National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bald eagle bull

  1. National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: National Bald Eagle Management...

  2. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (16 USC §§ 668–668d) and Related Regulations (50 CFR Part 22)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Bald and Golden Eagle Act (16 U.S.C. 668-668c) prohibits anyone from taking, possessing, or transporting a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) or golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), or the parts, nests, or eggs of such birds without prior authorization.

  3. EAGLE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003500WKSTN00 EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration https://github.com/ssrangan

  4. NREL: Wind Research - Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A bald eagle named Spirit and a golden eagle named Nova recently helped a team of researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) collect terabytes of data for a project ...

  5. Diana Bull

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... HomeDiana Bull Diana Bull Engineering Sciences R&D Department: Water Power Technologies bull Diana Bull is the wave energy converter (WEC) modeling lead in the Water Power ...

  6. Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds | Community | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 17, 2016 A bald eagle named Spirit and a golden eagle named Nova recently helped a team of researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) collect terabytes of data for a project aimed at helping researchers make wind energy safer for birds. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with industry to gather data about bird flight patterns, which will help the companies develop technology to reduce bird collisions with

  7. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In addition to immediate impacts, this definition also covers impacts that result from human-induced alterations initiated around a previously used nest site during a time when...

  8. Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Eagle County, Colorado, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  9. Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  10. Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data Dashboard Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Eagle County, Colorado, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Eagle County Data ...

  11. EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-16

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. Today there is no tools to conduct "graph mining" on RDF standard data sets. We address that need through implementation of popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, degree distribution, diversity degree, PageRank, etc.). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts and call our software tool as EAGLE. In RDF style, EAGLE stands for "EAGLE 'Is an' algorithmic graph library for exploration. EAGLE is like 'MATLAB' for 'Linked Data.'

  12. EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-16

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. Today there is no tools to conduct "graphmore » mining" on RDF standard data sets. We address that need through implementation of popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, degree distribution, diversity degree, PageRank, etc.). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts and call our software tool as EAGLE. In RDF style, EAGLE stands for "EAGLE 'Is an' algorithmic graph library for exploration. EAGLE is like 'MATLAB' for 'Linked Data.'« less

  13. Bull Solar GmbH Bull Holding AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Bull Holding AG) Place: North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany Sector: Solar Product: German solar installer. References: Bull Solar GmbH (Bull Holding AG)1 This article is a stub....

  14. Eagle, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Idaho's 1st congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Eagle, Idaho Hyperion Energy References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division...

  15. Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Eagle Conservation Plan (ECP) process and requirements. Calls for: 1) Preliminary landscape-level assessments to assess potential wildlife interactions; 2) Site-specific...

  16. Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd Place: Suzhou, China Sector: Vehicles...

  17. Bull Outdoor Products: Order (2015-CE-14014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Bull Outdoor Products, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Bull had failed to certify that refrigerator basic model BC-130 complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  18. Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Facility Bull Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser Market...

  19. Bull Moose Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: San Diego, California Sector: Biomass Product: Focused on development of biomass waste energy projects. References: Bull Moose Energy LLC1 This article is a stub. You...

  20. Bull Moose Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bull Moose Energy Address: P.O. Box 231501 Place: Encinitas, California Zip: 92023 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Biomass Product:...

  1. BullDog BioDiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BullDog BioDiesel Jump to: navigation, search Name: BullDog BioDiesel Place: Ellenwood, Georgia Zip: 30294 Product: BullDog operates a 68.2mLpa (12m gallon) capacity,...

  2. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 delete me old download page ...

  3. Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Reported Data Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Eagle County, Colorado. Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data (2.15 MB) More Documents & Publications Virginia -- SEP Summary of Reported Data Los Angeles Summary of Reported Data St. Lucie County Summary of Reported Data

  4. Take of Eagles Permit 3-200-16 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Take of Eagles Permit 3-200-16 Abstract Federal Fish and Wildlife Permit Application Form for Take of Depredating Eagles and Eagles that...

  5. FOA Announcement: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Testing Opportunities | Department of Energy FOA Announcement: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and Field Testing Opportunities FOA Announcement: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and Field Testing Opportunities June 22, 2016 - 4:08pm Addthis The Energy Department's Wind Program issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind turbines or wind facilities. This

  6. Notice of Intent: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind turbines or wind facilities. ...

  7. Smart Phone Technologies Reduce Risks to Eagles from Wind Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential Mitigating Wind-Radar ...

  8. Eagle Mountain, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eagle Mountain, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3141169, -112.006882 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  9. Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data More Documents & Publications Virginia -- SEP Summary of Reported Data Los Angeles Summary of Reported Data St. Lucie ...

  10. Webinar: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and Field Testing Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, the Energy Department's Wind Program issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind...

  11. Golden Eagle Territories and Ecology at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratanduono, M.

    2015-09-29

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to collect information on golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) use of Site 300. During 2014, we conducted surveys at Site 300 and for an area including a 10-mile radius of Site 300. Those surveys documented 42 golden eagle territories including two territories that overlapped with Site 300. These were named ‘Tesla’ and ‘Linac Road’. In 2015, we conducted surveys to refine the territory boundaries of golden eagle territories that overlapped with Site 300 and to document eagle activity at Site 300.

  12. Application for Nonpurposeful Eagle Take Permit | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eagle Take Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit Application: Application for Nonpurposeful...

  13. Eagle County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  14. Eagle County- Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  15. Solasta aka The Eagle Axis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 2458 Sector: Efficiency, Solar Product: Start-up planning to produce high-efficiency solar cells using nanoscale elements. References: Solasta (aka The Eagle Axis)1 This...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Golden Eagle was also recognized for its recycling and energy-efficiency initiatives, employee carpooling, and its green transportation program. Project at a Glance Fleet Type: ...

  17. Scaled Eagle Nebula Experiments on NIF (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scaled Eagle Nebula Experiments on NIF Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaled Eagle Nebula Experiments on NIF You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  18. EAGLE project for IGFC in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiso, Fumihiko; Akiyama, Tooru; Morihara, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kouji; Kida, Eiji; Iritani, Junichi; Tsujiguchi, Satoshi

    2000-07-01

    An Integrated Coal Gasification Fuel Cell power plant (IGFC) is one of the most attractive power plants in the 21st century because of its high efficiency and low impact on the environment. Under financial support of NEDO, the project for IGFC named ``Coal Energy Application for Gas, Liquid and Electricity (EAGLE)'' is in progress. This paper shows the current status of the project. EAGLE project aims to establish coal gasification technology for fuel cells, with special emphasis, to develop an coal gasifier and a gas clean up system which reduces trace elements within the tolerant level for fuel cells. Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (EPDC) and Hitachi Ltd. have researched and designed the plant. Plant Capacity of the plant is 150 tons per day of coal. Oxidization agent is pure oxygen produced by an air separation unit. Two-stage entrained flow type gasifier has been selected for EAGLE. Both cyclone and filter is used for dust removal. Syngas contains not only H{sub 2}S but also COS as sulfur compounds. H{sub 2}S is removed by the wet gas clean-up system using methyl di-ethanol amine (MDEA). However COS cannot be absorbed by MDEA. To improve the desulfurization ratio, Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) hydrolysis unit is used for conversion of COS to H{sub 2}S. Construction of the plant started in 1998. The gasifier and the heat recovery boiler have been already manufactured and constructed at the plant site Wakamatsu in Fukuoka prefecture. Testing of the plant operation will start in 2001 and continue until 2004.

  19. Bull Frog Green Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Frog Green Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bull Frog Green Energy LLC Place: Carlsbad, California Zip: 92009 Product: A company, probably an individual, which has...

  20. Eagle Point, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Eagle Point is a city in Jackson County, Oregon. It falls under Oregon's 2nd congressional district.12 References...

  1. Erigo and EaglePicher | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erigo and EaglePicher NREL researchers are testing an energy storage system for a microgrid-developed by Erigo and EaglePicher and sponsored by U.S. Northern Command-that contains three independently controllable energy storage technologies. Photo of energy storage system hardware in a laboratory Photo by Dennis Schroeder Microgrids-and effective storage systems supporting them-are especially important for remote military bases where accessing energy can be costly and dangerous. This research is

  2. Progress in 2012-2013 on HEDLP LAB 11-583 Eagle Nebula (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Progress in 2012-2013 on HEDLP LAB 11-583 Eagle Nebula Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Progress in 2012-2013 on HEDLP LAB 11-583 Eagle Nebula Authors: ...

  3. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 delete me old download page duplicate

  4. Eagle LNG Partners Jacksonville LLC- Dkt. No. 16-15-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application (Application), filed on January 27, 2016, by Eagle LNG Partners Jacksonville LLC (Eagle...

  5. Bull Outdoor Products: Proposed Penalty (2015-CE-14014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Bull Outdoor Products, Inc. failed to certify refrigerator basic model BC-130 as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  6. EA-1905: Double Eagle Water System, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA, prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office and adopted by DOE, evaluates the expansion and upgrade of the City of Carlsbad’s Double Eagle Water System.

  7. Stan Bull, Long-Time NREL Leader, Named AAAS Fellow - News Releases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stan Bull, Long-Time NREL Leader, Named AAAS Fellow January 11, 2011 Stanley R. Bull, former associate director for Science and Technology at the U.S. Department of Energy's...

  8. Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 16, 2016 - 10:38am Addthis Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. | Footage courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RES Americas. Kelly Yaker National Renewable Energy Laboratory How does it work? Researchers at NREL teamed with industry to study the flight patterns of two eagles. The data will help the companies develop systems to detect birds and prevent collisions with

  9. Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Pitkin Counties- Energy Smart Colorado Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  10. Notice of Intent: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and Field Testing Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department's Wind Program intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind...

  11. Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Lake, and Pitkin Counties- Energy Smart Colorado Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  12. Eagle LNG Partners Jacksonville LLC- Dkt. No. 16-15-LNG Exports to (FTA and NFTA) Countries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application (Application), filed on January 27, 2016, by Eagle LNG Partners Jacksonville LLC (Eagle...

  13. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly; Olson, Jason

    2009-07-13

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other

  14. T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD About Us T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD Dr. T. M. Bull Bennett (Mi'kmaq), was born in Brunswick, ME, and grew up in the mountains and prairies of Wyoming. As an undergraduate he studied field ecology earning a BS in Biology from Black Hills State University. He completed his MS in Zoology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming where he studied captive propagation of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) as part of the National Black-Footed Ferret

  15. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

    2002-12-01

    This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

  16. WINDExchange Webinar: Wind Energy and Eagles: The Problem, the Permit, and the Path Forward

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Save the date for this free webinar. Wally Erickson of WEST, Inc. will present on the conservation and permitting challenges associated with wind and eagles; Annie Mudge of Cox, Castle &...

  17. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, James S.; Baxter, Jeremy

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes the second year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. An enumeration fence and traps were installed on the creek from September 6th to October 12th 2001 to enable the capture of post-spawning bull trout emigrating out of the watershed. During the study period, a total of 273 bull trout were sampled through the enumeration fence. Length and weight were determined for all bull trout captured. In total, 39 fish of undetermined sex, 61 males and 173 females were processed through the fence. An additional 19 bull trout were observed on a snorkel survey prior to the fence being removed on October 12th. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during this project was 292 fish. Several other species of fish were captured at the enumeration fence including westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), Rocky Mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and kokanee (O. nerka). A total of 143 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in two different locations (river km 27.5-30.5, and km 24.0-25.5) on October 3rd. The majority of redds (n=132) were observed in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past five years. The additional 11 redds were observed in a 1.5 km section (river km 24.0-25.5). Summary plots of water temperature for Bradford Creek, Sandown Creek, Buhl Creek, and Skookumchuck Creek at three locations suggested that water temperatures were within the temperature range preferred by bull trout for spawning, egg incubation, and rearing.

  18. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, James S.; Baxter, Jeremy

    2001-02-01

    An enumeration fence and traps were installed on Skookumchuck Creek from September 7 th to October 16 th to enable the capture of post-spawning bull trout emigrating out of the watershed. During the study period, a total of 252 bull trout were sampled through the enumeration fence. Length, weight, and sex were determined for all but one of the 252 bull trout captured. In total, one fish of undetermined sex, 63 males and 188 females were processed through the fence. A total of 67 bull trout were observed on a snorkel survey prior to the fence being removed on October 16 th . Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout count during this project was 319 fish. Several other species of fish were captured at the enumeration fence including westslope cutthroat trout, Rocky Mountain whitefish, kokanee, sucker, and Eastern brook trout. Redds were observed during ground surveys in three different locations (river km 27.5- 28.5, km 29-30, and km 24-25). The largest concentration of redds were noted in the upper two sections which have served as the index sections over the past four years. A total of 197 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground on October 4 th . The majority of redds (n=189) were observed in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past four years. The additional 8 redds were observed in a 1.5 km section (river km 24.0-25.5). Summary plots of water temperature for Bradford Creek, Sandown Creek, Skookumchuck Creek at km 39.5, and Skookumchuck Creek at the fence site suggested that water temperatures were within the range preferred by bull trout for spawning, egg incubation, and rearing.

  19. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2004-04-01

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H

  20. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2003-06-01

    We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

  1. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2005-11-01

    We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/12 (1) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis. Typically developers consider migratory birds, bald and golden eagle habitat, fish habitat, protected marine mammals and endangered and threatened species. The candidate...

  3. Genetic Inventory of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Pend Oreille Subbasin, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Maroney, Joseph R.; Andersen, Todd

    2004-11-01

    In 2003, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) collected tissue samples for genetic analysis from 209 bull trout and 1,276 westslope cutthroat. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife developed and applied microsatellite DNA screening protocols for the analysis of bull trout at 13 loci and 24 loci for cutthroat trout. This project will continue collection and analysis of additional samples next year. At that time, a final annual report will be compiled for the three-year study that will describe the genetic characteristics for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. The extent of hybridization of bull trout (with brook trout) and westslope cutthroat trout (with Yellowstone cutthroat trout and rainbow trout) in the Priest Lake and Lower Pend Oreille subbasins will also be examined.

  4. Genetic Inventory of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the Pend Oreille Subbasin, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroney, Joseph R.; Shaklee, James B.; Young, Sewall F.

    2003-10-01

    In 2002, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) collected tissue samples for genetic analysis from 280 bull trout and 940 westslope cutthroat. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife developed and applied microsatellite DNA screening protocols for the analysis of bull trout at 13 loci and 24 loci for cutthroat trout. This project will continue collection and analysis of additional samples for the next 2 years. At that time, a final annual report will be compiled for the three-year study that will describe the genetic characteristics for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. The extent of hybridization of bull trout (with brook trout) and westslope cutthroat trout (with Yellowstone cutthroat trout and rainbow trout) in the Priest Lake and Lower Pend Oreille subbasins will also be examined.

  5. Microsoft Word - Bull--Optimal_Resistive_Control_Strategy_for_a_Floating_OWC_Device--EWTEC2013.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimal Resistive Control Strategy for a Floating OWC Device Diana Bull 1 , Erick Johnson 2 1 Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA dlbull@sandia.gov 2 Montana State University Bozeman, MT, USA erick.johnson@me.montana.edu Abstract- A resistive control strategy to optimize pneumatic power for a floating OWC device is presented. This strategy utilizes a linear, frequency-domain performance model that links an oscillating structure to air-pressure fluctuations with a Wells Turbine in

  6. EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

  7. Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams : 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Steven W.

    1992-07-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are native to many tributaries of the Snake River in southeast Washington. The Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS) have identified bull trout as a species of special concern which means that they may become threatened or endangered by relatively, minor disturbances to their habitat. Steelhead trout/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha) are also native to several tributaries of the Snake river in southeast Washington. These species of migratory fishes are depressed, partially due to the construction of several dams on the lower Snake river. In response to decreased run size, large hatchery program were initiated to produce juvenile steelhead and salmon to supplement repressed tributary stocks, a practice known as supplementation. There is a concern that supplementing streams with artificially high numbers of steelhead and salmon may have an impact on resident bull trout in these streams. Historically, these three species of fish existed together in large numbers, however, the amount of high-quality habitat necessary for reproduction and rearing has been severely reduced in recent years, as compared to historic amounts. The findings of the first year of a two year study aimed at identifying species interactions in southeast Washington streams are presented in this report. Data was collected to assess population dynamics; habitat utilization and preference, feeding habits, fish movement and migration, age, condition, growth, and the spawning requirements of bull trout in each of four streams. A comparison of the indices was then made between the study streams to determine if bull trout differ in the presence of the putative competitor species. Bull trout populations were highest in the Tucannon River (supplemented stream), followed by Mill Creek (unsupplemented stream). Young of the year bull trout utilized riffle and cascade habitat the most in all

  8. Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl

    2008-11-20

    The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River

  9. Off-shelf portion of Harris delta: a reexamination of downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, M.

    1989-03-01

    This study relates the Eagle Ford-equivalent Harris delta north of the Stuart City shelf edge with the downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford section south of that shelf edge. Together, they comprised one large deltaic complex that divided into two major lobes at an avulsion site near Anderson County. One lobe prograded southwestward toward Kurten field in Brazos County; the other (now partly eroded) prograded southeastward beside the low-lying Sabine (uplift) landmass into Polk County. The Polk County lobe crossed the Stuart City shelf edge in the Seven Oaks-Hortense field area and continued to prograde southward into deeper and higher energy water. Such an environment caused this off-shelf Harris delta to oversteepen, resulting in frequent slumps and gravity flows that deposited debris-flow and turbidite sands along with predominantly fine-grained prodelta sediments. More familiar deltaic facies (outer fringe) are present in the uppermost section. Numerous structural and stratigraphic maps and cross sections illustrate the progradation of the downdip Harris delta and its features. The progradation was arrested for a time by deeper water at the older and more precipitous Sligo shelf edge. This progradational hiatus is recorded by a relatively strong reflection that separates two seismic sequences. The younger, onlapping sequence appears to represent continued Harris delta sedimentation. Among the interesting features mapped seismically and/or geologically are mounded reflections that represent the largest slumping events, thickness anomalies associated with the carbonate substrate, and erosional( ) channels at the section top. These off-shelf Harris delta deposits appear to interfinger laterally with a genetically different eastern (Tuscaloosa ) sequence in Tyler and Jasper Counties.

  10. Off-shelf portion of Harris delta: Reexamination of downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, M.H. ); Van Siclen, D.C.; Sheriff, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This study related the Eagle Ford equivalent Harris delta north of the Stuart City shelf edge with downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford section south of that shelf edge. Together, they comprised one large deltaic complex that divided into two major lobes at an avulsion site near Anderson County, Texas. One lobe prograded southwestward toward Kurten field in Brazos County, the other (now partly eroded) prograded southeastward beside the low-lying Sabine (uplift) landmass into Polk County. The Polk County lobe crossed the Stuart City shelf edge in the Seven Oaks-Hortense field area, and continued to prograde southward into deeper and higher energy water. Such an environment caused this off-shelf Harris delta to oversteepen, resulting in frequent slumps and gravity flows that deposited debris-flow and turbidite sands along with predominantly fine-grained prodelta sediments. More familiar deltaic facies (outer fringe) are present in the uppermost section. Numerous structural and stratigraphic maps and cross sections illustrate the progradation of the downdip Harris delta and its features. The progradation was arrested for a time by deeper water at the older and more precipitous Sligo shelf edge. This progradational hiatus is recorded by a relatively strong reflection that separates two seismic sequences. The younger onlapping sequence appears to represent continued Harris delta sedimentation. among the interesting features mapped seismically and/or geologically are: mounded reflections that represent the largest slumping events, thickness anomalies associated with the carbonate substrate, and erosional( ) channels at the section top. These off-shelf Harris delta deposits appear to interfinger laterally with a genetically different eastern (Tuscaloosa ) sequence in Tyler and Jasper Counties.

  11. Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams. Final Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, Keith D.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed.

  12. EAGLES 1.1: A microcomputer software package for analyzing fuel efficiency of electric and gasoline vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.M.

    1994-05-15

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s electric/hybrid vehicle research program, Argonne National Laboratory has developed a computer software package called EAGLES. This paper describes the capability of the software and its many features and potential applications. EAGLES version 1.1 is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of battery performance in electric-vehicle applications, or the estimation of fuel economy for a gasoline vehicle. The principal objective of the electric-vehicle analysis is to enable the prediction of electric-vehicle performance (e.g., vehicle range) on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The model provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified velocity/time or power/time profile, taking into consideration the effects of battery depth-of-discharge and regenerative braking. Alternatively, the software package can be used to determine the size of the battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements (e.g., range and driving patterns). For gasoline-vehicle analysis, an empirical model relating fuel economy, vehicle parameters, and driving-cycle characteristics is included in the software package. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance can be simulated. The software package includes many default data sets for vehicles, driving cycles, and battery technologies. EAGLES 1.1 is written in the FORTRAN language for use on IBM-compatible microcomputers.

  13. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  14. Richland C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 15 to March 15 Hanford Site Boundary Industrial Areas Protected Bald Eagle Winter Night Roost Areas for FY2015 (Version 11-5-15) / 0 2 4 6 8 10 Miles 0 5 10 15 20 Kilometers

  15. DOE/RL-94-150

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for bald eagles were published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to advise ... Consultation or coordination with the USFWS or the Washington Department of Fish and ...

  16. EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the migratory bird conventions, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703-711), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts (16 U.S.C. 668-668d), the Fish and Wildlife ...

  17. EM Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices EM Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices March 31, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Two adult bald eagles sit atop a tree on the Hanford ...

  18. A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Blog An American bald eagle, which is common in the region during fall and spring, especially around black-tailed prairie dog colonies, wetlands and other water areas. NNSA ...

  19. HNF-52464

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    464 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Bald Eagle Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 HNF-52464 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Bald Eagle Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2012 Date Published August 2012

  20. HNF-59488

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    488 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Bald Eagle Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2015 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 HNF-59488 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Bald Eagle Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2015 Date

  1. User`s guide to EAGLES Version 1.1: An electric- and gasoline-vehicle fuel-efficiency software package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.W.

    1995-01-01

    EAGLES is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of fuel efficiency in electric-vehicle (EV) applications or the estimation of fuel economy for a gasoline vehicle. The principal objective of the EV analysis is to enable the prediction of EV performance on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The EV model included in the software package provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified vehicle velocity/time or power/time profile. The capability of the battery is modeled by an algorithm that relates the battery voltage to the withdrawn (or charged) current, taking into account the effect of battery depth-of-discharge. Alternatively, the software package can be used to determine the size of the battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements. For gasoline vehicles, a generic fuel-economy model based on data from EPA Test Car List 1991 is included in the software package. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance, including range penalty for EVs, can be studied. Also available is an option to estimate the time needed by a specified vehicle to reach a certain speed with the application of a constant power and an option to compute the fraction of time and/or distance in a driving cycle at speeds exceeding a specified value. Certain parameters can be changed interactively prior to a run.

  2. Bald Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  3. Enhanced sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 imaging for the detection of regional ischemic coronary disease by combining SPECT with bull's eye analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasabali, B.; Woodard, M.L.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.; Blend, M.J. (Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the combination of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and quantitative bull's eye analysis (QBA) TI-201 cardiac stress imaging may improve the detection of myocardial ischemia over that achieved with planar (PLN) imaging. This study will evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT and QBA in the detection of disease in the left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCX), and right coronary artery. Ninety-nine patients who underwent both TI-201 stress imaging and coronary arteriography were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 99, 62 had PLN imaging and 37 were evaluated with SPECT; 23 of these 37 had QBA. The overall sensitivity and specificity were as follows: PLN, 94% and 50%; SPECT, 90% and 67%; QBA, 100% and 20%; and SPECT with QBA, 92% and 72%, respectively. The regional sensitivity and specificity of PLN for individual coronary arteries were as follows: RCA, 78% and 74%; LAD, 89% and 60%; LCX, 50% and 89%, respectively. For SPECT, the results were: RCA, 86% and 93%; LAD, 85% and 88%; and LCX, 60% and 88%. For QBA alone, the results were: RCA, 100% and 75%; LAD, 88% and 53%; and LCX, 100% and 89%. The results for QBA with SPECT were: RCA, 100% and 94%; LAD, 88% and 80%; and LCX, 67% and 95%. Thus, SPECT interpreted on conjunction with QBA showed higher sensitivity for evaluation of ischemia in the RCA and LCX arteries and higher specificity in the detection of LAD and RCA disease than did PLN TI-201 imaging. Because of the low specificity of QBA (20%), caution is advised in the interpretation of QBA alone without reviewing SPECT images.

  4. Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

  5. Bull Hill | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    First Wind Energy Purchaser NSTAR Location Hancock County ME Coordinates 44.723076, -68.170852 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":...

  6. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  7. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Animals NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Animals Coyotes, kit foxes, pronghorn antelope, desert tortoises, sidewinder snakes, bald eagles, kangaroo rats and peregrine falcons are just a few of the more than 1,500 animal species found on the Nevada National Security Site. Instructions: Click the document THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details. Click the Category, Number, or Date table header links to sort the information. Thumbnail Category Number

  8. DOE/RL-94-150

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-150 Revision 2 Bald Eagle Management Plan for the Hanford Site, South Central Washington Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute

  9. Microsoft Word - sensitive-species-table.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Sensitive Species Occurring or Potentially Occurring at LANL Scientific Name Common Name Protected Status 1 Potential to Occur 2 Gila pandora Rio Grande Chub NMS Moderate Falco peregrinus anatum American Peregrine Falcon NMT, FSOC High Falco peregrinus tundrius Arctic Peregrine Falcon NMT, FSOC Moderate Haliaeetus leucocephalus Bald Eagle NMT, S1 High Cynanthus latirostris magicus Broad-billed Hummingbird NMT Low Accipiter gentilis Northern Goshawk NMS, FSOC High Lanius ludovicianus

  10. Sensitive Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the impact of Laboratory activities on sensitive species, LANL can potentially reduce the possibility of these species being upgraded to federal protection. February 2, 2015 sensitive species The bald eagle is one of our sensitive species. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Sensitive species are plants and animals that are protected at the state

  11. HNF-55187

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5187 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Bald Eagle Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2013 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

  12. HNF-58547

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8547 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Bald Eagle Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2014 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 HNF-58547 Revision 0 TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

  13. untitled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE SENECA NATION WIND TURBINE PROJECT CATTARAUGUS TERRITORY ERIE COUNTY, NEW YORK Jointly prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Seneca Nation AUGUST 2015 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS BGEPA Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act BMP best management practice BPU Salamanca BPU CFR Code of Federal Regulations CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CRIS New York State Cultural Resources Identification System

  14. untitled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE SENECA NATION WIND TURBINE PROJECT CATTARAUGUS TERRITORY ERIE COUNTY, NEW YORK Jointly prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Seneca Nation OCTOBER 2015 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS BGEPA Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act BMP best management practice BPU Salamanca BPU CFR Code of Federal Regulations CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CRIS New York State Cultural Resources Identification System

  15. This fact sheet summarizes what is known about the adverse impacts of land-based

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fact sheet summarizes what is known about the adverse impacts of land-based wind power on wildlife in North America and the status of our knowledge regarding how to avoid or minimize these impacts. BACKGROUND: BIG HORN WIND FARM, PHOTO BY IBERDROLA RENEWABLES, INC., NREL 15188 * INSET, L-R: EASTERN MEADOWLARK, PHOTO BY MATTHEW PAULSON, FLICKR * AMERICAN BALD EAGLE, PHOTO BY USFWS, FLICKR * HOARY BAT, PHOTO BY J. N. STUART, FLICKR Wind Turbine Interactions with Wildlife and their Habitats A

  16. Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  17. cx-bull-shoals-dam.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  18. cx-malden-neosho-bull-shoals.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. TriEagle Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 19126 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  20. Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform ... Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy Information ...

  1. EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: Dearborn, Michigan Zip: MI 48126 Product: Joint Venture developing, manufacturing and distributing a breakthrough, high performance sealed lead-acid battery....

  2. Eagle County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Edwards, Colorado El Jebel, Colorado Gypsum, Colorado Minturn, Colorado Red Cliff, Colorado Vail, Colorado Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Eagle County - Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PV: 500 Solar Thermal: 500 Commercial 1,500 Program Administrator Walking Mountains Science Center Website http:www.energysmartcolorado.com Date added to DSIRE 2014-10-08...

  4. Eagle County - Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    project cost + 1,000 for an energy assessment Program Administrator Walking Mountains Science Center Website http:www.energysmartcolorado.com Date added to DSIRE 2014-03-27 Last...

  5. Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.52 2.79 2.24 2.35 2000's 3.91 4.45 3.44 5.34 5.95 7.49 6.73 6.72 9.00 4.47 2010's 5.13 4.57 ...

  6. Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.77 4.97 4.44 4.94 5.00 4.95 5.04 4.61 4.61 4.39 4.11 3.94 2012 3.67 3.24 3.02 2.78 2.63 3.10 3.43 3.78 3.28 3.64 4.04 ...

  7. Eagle County, Colorado, Summary of Reported Data From July 1...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for Lending 0 Results Amount Loaned Out (Residential) 84,204 of Loans (Residential) 10 Average Loan Amount (Residential) 8,420 Energy Smart offered incentives and financing. ...

  8. Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1: "The Future for Transport Demand" Dr. Kydes: Why don't we begin. Good morning, thank you for attending, and welcome to our session entitled The Future of Transport Demand. My name is Andy Kydes. I'm the only one at the table without a table name tag; it shows the importance of the people here; it turns out I'm the Senior Technical Advisor to the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Now why is this topic important? I'm going, in the interest of time, to skip over a number

  9. Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 942 1,260 1,471 1,990 2000's 2,114 1,896 1,914 1,969 2,258 2,132 2,118 1,955 1,695 1,237 2010's ...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Regional Heavy-Duty LNG Fueling Station March 21, 2015 Photo of a street sweeper New Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural Gas March 7, 2015 Photo of a truck pulling into a CNG ...

  11. Eagle Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4383653, -107.3244921 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  12. Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 159 155 151 135 135 127 118 210 210 257 243 213 2012 281 269 283 258 201 247 244 256 228 247 246 212 2013 259 236 246 250 ...

  13. Updates to the EIA Eagle Ford Play Maps

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... play, and lower initial GORsoil-rich wells are shown in green along the northern portion. ... gas relative to oil). December 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updates to ...

  14. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

  15. Microsoft Word - SAND BBDBMooring BrefortBull final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mooring Design for the Floating Oscillating Water Column ... of Energy's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. ... and a power take-off turbine. 1 A sketch of the device ...

  16. Progress in 2012-2013 on HEDLP LAB 11-583 Eagle Nebula (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Kane, J O Publication Date: 2013-05-13 OSTI Identifier: 1080402 Report Number(s):...

  17. Best Practices Case Study: David Weekley Homes - Eagle Springs and Waterhaven, Houston, TX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study describing David Weekley Homes, Houston Division, has qualified more than 1,240 homes for the DOE Builders Challenge. Advanced framed 2x6 walls with open headers and two-stud corners allow more room for R-20 damp sprayed cellulose wall cavity insulation that is covered with R-5 rigid XPS foam. A radiant barrier cuts heat gain in the R-38 insulated vented attics. Draft stopping at fireplace and duct chases and behind tubs, gluing sheetrock to framing, and extensive caulking make for air-tight homes at 3.0 ACH50.

  18. Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.52 2.79 2.24 2.35 2000's 3.91 4.45 3.44 5.34 5.95 7.49 6.73 6.72 9.00 4.47 2010's 5.13 4.57 3.41 4.37 5.18 3.78 Cubic Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.77 4.97 4.44 4.94 5.00 4.95 5.04 4.61 4.61 4.39 4.11 3.94 2012 3.67 3.24 3.02 2.78 2.63 3.10 3.43 3.78 3.28 3.64 4.04 4.38 2013 4.06 3.97 4.09 4.67 4.97 4.90 4.38 4.23 4.25 4.20 4.27 4.66 2014 5.13 6.13 5.56

  19. The Development of EAGLE-I: the First-Ever Technology to Track...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the number and location of outages, and when service is restored on the grid in real-time. ... emergency situation information on power and natural gas infrastructure -- a ...

  20. Scaled Eagle Nebula Experiments on NIF (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND ...

  1. Todd County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Browerville, Minnesota Burtrum, Minnesota Clarissa, Minnesota Eagle Bend, Minnesota Grey Eagle, Minnesota Hewitt, Minnesota Long Prairie, Minnesota Osakis, Minnesota Staples,...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Bull Shoals U1 repair MSB edit 3.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fire suppression damaged oil insulated cable system * Minor damage to power plant. ... and build up of combustible gas * Power Plant lost all power and went in the Black. ...

  3. CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

    2012-03-30

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding.

  4. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  7. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Grant for the City of Carlsbad Improvement of the Double Eagle Well ... of an existing DOE Infrastructure Grant toward improving the Double Eagle Well Field. ...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Pitkin Counties- Energy Smart Colorado Loan Program Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for...

  10. CX-010343: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bald Hill Farms Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. The Farrel W. Lytle Award | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farrel W. Lytle Award Farrel and Manetta at home in Eagle Valley, Nevada. Farrel and Manetta at home in Eagle Valley, Nevada. The Farrel W. Lytle Award was established by the SSRL ...

  12. 33269,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    THE",19,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS OILS",1105,"PAULSBORO, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,830,"SPAIN",218,0,0,"COASTAL EAGLE PT OIL CO","EAGLE PT PLT","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 33269,"COASTAL...

  13. Arkansas Converter Station Alternative Siting Area Representative...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... LOWER HATCHIE NWR HATCHIE NWR CHICKASAW NWR Creek WMA Eagle Lake Refuge WMA Lucias E. John Tully WMA Wolf River WMA Eagle Lake Refuge WMA St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA HENNING ...

  14. Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ...NASANOAA. The Development of EAGLE-I: the First-Ever Technology to Track Power Outages Nationwide Eagle-I is the first-ever system to monitor energy infrastructure ...

  15. Chippewa County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cooks Valley, Wisconsin Cornell, Wisconsin Delmar, Wisconsin Eagle Point, Wisconsin Eau Claire, Wisconsin Edson, Wisconsin Estella, Wisconsin Goetz, Wisconsin Hallie,...

  16. Inspection Report: S02IS003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Procurement Issues Involving Small Business Set-Aside Contracts Awarded to Eagle Research Group, Inc

  17. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  18. CX-000550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment Upgrades to Bull Shoals Dam SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 10/19/2009Location(s): Bull Shoals Dam, ArkansasOffice(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  19. EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin

  20. Taney County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bull Creek, Missouri Forsyth, Missouri Hollister, Missouri Kirbyville, Missouri Merriam Woods, Missouri Rockaway Beach, Missouri Saddlebrooke, Missouri Taneyville, Missouri...

  1. CX-004530: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bald Mountain Low-Temperature Geothermal ProjectCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 11/24/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  2. CX-011613: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bald Mountain Fiber Optic Splice Temporary Pad CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 12/11/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  3. CX-010146: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bald Mountain, Miller Peak, Lines Creek, and Taft Passive Repeater Communication Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/24/2013 Location(s): Montana, Montana, Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. Microsoft Word - Annual Report 2009_Final.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Eagle Tacoma delivering the final cargo of crude oil to achieve 727 million barrels on ......... 1 Oil Acquisitions and Receipts ...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/10 (2) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    golden eagles, marine mammals, and endangered or threatened species. In addition, the fish habitat assessment process must be followed for all projects located on federal land...

  6. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Refineras Refineries Refinera Raffinerie Asphalt ... Usine de valorisation United States Estados Unidos ... Ltd 71 Marathon Petroleum Co LP 106 Silver Eagle ...

  7. Microsoft Word - Table 1 POEE-Trasporters Rev 8-27-12.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ontario (Ojibway) Panhandle Eastern Pipeline Union Gas Limited Douglas, Arizona Naco, Sonora El Paso Natural Gas Company PEMEX Pipeline Eagle Pass, Texas Piedras Negras, Coahuila...

  8. Microsoft Word - Instructions for Sample Monthly Report Forms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ontario (Ojibway) Panhandle Eastern Pipeline Union Gas Limited Douglas, Arizona Naco, Sonora El Paso Natural Gas Company PEMEX Pipeline West Texas Gas, Inc. PEMEX Pipeline Eagle...

  9. EIS-0471: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0471: Final Environmental Impact Statement Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho The U.S. Department of Energy...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy...

  11. DOE/EA-1905 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from an existing CBFO infrastructure improvement grant to ... water delivery system are aging and in disrepair, resulting ... in the Double Eagle transmission and distribution system ...

  12. CX-014387: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eagle Fish Hatchery Maintenance Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 10/13/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 472, Standard on Professional Competence ... record maximum count of 75 eagles in 1996. Nest monitoring in FY 2015 documented a ...

  14. EA-1905: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1905: Final Environmental Assessment Department of Energy Funding For Double Eagle Water System, Carlsbad, New Mexico (November 2011) For more...

  15. Summit County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  16. Gunnison County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  17. Lake County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  18. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  19. Lake County- Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  20. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  1. Jackson County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Ashland, Oregon Butte Falls, Oregon Central Point, Oregon Eagle Point, Oregon Gold Hill, Oregon Jacksonville, Oregon Medford, Oregon Phoenix, Oregon Rogue River, Oregon...

  2. Cincinnati, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Energy Companies in Cincinnati, Ohio AHL-TECH Ameridian Speciality Services CECO Environmental Corp Cinergy Ventures II LLC Eagle Energy LLC Global Energy...

  3. Michigan's 14th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC Ford Ford Electric Battery Group Ford Motor Co Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme General Motors NextEnergy Trenton...

  4. Wayne County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC Ford Ford Electric Battery Group Ford Motor Co Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme Full Circle Developments Inc General...

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    including the Eagle Ford and portions of the Marcellus and, correspondingly, to decrease drilling in basins where a relatively greater share of production is dry natural gas....

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lake County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summit County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy...

  8. NMMSS 2015 Attendee List

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    58. Colleen Gradle Eagle Research Group colleengradle@ent.onemillrun.com 59. Eric Green Duke Energy Eric.Green@duke-energy.com 60. Karen Green National Atomic Testing...

  9. Aroostook County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caribou, Maine Cary, Maine Castle Hill, Maine Caswell, Maine Central Aroostook, Maine Chapman, Maine Connor, Maine Crystal, Maine Cyr, Maine Dyer Brook, Maine Eagle Lake, Maine...

  10. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Small Business Project Execution and Integration Services (PEI) Goldbelt Eagle, LLC Alaska Native Small Disadvantaged 8(a) Business Site Operations Services (SOS) Booz Allen ...

  11. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production increases over the past several years in the Bakken, Permian Basin, and Eagle Ford formations accounted for almost all of crude oil production growth in the United ...

  12. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    regions, including recent shale gas discoveries in the Haynesville, Eagle Ford, Barnett, Floyd-NealConasauga, and Marcellus shale plays. Magnolia emphasizes that the size...

  13. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Eagle Ford Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  14. BPA-2015-00273-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    minutes and other correspondence between the Bonneville Power Administration and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding dam operations in bull trout critical habitat since...

  15. BPA-2014-01504-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and all associated decision documents, to include any that implement Inland Native Fish Strategy management direction. She also asks for bull trout specific biological...

  16. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BPA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat and hatchery actions that effectively and efficiently advance the recovery of fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout . 6. Increase operational...

  17. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  18. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  19. Paper Title (use style: paper title)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development Roadmap: Design to Commercialization Kelley Ruehl and Diana Bull Water Power Technologies Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 Email: kmruehl@sandia.gov...

  20. Tribal Colleges and Universities | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Community College, Cloquet, Minnesota Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, North Dakota Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, North Dakota United Tribes Technical College, ...

  1. FY 2015 FOIA Requests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    related to bull trout critical habitat Nov 2010 - present Requester: Arlene Montgomery Comments: Released in its entirety. CLOSED Date Received: 1232014 Date Due: 130...

  2. Fermilab Today | State University of New York at Buffalo Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buffalo May 30, 2012 NAME: State University of New York at Buffalo HOME TOWN: Buffalo, New York MASCOT: Victor E. Bull SCHOOL COLORS: Blue and white PARTICLE PHYSICS...

  3. EIS-0265-SA-88: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO), propose to complete seven types of fish habitat enhancement projects. The projects are located within bull trout and Middle...

  4. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency, Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK), Presentation, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Wave Energy Tags SAND2015-7424C author Bacelli, G.; Bull, D.; Coe, R.; Patterson, D. ...

  5. SAND2012-7270C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equation approach Diana Bull Water Power Technologies Sandia National Laboratories ... This Wave Energy Converter (WEC) is a particular style of Oscillating Water Column (OWC). ...

  6. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK), Modeling and Analysis, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Wave Energy Tags SAND2015-8089C author Patterson, David; Bull, Diana; Bacelli, Giorgio; ...

  7. SAND2014-2100C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PNEUMATIC PERFORMANCE OF A NON-AXISYMMETRIC FLOATING OSCILLATING WATER COLUMN WAVE ENERGY CONVERSION DEVICE IN RANDOM WAVES by Diana Bull Water Power Department, Sandia National ...

  8. Microsoft Word - luo-y2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Mace, and K.-M. Xu, 2003: Cirrus cloud statistics from a cloud- resolving model ... Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): An Earth Observing System Experiment. Bull. Amer. ...

  9. Carlsbad, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motors Bull Frog Green Energy LLC California Wind Systems Emission Power Solutions Plc EPS Macquarie Funds Management USA Inc Metallic Power Inc Peak Sun Silicon Corp...

  10. Microsoft Word - SANDIA REPORT - final RM6.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wave Energy Converter Diana Bull, Chris Smith, Dale Scott Jenne, Paul Jacob, Andrea ... New Mexico 87185-MS1124 Chris Smith, Steve Willits, Arnold Fontaine Applied ...

  11. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400 2,800 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica September-2015 September-2016 Oil production thousand barrels/day 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 18,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica September-2015 September-2016 Natural gas production million cubic feet/day 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica September-2015 September-2016 New-well oil production per rig

  12. Battery Company Puts New Nanowire Technology into Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    By integrating OneD's silicon nanowire anode into full battery cells, EaglePicher has been able to demonstrate cell energy densities around 300 Whkg, a significant improvement ...

  13. Wyoming County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York Covington, New York Eagle, New York Gainesville, New York Genesee Falls, New York Java, New York Middlebury, New York Orangeville, New York Perry, New York Pike, New York...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Eagle Nebula Experiments on NIF: NIF Facility Time Proposal Cooper, A B ; Remington, B A ; Pound, M W ; Moore, A S ; Maclaren, S A ; Williams, R J ; Ryutov, D D ; Foord, M E ; ...

  15. False Pass Wind Resource Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    False Pass Wind Resource Report False Pass meteorological tower, view to the east, D. ... Eagle River, Alaska D r a f t 1 False Pass Wind Resource Report P a g e | 2 Summary The ...

  16. El Jebel, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. El Jebel is a census-designated place in Eagle County, Colorado.1 References US...

  17. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Mr. Kelley became an Eagle Scout in 1990. Panel 1: Bulk Power Generation and Transmission: ... He also helped develop a new method for assessing the economic benefits of proposed ...

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... XML etc.) hard to represent as adjacency matrices. * Associative-memory based learning * N-d-k problem (incremental k) * Understand power of in-memory computing Why EAGLE ? ...

  19. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Visits WIPP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz accepts special recognition on behalf of DOE for support of the expansion and upgrade to Carlsbad’s Double Eagle Water System from Mayor Dale Janway (right) at a town hall-style meeting this month.

  20. MPO SAN ANTONIO - BEXAR COUNTY METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... agricultural tractors, combines, commercial airports, point sources, and heavy duty truck idling 2012 With Eagle Ford Emission Inventory WRF v3.2 CAMx 5.40 Local 2012 San ...

  1. X Time Series

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... agricultural tractors, combines, commercial airports, point sources, and heavy duty truck idling 2012 With Eagle Ford Emission Inventory WRF v3.2 CAMx 5.40 Local 2012 San ...

  2. CX-000012: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eagle Junction Clearwire Wireless Communication FacilitiesCX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.15, B1.19Date: 12/02/2009Location(s): Polk County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. Red Cliff, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Red Cliff is a town in Eagle County, Colorado. It falls under Colorado's 2nd congressional...

  4. CX-006591: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Invasive Species Removal and Reclamation in Gold Eagle Mining, IncorporatedCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.20Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  5. Carlsbad Field Office P O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL ED M. Eagle, EPA ED E. Feltcorn, EPA ED R. Joglekar, EPA ED S. Ghose, EPA ED S. Holmes, NMED ED J. Kieling, NMED ED T. Kesterson, NMED ED C. Timm, Pecos MS ED D. Winters,...

  6. Through Sandia DOE/ARM* is putting in place a UAS/UAV** hosting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Alaska Fairbanks: In Situ A 20 (Boeing Scan Eagle); 45,000 flight hours, mostly in Iraq; 20+ hour flight duration Sandia National Laboratories Long Range Plan * Segment R2204 ...

  7. DOE/ARM UAS Plans

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    UAS Tests at Oliktok University of Alaska Fairbanks: In Situ A 20 (Boeing Scan Eagle); >45,000 flight hours, mostly in Iraq; 20+ hour flight duration; wing span just over 10 feet. ...

  8. OASIS Group Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SN) BPAP CORP EAGL MCPI MSCG PGEM PSEM PWX SCLM TEA TEMU LDWP PODNOB (SN) MSCG PAC PGEM PPMI PWX TNSK * With BPA: Reservation MW amounts, Priorities of the TSRs, Timing...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and repaired, which the company expected to complete by the end of the gas day May 8. Turkey Gathering and Eagle Rock Cargray Plant in Texas are shut in while repairs are being...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and repaired, which the company expected to complete by the end of the gas day May 8. Turkey Gathering and Eagle Rock Cargray Plant in Texas are shut in while repairs are being...

  11. Avon, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Avon is a town in Eagle County, Colorado. It falls under Colorado's 2nd congressional...

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Adoption of Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water System (DOEEA-1905) October 2011 United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NM- P020-114414 Double Eagle Water ...

  13. CX-003512: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Resort Communities Retrofit ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 07/09/2010Location(s): Eagle, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  14. Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 03 Orange, TX 04 Beaumont, TX (including Port Neches) 23 LAREDO, TEXAS 01 Brownsville-Cameron County (including Port Isabel) 02 Del Rio 03 Eagle Pass 04 Laredo 05 HildagoPharr 07 ...

  15. Edwards, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Edwards is a census-designated place in Eagle County, Colorado.1 References US Census...

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to come online by the end of 2014. These include the NET Mexico expansion from the Agua Dulce Hub to near Rio Grand City, which will connect Eagle Ford to the Los Ramones...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to 8.7 million bd in 2014. Increasing production of light crude oil in low-permeability or tight resource formations in regions like the Bakken, Permian Basin, and Eagle...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... (Million Cubic Feet)","Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (MMcf)","El Paso, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (MMcf)","Hidalgo, TX Natural Gas ...

  19. CX-010194: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technology Integration Program Phase II Field Trial: Site One - Eagle Ford Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04132007.) EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle...

  1. Matanuska Electric Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Matanuska Electric Assn Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Matanuska Electric Assn Inc Place: Alaska Phone Number: MEA Headquarters: 907-761-9300, 907-745-3231 or Eagle River:...

  2. U.S. oil reserves highest since 1975, natural gas reserves set...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Most of that came from the state's Eagle Ford shale play and other tight oil formations in the Permian Basin. Proved reserves are those volumes of oil natural gas that analysis of ...

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas leads all states in total proved oil reserves, which came mostly from the Eagle Ford shale play and other tight formations in the Permian Basin. Texas energy highlighTs ...

  4. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    million barrels (60% of the nation's total net increase) in 2014. Most of these new oil reserves were added in the Texas portion of the Permian Basin and the Eagle Ford Shale play. ...

  5. North Dakota and Texas help boost U.S. oil reserves to highest...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Most of that came from the state's Eagle Ford shale play and other tight oil formations in the Permian Basin. The other states that rounded out the top 5 increases in proved oil ...

  6. Table 2. U.S. tight oil plays: production and proved reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Basin","Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves" "Williston","Bakken","ND, MT, SD",270,4844,387,5972,1128 "Western Gulf","Eagle Ford","TX",351,4177,497,5172,995 "Permian","Bo...

  7. Response to FESAC survey, Non-Fusion Connections to Fusion Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response to FESAC survey, Non-Fusion ... Due to the iconic status of the pillars of the Eagle Nebula, this research will bring ...

  8. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY __________________________________________ ) EAGLE LNG PARTNERS JACKSONVILLE, LLC ) FE DOCKET NO. 16-15-LNG __________________________________________ ) ORDER GRANTING LONG-TERM, MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM, OR IN ISO CONTAINERS LOADED AT, THE PROPOSED EAGLE LNG FACILITY IN JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, TO FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS DOE/FE ORDER NO. 3867 JULY 21, 2016 2 I. DESCRIPTION OF REQUEST On January

  9. Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC Earns Corporate Award for Mining Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earns Corporate Award for Mining Operations CARLSBAD, N.M., May 3, 2001 - Washington Group International has selected Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) for a 2000 Eagle Award. WTS is the management and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Washington Group International's annual Eagle Awards Program acknowledges and honors extraordinary projects, teams and individual performers. Washington Group International is the parent

  10. DOE/EA-1905 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FUNDING FOR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    905 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FUNDING FOR CITY OF CARLSBAD, NM DOUBLE EAGLE WATER SYSTEM AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (DOE CBFO) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE CBFO is adopting an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Carlsbad Field Office for the expansion and upgrade of the City of Carlsbad's Double Eagle Water System. The City of

  11. WIPP Documents - National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Adoption of Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NM-P020-11-1414 Double Eagle Water System DOE/EA-1905 October 2011 This document examines the potential environmental impacts associated with providing DOE funding for the proposed improvements to the City of Carlsbad Double Eagle Water System Amendment to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste This Federal Register Notice

  12. Articles about Wind Program Funding | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Program Funding Articles about Wind Program Funding RSS Below are stories about funding featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program. June 22, 2016 FOA Announcement: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and Field Testing Opportunities The Energy Department's Wind Program issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind turbines or wind facilities. This FOA would aim

  13. Plasma meets nano at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma meets nano at PPPL By John Greenwald February 13, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, right, with Washington University undergraduate Mitchell Eagles in the PPPL nanolaboratory. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, right, with Washington University undergraduate Mitchell Eagles in the PPPL nanolaboratory. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

  14. CX-006383: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    383: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Eagle Direct Wafer Manufacturing Plants CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.31 Date: 07/28/2011 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Loan Guarantee Program Office The Department of Energy proposed action is to issue a loan guarantee to 1366 Technologies for Project Eagle, which includes retrofitting and re-equipping two existing facilities to produce standard multicrystalline silicon wafers for solar cells

  15. Leading the Charge: Tribal Women in Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Women in Power Leading the Charge: Tribal Women in Power October 22, 2012 - 4:19pm Addthis Andrea Alexander, Makah Tribe in Neah Bay (Washington)/Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Andrea Alexander, Makah Tribe in Neah Bay (Washington)/Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Kathy Mayo, Eagle Village in Upper Yukon (Alaska)/Tanana Chiefs Conference Kathy Mayo, Eagle Village in Upper Yukon (Alaska)/Tanana Chiefs Conference Tara Hess-McGeown, Washoe Tribe of Nevada and

  16. M O U N D E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... follor8: TABF - Tork Orders for the Dlmwtl.lng of Units III and IV TAB G - Tentative ... SE co-r *A* Balding, m cara)r l AaBuil&lng,141cosasr 12,ooo 24,ooo 50,m 25,000 a00 ...

  17. FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Jon'es, Bureau of Mines Bull. 503 Smith and Linnett, JCS (London), 1953, pp. 37-43 ... Gas Dynamics Symp., 1955, Fuels 94. Setchkin, Nicholas P. pp. 139-150. 199. Smith, Marion ...

  18. DOE-LM/XXXX-2006

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... the PRT basin in late summer to discourage the establishment of bull and green frogs. ... in Fernald Preserve 2014 Site Environmental Report U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  19. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SCAIRT WOMAN WILLMEN JIM CREEK TAYLOR SIMON BUTTE SCHEFIELD BULL ... UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  20. BPA-2014-00407-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pend d'Oreille and its tributaries, bull trout in Lake Pend d'Oreille and aquatic invasive species in Lake Pend d'Oreille related to the ongoing operations of Albeni Falls Dam....

  1. Trent Tucker

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Trent Tucker is known as one of the great 3-point shooters in the NBA, played for several teams including the World Champ Chicago Bulls in 1993.  Trent attended the University of Minnesota on...

  2. DOE_/10630--29 DE92

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Bull., Biol., Ser. 6(3):1-81. I Jorgensen, C. D., H. D. Smith and J. R. Garcia. 1980. ... Nevada 89193-8521 (1) O Gayle Smith P. O. Box 26569 Las Vegas, Nevada 89126 (I) Dr'. ...

  3. SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Estimated annual energy* (millions kWh) actual net energy (millions kWh) Beaver 1965 112,000 172 161 Blakely Mountain 1956 75,000 169 119 Broken Bow 1970 100,000 129 186 Bull ...

  4. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  DEMD Sand & Gravel Study  OIl & GAS PREPARATION WORK GROUP  COMMUNITY SCALE PV SYSTEM INSTALLATION  ONE OF SEVEN

  5. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation Feasibility Study Supporting Wind Development and Establishment of Renewable Energy and Energy Development Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Washee Zee) 701-854-3437 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION

  6. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation: Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8540 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation OVERVIEW: BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO) STANDING ROCK ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION LOCATED IN

  7. State Department Concurrence.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (Washee Zee) 701-854-3437 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION

  8. Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed: Technical progress report for the second quarter, January 19--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-05-01

    This research project is for the development of a technically and economically feasible process for drying and stabilizing of fine particles of high-moisture subbituminous coal. Research activities were initiated with efforts concentrating on characterization of the two feed coals: Eagle Butte coal from AMAX Coal Company's mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming; and coal from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc.'s mine located in central Alaska. Both of the feed coals are high-moisture subbituminous coals with ''as received'' moisture contents of 29% and 22% for the Eagle Butte and Usibelli coals, respectively. However, physical analyses of the crushed coal samples (--28-mesh particle size range) indicate many differences. The minimum fluidization velocity (MFV) of the feed coals were experimentally determined. The MFV for --28-mesh Eagle Butte coal is approximately 1 ft/min, and the MFV for --28-mesh Usibelli coal is approximately 3 ft/min. 2 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Wigwam River McNeil Substrate Sampling Program : 1998-2002 Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tepper, Herb

    2003-01-01

    The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). The river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning steam in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000), and thus has been the focus of numerous studies in the last ten years (Cope 1998; Cope and Morris 2001; Cope, Morris and Bisset 2002; Kohn Crippen Consultants Ltd. 1998; Westover 1999a; Westover 1999b; Westover and Conroy 1997). Although bull trout populations in the East Kootenay region remain healthy, bull trout populations in other parts of British Columbia and within their traditional range in northwestern United States have declined. Thus, bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Centre (Cannings 1993) and remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the north-western United States, within the Columbia River watershed, were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1999, the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection applied and received funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. The purpose of this report is to summarize one of the many studies undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00). Three permanent sampling sites were established on the Wigwam River in April 1998. At each site, substrate samples were obtained using a McNeil Core sampler in April of each year from 1998 to 2002. The objectives of this study were to assess the quality of stream-bed substrates used by bull trout for spawning prior to major resource development in the Wigwam watershed

  10. The Importance of Internal Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerst, Kacy; Moore, Randy A., Schaefer, Richard

    2015-02-10

    The story of an ARPA-E awardee doesn’t necessarily end when ARPA-E funding runs out. Two ARPA-E awardees—Eagle Picher Technologies and Baldor Electric Company—have developed technologies to the point where internal stakeholders of their respective companies committed additional funds to help these technologies achieve success in the market. This video features remarks from ARPA-E Technology-to-Market Advisor Kacy Gerst and interviews with technologists at Eagle Picher and Baldor, who each tell the story of how they achieved buy-in from their internal leadership to further develop their ARPA-E-funded technologies.

  11. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 A P R I L 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY In January, OE's energy infrastructure monitoring capability was offically given the name Environment for Analysis of Geo-Located Energy Information (EAGLE-I). Through EAGLE-I, OE's Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) division has developed the capability to monitor the Nation's energy infrastructure in near real-time and to geospatially map energy assets and systems, tying together a variety of data sources into one

  12. Boulder County Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Dashboard Boulder County Data Dashboard The data dashboard of Boulder County, a partner in the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Boulder County Data Dashboard (301.52 KB) More Documents & Publications Kansas City Data Dashboard Bainbridge Island Data Dashboard Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard

  13. shaleusa9.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Bexar Zavala Kinney Dimmit La Salle Kimble Medina Matagorda Travis Lee Sutton Nueces Real ... Map Date :May 29, 2010 Mexico TX NM LA AR OK W e s t e r n G u l f B a s i n Mexico Eagle ...

  14. CX-002757: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drill One Exploratory Borehole on Lease Tract 15A by Golden Eagle UraniumCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3Date: 06/15/2010Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  15. San Antonio, Texas Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Dashboard San Antonio, Texas Data Dashboard The data dashboard for San Antonio, Texas, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. San Antonio Data Dashboard (307.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Massachusetts -- SEP Data Dashboard Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard Cincinnati Data Dashboard

  16. CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drill One Exploratory Hole On Lease Tract C-WM-17 by Golden Eagle UraniumCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3Date: 06/02/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  17. Mining into the new millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-06-15

    After more than 3 years of production and a billion tons of coal shipped, Foundation Coal West, a subsidiary of Foundation Coal Holding Inc., continues to operate two of the original surface mines in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. The article describes equipment (conveyors, trucks, surface miners etc.) deployed at Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte PRB operations. 3 photos.

  18. CX-010444: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technology Integration Program - Field Trial Site Two - Eagle Ford Shale, DeWitt County, Texas CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 06/19/2013 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Del Rio, TX 29 30 25 25 27 28 2011-2016 Eagle Pass, TX 397 397 418 418 469 431 2011-2016 El Paso, TX 146 180 288 387 155 185 2011-2016 Hidalgo, TX 699 567 6,810 7,327 6,090 6,434 ...

  20. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    20, 2015 1:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Sandia Resort, Eagle Room 30 Rainbow Road Albuquerque, New Mexico 87113 AGENDA Time Action Presenter 1:00 p.m. Call to Order Lee Bishop, DDFO ...

  1. CX-010101: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Grant for the City of Carlsbad Improvement of the Double Eagle Well Field CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B1.18 Date: 02/05/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Carlsbad Field Office

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southwest Power Pool Sub-Regional Planning Meeting Sub-Regional Area 3 David Sargent May 12, 2009 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 2 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 3 Five Year Construction Plan 2009 Bull Shoals Dam Bus Upgrade - from 600 to 1200/2000 amps The bus is a limiting element for the line going from Bull Shoals toward Harrison. New Madrid 161/69 kV Autotransformer Replacement New Madrid-Malden-Piggott-Kennett 69 kV Line Rebuild - 55 miles of line collapsed during an ice

  3. Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2004-04-01

    In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

  4. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

    2003-03-01

    In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

  5. Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) monitored its current enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in East River and several of its tributaries.

  6. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

    1997-06-01

    In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

  7. Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2005-06-01

    In 2004 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) implemented a new enhancement monitoring project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River.

  8. Economics of large-scale thorium oxide production: assessment of domestic resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Bloomster, C.H.; Enderlin, W.I.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Drost, M.K.; Weakley, S.A.

    1980-02-01

    The supply curve illustrates that sufficient amounts of thorium exist supply a domestic thorium-reactor economy. Most likely costs of production range from $3 to $60/lb ThO/sub 2/. Near-term thorium oxide resources include the stockpiles in Ohio, Maryland, and Tennessee and the thorite deposits at Hall Mountain, Idaho. Costs are under $10/lb thorium oxide. Longer term economic deposits include Wet Mountain, Colorado; Lemhi Pass, Idaho; and Palmer, Michigan. Most likely costs are under $20/lb thorium oxide. Long-term deposits include Bald Mountain, Wyoming; Bear Lodge, Wyoming; and Conway, New Hampshire. Costs approximately equal or exceed $50/lb thorium oxide.

  9. Environment and Materials Stewardship | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment and Materials Stewardship NREL's sustainability programs reduce greenhouse gases, reduce waste and prevent pollution, and encourage green purchasing. Sustainability, successfully integrated with environmental management, protects and enhances the vegetation, wildlife, and natural resources on NREL's campus. A photo of a falcon flying low over tall, brown grasses A Golden Eagle flies from a lift to his trainer during research at the National Wind Technology Center to help NREL develop

  10. Rosebud Sioux Tribe - Next Steps Toward Wind Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montileaux Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm Rosebud Sioux Tribe Resource Development Office/Tribal Utilities Commission Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen) Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Resource Development Phil Two Eagle, Resource Dev. Dir. Ken Haukaas, Wind Farm Coordinator Dr. Bill Akard, Sinte Gleska University, Cultural Resources RST Tribal Utilities Tony Rogers,

  11. Meeting today's challenges to supply tomorrow's energy. Clean fossil energy technical and policy seminar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-07-01

    Papers discussed the coal policy of China, Russia, Indonesia and Vietnam; clean coal technology (small-scale coal power plants, carbon capture and sequestration, new coking process SCOPE21, coal gasification (HyPr-RING), CO{sub 2} reduction technology, Supercritical coal-fired units and CFB boilers, EAGLE project, coal liquefaction), the coal consumer's view of clean fossil energy policy, and natural gas policy and technology. Some of the papers only consist of the presentation overheads/viewgraphs.

  12. NREL: Transportation Research - NREL's Battery Life Predictive Model Helps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Companies Take Charge NREL's Battery Life Predictive Model Helps Companies Take Charge October 26, 2015 A series of batteries hooked together next to a monitor. An example of a stationary, grid-connected battery is the NREL project from Erigo/EaglePicher Technologies, LLC Technologies. Inverters and nickel cadmium batteries inside of a utility scale 300 kW battery storage system will support Department of Defense micro-grids. Photo by Dennis Schroeder / NREL 32696 Companies that rely on

  13. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends EIA Conference, July 15, 2014 2 * Drilling Productivity Report performance review - Permian - Eagle Ford - Bakken * Crude oil production projections - Short-Term Energy Outlook - Annual Energy Outlook - International tight oil outlook * New DPR region highlights: Utica Drilling Productivity Report review - major tight

  14. DOE Participates in EDF Climate Corps Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Participates in EDF Climate Corps Training DOE Participates in EDF Climate Corps Training May 31, 2016 - 12:55pm Addthis Back row, left to right: Bartlomiej Walentynski (Tiffany & Co.), Joshua Yiangou (REI), Tanvi Umarje (Express), Brad Waters (Under Armour), Lisa Lieberbaum (PVH). Front row, left to right: Nitin Raviprasad (Best Buy), Lillian Mirviss (The Gap), Shuvya Arakali (American Eagle Outfitters), Linh Tran (Guitar Center). Back row, left to right: Bartlomiej Walentynski (Tiffany

  15. Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The seven regions analyzed in this report accounted for 92% of domestic oil production growth and all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-14. August 2016 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken Region 3 Eagle Ford Region 4 Haynesville Region 5 Marcellus Region 6 Niobrara Region 7 Permian Region 8 Utica Region 9 Explanatory notes 10

  16. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sicangu Lakota Oyate (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Project (Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Project) 30 MW Wind Energy Facility Phil Two Eagle, Director Ken Haukaas, Project Manager Resource Development Office Dale Osborn, President Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (DISGEN) www.disgenonline.com Sicangu Lakota Oyate (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Project (Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Project) Project Objectives 1. Complete all the development

  17. CX-008360: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    77: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007677: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 01/24/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Loan Guarantee Program Office The Department of Energy proposed action is for the use of a federal loan guarantee by 1366 Technologies to support the renovation of an existing building, located at 159 Wells Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts, into a solar wafer production facility. The

  18. U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Del Rio, TX 3.48 3.03 3.20 3.20 3.20 2.67 2011-2016 Eagle Pass, TX 3.61 3.16 3.52 3.41 3.18 2.58 2011-2016 El Paso, TX 2.52 2.25 2.14 2.48 2.08 1.77 2011-2016 Hidalgo, TX 2.72 2.44 ...

  19. CX-007677: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007677: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 01/24/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Loan Guarantee Program Office The Department of Energy proposed action is for the use of a federal loan guarantee by 1366 Technologies to support the renovation of an existing building, located at 159 Wells Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts, into a solar wafer production facility. The

  20. Review of EIA Oil Production Outlooks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends EIA Conference, July 15, 2014 2 * Drilling Productivity Report performance review - Permian - Eagle Ford - Bakken * Crude oil production projections - Short-Term Energy Outlook - Annual Energy Outlook - International tight oil outlook * New DPR region highlights: Utica Drilling Productivity Report review - major tight

  1. Response to FESAC survey, Non-Fusion Connections to Fusion Energy Sciences. Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, J. O.; Martinez, D. A.; Pound, M. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Villette, B.; Casner, A.; Mancini, R. C.

    2015-06-19

    Due to the iconic status of the pillars of the Eagle Nebula, this research will bring popular attention to plasma physics, HED laboratory physics, and fundamental science at NIF and other experimental facilities. The result will be to both to bring new perspectives to the studies of hydrodynamics in inertial confinement fusion and HED scenarios in general, and to promote interest in the STEM disciplines.

  2. Companies Selected for Small Wind Turbine Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Companies Selected for Small Wind Turbine Project For more information contact: Terry Monrad (303) 972-9246 Golden, Colo., Nov. 27, 1996 -- In an effort to develop cost-effective, low-maintenance wind turbine systems, the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has selected four companies to participate in the Small Wind Turbine Project. The four companies are Windlite Co., Mountain View, Calif.; World Power Technologies, Duluth, Minn.; Cannon/Wind Eagle Corp.,

  3. Energy Smart Colorado, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitchell, John M.; Palmer, Adam L.

    2014-03-31

    Energy Smart Colorado is an energy efficiency program established in 2011 in the central mountain region of Colorado. The program was funded through a grant of $4.9 million, awarded in August 2010 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Program. As primary grant recipient, Eagle County coordinated program activities, managed the budget, and reported results. Eagle County staff worked closely with local community education and outreach partner Eagle Valley Alliance for Sustainability (now Walking Mountains Science Center) to engage residents in the program. Sub-recipients Pitkin County and Gunnison County assigned local implementation of the program in their regions to their respective community efficiency organizations, Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) in Pitkin County, and Office for Resource Efficiency (ORE) in Gunnison County. Utility partners contributed $166,600 to support Home Energy Assessments for their customers. Program staff opened Energy Resource Centers, engaged a network of qualified contractors, developed a work-flow, an enrollment website, a loan program, and a data management system to track results.

  4. NREL Announces Management Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announces Management Changes For more information contact: Bob Noun (303) 275-3062 Golden, Colo., June 27, 1997 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Director Richard Truly announced a reorganization that creates two new management positions at the laboratory. Effective July 1, 1997, Dr. Stanley Bull becomes Associate Director for Research Operations. He will manage the research and development of more than 30 renewable energy technologies such as solar energy, wind energy, fuels

  5. Box Canyon Model Watershed Project : Annual Report 1997/1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Box Canyon Watershed Project. This project will concentrate on watershed protection and enhancement from an upland perspective and will complement current instream restoration efforts implemented through the Kalispel Resident Fish Project. Primary focus of this project is the Cee Cee Ah Creek watershed due to its proximity to the Reservation, importance as a traditional fishery, and potential for bull trout and west-slope cutthroat trout recovery.

  6. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

  7. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines. Phase II. Second quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The detailed design of a radial inflow steam turbine (RIT) comprised of two radial inflow turbine stages driving a common bull gear/output shaft designed for rated speeds of 70,000 rpm and 52,500 rpm, respectively, is described. Details are presented on: aerodynamic design; high speed rotors; high speed rotor bearings; high speed rotor sealing; gearing; output shaft; static structure; and predicted performance. (MCW)

  8. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7424.pdf Filesize 2 MB Version 1 Date added December 17, 2015 Downloaded 74 times Category Energy Efficiency, Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK), Presentation, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Wave Energy Tags SAND2015-7424C author Bacelli, G.; Bull, D.; Coe, R.; Patterson, D. event-name 3rd Marine Energy Technology Symposium event-location Washington D.C. event-date April 2015 report-id SAND2015-7424C slide_template default

  9. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8089C.pdf Filesize 1 MB Version 1 Date added December 16, 2015 Downloaded 81 times Category Energy Efficiency, Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK), Modeling and Analysis, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Wave Energy Tags SAND2015-8089C author Patterson, David; Bull, Diana; Bacelli, Giorgio; Coe, Ryan year 2015 event-name 3rd Marine Energy Technology Symposium event-location Washington D.C. slide_template default Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource

  10. START HERE 2015 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site DSCF8864resized Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2015 Annual Report Sections Revegetation Monitoring Report Vegetation Survey Report Wildlife Survey Report Wetland Mitigation Monitoring Report Rocky Flats Vascular Flora List (2015) 2015 Photopoint Monitoring Closure Revegetation Locations Post-Closure Revegetation Locations Wetland Mitigation Locations Game Camera Video Bull Elk Video

  11. Entrance Channel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entrance Channel Correlations in 40Ca Jeffrey Scott Bull -0.5 0.0 0.5 Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Department of Physics Duke University 1989 ENTRANCE CHANNEL CORRELATIONS IN 40Ca by Jeffrey Scott Bun Depanment of Physics Duke University Date: Approved: Dissenation submitted in panial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Duke University 1989 -- .. ABSTRACT (Physics-Nuclear) ENTRANCE CHANNEL

  12. Cascadia Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  13. Scientific and Organizational Awards | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific and Organizational Awards NREL's facility and staff are regularly recognized by scientific societies and community and government organizations. Find awards and honors by category below. Scientific and Technical Society Honors and Awards Scientific and technical society fellows are listed below, along with recent awards. American Association for the Advancement of Science 2015 Fellow -Brian Gregg 2014 Fellow - David S. Ginley 2013 Fellow - Martin Keller 2011 Fellow - Stanley Bull 2003

  14. Los Alamos honors computer code team with Feynman Innovation Prize

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team honored with Feynman Innovation Prize Los Alamos honors computer code team with Feynman Innovation Prize This year's honorees for the Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize at Los Alamos National Laboratory are the Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Team members. July 22, 2015 Winners of the 2015 Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize at Los Alamos National Laboratory, from left, are Larry J. Cox, Forrest B. Brown, Avneet Sood, Gregg W. McKinney, Jeffrey S. Bull and H. Grady Hughes. Also on the

  15. Improving Batteries for Electric Vehicle Use is Common Goal - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Improving Batteries for Electric Vehicle Use is Common Goal May 11, 2004 Golden, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will collaborate with the Korea Automotive Research Institute (KATECH) on a project to test advanced battery systems that could be used in future generations of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. The research effort was announced today following the formal signing of a memorandum of understanding by Stan Bull, NREL

  16. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  17. Slide 0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    US EIA/SAIS 2010 Energy Conference Short-term Stressses, Long-Term Change Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most? April 6, 2010 Edward L. Morse Head of Global Commodities Research +1 212 325 1013 edward.morse@credit-suisse.com ANALYST CERTIFICATIONS AND IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES ARE IN THE DISCLOSURE APPENDIX. FOR OTHER IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES, PLEASE REFER TO https://firesearchdisclosure.credit-suisse.com. 1 What have we learned about commodities? 2 Structural commodity bull market looks

  18. FLUX ROPE FORMATION PRECEDING CORONAL MASS EJECTION ONSET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, L. M.; Kliem, B. E-mail: bhk@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-08-01

    We analyze the evolution of a sigmoidal (S-shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2014 Rank Mine Name / Operating Company Mine Type State Production (short tons) 1 North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining LLC Surface Wyoming 117,965,515 2 Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company LLC Surface Wyoming 101,016,860 3 Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining LLC Surface Wyoming 34,809,101 4 Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal LLC Surface Wyoming 33,646,960 5 Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc. Surface Wyoming 20,690,237 6 Spring Creek Coal

  20. Completed EISs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Completed EISs Number of EISs in report: 294 Number Title Prog Office Ops Office Federal Register Notices Notice Date Citation Agency Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility, Bonneville County, Idaho (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0471 5/20/2011 EPA 76 FR 29240 Adopted American Centrifuge Plant in Piketon, Pike County, Ohio (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0468 5/20/2011 EPA 76 FR 29240 Adopted Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Mason County, Washington (Adopted) EE DOE/EIS-0456 10/8/2010 EPA 75 FR 62386 NOA FEIS 11/29/2010

  1. RoboRAVE Rally Northern New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RoboRAVE Rally Northern New Mexico RoboRAVE Rally Northern New Mexico WHEN: Mar 05, 2016 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM WHERE: Northern New Mexico College, Eagle Memomorial Gymnasium Espanola, NM CONTACT: Janelle Vigil-Maestas 505 665-4329 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Numerous teams of students from Northern New Mexico area schools are testing their critical thinking and teamwork skills to build autonomous robots at RoboRAVE Rally Northern New Mexico. Additionally, Explora

  2. SREL Reprint #3342

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Wintering Golden Eagles on the coastal plain of South Carolina Mark Vukovich1, Kelsey L. Turner2, Tracy E. Grazia3, Thomas Mims3, James C. Beasley2, and John C. Kilgo1 1USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, P.O. Box 700, New Ellenton, South Carolina 29809, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, P.O. Box Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA 3USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, P.O. Box 700, New Ellenton,

  3. Amy Ross

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amy Ross Amy Ross-Helping kids soar high The Materials Science and Technology Division's Amy Ross is a volunteer pilot and coordinator for the Experimental Aircraft Association's Young Eagles Program. January 9, 2015 Amy Ross Amy Ross owns a bright-yellow 1968 Beechcraft Musketeer Super III called Big Bird. While still on the ground, Ross explains how planes fly to her young visitors and what will happen once they are in the air. As they walk toward the planes, Ross asks, "Can you guess

  4. Born on an Air Force base in Mississippi, Jan never

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on an Air Force base in Mississippi, Jan never lived any place for more than three years as a child. Her family moved to Germany when she was seven, and she recalls trips all over Europe. "We visited Holland, camped in Italy for a summer, and toured numerous museums and castles. My dad had been a pilot in World War II and Korea, and he took us to Hitler's Eagle's Nest retreat, and even to the Dachau concentration camp. These made extremely strong impressions of the influences of cultural

  5. Amy Ross

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ross January 9, 2015 Helping kids soar high The Materials Science and Technology Division's Amy Ross is a volunteer pilot and coordinator for the Experimental Aircraft Association's Young Eagles Program, which introduces kids ages 8 to 17 to the joy of flying during free flights. She even has her own plane, a bright-yellow 1968 Beechcraft Musketeer Super III called Big Bird. While still on the ground, Ross explains how planes fly to her young visitors and what will happen once they are in the

  6. Indigenous Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indigenous S ustainability Image by Jonathan Thunder Climate Change Impacts Tar Sands 86% Food Economy Food Dollars Spent On the Food Dollars Spent On the "the staEsEcs showed tha ReservaEon ReservaEon only 1 million dollars or 14% of the reservaEon households' food dollars stayed on the reservaEon, while 7 million or 86% le6 the reservaEon." ---WELRP Food Sovereignty Report 2008 14 14% 86% Indigenous Corn RestoraEon Project Seneca Pink Lady Flour Corn with Sue Wika Pawnee Eagle Corn

  7. Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm Rosebud Sioux Tribe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Donald Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm Rosebud Sioux Tribe Resource Development Office/Tribal Utilities Commission Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen) Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 The Participants: Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Resource Development Phil Two Eagle, Resource Dev. Dir. Ken Haukaas, Wind Farm Coordinator Dr. Bill Akard, Sinte Gleska University, Cultural

  8. Temporal trends in and influence of wind on PAH concentrations measured near the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes, D.R.; Basu, I.; Sweet, C.W.; Hites, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on temporal trends in gas- and particle-phase PAH concentrations measured at three sites in the Great Lakes' Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network: Eagle Harbor, near Lake Superior, Sleeping Bear Dunes, near Lake Michigan, and Sturgeon Point, near Lake Erie. While gas-phase concentrations have been decreasing since 1991 at all sites, particle-phase concentrations have been decreasing only at Sleeping Bear Dunes. To determine whether these results represent trends in background levels or regional emissions, the average concentrations are compared to those found in urban and rural studies. In addition, the influence of local wind direction on PAH concentrations is investigated, with the assumption that dependence on wind direction implies regional sources. Using these two methods, it is found that PAH concentrations at Eagle Harbor and Sleeping Bear Dunes represent regional background levels but that PAH from the Buffalo Region intrude on the background levels measured at the Sturgeon Point site. At this site, wind from over Lake Erie reduces local PAH concentrations.

  9. Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed: Technical progress report for the third quarter, April 1, 1989-June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Cha, C.Y.; Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-07-01

    This research project is for the development of a technical and economical feasible process for drying and stability fine particles of high-moisture subbituminous coal. Research conducted in this quarter focused upon thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of both feed coals; continuation of the bench-scale IFB drying experiments; and initiation of the characterization of the products from the bench-scale drying experiments to determine their moisture reabsorption, dustiness, and spontaneous ignition properties. Thirty 4-hr and six 12-hr bench-scale IFB drying tests were conducted this quarter making a total of forty-one 4-hr (19 using Eagle Butte feed coal and 22 using Usibelli feed coal) and six 12-hr (3 using each feed coal) tests conducted thus far. IFB reactor slopes of 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 degrees were investigated for each feed coal. During the tests using Eagle Butte coal, gas-to-solids ratios ranging from approximately 0.7 to 9.7 lb/lb (kg/kg) and average IFB reactor temperatures ranging from approximately 370 to 700/degree/F (188 to 371/degree/C) were tested. 5 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Extending gear life in a coal pulverizer gearbox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-08-15

    A coal-fired power plant in the Western United States experienced short gearbox life in the 13 coal pulverizers operating at the plant. Wear on the bronze bull gear faces was suspected to have been caused by high particulate loading of coal dust and dirt in the gear oil, catalytic reaction between gear oil additives and some of the particulates generated, and high levels of copper in the gear oil. By addressing particulate ingress, adding filtration and switching to a synthetic gear oil, significant benefits were made to the power plant and gear oil life was extended. 2 photos., 1 tab.

  11. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd

    2009-07-08

    In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

  12. Highways of hope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-08-15

    It is hoped that through public-private partnerships between Alpha Natural Resources and Pioneer Group and Virginia Department of Transportation, and between one of these coal companies and Buchanan County, Virginia, Industrial Development Authority a four-lane 'highway of hope' between Lovers Gap and Poplar Gap will be paved and a ridge top connector route will eventually be completed to Bull Gap where it will intersect with the Coalfields Expressway and US 460. The town of Grundy is also looking into strip mining coal from beneath the small mountaintop airport at Lovers Gap and turning it into a regional airport. The article discusses these plans. 4 photos.

  13. Index of /nnpss/photos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nnpss/photos [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] DurhamBullsGame/ 07-Jul-2011 17:46 - [DIR] Farewell/ 07-Jul-2011 17:48 - [IMG] GroupPhoto_HIGH_RESOLUTION.jpg 07-Jul-2011 14:44 4.8M [IMG] GroupPhoto_LOW_RESOLUTION.jpg 07-Jul-2011 14:44 428K [IMG] GroupPhoto_MEDIUM_RESOLUTION.jpg 07-Jul-2011 14:44 5.0M [DIR] Lectures/ 07-Jul-2011 17:58 - [DIR] PosterSession/ 07-Jul-2011 17:50 - [DIR] WelcomeReception/ 07-Jul-2011 17:47 -

  14. Creation of Light and/or Surface Plasmons with Heated Metallic Films -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Find More Like This Return to Search Creation of Light and/or Surface Plasmons with Heated Metallic Films DOE Grant Recipients University of Minnesota Contact University of Minnesota About This Technology <span id="Caption"><span id="ctl00_MainContentHolder_zoomimage_defaultCaption">Ultrasmooth thin metal films with a nanoscale bull&rsquo;s eye pattern of circular concentric grooves produce a

  15. Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David

    2009-08-13

    The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

  16. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

    1984-03-01

    This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

  17. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

  18. Iron/potassium perchlorate pellet burn rate measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J.W.; Walters, R.R.

    1995-01-25

    A burn rate test having several advantages for low gas-producing pyrotechnic compacts has been developed. The technique involves use of a high speed video motion analysis system that allows immediate turnaround and produces all required data for rate computation on magnetic tape and becomes immediately available on the display screen. The test technique provides a quick method for material qualification along with data for improved reliability and function. Burn rate data has been obtained for both UPI and Eagle Pitcher Iron/Potassium Perchlorate blends. The data obtained for the UPI blends cover a range of composition, pellet density, and ambient (before ignition) pellet temperature. Burn rate data for the E-P blends were extended to include surface conditions or particle size as a variable parameter.

  19. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    This report evaluates the chemistry of seep water occurring in three desert drainages near Shiprock, New Mexico: Many Devils Wash, Salt Creek Wash, and Eagle Nest Arroyo. Through the use of geochemical plotting tools and multivariate statistical analysis techniques, analytical results of samples collected from the three drainages are compared with the groundwater chemistry at a former uranium mill in the Shiprock area (the Shiprock site), managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The objective of this study was to determine, based on the water chemistry of the samples, if statistically significant patterns or groupings are apparent between the sample populations and, if so, whether there are any reasonable explanations for those groupings.

  20. Biofuels Issues and Trends - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  1. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  2. The Effect of Element Formulation on the Prediction of Boost Effects in Numerical Tube Bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardelcik, A.; Worswick, M.J.

    2005-08-05

    This paper presents advanced FE models of the pre-bending process to investigate the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost effects in tube bending. Tube bending experiments are conducted with 3'' (OD) IF (Interstitial-Free) steel tube on a fully instrumented Eagle EPT-75 servo-hydraulic mandrel-rotary draw tube bender. Experiments were performed in which the bending boost was varied at three levels and resulted in consistent trends in the strain and thickness distribution within the pre-bent tubes. A numerical model of the rotary draw tube bender was used to simulate pre-bending of the IF tube with the three levels of boost from the experiments. To examine the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost, the tube was modeled with shell and solid elements. Both models predicted the overall strain and thickness results well, but showed different trends in each of the models.

  3. Attainment of the spirit of NEPA: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, D.J. ); Kott, F.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Great Lakes Gas Transmission Company recently undertook a major expansion of their interstate natural gas pipeline system. The environmental permitting process for this large (460 mile), multi-state construction project exemplified the pervasiveness of the spirit of NEPA in dozens of federal, state, and local jurisdictional agencies, as well as associated organizations which lacked permitting authority but which took an active interest in the permitting process. Additionally, approvals from watershed districts, county zoning offices, and military preserves were obtained. Permit applications and agency consultations were complex and extremely labor-intensive. Overlapping jurisdictional authority turned permit acquisition into a labyrinth for which progress needed to be tracked weekly, and interagency logjams proved to be problematic. One specific example involved an archaeological site at the edge of a wetland under an eagle's nest. While the efficiency of multiple agencies administering NEPA is questionable, there seems little doubt as to the efficacy of the spirit of NEPA in this geographic region.

  4. Petroleum geology of Kate Spring field, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, D.E.

    1991-06-01

    Kate Spring field was opened by Marathon Oil Company at the 1 Kate Spring well in December 1985. Because of poor market conditions and production problems, the well was not produced and the field was not confirmed until the Evans 1 Taylor well was completed in October 1987. As of August 1990, five wells have produced over 575,000 bbl of oil and have the capacity to flow at rates of several hundred to several thousand barrels per day. The oil is 10-12{degrees} API and is saturated with gas. The oil is used for road asphalt which limits its marketability. Production is from landslide blocks of Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata that were emplaced in Miocene-Pliocene time, during the structural development of the Railroad Valley basin. The slide blocks are overlain by valley fill and probably correspond to similar blocks encountered within the valley fill at Eagle Springs field, adjacent to the north. The pay is at a depth of 4,500 ft. Kate Spring is a part of the fault-block bench that contains Eagle Springs field and is situated on the east flank of the Railroad Valley graben. There is east-west closure on the structure of the field, but the north end of the field has not been defined. The accumulation is sealed by the unconformity at the slide block-valley fill contact. The nature of the reservoir implies that the production is controlled by fractures and precludes useful extrapolation of any measurable matrix porosity. Based on volumetric calculations, the field will probably produce 2-3 million bbl of oil.

  5. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  6. Bonneville Power Administration, Lower Columbia Region: Noxious Weed Management, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR; Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program

    1996-01-01

    During the 1996 season ODA executed the contract between BPA and ODA. Execution of this contract included the following activities: Survey for target noxious weeds, such as Gorse; collection and redistribution of biological control agents, for example, Apion seed weevils for Scotch broom, bioagents for diffuse and spotted knapweed, Gorse spider mite, and gall fly releases for control of Canada thistle and bull thistle; and control of isolated infestations of Gorse on BPA rights-of-way. Training was provided for line crews at the Chemawa, Alevy and North Bend districts. The purpose of the program is to assist BPA in the integrated prevention and control of noxious weed species on BPA transmission line maintenance right-of-ways.

  7. Self locking drive system for rotating plug of a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brubaker, James E.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure describes a self locking drive system for rotating the plugs on the head of a nuclear reactor which is able to restrain plug motion if a seismic event should occur during reactor refueling. A servomotor is engaged via a gear train and a bull gear to the plug. Connected to the gear train is a feedback control system which allows the motor to rotate the plug to predetermined locations for refueling of the reactor. The gear train contains a self locking double enveloping worm gear set. The worm gear set is utilized for its self locking nature to prevent unwanted rotation of the plugs as the result of an earthquake. The double enveloping type is used because its unique contour spreads the load across several teeth providing added strength and allowing the use of a conventional size worm.

  8. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Steve

    2004-02-01

    The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha sub-basins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

  9. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

    1994-06-01

    In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management

  11. Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. W. Weiss

    2006-09-30

    Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field

  12. STUDY OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF ACTIVE REGION 11117 AROUND THE TIME OF A CONFINED FLARE USING A DATA-DRIVEN CESE-MHD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2012-11-10

    We apply a data-driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare that occurred on 2010 October 25. The MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma {beta}. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photosphere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria based on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory around the time of the flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most cases. The magnetic configuration changes very little during the studied time interval of 2 hr. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by {approx}10{sup 30} erg, which seems to be adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare.

  13. An overview of the NREL/SNL flexible turbine characterization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, Gunjit; Kelley, Neil; McKenna, Ed; Osgood, Richard; Sutherland, Herbert; Wright, Alan

    1998-09-01

    There has been a desire to increase the generating capacity of the latest generation of wind turbine designs. In order to achieve these larger capacities, the dimensions of the turbine rotors are also increasing significantly. These larger structures are often much more flexible than their smaller predecessors. This higher degree of structural flexibility has placed increased demands on available analytical models to accurately predict the dynamic response to turbulence excitation, In this paper we present an overview and our progress to date of a joint effort of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). In this paper we present an overview and status of an ongoing program to characterize and analytically model the dynamics associated with the operation of one of the most flexible turbine designs currently available, the Cannon Wind Eagle 300 (CWE-300). The effort includes extensive measurements involving a detailed inventory of the turbine's physical properties, establishing the turbine component and fill-system vibrational modes, and documenting the dynamic deformations of the rotor system and support tower while in operation.

  14. Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

  15. Plugged grids: A new solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, M.F.

    1993-12-31

    Blocked Truck Dump Grids are a coal industry country-wide problem. It does not matter if you operate a western state multi-million ton per year mega-mine or one of the many 500 ton per hour eastern ones. Forcing oversize coal through the grizzly has been a labor intensive problem for both, causing: reduced production throughput because of increased downtime; unnecessary use of maintenance or operational personnel with usually expensive ancillary equipment; and introduction of a hazardous situation with a potential safety problem. Operators have developed numerous techniques to address the problem with varying degrees of success. During 1989, AMAX Coal and Gundlach Machinery personnel developed the concept of a semi-automatic, unmanned breaker which would traverse back and forth across the top of a grizzly, breaking up the oversize chunks of coal allowing them to fall through the grizzly openings. A small test unit was built in early 1990, and the technique successfully demonstrated. In March, 1991, the first commercial unit was installed on the 26 foot {times} 123 foot grizzly at AMAX Coal`s Eagle Butte Mine located north of Gillette, Wyoming, which processes LIP to 8,000 tons per hour of raw coal. After minor adjustments, the unit was put into operation in mid-April, 1991, and is performing two years later as planned.

  16. Gas turbine fuel from low-rank coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maas, D.J.; Smith, F.J.

    1986-06-01

    Five low-rank coals from the western United States were cleaned in a bench-scale heavy media separation procedures followed by acid leaching and hydrothermal processing. The objective of these cleaning steps was to determine the amenability of preparing gas turbine quality fuel from low-rank coal. The best candidate for scale-up was determined to be a Wyoming subbituminous coal from the eagle Butte mine. Two hundred thirty kilograms of cleaned and micronized coal/water fuel were prepared in pilot-scale equipment to determine process parameters and fuel characteristics. After establishing operating conditions, two thousand kilograms of cleaned and micronized coal/water and powdered coal fuel were produced for testing in a pilot-scale gas turbine combustor. An economic analysis was completed for a commercial-scale plant designed to produce clean gas turbine fuel from low-rank coal using the most promising process steps identified form the bench- and pilot-scale studies. 21 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. Coal desulfurization by chlorinolysis: production and combustion-test evaluation of product coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalvinskas, J.; Daly, D.

    1982-04-30

    Laboratory-scale screening tests were carried out on PSOC 276, Pittsburgh Coal from Harrison County, Ohio to establish chlorination and hydrodesulfurization conditions for the batch reactor production of chlorinolysis and chlorinolysis-hydrodesulfurized coals. In addition, three bituminous coals, Pittsburgh No. 8 from Greene County, PA, Illinois No. 6 from Jackson County, Illinois and Eagle No. 5 from Moffat County, Colorado were treated on the lab scale by the chlorinolysis process to provide 39 to 62% desulfurization. Two bituminous coals (PSOC 276, Pittsburgh Coal from Harrison County, Ohio and 282, Illinois No. 6 Coal from Jefferson County, Illinois) and one subbituminous coal (PSOC 230, Rosebud Coal fom Rosebud County, Montana) were then produced in 11 to 15 pound lots as chlorinolysis and hydrodesulfurized coals. The chlorinolysis coals had a desulfurization of 29 to 69%, reductions in volatiles (12 to 37%) and hydrogen (6 to 31%). Hydrodesulfurization provided a much greater desulfurization (56 to 86%), reductions in volatiles (77 to 84%) and hydrogen (56 to 64%). The three coals were combustion tested in the Penn State plane flame furance to determine ignition and burning characteristics. All three coals burned well to completion as: raw coals, chlorinolysis processed coals and hydrodesulfurized coals. The hydrodesulfurized coals experienced greater ignition delays and reduced burning rates than the other coals because of the reduced volatile content. It is thought that the increased open pore volume in the desulfurized-devolatilized coals compensates in part for the decreased volatiles effect on ignition and burning. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-24

    EAGLES1.1 is PC-based interactive software for analyzing performance (e.g., maximum range) of electric vehicles (EVs) or fuel economy (e.g., miles/gallon) of gasoline vehicles (GVs). The EV model provides a second by second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified vehicle velocity/time or power/time profile. It takes into account the effects of battery depth-of-discharge (DOD) and regenerative braking. The GV fuel economy model which relates fuel economy, vehicle parameters, and driving cycle characteristics, canmore » be used to investigate the effects of changes in vehicle parameters and driving patterns on fuel economy. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance can be studied. Alternatively, the software can be used to determine the size of battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements (e.g., maximum range and driving patterns). Options are available to estimate the time necessary for a vehicle to reach a certain speed with the application of a specified constant power and to compute the fraction of time and/or distance in a drivng cycle for speeds exceeding a given value.« less

  19. Characterization of Epitaxial Film Silicon Solar Cells Grown on Seeded Display Glass: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C.; Stradins, P.; LaSalvia, V.; Chuang, T. K.; Couillard, J. G.; Branz, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    We report characterizations of epitaxial film crystal silicon (c-Si) solar cells with open-circuit voltages (Voc) above 560 mV. The 2-um absorber cells are grown by low-temperature (<750 degrees C) hot-wire CVD (HWCVD) on Corning EAGLE XG display glass coated with a layer-transferred (LT) Si seed. The high Voc is a result of low-defect epitaxial Si (epi-Si) growth and effective hydrogen passivation of defects. The quality of HWCVD epitaxial growth on seeded glass substrates depends on the crystallographic quality of the seed and the morphology of the epitaxial growth surface. Heterojunction devices consist of glass/c-Si LT seed/ epi n+ Si:P/epi n- Si:P/intrinsic a-Si:H/p+ a-Si:H/ITO. Similar devices grown on electronically 'dead' n+ wafers have given Voc {approx}630 mV and {approx}8% efficiency with no light trapping features. Here we study the effects of the seed surface polish on epi-Si quality, how hydrogenation influences the device character, and the dominant junction transport physics.

  20. High-performance batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. Progress report, October 1978-September 1979. [40 kWh, Li-Al and Li-Si anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, D. L.; Steunenberg, R. K.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gay, E. C.; Battles, J. E.; Hornstra, F.; Miller, W. E.; Vissers, D. R.; Roche, M. F.; Shimotake, H.; Hudson, R.; Askew, B. A.; Sudar, S.

    1980-03-01

    The research, development, and management activities of the programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and at contractors' laboratories on high-temperature batteries during the period October 1978 to September 1979 are reported. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and for stationary energy-storage applications. The present cells, which operate at 400 to 500/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with one or more inner positive electrodes of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, facing negative electrodes of lithium-aluminum or lithium-silicon alloy, and molten LiCl-KC1 electrolyte. During this reporting period, cell and battery development work has continued at ANL and contractors' laboratories. A 40 kWh electric-vehicle battery (designated Mark IA) was fabricated and delivered to ANL for testing. During the initial heat-up, one of the two modules failed due to a short circuit. A failure analysis was conducted, and the Mark IA program completed. Development work on the next electric-vehicle battery (Mark II) was initiated at Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. and Gould, Inc. Work on stationary energy-storage batteries during this period has consisted primarily of conceptual design studies. 107 figures, 67 tables.

  1. Sedimentology and petroleum occurrence, Schoolhouse Member, Maroon Formation (Lower Permian), northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.Y.; Schenk, C.J.; Anders, D.L.; Tuttle, M.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The Lower Permian Schoolhouse Member of the Maroon Formation (formerly considered the Schoolhouse Tongue of the Weber Sandstone) forms a partly exhumed petroleum reservoir in the Eagle basin of northwestern Colorado. The Schoolhouse consists mainly of yellowish gray to gray, low-angle to parallel bedded, very fine to fine-grained sandstone of eolian sand-sheet origin; interbedded fluvial deposits are present in most sections. The sand-sheet deposits of the Schoolhouse Member are sedimentologically and petrologically similar to those in the underlying red beds of the main body of the Maroon Formation, and the Schoolhouse is considered the uppermost sand sheet in the Maroon depositional sequence. The bleached and oil-stained Schoolhouse member is distinguished from the underlying Maroon red beds on the basis of its diagenetic history, which is related to regional hydrocarbon migration and development of secondary porosity. Geological and geochemical data suggest that Schoolhouse Member oils have upper Paleozoic sources, including the intrabasinal Belden Formation. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, J. O.; Martinez, D. A.; Pound, M. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Villette, B.; Casner, A.; Mancini, R. C.

    2015-06-18

    This research will; confirm the possibility of studying the structure and evolution of star-forming regions of molecular clouds in the laboratory; test the cometary model for the formation of the pillar structures in molecular clouds; assess the effect of magnetic fields on the evolution of structures in molecular clouds; and develop and demonstrate a new, long-duration (60-100 ns), directional source of x-ray radiation that can be used for the study of deeply nonlinear hydrodynamics, hydrodynamic instabilities that occur in the presence of directional radiation, shock-driven and radiatively-driven collapse of dense cores, and photoionization. Due to the iconic status of the pillars of the Eagle Nebula, this research will bring popular attention to plasma physics, HED laboratory physics, and fundamental science at NIF and other experimental facilities. The result will be to both to bring new perspectives to the studies of hydrodynamics in inertial confinement fusion and HED scenarios in general, and to promote interest in the STEM disciplines.

  3. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

    2002-11-01

    Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have

  4. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd

    2008-11-18

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public

  5. A sodium gadolinium phosphate with two different types of tunnel structure: Synthesis, crystal structure, and optical properties of Na{sub 3}GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, M.; Cheng, W.-D. Zhang, H.; Zhao, D.; Zhang, W.-L.; Yang, S.-L.

    2008-09-15

    A sodium gadolinium phosphate crystal, Na{sub 3}GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8}, has been synthesized by a high-temperature solution reaction, and it exhibits a new structural family of the alkali-metal-rare-earth phosphate system. Although many compounds with formula M{sub 3}LnP{sub 2}O{sub 8} have been reported, but they were shown to be orthorhombic [R. Salmon, C. Parent, M. Vlasse, G. LeFlem, Mater. Res. Bull. 13 (1978) 439] rather than monoclinic as shown in this paper. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows the structure to be monoclinic with space group C2/c and the cell parameters: a=27.55 (25), b=5.312 (4), c=13.935(11) A, {beta}=91.30(1){sup o}, and V=2038.80 A{sup 3}, Z=4. Its structure features a three-dimensional GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 3-} anionic framework with two different types of interesting tunnels at where Na atoms are located by different manners. The framework is constructed by Gd polyhedra and isolated PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. It is different from the structure of K{sub 3}NdP{sub 2}O{sub 8} [R. Salmon, C. Parent, M. Vlasse, G. LeFlem, Mater. Res. Bull. 13 (1978) 439] with space group P2{sub 1}/m that shows only one type of tunnel. The emission spectrum and the absorption spectrum of the compound have been investigated. Additionally, the calculations of band structure, density of states, dielectric constants, and refractive indexes have been also performed with the density functional theory method. The obtained results tend to support the experimental data. - Graphical abstract: Projection of the structure of Na{sub 3}GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8} with a unit cell edge along the b-axis. The Na-O bonds are omitted for clarity.

  6. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel

    2009-04-03

    validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  7. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment, Technical Report 1999-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    The Arrow Lakes food web has been influenced by several anthropogenic stressors during the past 45 years. These include the introduction of mysid shrimp (Mysis relicta) in 1968 and 1974 and the construction of large hydroelectric impoundments in 1969, 1973 and 1983. The construction of the impoundments affected the fish stocks in Upper and Lower Arrow lakes in several ways. The construction of Hugh Keenleyside Dam (1969) resulted in flooding that eliminated an estimated 30% of the available kokanee spawning habitat in Lower Arrow tributaries and at least 20% of spawning habitat in Upper Arrow tributaries. The Mica Dam (1973) contributed to water level fluctuations and blocked upstream migration of all fish species including kokanee. The Revelstoke Dam (1983) flooded 150 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 80 km of tributary streams which were used by kokanee, bull trout, rainbow trout and other species. The construction of upstream dams also resulted in nutrient retention which ultimately reduced reservoir productivity. In Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), nutrients settled out in the Revelstoke and Mica reservoirs, resulting in decreased productivity, a process known as oligotrophication. Kokanee are typically the first species to respond to oligotrophication resulting from aging impoundments. To address the ultra-oligotrophic status of ALR, a bottom-up approach was taken with the addition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus in the form of liquid fertilizer from 1999 to 2004). Two of the main objectives of the experiment were to replace lost nutrients as a result of upstream impoundments and restore productivity in Upper Arrow and to restore kokanee and other sport fish abundance in the reservoir. The bottom-up approach to restoring kokanee in ALR has been successful by replacing nutrients lost as a result of upstream impoundments and has successfully restored the productivity of Upper Arrow. Primary production rates increased, the phytoplankton community responded

  8. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  9. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin of Washington : 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Karl, David; Coyle, Terrence

    2001-11-01

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about the threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77. 12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of their habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2000 field season (March to November, 2000).

  10. Strength and durability properties of core lithologies from coal-bearing Tyonek formation, Cook Inlet region, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odum, J.K.

    1985-04-01

    The Tyonek Formation (late Oligocene to middle Miocene) is a nonmarine unit of sandstone, siltstone, and claystone that contains large quantities of strippable subbituminous coal and lignite. The geotechnical properties, determined by field and laboratory tests on core from the Capps and Chuitna coalfields, dictate the equipment needs for excavation, determination of pit slope angle for mine planning, and durability of excavated spoil to weathering degradation. Point-load strength index tests are rapid and inexpensive field tests approximating the tensile and unconfined compressive strength of rock types. These tests, combined with laboratory uniaxial compression tests, were used to rank the formation lithologies in order of decreasing strength: coal (2670 psi), carbonaceous claystone (835 psi), siltstone (435 psi), claystone (375 psi), and sandstone (145 psi). Except for coal, the lithologies range in hardness from soft soil to soft rock. Laboratory slake durability index tests, which measure the deterioration potential of rock masses as a result of cyclic wetting and drying, were used to rank lithologies in order of decreasing durability: claystone (49%), carbonaceous claystone (46%), siltstone (40%), and sandstone (20%). The cored Tyonek lithologies are noncarbonate, and their strength and durability increase with decreasing grain size and increasing clay-particle content. Compressional wave velocity, combined with point-load data, indicates that most of the rocks could be removed by bull-dozers with ripping blades or by scrapers and shovels. However, coal (with rare exceptions, the strongest lithology tested) would require blasting before removal.

  11. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  12. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    1999-11-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  13. Quaternary history of the northeastern Bighorn Basin based on a climatically-controlled process-response model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdseye, R.U.

    1985-01-01

    The highest surfaces and oldest Pleistocene sediments in the northeastern Bighorn Basin are associated with the 600 kya North Kane Ash. Subsequent climatically-induced periods of aggradation and incision produced the remaining geomorphic elements. Processes associated with a typical interglacial-glacial cycle include: (1) interglacial stability with Bighorn River alluviation, pedimentation, and eolian deposition; (2) late-interglacial to early-glacial incision; (3) alluvial fan extension and increased landslide development during glacial intervals; and (4) an early-interglacial return to more stable conditions. Frequent stream captures during interglacial times were caused by the out-of-phase relationships between the Bighorn River and its tributaries. Quaternary climates of a given type have not been of equal magnitude or duration in the northeastern Bighorn Basin. The most intense glacial climates from which sediments are preserved are believed to have occurred ca. 600 kya, 440 kya an d140 kya. An abnormally dry climate existed between 400 kya and 275 kya, while extremely wet interglacial conditions prevailed about 100 kya. The last complete climatic cycle was the Bull Lake. The subsequent Holocene interglacial has been unusually dry. Thus not all Pleistocene climates have been capable of generating terraces of extensive alluvial fans.

  14. Multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometry of supersonic plasma jets andcomparisons with synthetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merritt, Elizabeth C.; Lynn, Alan G.; Gilmore, Mark A.; Thoma, Carsten; Loverich, John; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-05-03

    A multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometer [Merritt et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 033506 (2012)] is being used to make time-resolved density measurements of supersonic argon plasma jets on the Plasma Liner Experiment [Hsu et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 56, 307 (2011)]. The long coherence length of the laser (> 10 m) allows signal and reference path lengths to be mismatched by many meters without signal degradation, making for a greatly simplified optical layout. Measured interferometry phase shifts are consistent with a partially ionized plasma in which an initially positive phase shift becomes negative when the ionization fraction drops below a certain threshold. In this case, both free electrons and bound electrons in ions and neutral atoms contribute to the index of refraction. This paper illustrates how the interferometry data, aided by numerical modeling, are used to derive total jet density, jet propagation velocity ({approx} 15-50 km/s), jet length ({approx} 20-100 cm), and 3D expansion.

  15. How loads affect coiled tubing life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. Inc., AK )

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing was performed on 1-3/4-in OD, 0.125 in. wall thickness (WT) coiled tubing using a standard coiled tubing unit (CTU) as shown in this paper. Testing was conducted under Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil well, conditions to determine the effects of axial load, internal pressure and bending stress on the longevity, or usable running footage, that can be expected with larger diameter tubing. The CTU was rigged up in a standard configuration with injector head 50 ft off the ground, the worst case for bending on most currently available North Slope units. Internal pressure was supplied by a small triplex pump and the end of tubing was closed off with a fishing neck and bull plug. Weight, for the first four tests, was suspended from the coiled tubing by a special clamp. The tubing was cycled up and over the guide arch until a loss of internal coiled tubing pressure (CTP) occurred, or until the tubing became stuck in the stripper brass.

  16. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

    1986-08-01

    We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

  17. Recycling efficiency: The shape of things to come

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1995-09-01

    In the mid-`70s, curbside recycling was easy. Virtually all the programs collected only newspaper at the curbside. They were placed in a rack beneath the garbage truck or in a trailer behind the truck. Of course, the rack might fill up too soon, but that was a minor problem, usually resolved by offloading sites for the newspaper. Today, curbside recycling is much more complicated. Curbside programs can collect a bewildering array of materials, including plastics, mixed paper, and even textiles. The simple rack is in the Smithsonian, replaced by highly sophisticated vehicles. Some can automatically collect recyclables without the driver ever getting out of the cab. Simplicity, it seems, has given way to complexity as recycling rates have skyrocketed. The recycling industry has been buffeted recently by a slew of anti-recycling articles in the popular press, yet, ironically, it has been enjoying the best markets has blunted the anti-recyclers. However, bull markets are not forever. Recyclers cannot afford to adopt a ``What, me worry?`` attitude towards the business of recycling. As collectors become increasingly skilled in collecting recyclables, they can translating these skills into more efficient programs.

  18. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartlerode, Ray; Dabashinsky, Annette; Allen, Steve

    2003-01-28

    This project is necessary to insure that replacement of fish screening devices and fishways meet current NMFS design criteria for the protection of all salmonid life stages. The mission of the fish passage program in Northeast Oregon is to protect and enhance fish populations by assisting private landowners, public landowners, irrigation districts and others by maintaining fish screening devices and fishways. These facilities reduce or eliminate fish loss associated with irrigation withdrawals, and as a result insure fish populations are maintained for enjoyment by present and future generations. Assistance is provided through state and federal programs. This can range from basic technical advice to detailed construction, fabrication and maintenance of screening and passage facilities. John Day screens personnel identified 50 sites for fish screen replacement, and one fish passage project. These sites are located in critical spawning, rearing and migration areas for spring chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout. All projects were designed and implemented to meet current NMFS criteria. It is necessary to have a large number of sites identified due to changes in weather, landowner cooperation and access issues that come up as we try and implement our goal of 21 completed projects.

  19. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

    2002-12-01

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

  20. Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

    2003-09-01

    This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo

  1. Assessment of the Fishery Improvement Opportunities on the Pend Oreille River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Michael R.; Willms, Roger A.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the fishery improvement opportunities on the Box Canyon portion of the Pend Oreille River. This report contains the findings of the first year of the study. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss (Richardson)) were present in the Pend Oreille River prior to the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The river also contained native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki (Richardson)), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus (Walbaum)) and mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni (Girard)). Rainbow trout were planted in the river and some grew to lengths in excess of 30 inches. With the construction of Box Canyon Dam, in 1955, the most productive section of the river was inundated. Following the construction of the dam the trout fishery declined and the populations of spiny ray fish and rough fish increased. The objectives of the first year of the study were to determine the relative abundance of each species in the river and sloughs; the population levels in fish in the river and four selected tributaries; fish growth rates; the feeding habits and abundance of preferred prey; the migration patterns; and the total fishing pressure, catch per unit effort, and total harvest by conducting a year-round creel survey. 132 refs.

  2. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  3. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States overall electrical generation capacity is expected to increase by 10-25 gigawatts (GW) per year to meet increases in demand. Wind energy is a key component of state and federal renewable energy standards, and central to the Department of Energy’s 20% by 2030 wind production goals. Increased wind energy development may present increased resource conflict with avian wildlife, and environmental permitting has been identified as a potential obstacle to expansion in the sector. ICF developed an analytical framework to help applicants and agencies examine potential impacts in support of facility siting and permitting. A key objective of our work was to develop a framework that is scalable from the local to the national level, and one that is generalizable across the different scales at which biological communities operate – from local influences to meta-populations. The intent was to allow natural resource managers to estimate the cumulative impacts of turbine strikes and habitat changes on long-term population performance in the context of a species demography, genetic potential, and life history. We developed three types of models based on our literature review and participation in the scientific review processes. First, the conceptual model was developed as a general description of the analytical framework. Second, we developed the analytical framework based on the relationships between concepts, and the functions presented in the scientific literature. Third, we constructed an application of the model by parameterizing the framework using data from and relevant to the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA), and an existing golden eagle population model. We developed managed source code, database create statements, and written documentation to allow for the reproduction of each phase of the analysis. ICF identified a potential template adaptive management system in the form of the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Adaptive Harvest

  4. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  5. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  6. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  7. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 4 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  8. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  9. Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, Douglas J.

    2007-03-31

    The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNCs technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clarks Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clarks Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

  10. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the Great Lakes atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Pierrette Blanchard; Kenneth A. Brice; Ronald A. Hites

    2006-10-15

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations were measured in both the vapor and particle phases at seven sites near the Great Lakes as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Lower molecular weight PAHs, including fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, and pyrene, were dominant in the vapor phase, and higher molecular weight PAHs, including chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and coronene, were dominant in the particle phase. The highest PAH concentrations in both the vapor and particle phases were observed in Chicago followed by the semiurban site at Sturgeon Point, NY. The major sources of PAHs in and around Chicago are vehicle emissions, coal and natural gas combustion, and coke production. The spatial difference of PAH concentrations can be explained by the local population density. Long-term decreasing trends of most PAH concentrations were observed in both the vapor and particle phases at Chicago, with half-lives ranging from 3-10 years in the vapor phase and 5-15 years in the particle phase. At Eagle Harbor, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Sturgeon Point, total PAH concentrations in the vapor phase showed significant, but slow, long-term decreasing trends. At the Sturgeon Point site, which was impacted by a nearby city, particle-phase PAH concentrations also declined. However, most particle-phase PAH concentrations did not show significant long-term decreasing trends at the remote sites. Seasonal trends were also observed for particle-phase PAH concentrations, which were higher in the winter and lower in the summer. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Long-term elemental dry deposition fluxes measured around Lake Michigan with an automated dry deposition sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahin, U. Yi, S.M.; Paode, R.D.; Holsen, T.M.

    2000-05-15

    Long-term measurements of mass and elemental dry deposition (MG, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) were made with an automated dry deposition sampler (Eagle II) containing knife-edge surrogate surfaces during the Lake Michigan Mass Balance/Mass Budget Study. Measurements were made over a roughly 700-day period in Chicago, IL; in South Haven and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI; and over Lake Michigan on the 68th Street drinking water intake cribs from December 1993 to October 1995. Average mass fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 65, 10, 3.6, and 12 mg m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Primarily crustal elemental fluxes were significantly smaller than the mass fluxes but higher than primarily anthropogenic elemental fluxes. For example, the average elemental flux of Al in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 1.0, 0.34, 0.074, and 0.34 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The average Pb fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 0.038, 0.023, 0.035, and 0.032 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The measured fluxes at the various sites were used to calculate the dry deposition loadings to the lake. These estimated fluxes were highest for Mg and lowest for Cd.

  12. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  13. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  14. Pennsylvanian and Early Permian paleogeography of northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.Y. )

    1993-04-01

    Northwestern CO and northeastern UT include parts of four major sedimentary provinces active during the late Paleozoic ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny: the Eagle basin (Eb), the northern Paradox basin (Pb), the southern Wyoming shelf (Ws), and the southeastern Oquirrh basin (Ob). Depositional patterns in these provinces were controlled by eustatic and climatic fluctuations, tectonism, and sediment supply. In general, regressive deposits consist of fluvial, deltaic, and eolian sandstone, and transgressive deposits consist of marine limestone and clastic rocks. Morrowan and lower Atokan strata in most of the region consist of fine-grained clastic rock and more abundant limestone. Significant Morrowan and early Atokan highlands include the Front Range and Sawatch uplifts; the Uncompahgre uplift began its rapid rise in the late Atokan to Desmoinesian. Late Atokan to Desmoinesian tectonic activity resulted in restricted circulation and low clastic sediment supply to the central Eb and Pb, leading to evaporite deposition during regression. During the Missourian and Virgilian, clastic sediments prograded into the central Eb and northern Pb, ending evaporite deposition. During regressions, fluvial and eolian deposition dominated in the Eb, and sabkha and (or) shallow marine-deposition dominated in the northern Pb. The Ws continued to serve as a throughway for clastic sediment moving to the deepening Ob. Deposition of limestone during transgressions was limited to the western part of the study region and a small area in the eastern Eb. Regionally, the rates and magnitude of subsidence were greatest in the Ob, intermediate and very similar in the Eb and northern Pb, and lowest in the Ws. In all four sedimentary provinces, rates of subsidence were lowest in the Early Pennsylvania, highest in the Middle Pennsylvanian, and intermediate in the Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian.

  15. The Pennsylvanian and Permian Oquirrh-Wood River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geslin, J.K. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Oquirrh-Wood River Basin (OWRB) lie unconformably above the Antler orogenic belt and flysch trough/starved basin in NW Utah, NE Nevada, and SC Idaho. Strata of the basin, now separated geographically by the Neogene Snake River Plain, show similar subsidence histories, identical mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentary fill, and identical chert pebble conglomerate beds supplied by one or more DesMoinesian uplifts containing Lower Paleozoic strata. This conglomerate, of the lower Sun Valley Group, Snaky Canyon Formation, and parts of the Oquirrh Formation, was reworked progressively southward, to at least the Idaho-Utah border. It is present in strata as young as Virgilian. Virgilian to Leonardian rocks are ubiquitously fine-grained mixed carbonate-siliciclastic turbidites. These rocks contain cratonal, well-sorbed subarkosic and quartzose sand and silt in part derived from the Canadian Shield. This siliciclastic fraction is intimately mixed with arenaceous micritized skeletal material and peloids derived from an eastern carbonate platform represented by the Snaky Canyon Formation in east-central Idaho, an eastern facies of the Eagle Creek Member, Wood River Formation in the Boulder Mountains, and the Oquirrh Formation in the Deep Creek Mountains. Subsidence of the OWRB may have been caused by two phases (DesMoinesian and Wolfcampian to Leonardian) of crustal loading by continental margin tectonism to the west. An elevated rim separated the OWRB from coeval volcanogenic basins to the west. Earlier, Antler-age structures may have been reactivated. A new pulse of tectonism occurred in Leonardian to Guadalupian time as in most places carbonatic and phosphatic strata of the Leonardian to Guadalupian Park City and Phosphoria Formation overlie OWRB strata, with different geographic arrangement of basinal, slope, and shelf depocenters.

  16. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

    1984-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of Kerr Dam operations on the fisheries of the Lower Flathead System. Supported by Bonneville Power Administration funding, and conducted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the study began in December of 1982 and is scheduled for completion in December of 1987. This report covers the 1983-84 field season and includes the status of target fish species populations in the Flathead River and tributaries, and initial work in South Bay of Flathead Lake. Additionally it addresses how Kerr operations may effect the reproduction of salmonids and northern pike. Combined trout population estimates for rainbow, brown, brook, and bull trout, averaged 13 fish/km of the lower Flathead River. The number of bull trout and cutthroat trout captured was so low that estimation of their individual populations was not possible. An interim closure to trout harvest on the lower Flathead River was recommended and approved by the Tribal Council until study results can be further analyzed and management options reviewed. Population estimates for northern pike ranged from six/kilometer in poorer habitat, to one hundred three/km in the best habitat in the main Flathead River. Seven pike were radio tagged and their movements monitored. Movements of over 89 km were recorded. One fish left the Flathead River and moved down the Clark Fork to the Plains area. Fish weirs were constructed on the Jocko River and Mission Creek to assess spawning runs of trout from the main river. Thirty-two adult rainbow passed the Jocko weir and twenty-eight passed the Mission weir during the spring spawning season. Twenty adult brown trout were captured at the Jocko weir and five at Mission weir in the fall. The Jocko weir suffered minor damage due to bed load movement during high flows of spring runoff. The structure of trout populations in the lower Flathead River points to spawning and recruitment problems caused by hydroelectric operations and

  17. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, Ian

    1985-01-01

    The goal was to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance the reservoir fishery in Libby. This report summarizes data collected from July 1984 through July 1985, and, where appropriate, presents data collected since 1983. The Canada, Rexford, and Tenmile areas of the reservoir are differentially affected by drawdown. Relative changes in water volume and surface area are greatest in the Canada area and smallest in the Tenmile area. Reservoir morphology and hydraulics probably play a major role in fish distribution through their influence on water temperature. Greatest areas of habitat with optimum water temperature for Salmo spp. and kokanee occurred during the spring and fall months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity levels were not limiting during any sampling period. Habitat enhancement work was largely unsuccessful. Littoral zone vegetation plantings did not survive well, primarily the result of extreme water level fluctuations. Relative abundances of fish species varied seasonally within and between the three areas. Water temperature is thought to be the major influence in fish distribution patterns. Other factors, such as food availability and turbidity, may mitigate its influence. Sampling since 1975 illustrates a continued increase in kokanee numbers and a dramatic decline in redside shiners. Salmo spp., bull trout, and burbot abundances are relatively low while peamouth and coarsescale sucker numbers remain high. A thermal dynamics model and a trophic level components model will be used to quantify the impact of reservoir operation on the reservoir habitat, primary production, secondary production and fish populations. Particulate carbon will be used to track energy flow through trophic levels. A growth-driven population dynamics simulation model that will estimate the impacts of reservoir operation on fish population dynamics is also being considered.

  18. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  19. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  20. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  1. In vitro effects of fatty acids on goat, calf and guinea pig hepatic gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiello, R.J.; Armentano, L.E.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated hepatocytes from male guinea pigs, ruminating goats and bull calves were incubated at 39 C for 1h. Fatty acids C18:1, C16, and C8 (.5, 1, 2 mM) were added as albumin complexes (3:1 molar ratio), C2 and C4 (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mM) were added as Na salts. In ruminant cells C2 had no effect on (2-/sup 14/C)-propionate (PROP) (2.5 mM) or (U-/sup 14/C)-L-lactate (LACT) (2.5 mM) metabolism. C4 (2.5 or 5 mM) decreased (/sup 14/C)-glucose (GLU) (P < .01) from PROP (48% goats, 68% calves) and decreased LACT conversion to GLU, (27% goats, 50% calves), C8, C16 and C18:1 effects depended on gluconeogenic substrate and species. In goat cells conversion of PROP to GLU was increased (P < .01) by C18:1 (30%) and C8 (52%) with C16 showing a similar trend. There were no interactions between the effects of fatty acids and lactation state (lactating does vs wethers). In goat cells C8 increased PROP conversion to GLU relative to oxidation, other fatty acids did not change relative rates. In calf cells C18:1, C16 and C8 had no effect on PROP metabolism. C8 inhibited gluconeogenesis from LACT in goats (24%) (P < .07) and calves (47%) (P < .01). In contrast fatty acids decreased (P < .01) GLU production from PROP (C18:1 90%, C8 80%) and LACT (C18:1 75%, C8 75%) in cells from guinea pigs. They have established a clear difference in the regulation of gluconeogenesis among species which contain similar intracellular distribution of P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase.

  2. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn; Tohtz, Joel

    2008-11-12

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and

  3. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on

  4. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26

    expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  5. Fluid-evaporation records preserved in salt assemblages in Meridiani rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Sutton, S.R.; Dreibus, G.; Garrison, D.H.; Herrin, J.

    2009-09-25

    We studied the inter-relationships between the major anions (SO{sub 3}, Cl, and Br) and cations (FeO, CaO and MgO) using elemental abundances determined by APXS in salt assemblages of RATted (abraded) rocks at Meridiani to characterize the behavior of fluids that infiltrated into this region on Mars. A plot of SO{sub 3} versus Cl for the abraded rocks yielded an unusual pattern, whereas the SO{sub 3}/Cl ratios versus Cl for the same rocks showed a monotonically decreasing trend represented by a hyperbola. The systematic behavior of the SO{sub 3} and Cl data in the documented rocks at Meridiani suggests that these anions behaved conservatively during fluid-rock interactions. These results further indicate that two kinds of fluids, referred to as SOL-I and SOL-II, infiltrated into Endurance/Eagle/Fram craters, where they underwent progressive evaporative concentration. SOL-I is a low pH fluid consisting of high SO{sub 3} and low Cl and high Br, (this fluid infiltrated all the way to the crater-top region), whereas SOL-II fluid of high pH with low SO{sub 3} and high Cl and low Br reached only an intermediary level known as the Whatanga contact at Endurance. Based on the FeO/MgO as well as CaO/MgO versus SO{sub 3}/Cl diagram for rocks above the Whatanga contact, the cation and anion relationships in this system suggest that the Fe{sup 2+}/SO{sub 4} and Ca{sup 2+}/SO{sub 4} ratios in SOL-I fluids at Meridiani were > 1 before the onset of evaporation based on the 'chemical divide' considerations. Below the Whatanga contact, relatively dilute SOL-II fluids seem to have infiltrated and dissolved/flushed away the easily soluble Mg-sulfate/chloride phases (along with Br) without significantly altering the SO{sub 3}/Cl ratios in the residual salt assemblages. Further, Cl/Br versus Br in rocks above the Whatanga contact show a hyperbolic trend suggesting that Cl and Br behaved conservatively similar to SO{sub 3} and Cl in the SOL-1 fluids at Meridiani. Our results are

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological

  7. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Duane D.

    2009-11-14

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement

  8. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in

  9. 3D Model of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    The Tuscarora geothermal system sits within a ~15 km wide left-step in a major west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. The step over is defined by the Independence Mountains fault zone and the Bull Runs Mountains fault zone which overlap along strike. Strain is transferred between these major fault segments via and array of northerly striking normal faults with offsets of 10s to 100s of meters and strike lengths of less than 5 km. These faults within the step over are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the range-bounding fault zones between which they reside. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone wherein east-dipping faults mainly occupy western half of the accommodation zone and west-dipping faults lie in the eastern half of the accommodation zone. The 3D model of Tuscarora encompasses 70 small-offset normal faults that define the accommodation zone and a portion of the Independence Mountains fault zone, which dips beneath the geothermal field. The geothermal system resides in the axial part of the accommodation, straddling the two fault dip domains. The Tuscarora 3D geologic model consists of 10 stratigraphic units. Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium has eroded down into bedrock units, the youngest and stratigraphically highest bedrock units are middle Miocene rhyolite and dacite flows regionally correlated with the Jarbidge Rhyolite and modeled with uniform cumulative thickness of ~350 m. Underlying these lava flows are Eocene volcanic rocks of the Big Cottonwood Canyon caldera. These units are modeled as intracaldera deposits, including domes, flows, and thick ash deposits that change in thickness and locally pinch out. The Paleozoic basement of consists metasedimenary and metavolcanic rocks, dominated by argillite, siltstone, limestone, quartzite, and metabasalt of the Schoonover and Snow Canyon Formations. Paleozoic formations are lumped in a single basement unit in the model. Fault blocks in the eastern

  10. John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Linda

    2004-01-01

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional

  11. 3D Model of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    The Tuscarora geothermal system sits within a ~15 km wide left-step in a major west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. The step over is defined by the Independence Mountains fault zone and the Bull Runs Mountains fault zone which overlap along strike. Strain is transferred between these major fault segments via and array of northerly striking normal faults with offsets of 10s to 100s of meters and strike lengths of less than 5 km. These faults within the step over are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the range-bounding fault zones between which they reside. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone wherein east-dipping faults mainly occupy western half of the accommodation zone and west-dipping faults lie in the eastern half of the accommodation zone. The 3D model of Tuscarora encompasses 70 small-offset normal faults that define the accommodation zone and a portion of the Independence Mountains fault zone, which dips beneath the geothermal field. The geothermal system resides in the axial part of the accommodation, straddling the two fault dip domains. The Tuscarora 3D geologic model consists of 10 stratigraphic units. Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium has eroded down into bedrock units, the youngest and stratigraphically highest bedrock units are middle Miocene rhyolite and dacite flows regionally correlated with the Jarbidge Rhyolite and modeled with uniform cumulative thickness of ~350 m. Underlying these lava flows are Eocene volcanic rocks of the Big Cottonwood Canyon caldera. These units are modeled as intracaldera deposits, including domes, flows, and thick ash deposits that change in thickness and locally pinch out. The Paleozoic basement of consists metasedimenary and metavolcanic rocks, dominated by argillite, siltstone, limestone, quartzite, and metabasalt of the Schoonover and Snow Canyon Formations. Paleozoic formations are lumped in a single basement unit in the model. Fault blocks in the eastern

  12. Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Hua; Jones, Cecil L; Baker, Gary A; Xia, Shuqian; Olubajo, Olarongbe; Person, Vernecia

    2009-01-01

    The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel

  13. Multiscale Simulation of Moist Global Atmospheric Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2015-04-13

    the sphere of Jablonowski and Williamson (Q. J. R. Met. Soc. 2006), and moist extension of the Held-Suarez idealized climate benchmark (Held and Suarez, Bull. Amer. Met. Soc., 1994).

  14. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn

    2006-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost

  15. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn

    2006-06-26

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost

  16. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn

    2004-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost

  17. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were

  18. Assessment of the Fishery Improvement Opportunities on the Pend Oreille River: Recommendations for Fisheries Enhancement: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1992-03-01

    This report recommends resident fish substitution projects to partially replace anadromous fish losses caused by construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. These recommendations involve enhancing the resident fishery in the Pend Oreille River as a substitute for anadromous fish losses. In developing these recommendations we have intentionally attempted to minimize the impact upon the hydroelectric system and anadromous fish recovery plans. In this report we are recommending that the Northwest Power Planning Council direct Bonneville Power Administration to fund the proposed enhancement measures as resident fish substitution projects under the NPPC's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The Pend Oreille River, located in northeast Washington, was historically a free flowing river which supported anadromous steelhead trout and chinook salmon, and large resident cutthroat trout and bull trout. In 1939, Grand Coulee Dam eliminated the anadromous species from the river. In 1955, Box Canyon Dam was constructed, inundating resident trout habitat in the river and creating many back water and slough areas. By the late 1950's the fishery in the reservoir had changed from a quality trout fishery to a warm water fishery, supporting largemouth bass, yellow perch and rough fish (tenth, suckers, squawfish). The object of this study was to examine the existing fishery, identify fishery improvement opportunities and recommend fishery enhancement projects. Three years of baseline data were collected from the Box Canyon portion of the Pend Oreille River to assess population dynamics, growth rates, feeding habits, behavior patterns and factors limiting the fishery. Fishery improvement opportunities were identified based on the results of these data. Relative abundance surveys in the reservoir resulted in the capture of 47,415 fish during the study. The most abundant species in the reservoir were yellow perch, composing 44% of the fish captured. The perch population in

  19. Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

    2002-06-01

    The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation

  20. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of

  1. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M.; Ballinger, Dean

    2006-04-01

    year, we successfully held Pacific lamprey ammocetes. The number of fish sampled at Bonneville Dam was also down this year to 260,742, from 444,580 last year. Reasons for the decline are the same as stated above for John Day. Passage timing at Bonneville Dam was quite similar to previous years with one notable exception, sockeye. Sockeye passage was dominated by two large spikes in late May that greatly condensed the passage pattern, with the middle 80% passing Bonneville in just 18 days. Unlike John Day, passage for the rest of the species was well disbursed from late April through early June. Fish condition was good, with reductions in descaling rates for all species except unclipped steelhead and sockeye. Sockeye mortality matched last year's rate but was considerably lower for all other species. Rare species sampled at Bonneville this year included a bull trout and a eulachon.

  2. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs

  3. Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

    2008-11-19

    The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008

  4. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary and Their Implications for Managing River Flows and Restoring Estuarine Habitat, Physical Sciences Component, Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, David A.

    2009-08-03

    on river flow and tidal range), and tidal ranges have increased considerably (by a factor of 1.5 to 4 for most river-flow levels) since the 1900-1940 period at most stations, with the largest percentage changes occurring at upriver stations. These changes have been caused by a combination of changes in channel roughness, shape and alignment, changes in coastal tides, and (possibly) bed degradation. Tides are growing throughout the Northeast Pacific, and Astoria (Tongue Pt) has one of the most rapid rates of increase in tidal range in the entire Eastern Pacific, about 0.3m per century. More than half of this change appears to result from changes within the system, the rest from larger scale changes in coastal tides. Regression models of HHW have been used to estimate daily shallow water habitat (SWHA) available in a {approx}25 mile long reach of the system from Eagle Cliff to Kalama for 1925-2004 under four different scenarios (the four possible combinations of diked/undiked and observed flow/ virgin flow). More than 70% of the habitat in this reach has been lost (modern conditions vs. virgin flow with not dikes). In contrast, however, to the reach between Skamokawa and Beaver, selective dike removal (instead of a combination of dike removal and flow restoration) would suffice to increase spring SWHA. The second task consists of reconstruction of the hydrologic cycle before 1878, based on historic documents and inversion of tidal data collected before the onset of the historic flow record in 1878. We have a complete list of freshet times and peak flows for 1858-1877, and scattered freshet information for 1841-1857. Based on tidal data, we have reconstructed the annual flow cycles for 1870 and 1871; other time periods between 1854 and 1867 are under analysis. The three remaining tasks relate to post-1878 hydrologic conditions (flows, sediment supply and water temperature), and separation of the human and climate influences thereon. Estimated ob-served (sometimes routed

  5. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian

  6. Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M.

    2004-05-01

    ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into three chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fifth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River basin. Chapter 2 describes our tributary sampling methodology for monitoring the status of tributary NTT. Chapter 3 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and

  7. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-04-01

    during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

  8. SUPPORT FOR HU CFRT SUMMER HIGH SCHOOL FUSION WORKSHOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punjabi, Alkesh

    2010-02-09

    researchers in the HU CFRT mentor the students during summers. Mentors spend a considerable amount of time and efforts in training, teaching, guiding and supervising research projects. The HU CFRT has so far conducted nine workshops during the summers of 1996-2000 and 2002-2005. The first workshop was conducted in summer 1996. Students for the workshop are chosen from a national pool of exceptionally talented high school rising seniors/juniors. To our knowledge, most of these students have gone on to prestigious universities such as Duke University, John Hopkins University, CalTech, UCLA, Hampton University, etc. after completing their high school. For instance, Tiffany Fisher, participant of the 1996 summer workshop completed her BS in Mathematics at Hampton University in May 2001. She then went on to Wake Forest University at Winston-Salem, North Carolina to pursue graduate studies. Anshul Haldipur, participant of the 1999 summer workshop, began his undergraduate studies at Duke University in 2000. Christina Nguyen and Ilissa Martinez, participants of the 2000 summer workshop, are pursuing their undergraduate degrees at the UCLA and Florida State University respectively. The organizing committee of the APS DPP annual meeting invited Dr. Punjabi to deliver an invited talk on training the next generation of fusion scientists and engineers at the 2005 APS DPP meeting in Denver, CO. The organizing committee distributed a special flier with the Bulletin to highlight this invited talk and another talk on education as well the expo. This has given wide publicity and recognition to our workshops and Hampton University. Prof. Punjabi's talk: 'LI2 2: Training the next generation of fusion scientists and engineers: summer high school fusion science workshop, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 50, 221 (2005)' was very well-received. He talked about HU education and outreach initiative and the HU CFRT Summer High School Workshop. The audience had a considerable number of questions about our

  9. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01

    sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch

  10. Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F.

    2009-07-01

    This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate

  11. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo, Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2003-12-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River

  12. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River