacuum Extraction (VVE) is one alternative being considered for remediation of the RWMC SDA vadose zone. A proposed pilot-scale treatability study (TS) will provide operation and maintenance costs for the design of the potential scale-up of the system.

Herd, M.D.; Matthern, G.; Michael, D.L.; Spang, N.; Downs, W.; Weidner, J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cleary, P. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

Rainer Wallny

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Combined Passive Water Vapor Exchanger and Exhaust Gas Diffusion Barrier for Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells operating on hydrocarbon fuels require water vapor injection into the fuel stream for fuel reforming and the prevention of carbon fouling. Compared to active water recovery systems, a passive approach would eliminate the need for a separate water source, pumps, and actuators, and thus reduce parasitic thermal losses. The passive approach developed in this paper employs a capillary pump that recovers the water vapor from the exhaust, while providing a diffusion barrier that prevents exhaust gases from entering the fuel stream. Benchtop proof tests have proven the feasibility of the passive fuel humidifier concept, and have provided a calibration factor for a computational design tool that can be used for industrial applications

Williford, Rick E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hatchell, Brian K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Singh, Prabhakar (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates V. Mattioli and P. Basili Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction In recent years the Global Positioning System (GPS) has proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring precipitable water vapor (PWV) (Bevis et al. 1992), offering an independent source of information on water vapor when compared with microwave radiometers (MWRs), and/or radiosonde

362

Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents sampling data resulting from the June 8, 1995, sampling of SST 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-SX-106 using the vapor sampling system  

SciTech Connect

This document presents sampling data resulting from the March 24, 1995, sampling of SST 241-SX-106 using the vapor sampling system.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR By SCOTT RUSSELL WAITUKAITIS A Thesis Submitted: #12;Abstract I describe a study of Faraday rotation in a hot lithium vapor. I begin by dis- cussing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 The Lithium Oven and Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Theoretical Framework

Cronin, Alex D.

365

New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SCIENTIFIC REPORT SCIENTIFIC REPORT Title Page Project Title: New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration DOE Award Number: DE-FG36-04GO14327 Document Title: Final Scientific Report Period Covered by Report: September 30, 2004 to September 30, 2005 Name and Address of Recipient Organization: Magnetic Development, Inc., 68 Winterhill Road, Madison, CT 06443, phone: 203-214-7247, fax: 203-421-7948, e-mail: mjb1000@aol.com Contact Information: Mark J. Bergander, Ph.D., P.E., Principal Investigator, phone: 203-214-7247, fax: 203-421-7948, e-mail: mjb1000@aol.com Project Objective (as stated in the proposal): The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient

366

FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bulletin 627 Bulletin 627 BUREAU o b MINES FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS By Michael G. Zabetakis DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

367

Gas transport model for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A node-bond percolation model is presented for the gas permeability and pore surface area of the coarse porosity in woven fiber structures during densification by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Model parameters include the number of nodes per unit volume and their spatial distribution, and the node and bond radii and their variability. These parameters relate directly to structural features of the weave. Some uncertainty exists in the proper partition of the porosity between ``node`` and ``bond`` and between intra-tow and inter-tow, although the total is constrained by the known fiber loading in the structure. Applied to cloth layup preforms the model gives good agreement with the limited number of available measurements.

Starr, T.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

How solvent vapors can improve steam floods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal recovery methods depend for their success on the viscosity reduction of heavy crude oils at high temperatures. The viscosity of a heavy oil can also be reduced if it is diluted with a low-viscosity solvent, such as one of the lighter hydrocarbons. It is not surprising that there has been considerable interest in combining the two methods. The process of injecting vaporized solvent with the steam for a gravity drainage type recovery is described here along with a description of the particular phase behavior of steam/solvent mixtures which is beneficial to the process. And computer simulations which compare steam-only and steam/solvent floods under Athabasca-type conditions are overviewed.

Vogel, J. [Vogel, (Jack), Seabrook, TX (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Worker Protection from Chemical Vapors: Hanford Tank Farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank head-spaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns, risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits (OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors. (authors)

Anderson, T.J. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. / Environmental Health, Richland, WA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Effects of Water Vapor on the Oxidation of Nickel-Base ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

water vapor are compared at temperatures from 700°C to 1100°C. It is shown that water vapor affects the oxidation of such alloys in different ways. Water vapor ...

371

Water Vapor Flux Measurements from Ground-Based Vertically Pointed Water Vapor Differential Absorption and Doppler Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, two lidar systems were used to measure the vertical water vapor flux in a convective boundary layer by means of eddy correlation. This was achieved by combining a water vapor differential absorption lidar and a heterodyne wind ...

Andreas Giez; Gerhard Ehret; Ronald L. Schwiesow; Kenneth J. Davis; Donald H. Lenschow

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Operational test report integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, Ay102, AZ101, AZ102.

HARTY, W.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the varying classes of customers as available. This includes the luminaire, lamp, ballast, controller, wiring, energy, pole and all hardware. Each unit will be a mercury vapor...

374

Economic and Technical Tradeoffs Between Open and Closed Cycle Vapor Compression Evaporators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaporators are used extensively in the chemical, pulp and paper, food and beverage, and related industries. Mechanical vapor recompression (MVR) evaporators are a type using an open heat pump cycle with steam as the working fluid. The technology is widely used and time-proven. Closed cycle vapor compression is an emerging technology. A secondary working fluid such as a halocarbon is used in a closed heat pump cycle to transfer heat from the steam condenser to the hottest surface. Advantages of closed cycle evaporation include flexibility in working fluid selection, potential savings in compressor first cost, and isolation of the compressor from potentially corrosive or troublesome gases and liquid droplets in the suction vapor. A major disadvantage of closed cycle evaporation is that the driving force developed by the compressor (temperature difference) must be shared between two heat transfer surfaces, vs. one in the open cycle design. This paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of open and closed cycle evaporators. Factors considered include working fluid physical properties and thermodynamics, compressor operating limits and cost, and surface area sizing and cost.

Timm, M. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

An Alkali-Vapor Cell with Metal Coated Windows for Efficient Application of an Electric Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2 kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no ...

Sarkisyan, D; Guena, J; Lintz, M; Bouchiat, M A; Sarkisyan, David; Gu\\'{e}na, Jocelyne; Lintz, Michel; Bouchiat, Marie-Anne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Study of the Effects of Obstacles in Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion using CFD Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evaluation of the potential hazards related with the operation of an LNG terminal includes possible release scenarios with the consequent flammable vapor dispersion within the facility; therefore, it is important to know the behavior of this phenomenon through the application of advanced simulation tools. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) tools are often used to estimate the exclusion zones in an event of accidental LNG spill. In practice these releases are more likely to occur in the confines of complex geometries with solid obstacles such as LNG terminals, and LNG processing plants. The objective of this research is to study the effects that different obstacles have over the LNG vapor dispersion and the safety distance reduction caused by enhanced mixing. Through parametric analysis it is demonstrated that height, width and shape of the obstacles play an important role in the vapor concentration reduction. The findings of this research may be applied in the design stage of an LNG terminal, to improve the design of passive barriers, and for designing better layout configurations for storage tanks. Simulations results performed with FLACS (Flame Acceleration Simulator), a CFD solver, confirmed that these applications help to reduce safety distances.

Ruiz Vasquez, Roberto

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Mercury Vapor At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful...

378

EA-0881: Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

881: Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization and Supporting Activities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-0881: Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid...

379

Does EIA report water vapor emissions data? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA report water vapor emissions data? No. Water vapor is the most abundant greenhouse gas, but most scientists believe that human activity has a very small ...

380

New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and second step of compression. In the proposed system, the compressor compresses the vapor only to 50-60% of the final pressure, while the additional compression is provided by a jet device using internal potential energy of the working fluid flow. Therefore, the amount of mechanical energy required by a compressor is significantly reduced, resulting in the increase of efficiency (either COP or EER). The novelty of the cycle is in the equipment and in the way the multi-staging is accomplished. The anticipated result will be a new refrigeration system that requires less energy to accomplish a cooling task. The application of this technology will be for more efficient designs of: (1) Industrial chillers, (2) Refrigeration plants, (3) Heat pumps, (4) Gas Liquefaction plants, (5) Cryogenic systems.

Mark J. Bergander

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Desalination Using Vapor-Compression Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to produce potable water economically is the primary purpose of seawater desalination research. Reverse osmosis (RO) and multi-stage flash (MSF) cost more than potable water produced from fresh water resources. As an alternative to RO and MSF, this research investigates a high-efficiency mechanical vapor-compression distillation system that employs an improved water flow arrangement. The incoming salt concentration was 0.15% salt for brackish water and 3.5% salt for seawater, whereas the outgoing salt concentration was 1.5% and 7%, respectively. Distillation was performed at 439 K (331oF) and 722 kPa (105 psia) for both brackish water feed and seawater feed. Water costs of the various conditions were calculated for brackish water and seawater feeds using optimum conditions considered as 25 and 20 stages, respectively. For brackish water at a temperature difference of 0.96 K (1.73oF), the energy requirement is 2.0 kWh/m3 (7.53 kWh/kgal). At this condition, the estimated water cost is $0.39/m3 ($1.48/kgal) achieved with 10,000,000 gal/day distillate, 30-year bond, 5% interest rate, and $0.05/kWh electricity. For seawater at a temperature difference of 0.44 K (0.80oF), the energy requirement is 3.97 kWh/m3 (15.0 kWh/kgal) and the estimated water cost is $0.61/m3 ($2.31/kgal). Greater efficiency of the vapor compression system is achieved by connecting multiple evaporators in series, rather than the traditional parallel arrangement. The efficiency results from the gradual increase of salinity in each stage of the series arrangement in comparison to parallel. Calculations using various temperature differences between boiling brine and condensing steam show the series arrangement has the greatest improvement at lower temperature differences. The following table shows the improvement of a series flow arrangement compared to parallel: ?T (K) Improvement (%)*1.111 2.222 3.333 15.21 10.80 8.37 * Incoming salt concentration: 3.5% Outgoing salt concentration: 7% Temperature: 450 K (350oF) Pressure: 928 kPa (120 psig) Stages: 4

Lubis, Mirna R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Space Debris-de-Orbiting by Vaporization Impulse using Short Pulse Laser  

SciTech Connect

Space debris constitutes a significant hazard to low earth orbit satellites and particularly to manned spacecraft. A quite small velocity decrease from vaporization impulses is enough to lower the perigee of the debris sufficiently for atmospheric drag to de-orbit the debris. A short pulse (picosecond) laser version of the Orion concept can accomplish this task in several years of operation. The ''Mercury'' short pulse Yb:S-FAP laser being developed at LLNL for laser fusion is appropriate for this task.

Early, J; Bibeau, C; Claude, P

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development of 77 kV 40 MVA gas-vapor cooled transformer  

SciTech Connect

A 77 KV 40 MVA gas-vapor cooled transformer has been developed as a prototype of substation transformers, which is directed to nonflammable and lightweight properties. To examine the operating reliability of the transformer, the reliability test has continued since July, 1981 at the Hokusetsu substation of KEPCO (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.). This report will cover the development work on thermal stability of materials, electrical fault test, insulation characteristics, cooling of model transformer, flow-induced static electrifiction, protection system and the prototype unit which is being built based upon these developments.

Tokoro, K.; Harumoto, Y.; Ina, T.; Kabayama, Y.; Sato, T.; Yamauchi, A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chemical vapor deposition techniques and related methods for manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs made using the methods of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

King, Donald B. (Albuquerque, NM); Sadwick, Laurence P. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wernsman, Bernard R. (Clairton, PA)

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

Pruess, K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled. 2 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Simple microwave field imaging technique using hot atomic vapor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a simple technique for microwave field imaging using alkali atoms in a vapor cell. The microwave field to be measured drives Rabi oscillations on atomic hyperfine transitions, which are detected in a spatially resolved way using a laser beam and a CCD camera. Our vapor cell geometry enables single-shot recording of two-dimensional microwave field images with 350 {\\mu}m spatial resolution. Using microfabricated vapor cell arrays, a resolution of a few micrometers seems feasible. All vector components of the microwave magnetic field can be imaged. Our apparatus is simple and compact and does not require cryogenics or ultra-high vacuum.

Böhi, Pascal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Simple microwave field imaging technique using hot atomic vapor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a simple technique for microwave field imaging using alkali atoms in a vapor cell. The microwave field to be measured drives Rabi oscillations on atomic hyperfine transitions, which are detected in a spatially resolved way using a laser beam and a camera. Our vapor cell geometry enables single-shot recording of two-dimensional microwave field images with 350 {\\mu}m spatial resolution. Using microfabricated vapor cell arrays, a resolution of a few micrometers seems feasible. All vector components of the microwave magnetic field can be imaged. Our apparatus is simple and compact and does not require cryogenics or ultra-high vacuum.

Pascal Böhi; Philipp Treutlein

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Mercury Vapor At Medicine Lake Area (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kooten, 1987) Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Medicine Lake Area (Kooten, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Gerald K. Van Kooten (1987) Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mercury_Vapor_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Kooten,_1987)&oldid=386431" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

392

Treatment of oily wastewaters from onshore operations  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of samples of process water from the Alyeska ballast treatment plant, Port Valdez, Alaska, disclosed that organic matter present in the process stream included volatile organic matter (lower molecular weight hydrocarbons), dissolved nonvolatile organic matter (including phenolic and naphthalenic compounds), and suspended oil. To develop informaton on the effectiveness of oil removal and to characterize the chemical redistribution taking place in the process, concentrations of each organic fraction were measured and the principal compounds were characterized chemically. Results show that the treatment plant was effective in reducing free oil content of the ballast water. A reduction of 99.8% in the organic load was realized, producing effluent generally within federal regulations regarding discharge of oil. The bulk of organic content reduction took place in the gravity separator. (JMT)

Lysyj, I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

Helfritch, Dennis J. (Baltimore, MD)

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Dynamics of nucleation in chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the evolution of layer morphology during the early stages of metal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto Si(100) via pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} below 250{degrees}C. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that nuclei formation is limited by precursor dissociation which occurs on terraces, not at step sites. Also, the average size of clusters formed during CVD is larger than for Fe growth by evaporation (a random deposition process). Based on STM data and Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that the CVD-growth morphology is affected by preferential dissociation of Fe(CO){sub 5} molecules at existing Fe clusters -- an autocatalytic effect. We demonstrate that nucleation kinetics can be used to control formation of metal nanostructures on chemically tailored surfaces. Reactive sites on Si (001) are first passivated by hydrogen. H atoms are locally removed by electron stimulated desorption using electrons emitted from the STM tip. Subsequent pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} leads to selective nucleation and growth of Fe films in the areas where H has been removed.

Mayer, T.M.; Adams, D.P.; Swartzentruber, B.S.; Chason, E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Modeling of LNG Pool Spreading and Vaporization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a source term model for estimating the rate of spreading and vaporization of LNG on land and sea is introduced. The model takes into account the composition changes of the boiling mixture, the varying thermodynamic properties due to preferential boiling within the mixture and the effect of boiling on conductive heat transfer. The heat, mass and momentum balance equations are derived for continuous and instantaneous spills and mixture thermodynamic effects are incorporated. A parameter sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effect of boiling heat transfer regimes, friction, thermal contact/roughness correction parameter and VLE/mixture thermodynamics on the pool spreading behavior. The aim was to provide a better understanding of these governing phenomena and their relative importance throughout the pool lifetime. The spread model was validated against available experimental data for pool spreading on concrete and sea. The model is solved using Matlab for two continuous and instantaneous spill scenarios and is validated against experimental data on cryogenic pool spreading found in literature.

Basha, Omar 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Occupational Exposure Evaluation of Complex Vapor Mixtures at the Hanford Nuclear Waste Site, Washington Work-site Vapor Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Extensive sampling and analysis has been done over the years to characterize the radioactive and chemical properties of hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington State. The purpose of these analyses was to evaluate safety and environmental concerns related to tank stability. More recently, characterization studies have broadened to evaluate potential health hazards of chemical vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. The extensive sampling done during this campaign evaluated vapor concentrations of more than 100 different chemical at 70 sites in and around one section of the tank farms. Sampling identified only four vapors (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrosodimethylamine, and nitrosomethylethylamine) that were present above occupational exposure limits. These elevated concentrations were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors were measured above 10% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. This suggests that vapor controls can be focused on limited hazard zones around sources. (authors)

Anderson, T. J. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. / Environmental Health, P.O. Box 1000, S7-70, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Broadband Water Vapor Transmission Functions for Atmospheric IR Flux Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmission functions associated with water vapor molecular line and e-type absorption in the IR spectral regions are presented in the form of simple analytical functions and small tables, from which atmospheric IR fluxes and cooling rates can ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range ...

Refaat Tamer F.; Halama Gary E.; DeYoung Russell J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

400

Numerical analysis of vapor flow in a micro heat pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vapor flow in a flat plate micro heat pipe with both uniform and linear heat flux boundary conditions has been numerically analyzed. For both types of boundary conditions, the Navier-Stokes equations with steady incompressible two-dimensional flow were solved using the SIMPLE method. The results indicate that the pressure, shear stress, and friction factor under linear heat flux boundary conditions are considerably smoother, and hence, more closely approximate the real situation. As the heat flux increases, the pressure drop increases, but the friction factor demonstrates only a slight change for different heat flux conditions. The size and shape of the micro heat pipe vapor space was shown to have a significant influence on the vapor flow behavior for micro heat pipes. When the vapor space area decreases, the pressure drop, shear stress, and friction factor all significantly increase.

Liu, Xiaoqin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Intercomparison of Four Commercial Analyzers for Water Vapor Isotope Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ?18O and ?D of atmospheric water vapor are important tracers in hydrological and ecological studies. Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) provides an in situ technology for measuring ?18O and ?D in ambient conditions. An intercomparison ...

Xue-Fa Wen; Xuhui Lee; Xiao-Min Sun; Jian-Lin Wang; Ya-Kun Tang; Sheng-Gong Li; Gui-Rui Yu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Moisture Vertical Structure, Column Water Vapor, and Tropical Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of the relationship between water vapor and precipitation is analyzed in 5 yr of radiosonde and precipitation gauge data from the Nauru Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. The first vertical principal component of ...

Christopher E. Holloway; J. David Neelin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Improved Magnus Form Approximation of Saturation Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms, based on Magnus's form equations, are described that minimize the difference between several relationships between temperature and water vapor pressure at saturation that are commonly used in archiving data. The work was initiated in ...

Oleg A. Alduchov; Robert E. Eskridge

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor from UARS MLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results of upper-tropospheric water vapor obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented. MLS is less affected by clouds than infrared or visible techniques, and the UARS ...

W. G. Read; J. W. Waters; D. A. Flower; L. Froidevaux; R. F. Jarnot; D. L. Hartmann; R. S. Harwood; R. B. Rood

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ice Growth from the Vapor at ?5°C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are summarized and illustrated from a long series of experiments on ice growth from the vapor, nearly all in a very small range of conditions: ?5°C, slightly below liquid water saturation, with minimal environmental gradients and no ...

Charles A. Knight

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

New Equations for Computing Vapor Pressure and Enhancement Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations are presented which relate saturation vapor pressure to temperature for moist air. The equations are designed to be easily implemented on a calculator or computer and can be used to convert in either direction. They are more accurate ...

Arden L. Buck

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Solar Radiation Absorption due to Water Vapor: Advanced Broadband Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate parameterizations for calculating solar radiation absorption in the atmospheric column due to water vapor lines and continuum are proposed for use in broadband shortwave radiative transfer codes. The error in the absorption values is ...

Tatiana A. Tarasova; Boris A. Fomin

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus ...

Schneider, Tapio

409

Heat transfer during film condensation of a liquid metal vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this investigation is to resolve the discrepancy between theory and experiment for the case of heat transfer durirnfilm condensation of liquid metal vapors. Experiments by previous investigators have yielded ...

Sukhatme, S. P.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this work is to investigate theoretically and experimentally the following two phases of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapore, a. Heat transfer during film condensation of pure saturated ...

Kroger, Detlev Gustav

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Photoinitiated chemical vapor depostion [sic] : mechanism and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition (piCVD) is developed as a simple, solventless, and rapid method for the deposition of swellable hydrogels and functional hydrogel copolymers. Mechanistic experiments show that piCVD ...

Baxamusa, Salmaan Husain

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon and sacrificial polymer thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) produced films for a wide array of applications from a variety of organosilicon and organic precursors. The structure and properties of thin films were controlled by varying processing ...

Casserly, Thomas Bryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Column Water Vapor Content in Clear and Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With radiosonde data from 15 Northern Hemisphere stations, surface-to-400-mb column water vapor is computed from daytime soundings for 1988–1990. On the basis of simultaneous surface visual cloud observations, the data are categorized according ...

Dian J. Gaffen; William P. Elliott

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Initiated chemical vapor deposition of functional polyacrylic thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was explored as a novel method for synthesis of functional polyacrylic thin films. The process introduces a peroxide initiator, which can be decomposed at low temperatures (<200?C) ...

Mao, Yu, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kawaihae Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil geochemistry yielded quite complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radonemanation rates within the survey area (Cox and Cuff, 1981c). Mercury concentrations (Fig. 38) showed a general minimum along the Kawaihae-Waimea roads and a broad trend of increasing mercury concentrations toward both the north and south. There is no correlation apparent between the mercury patterns and either the resistivity sounding data or the surface geology in the area. The radon emanometry data (Fig.

416

Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanation surveys were performed over much of the accessible surface of Lualualei Valley (Cox and Thomas, 1979). The results of these surveys (Figs 7 and 8) delineated several areas in which soil mercury concentrations or radon emanation rates were substantially above normal background values. Some of these areas were apparently coincident with the mapped fracture systems associated with the caldera boundaries.

417

Raman Lidar Profiling of Tropospheric Water Vapor over Kangerlussuaq, Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new measurement capability has been implemented in the Arctic Lidar Technology (ARCLITE) system at the Sondrestrom upper-atmosphere research facility near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland (67.0°N, 50.9°W), enabling estimates of atmospheric water vapor ...

Ryan Reynolds Neely III; Jeffrey P. Thayer

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Lidar Monitoring of the Water Vapor Cycle in the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor mixing ratio distribution in the lower and middle troposphere has been continuously monitored, using an active lidar system. The methodology of the differential absorption laser method used for these measurements is summarized and ...

C. Cahen; G. Megie; P. Flamant

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers  

SciTech Connect

An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Determination of the Vapor Pressure of Lanthanum Fluoride  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary experiments have been made to determine the vapor pressure of lanthanum fluoride between 0.001 and 0.1 millimeter of mercury by means of the Knudsen effusion method. A tantalum cell for this purpose is described. Only preliminary results were obtained and they were all in a relatively high pressure region. However, a plot of the vapor pressure against the reciprocal of absolute temperature approximates a straight line such as would be predicted from theoretical considerations.

Stone, B. D.

1954-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Heat Recovery in Distillation by Mechanical Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant reduction in distillation tower energy requirements can be achieved by mechanical vapor recompression. Three design approaches for heating a distillation tower reboiler by mechanical vapor recompression are presented. The advantages of using a screw compressor are discussed in detail. An example of a xylene extraction tower is sited, illustrating the economic attractiveness in which a simple payback period of less than two years is achievable.

Becker, F. E.; Zakak, A. I.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

Jervis, T.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Cellular glass insulation keeps liquefied gas from vaporizing  

SciTech Connect

The North West Shelf Project, located on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, supplies much of that vast state with natural gas for domestic and industrial applications. Some of the gas is also exported to Japan as liquefied natural gas (LNG). While awaiting shipment to Japan, the LNG is stored at {minus}322 F in four storage tanks, each with a capacity of 2.5 million ft{sup 3}. When Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty Ltd., operator of the LNG facility, selected insulation material for the storage tanks, it went in search of a material with more than just insulating value. Since the insulation is installed inside the tanks, it must be able to resist wicking or absorbing the LNG. Also, it had to have sufficient strength to withstand the weight of the 2.5 million ft{sup 3} of LNG without being crushed or losing its insulting properties. And, as a safety precaution, the selected materials should neither burn nor support combustion. Ultimately, Woodside selected a cellular glass insulation called Foamglas, from Pittsburgh Corning Corp., that met all the performance criteria and was cost competitive with the lesser-performing alternatives. Foamglas is produced from strong, inert borosilicate glass. Its insulating capability is provided by the tiny, closed cells of air encapsulated within the foam-like structure of the glass. Since the cells are closed,neither liquid nor vapor can enter the structure of the insulation. The inert glass itself will not absorb or react with LNG, nor will it burn or support a fire. The cellular structure provides effective insulation in both not and cold applications, and offers a fire barrier.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Maria Cadeddu

425

Low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films using disilane and nitrous oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: disilane, low temperature, nitrous oxide, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, silicon oxide

Juho Song; G. S. Lee; P. K. Ajmera

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Design, construction, and initial operation of the BNL-coastal transport and diffusion, Air/Sea Interaction research buoy. Data report  

SciTech Connect

Design features of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Air/Sea Interaction (A/S-I) buoy are described, and construction, testing, and deployment experiences are related. This two-attitude buoy is similar to the MIT/Navy buoy which it replaces, but it accommodates more instruments and can be towed through shallower water. The BNL A/S-I buoy can be broken down into two, three, or four sections to facilitate overland transport. Compressed air is stored aboard and the controls for deploying, trimming, and recovering the buoy are centralized on the superstructure and are perpetually above water level. The ballast control plumbing is entirely within the hull for maximum protection. The buoy also has a propane storage and distribution system and a 40-watt thermoelectric generator for powering instruments. Two buoys were built and tested in 1978, and one buoy was deployed in 1979 and is in operation off the south coast of Long Island.

Huszagh, D; Ripperger, W; Fink, S

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 20, 2013 June 20, 2013 CX-010655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roof Repair on Crane Maintenance Area Roof CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/20/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2013 CX-010657: Categorical Exclusion Determination Western Sector Treatment System Soil Vapor Extraction Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2013 CX-010656: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stormwater Drainage Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 17, 2013 CX-010662: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reroute Diesel Water Cooling Line at 241-125H CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/17/2013

428

Dynamic modeling of plasma-vapor interactions during plasma disruptions  

SciTech Connect

Intense deposition of energy in short times on fusion reactor components during a plasma disruption may cause severe surface erosion due to ablation of these components. The exact amount of the eroded material is very important to the reactor design and its lifetime. During the plasma deposition, the vaporized wall material will interact with the incoming plasma particles and may shield the rest of the wall from damage. The vapor shielding may then prolong the lifetime of these components and increase the reactor duty cycle. To correctly evaluate the impact of vapor shielding effect a comprehensive model is developed. In this model the dynamic slowing down of the plasma particles, both ions and electrons, with the eroded wall material is established. Different interaction processes between the plasma particles and the ablated material is included. The generated photons radiation source and the transport of this radiation through the vapor to the wall is modeled. Recent experimental data on disruptions is analyzed and compared with model predictions. Vapor shielding may be effective in reducing the overall erosion rate for certain plasma disruption parameters and conditions.

Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process involving vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials for creating high aspect ratio (i.e., length much greater than diameter), isolated cylindrical holes in dielectric materials that have been exposed to high-energy atomic particles. The process includes cleaning the surface of the tracked material and exposing the cleaned surface to a vapor of a suitable etchant. Independent control of the temperatures of the vapor and the tracked materials provide the means to vary separately the etch rates for the latent track region and the non-tracked material. As a rule, the tracked regions etch at a greater rate than the non-tracked regions. In addition, the vapor-etched holes can be enlarged and smoothed by subsequent dipping in a liquid etchant. The 20-1000 nm diameter holes resulting from the vapor etching process can be useful as molds for electroplating nanometer-sized filaments, etching gate cavities for deposition of nano-cones, developing high-aspect ratio holes in trackable resists, and as filters for a variety of molecular-sized particles in virtually any liquid or gas by selecting the dielectric material that is compatible with the liquid or gas of interest.

Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Porter, John D. (Berkeley, CA); Yoshiyama, James M. (Fremont, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Drying of pulverized material with heated condensible vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for drying pulverized material utilizes a high enthalpy condensable vapor such as steam for removing moisture from the individual particles of the pulverized material. The initially wet particulate material is tangentially delivered by a carrier vapor flow to an upper portion of a generally vertical cylindrical separation drum. The lateral wall of the separation drum is provided with a plurality of flow guides for directing the vapor tangentially therein in the direction of particulate material flow. Positioned concentrically within the separation drum and along the longitudinal axis thereof is a water-cooled condensation cylinder which is provided with a plurality of collection plates, or fines, on the outer lateral surface thereof. The cooled collection fines are aligned counter to the flow of the pulverized material and high enthalpy vapor mixture to maximize water vapor condensation thereon. The condensed liquid which includes moisture removed from the pulverized materials then flows downward along the outer surface of the coolant cylinder and is collected and removed. The particles travel in a shallow helix due to respective centrifugal and vertical acceleration forces applied thereto. The individual particles of the pulverized material are directed outwardly by the vortex flow where they contact the inner cylindrical surface of the separation drum and are then deposited at the bottom thereof for easy collection and removal. The pulverized material drying apparatus is particularly adapted for drying coal fines and facilitates the recovery of the pulverized coal. 2 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Vaporization behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and direct observations of the vapor phase using laser diagnostics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transition metal and actinide carbides, such as ZrC or NbC and UC or ThC, exhibit a wide range of stoichiometry, and therefore vaporize incongruently. At long times, steady state vaporization can be achieved where relative concentrations of atomic species on solid surface equals that in the gas phase. The surface composition under these steady state conditions is termed the congruently vaporizing composition, (CVC). Modeling the vaporization or corrosion behavior of this dynamic process is complex and requires an understanding of how the surface composition changes with time and a knowledge of CVC, which is both temperature and atmosphere dependent. This paper describes vaporization and corrosion behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and, as an example, describes a thermokinetic model that characterizes the vaporization behavior of the complex carbide U{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}C{sub y} in hydrogen at 2500 to 3200 K. This model demonstrates that steady state corrosion of U{sub x}Zr{sub l-x}C{sub y} is rate limited by gaseous transport of Zr where partial pressure of Zr is determined by CVC. This paper also briefly describes efforts to image and characterize the vapor phase above the surface of ZrC in static and flowing gas environments using planar laser induced fluorescence. We have developed the method for monitoring and controlling the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuels in nuclear thermal rockets. However, the techniques described can be used, to image boundary layers, and could be used verifying corrosion models.

Butt, D.P.; Wantuck, P.J.; Rehse, S.J.; Wallace, T.C. Sr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Low temperature photochemical vapor deposition of alloy and mixed metal oxide films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for formation of an alloy thin film, or a mixed metal oxide thin film, on a substrate at relatively low temperatures. Precursor vapor(s) containing the desired thin film constituents is positioned adjacent to the substrate and irradiated by light having wavelengths in a selected wavelength range, to dissociate the gas(es) and provide atoms or molecules containing only the desired constituents. These gases then deposit at relatively low temperatures as a thin film on the substrate. The precursor vapor(s) is formed by vaporization of one or more precursor materials, where the vaporization temperature(s) is selected to control the ratio of concentration of metals present in the precursor vapor(s) and/or the total precursor vapor pressure.

Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM Observations Cady-Pereira, Karen Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Shephard, Mark Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Atmospheric State and Surface The primary objective of the TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) instrument on the Aura spacecraft is the retrieval of trace gases, especially water vapor and ozone. The TES retrievals extremely useful for global monitoring of the atmospheric state, but they must be validated. The ARM sites are well instrumented and provide continuous measurements, which

434

High temperature vapor pressure and the critical point of potassium  

SciTech Connect

The vapor pressure of potassium was experimentally determined from 2100 deg F up to-its critical temperature. An empirical equation of the form ln P = A + B/T + C ln T + DT/sup 1.5/ was found to best fit the data. A critical pressure of 2378.2 plus or minus 4.0 psia (161.79 plus or minus 0.27 ata) was measured. The corresponding critical temperature, extrapolated from the pressure-- temperature curve, is 4105.4 plus or minus 5 deg R (2280.8 plus or minus 3 deg K). The technique employed was tae pressure tube method developed earlier in this laboratory and used for determining the vapor pressure of rubidium and cesium. This method measures tae critical pressure directly, as well as the vapor pressure st lower temperatures. (4 tables, 6 figures, 26 references) (auth)

Jerez, W.R.; Bhise, V.S.; Das Gupta, S.; Bonilla, C.F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption technique to retrieve columnar water vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential absorption techniques are suitable to retrieve the total column water vapor contents from imaging spectroscopy data. A technique called Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption (APDA) is derived directly from simplified radiative transfer equations. It combines a partial atmospheric correction with a differential absorption technique. The atmospheric path radiance term is iteratively corrected during the retrieval of water vapor. This improves the results especially over low background albedos. The error of the method for various ground reflectance spectra is below 7% for most of the spectra. The channel combinations for two test cases are then defined, using a quantitative procedure, which is based on MODTRAN simulations and the image itself. An error analysis indicates that the influence of aerosols and channel calibration is minimal. The APDA technique is then applied to two AVIRIS images acquired in 1991 and 1995. The accuracy of the measured water vapor columns is within a range of {+-}5% compared to ground truth radiosonde data.

Schlaepfer, D.; Itten, K.I. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography] [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography; Borel, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, J. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Interactions between Liquid-Wall Vapor and Edge Plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of liquid walls for fusion reactors could help solve problems associated with material erosion from high plasma heat-loads and neutronic activation of structures. A key issue analyzed here is the influx of impurity ions to the core plasma from the vapor of liquid side-walls. Numerical 2D transport simulations are performed for a slab geometry which approximates the edge region of a reactor-size tokamak. Both lithium vapor (from Li or SnLi walls) and fluorine vapor (from Flibe walls) are considered for hydrogen edge-plasmas in the high- and low-recycling regimes. It is found that the minimum influx is from lithium with a low-recycling hydrogen plasma, and the maximum influx occurs for fluorine with a high-recycling hydrogen plasma.

Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Intermediate Vapor Expansion Distillation and Nested Enrichment Cascade Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although it is known that incorporating an intermediate reboiler or reflux condenser in a distillation column will improve column efficiency by 15 to 100%, there has been little use of this technique to date." Intermediate vapor compression heat pumping was recently introduced as one practical means of achieving this benefit. Introduced in this paper are two new means having added advantages over compression: intermediate vapor expansion heat pumping, and nested enrichment cascades. In both cases the efficiency advantage is obtained without requiring import of shaft work. With intermediate vapor expansion, the expander is more efficient and less costly than the compressor which achieves comparable improvement in distillation efficiency. With the "nested enrichment" technique, the increased efficiency is obtained without requiring either compressors or expanders.

Erickson, D. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Standard hydrogen monitoring system-B operation and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide information for the operation and maintenance of the Standards Hydrogen Monitoring System-B (SHMS-B) used in the 200E and 200W area tank farms on the Hanford site. This provides information specific to the mechanical operation of the system and is not intended to take the place of a Plant Operating Procedure. The primary function of the SHMS-B is to monitor specifically for hydrogen in the waste tank vapor space which may also contain unknown quantities of other gaseous constituents.

Bender, R.M.

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Office of Business Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations HSS Logo Office of Business Operations Reports to the Office of Resource Management Director's Message Welcome to the Office of Business Operations Richard D....

440

Operations Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Strategic Plan Updated July 2009 Operations Organization Chief Operating Officer (COO) Deputy COO Environment, Health & Safety EH&S Facilities FAC Project Management...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Two Stage Vapor Compression Heat Pump with Solution Circuits: Catering to Simultaneous Chilling and Water Heating Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The benefits of using a two stage vapor compression heat pump with ammonia water solution circuits (VCHSC) to simultaneously provide chilled water for air conditioning and hot water for various uses are reviewed. The performance results for a two stage VCHSC are summarized. Experimental results indicate that the two stage VCHSC can achieve cooling coefficient of performances as high as 1.04 while pumping heat through a lift of 194°F (108°C). Comparison is made with a system consisting of a vapor compressor chiller and a gas fired furnace. The basis for comparison being primary energy usage, energy cost and initial cost of the systems. Energy saving at various operating conditions is estimated. In some cases, energy saving could be as high as 31%. Based on the national average energy prices in 1991 and the projected prices for 1995, suitable applications for the two stage VCHSC have been identified.

Rane, M. V.; Radermacher, R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

High efficiency vapor-fed AMTEC system for direct conversion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) is a high temperature, high efficiency system for converting thermal to electrical energy, with no moving parts. It is based on the unique properties of {beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which is an excellent conductor of sodium ions, but an extremely poor conductor of electrons. When the inside of the BASE is maintained at a higher temperature and pressure, a concentration gradient is created across the BASE. Electrons and sodium atoms cannot pass through the BASE. However, the sodium atoms are ionized, and the sodium ions move through the BASE to the lower potential (temperature) region. The electrons travel externally to the AMTEC cell, providing power. There are a number of potential advantages to a wick-pumped, vapor-fed AMTEC system when compared with other designs. A wick-pumped system uses capillary forces to passively return liquid to the evaporator, and to distribute the liquid in the evaporator. Since the fluid return is self-regulating, multiple BASE tubes can use a single remote condenser, potentially improving efficiency in advanced AMTEC designs. Since the system is vapor-fed, sodium vapor is supplied at a uniform temperature and flux to the BASE tube, even with non-uniform heat fluxes and temperatures at the evaporator. The primary objective of the Phase 2 program was to develop wick-pumped AMTEC cells. During the program, procedures to fabricate wicks with smaller pore sizes were developed, to allow operation of an AMTEC cell at 800 C. A revised design was made for a High-Temperature, Wick-Fed AMTEC cell. In addition to the smaller wick pore size, several other changes were made to increase the cell efficiency: (1) internal artery return of condensate; (2) high temperature electrical feedthrough; and (3) separate heat pipe for providing heat to the BASE.

Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

443

Vapor sampling of the headspace of radioactive waste storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper recants the history of vapor sampling in the headspaces of radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The first two tanks to receive extensive vapor pressure sampling were Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-C-103. At various times, a gas chromatography, on-line mass spectrometer, solid state hydrogen monitor, FTIR, and radio acoustic ammonia monitor have been installed. The head space gas sampling activities will continue for the next few years. The current goal is to sample the headspace for all the tanks. Some tank headspaces will be sampled several times to see the data vary with time. Other tanks will have continuous monitors installed to provide additional data.

Reynolds, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Operations Directorate (OPS Directorate)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Directorate (OPS Directorate) Operations Directorate (OPS Directorate) Purpose A group chartered by the Associate Laboratory Director for the Advanced Photon Source that includes the responsible Division Directors and other appropriate APS operations personnel. The Operations Directorate collectively coordinates operating decisions that affect the facility as a whole and establishes both long- and short-term schedules, including scheduled maintenance and facility improvement periods. The Operations Directorate is the APS forum in which decisions regarding operations are discussed: These include, but are not limited to: Safety issues related to operations Operational Schedule Global operating parameters within the defined and approved operational and safety envelopes, such as energy, maximum circulating beam

445

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: OLED's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information For more information on this project, please contact: Steve Johnson Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4274 SGJohnson@lbl.gov Sponsor Information This project is...

446

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: Charge Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information For more information on this project, please contact: Steve Johnson Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4274 SGJohnson@lbl.gov Sponsor Information This project is...

447

Replacing Incandescent Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as ellipsoidal reflectors (type-ER) in recessed fixtures. Use reflector (R)or parabolic reflector (PAR) CFLs for flood and spotlighting. Some CFL fixtures have built-in...

448

High efficiency inverter and ballast circuits  

SciTech Connect

A high efficiency push-pull inverter circuit employing a pair of relatively high power switching transistors is described. The switching on and off of the transistors is precisely controlled to minimize power losses due to common-mode conduction or due to transient conditions that occur in the process of turning a transistor on or off. Two current feed-back transformers are employed in the transistor base drives; one being saturable for providing a positive feedback, and the other being non-saturable for providing a subtractive feedback.

Nilssen, O.K.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Smoothing HCCI heat release with vaporization-cooling-induced thermal stratification using ethanol.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends are being widely considered as alternative fuels for light-duty automotive applications. At the same time, HCCI combustion has the potential to provide high efficiency and ultra-low exhaust emissions. However, the application of HCCI is typically limited to low and moderate loads because of unacceptably high heat-release rates (HRR) at higher fueling rates. This work investigates the potential of lowering the HCCI HRR at high loads by using partial fuel stratification to increase the in-cylinder thermal stratification. This strategy is based on ethanol's high heat of vaporization combined with its true single-stage ignition characteristics. Using partial fuel stratification, the strong fuel-vaporization cooling produces thermal stratification due to variations in the amount of fuel vaporization in different parts of the combustion chamber. The low sensitivity of the autoignition reactions to variations of the local fuel concentration allows the temperature variations to govern the combustion event. This results in a sequential autoignition event from leaner and hotter zones to richer and colder zones, lowering the overall combustion rate compared to operation with a uniform fuel/air mixture. The amount of partial fuel stratification was varied by adjusting the fraction of fuel injected late to produce stratification, and also by changing the timing of the late injection. The experiments show that a combination of 60-70% premixed charge and injection of 30-40 % of the fuel at 80{sup o}CA before TDC is effective for smoothing the HRR. With CA50 held fixed, this increases the burn duration by 55% and reduces the maximum pressure-rise rate by 40%. Combustion stability remains high but engine-out NO{sub x} has to be monitored carefully. For operation with strong reduction of the peak HRR, ISNO{sub x} rises to around 0.20 g/kWh for an IMEP{sub g} of 440 kPa. The single-cylinder HCCI research engine was operated naturally aspirated without EGR at 1200 rpm, and had low residual level using a CR = 14 piston.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program. [Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the finding and recommendations on the audit of the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program. The status of the program was assessed to determine whether the Department was achieving objectives stated in its January 1990 Plan for the Demonstration, Transition and Deployment of AVLIS Technology. Through Fiscal Year 1991, the Department had spent about $1.1 billion to develop AVLIS technology. The January 1990 plan provided for AVLIS to be far enough along by September to enable the Department to make a determination of the technical and economic feasibility of deployment. However, the milestones needed to support that determination were not met. An estimated $550 million would be needed to complete AVLIS engineering development and related testing prior to deployment. The earliest possible deployment date has slipped to beyond the year 2000. It is recommended that the Department reassess the requirement for AVLIS in light of program delays and changes that have taken place in the enrichment market since January 1990. Following the reassessment, a decision should be made to either fully support and promote the actions needed to complete AVLIS development or discontinue support for the program entirely. Management's position is that the Department will successfully complete the AVLIS technology demonstration and that the program should continue until it can be transferred to a Government corporation. Although the auditors recognize that AVLIS may be transferred, there are enough technical and financial uncertainties that a thorough assessment is warranted.

Not Available

1992-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Computation of Infrared Cooling Rates in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast but accurate method for calculating the infrared radiative terms due to water vapor has been developed. It makes use of the behavior in the far wings of absorption lines to scale transmission along an inhomogencous path to an equivalent ...

Ming Dah Chou; Albert Arking

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Probing Hurricanes with Stable Isotopes of Rain and Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain and water vapor were collected during flights in Hurricanes Olivia (1994), Opal (1995), Marilyn (1995), and Hortense (1995) and analyzed for their stable isotopic concentrations, or ratios, H218O:H2O and HDO:H2O. The spatial patterns and ...

Stanley Gedzelman; James Lawrence; John Gamache; Michael Black; Edward Hindman; Robert Black; Jason Dunion; Hugh Willoughby; Xiaoping Zhang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Observation of Water Vapor Greenhouse Absorption over the Gulf of Mexico Using Aircraft and Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through its interaction with radiation, water vapor provides an important link between the ocean and atmosphere. One way this occurs is through the greenhouse effect; observations of water vapor greenhouse absorption in the Gulf of Mexico during ...

David Marsden; Francisco P. J. Valero

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Investigation of Turbulent Processes in the Lower Troposphere with Water Vapor DIAL and Radar–RASS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution water vapor and wind measurements in the lower troposphere within the scope of the Baltic Sea Experiment (BALTEX) are presented. The measurements were performed during a field campaign with a new water vapor differential ...

V. Wulfmeyer

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Biblarz, Oscar (Swampscott, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Influence of a Tropical Island Mountain on Solar Radiation, Air Temperature and Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation, air temperature, and water vapor pressure at 17 stations on the northwest flank of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are compared with modeled clear day solar radiation and free atmosphere air temperature and water vapor pressure. ...

Dennis Nullet

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modes and Mechanisms of Global Water Vapor Variability over the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modes and mechanisms of the annual water vapor variations over the twentieth century are investigated based on a newly developed twentieth-century atmospheric reanalysis product. It is found that the leading modes of global water vapor ...

Liping Zhang; Lixin Wu; Bolan Gan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study presented here attempts to quantify the significance of southerly water vapor fluxes on precipitation occurring in the eastern Fertile Crescent region. The water vapor fluxes were investigated at high temporal and spatial resolution by ...

J. P. Evans; R. B. Smith

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements Made by Raman Lidar and Radiosondes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the calibration characteristics of the NASA/GSFC Raman water vapor lidar during three field experiments that occurred between 1991 and 1993. The lidar water vapor profiles are calibrated using relative humidity profiles ...

R. A. Ferrare; S. H. Melfi; D. N. Whiteman; K. D. Evans; F. J. Schmidlin; D. O'C. Starr

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor on a horizontal plate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of the investigation is to analyze the following two features of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapor: a. Heat transfer during film condensation of a pure saturated potassium vapor on a horizontal ...

Meyrial, Paul M.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Distributions of Liquid, Vapor, and Ice in an Orographic Cloud from Field Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase distribution of the water mass of a cold orographic cloud into vapor, liquid, and ice is calculated from measurements made from an instrumented aircraft. The vapor values are calculated from thermodynamic measurements, and the liquid is ...

Taneil Uttal; Robert M. Rauber; Lewis O. Grant

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Chemical vapor deposition thin films as biopassivation coatings and directly patternable dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organosilicon thin films deposited by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PPECVD) and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) were investigated as potential biopassivation coatings for neural probes. ...

Pryce Lewis, Hilton G. (Hilton Gavin), 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Determination of concentration-dependent dispersion of propane in vapor extraction of heavy oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vapex (vapor extraction) is a solvent-based non-thermal in-situ heavy oil recovery process. In Vapex process, a vaporized hydrocarbon solvent is injected into an upper horizontal… (more)

Abukhalifeh, Hadil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Measurements of the Vapor Pressure of Supercooled Water Using Infrared Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of the vapor pressure of supercooled water utilizing infrared spectroscopy, which enables unambiguous verification that the authors’ data correspond to the vapor pressure of liquid water, not a mixture of liquid water ...

Will Cantrell; Eli Ochshorn; Alexander Kostinski; Keith Bozin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Section 5.4.5 Exterior Lighting: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that allows plenty of time for both pedestrians and motorists to be seen. LAMP AND BALLAST SELECTION Mercury vapor lights should be avoided. Replace mer- cury vapor lights with...

467

Cold source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... R-134a to simulate the flow of LH2 with the expected vapor flow rate and liquid-to-vapor density ratio.) A separate, 0.5 m3 ballast tank will be ...

468

Grid orientation effects in the simulation of cold water injection into depleted vapor zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A considerable body of field experience with injection has been accumulated at Larderello, Italy and The Geysers, California; the results have been mixed. There are well documented cases where injection has increased flow rates of nearby wells. Return of injected fluid as steam from production wells has been observed directly through chemical and isotopic changes of produced fluids (Giovannoni et al., 1981; Nuti et al., 1981). In other cases injection has caused thermal interference and has degraded the temperature and pressure of production wells. Water injection into depleted vapor zones gives rise to complex two-phase fluid flow and heat transfer processes with phase change. These are further complicated by the fractured-porous nature of the reservoir rocks. An optimization of injection design and operating practice is desirable; this requires realistic and robust mathematical modeling capabilities.

Pruess, K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

TEMPLETON, A.M.

2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

470

Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

TEMPLETON, A.M.

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

TEMPLETON, A.M.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

High efficiency vapor-fed AMTEC system for direct conversion. Appendices for final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of four appendices for the final report. They are: Appendix A: 700 C Vapor-Fed AMTEC Cell Calculations; Appendix B: 700 C Vapor-Fed AMTEC Cell Parts Drawings; Appendix C: 800 C Vapor-Fed AMTEC Cell Calculations; and Appendix D: 800 C Wick-Pumped AMTEC Cell System Design.

Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

473

Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-BX-110: Results from samples collected on 04/30/96  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-BX-110 (Tank BX-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-U-109: Results from samples collected on 8/10/95  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-109 (Tank U-109) At the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. This tank is on the Hydrogen Waste List. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases and total non-methane hydrocarbons is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples is also listed in the table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Parastillation Process in Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Parastillation process is a new method for multi-stage, counter-current contact between vapor and liquid that results in 33% more ideal stages than distillation for a given tray spacing. Patents have been granted in the U.S.A., U.K., Europe and other countries. Performance of the process has been confirmed over the past several years by computer simulation, by laboratory tests and in commercial installations.

Canfield, F.; Jenkins, O.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Uncertain generalized aggregation operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to extend the generalized ordered weighted averaging operator and provide a new class of operators called the uncertain generalized ordered weighted averaging (UGOWA) operator. It provides a very general formulation that includes ... Keywords: Aggregation, Decision making, Generalized mean, OWA operator, Operator weights

Li-Gang Zhou; Hua-You Chen; José M. Merigó; Anna M. Gil-Lafuente

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Heat Transfer Operators Associated with Quantum Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this article is the investigation of the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since, any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This article is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

Ç. Aksak; S. Turgut

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

Mathematical analysis of hydrogen mixing and diffusion in the vapor space of a high-level nuclear waste tank  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents mathematical analyses of the possible accumulation of radiolytically produced hydrogen in the vapor space in a tank storing liquid high-level radioactive waste. Under normal operating conditions, these tanks are continuously ventilated with air to ensure that the concentration of hydrogen never reaches its lower flammability limit (4%). These scenarios are considered in which it is postulated that hydrogen may accumulate and present a flammability hazard. These scenarios are stratification due to gravity, slow mixing when the ventilation system is operating, and slow mixing when the ventilation system is not operating. In all three cases, the analyses indicate that the accumulation of hydrogen is not likely and thus does not present a flammability problem so long as controls are in place to dilute its concentration to less than 4%.

Bibler, N.E. (ed.); Wallace, R.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Air Carrier Flight Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air carriers operate under a system of prioritized goals including safety, customer service (on-time departures and arrivals) and operating economics. The flight operations department is responsible for the safe and ...

Midkif, Alan H.

480

Definitions common to all certification and test procedures are in: D-200 Definitions for Certification Procedures and Test Procedures for Vapor Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the purpose of this procedure, the term "ARB " refers to the State of California Air Resources Board, and the term "ARB Executive Officer " refers to the Executive Officer of the ARB or his or her authorized representative or designate. 1.1 General Applicability This procedure applies to the determination of the one minute static pressure performance of a vapor recovery system of a cargo tank by fluid mechanical principles. This procedure applies to any vapor emissions associated with the dispensing of any fluid, although it is written to reflect application to the hydrocarbon vapors associated with the dispensing of gasoline. 1.2 Determinations of Compliance and Violation Determinations of certain modes of compliance with and violation of certification specifications is outlined in § 9. 1.3 Modifications Modification of this procedure may be necessary for vapors and fluids other than the hydrocarbon vapors associated with the dispensing of gasoline. Any modification of this method shall be subject to approval by the ARB Executive Officer. 2 PRINCIPLE AND SUMMARY OF TEST PROCEDURE Upon completion of loading operations at the bulk gasoline distribution facility, the gasoline cargo tank is pressurized, with nitrogen, to 18 inches water column. By using the total cargo California Air Resources Board March 17, 1999 TP-204.2, Page 1tank shell capacity, post-loading headspace volume, and the Ideal Gas Law, a one-minute maximum allowable pressure decay is calculated. The pressure decay is monitored for one minute and compliance is determined by comparison with the maximum allowable calculated value. The leak rate through the cargo tank internal vapor vent valve is similarly obtained. 3

unknown authors

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ballast operated vapor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

A conserved Parity Operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry of Nature under a Space Inversion is described by a Parity operator. Contrary to popular belief, the Parity operator is not unique. The choice of the Parity operator requires several arbitrary decisions to be made. It is shown that alternative, equally plausible, choices leads to the definition of a Parity operator that is conserved by the Weak Interactions. The operator commonly known as CP is a more appropriate choice for a Parity operator.

Mark J Hadley

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

482

Operating Experience Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operating Experience Summaries The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information...

483

ARM - NSA Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Operations Barrow Facility Instrumentation at the Barrow facility operates 7 days a week, 24 hours a day, year around. The...

484

Control and Optimization of Vapor Compression Cycles Using Recursive Least Squares Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor compression cycles are the primary method by which refrigeration and air-conditioning systems operate, and thus constitute a significant portion of commercial and residential building energy consumption. This thesis presents a data-driven approach to find the optimal operating conditions of a multi-evaporator system in order to minimize the energy consumption while meeting operational requirements such as constant cooling or constant evaporator outlet temperature. The experimental system used for controller evaluation is a custom built small-scale water chiller with three evaporators; each evaporator services a separate body of water, referred to as a cooling zone. The three evaporators are connected to a single condenser and variable speed compressor, and feature variable water flow and electronic expansion valves. The control problem lies in development of a control architecture that will minimize the energy consumed by the system without prior information about the system in the form of performance maps, or complex mathematical models. The control architecture explored in this thesis relies on the data collected by sensors alone to formulate a function for the power consumption of the system in terms of controlled variables, namely, condenser and evaporator pressures, using recursive least squares estimation. This cost function is then minimized to attain optimal set points for the pressures which are fed to local controllers.

Rani, Avinash

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

Kunnmann, Walter (Stony Brook, NY); Larese, John Z. (Rocky Point, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Report of results of the vapor vacuum extraction test at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the state of Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A test-scale vapor vacuum extraction (VVE) system was installed and operated at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), which is west of Idaho Falls, Idaho and is managed by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. The system was constructed for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of VVE or vapor venting technology to abate a volatile organic compound (VOC) plume located in the vadose zone below the subsurface disposal area at the complex. To date, the system has been operated for two periods, a two-week test and a four-month test. The purpose of the two-week test was to determine what would be extracted from the borehole and to verify the design of the system to handle what would be extracted.

Chatwin, T.D.; Miyasaki, D.H.; Sisson, J.B.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Report of results of the vapor vacuum extraction test at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the state of Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A test-scale vapor vacuum extraction (VVE) system was installed and operated at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), which is west of Idaho Falls, Idaho and is managed by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. The system was constructed for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of VVE or vapor venting technology to abate a volatile organic compound (VOC) plume located in the vadose zone below the subsurface disposal area at the complex. To date, the system has been operated for two periods, a two-week test and a four-month test. The purpose of the two-week test was to determine what would be extracted from the borehole and to verify the design of the system to handle what would be extracted.

Chatwin, T.D.; Miyasaki, D.H.; Sisson, J.B.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mercury Vapor At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The high degree of cultural activity (e.g. residential areas, streets, jet runways, etc.) on Mokapu both limited the extent of the soil geochemical surveys performed and rendered their interpretation much more difficult. Soil mercury concentrations and radon emanometry data on the peninsula showed a few localized high values (Figs 13, 14), but no consistent correlation between the anomalous zones and geologic features could be

489

Catalytic hydrogenation process and apparatus with improved vapor liquid separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous hydrogenation process and apparatus wherein liquids are contacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst reaction zone with the liquids and gas flowing vertically upwardly through that zone into a second zone substantially free of catalyst particles and wherein the liquid and gases are directed against an upwardly inclining surface through which vertical conduits are placed having inlet ends at different levels in the liquid and having outlet ends at different levels above the inclined surface, such that vapor-rich liquid is collected and discharged through conduits terminating at a higher level above the inclined surface than the vapor-poor liquid which is collected and discharged at a level lower than the inclined surface.

Chervenak, Michael C. (Pennington, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Trenton, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Enhanced frequency up-conversion in Rb vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate highly efficient generation of coherent 420 nm light via up-conversion of near-infrared lasers in a hot rubidium vapor cell. By optimizing pump polarizations and frequencies we achieve a single-pass conversion efficiency of 260%/W, significantly higher than in previous experiments. A full 2D exploration of the coherent light generation and fluorescence as a function of the pump frequencies reveals that coherent blue light is generated at 85Rb two-photon resonances, as predicted by theory, but at high vapor pressure it is suppressed in spectral regions that don't support phase matching or exhibit single-photon Kerr refraction. Favorable scaling of our current 1 mW blue beam power with additional pump power is predicted. Infrared pump polarization could be used for future intensity switching experiments.

Vernier, A; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Hydrocarbon pool and vapor fire data analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The flame geometry and thermal radiation data from a series of large scale experiments involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and gasoline spills on water were analyzed. The experiments were conducted at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. Two types of fires have been studied; namely, pool fires and vapor fires. The spill quantity varied from 4 m/sup 3/ to approximately 6 m/sup 3/. The LPG pool fire flame height to diameter ratio were between 3.5 and 4.5. The gasoline flame height was about 2. The flame emissive powers for LPG pool fires ranged from 78 kW/m/sup 2/ to 115 kW/m/sup 2/. The average surface emissive power for gasoline pool fire was 40 kW/m/sup 2/. The LPG vapor fire emissive power ranged from 159 to 269 kW/m/sup 2/. 63 figures, 13 tables.

Mudan, K.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

494

Spar buoy construction having production and oil storage facilities and method of operation  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a floating structure including oil storage capacity and production facilities and adapted to be anchored by catenary mooring lines at a subsea well location, the combination of: a vertical elongated hull means having means to maintain the hull means in vertical position; the hull means including a vertical oil storage chamber means for storing oil and extending for a major portion of the height of the floating structure; vertical variable ballast chamber means extending from the bottom of the storage chamber means to above the top of the oil storage chamber means and selectively filled with ballast to maintain the center of gravity of the structure a selected distance from the center of buoyancy of the structure; work chamber means in the hull means above the oil storage chamber means; means in the work chamber means and in the variable ballast chamber means for controlling the amount of ballast in the variable ballast means; means in the oil storage chamber means and in the work chamber means for feeding oil to the oil storage chamber means and for removing water therefrom as oil is introduced therein; a central longitudinal passageway through the hull means; a riser means extending into the passageway from the subsea well location and terminating at the work chamber means; means on the riser buoyant tank means and on the hull means in the central passageway for guiding relative movement between the hull means and the riser means.

Daniell, A.F.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

495

Vaporizing Flow in Hot Fractures: Observations from Laboratory Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding water seepage in hot fractured rock is important in a number of fields including geothermal energy recovery and nuclear waste disposal. Heat-generating high-level nuclear waste packages which will be emplaced in the partially saturated fractured tuffs at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, if it becomes a high-level nuclear waste repository, will cause significant impacts on moisture distribution and migration. Liquid water, which occupies anywhere from 30 to 100% of the porespace, will be vaporized as the temperature reaches the boiling temperature. Flowing primarily in fractures, the vapor will condense where it encounters cooler rock, generating mobile water. This water will flow under gravitational and capillary forces and may flow back to the vicinity of the emplaced waste where it may partially escape vaporization. Water flowing down (sub-) vertical fractures may migrate considerable distances through fractured rock that is at above-boiling temperatures; thus, flowing condensate may contact waste packages, and provide a pathway for the transport of water-soluble radionuclides downward to the saturated zone. Thermally-driven flow processes induced by repository heat may be as important or even more important for repository performance than natural infiltration. For a nominal thermal loading of 57 kW/acre, vaporization may generate an average equivalent percolation flux from condensate of 23.1 mm/yr over 1,000 years, and 5.2 mm/yr over 10,000 years. These numbers are comparable to or larger than current estimates of net infiltration at Yucca Mountain. This condensate, which is generated in the immediate vicinity (meters) of the waste packages, will likely have a larger impact on waste package and repository performance than a similar amount of water introduced at the land surface.

Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are disclosed which determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to an equation given in the patent where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4) + K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation. 11 figs.

Nelson, L.D.; Cerni, T.A.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

497

M.D.?Lukin, “Storage of light in atomic vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experiment in which a light pulse is decelerated and trapped in a vapor of Rb atoms, stored for a controlled period of time, and then released on demand. We accomplish this storage of light by dynamically reducing the group velocity of the light pulse to zero, so that the coherent excitation of the light is reversibly mapped into a collective Zeeman (spin) coherence of the Rb vapor. PACS numbers 03.67.-a, 42.50.-p, 42.50.Gy Typeset using REVTEX 1 Photons are the fastest and most robust carriers of information, but they are difficult to localize and store. The present Letter reports a proof-of-principle demonstration of a technique [1,2] to trap, store, and release excitations carried by light pulses. Specifically, a pulse of light which is several kilometers long in free space is compressed to a length of a few centimeters and then converted into collective spin excitations in a vapor of Rb atoms. After a controllable storage time, the process is reversed and the atomic coherence is converted

D. F. Phillips; A. Fleischhauer; A. Mair; R. L. Walsworth; M. D. Lukin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavlength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to: ##EQU1## where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4)+K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation.

Nelson, Loren D. (Morrison, CO); Cerni, Todd A. (Littleton, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

500

Operator pencil passing through a given operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a linear differential operator acting on the space of densities of a given weight $\\lo$ on a manifold $M$. One can consider a pencil of operators $\\hPi(\\Delta)=\\{\\Delta_\\l\\}$ passing through the operator $\\Delta$ such that any $\\Delta_\\l$ is a linear differential operator acting on densities of weight $\\l$. This pencil can be identified with a linear differential operator $\\hD$ acting on the algebra of densities of all weights. The existence of an invariant scalar product in the algebra of densities implies a natural decomposition of operators, i.e. pencils of self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint operators. We study lifting maps that are on one hand equivariant with respect to divergenceless vector fields, and, on the other hand, with values in self-adjoint or anti-self-adjoint operators. In particular we analyze the relation between these two concepts, and apply it to the study of $\\diff(M)$-equivariant liftings. Finally we briefly consider the case of liftings equivariant with respect to the algebra of projective transformations and describe all regular self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint liftings.

A. Biggs; H. M. Khudaverdian

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z