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1

Lead shot poisons bald eagles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the controversy between the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Wildlife Federation and the increased mortality of bald eagles. The eagles are being poisoned by preying on waterfowl which have ingested lead shot or have been wounded by shot and not recovered. The controversy has resulted in the establishment of new criteria for so-called non-toxic shot waterfowl hunting.

Cohn, J.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Bald and Golden Eagles of the SRP. (Annual report, 1986)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both Bald and Golden Eagles have a prior history of occurrence on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Sightings of Bald Eagles have been uncommon but persistent, while Golden Eagle sightings have been rare. A one-year survey was conducted to assess the use of the SRP by these two species. Thirty-six Bald Eagles were seen during the study period. No Golden Eagles were observed. Over 90% of the Bald Eagle sightings were on Par Pond; three out of four of these birds were adults. Thirteen percent of the sightings were of paired birds, and the remainder were of solitary individuals. Bald Eagles were observed during every month of the survey. The majority were seen between November and May. Sightings were evenly divided between morning and afternoon hours. Two marked Bald Eagles were observed. Since the conclusion of this study, twenty-two Bald Eagles have been reported. Six were new locality records for the SRP. Four of these sightings were on L-Lake. Bald Eagle use of the SRP is higher than was previously thought; Golden Eagle use remains rare.

Mayer, J.J.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kennamer, R.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Golden Eagle Protection Act Golden Eagle Protection Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Year 1940 Url [[File:|160px|link=http://permits.fws.gov/ltr/ltr.shtml]] Description References FWS Overview[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 668-668c), enacted in 1940, and amended several times since then, prohibits anyone, without a permit issued by the Secretary of the Interior, from "taking" bald eagles, including their parts, nests, or eggs. The Act provides criminal penalties for persons who "take, possess, sell, purchase, barter, offer to sell, purchase or barter, transport, export or import, at any time or any manner, any bald eagle ... [or any golden eagle], alive or dead, or any part, nest,

4

Mercury concentrations in tissues of Florida bald eagles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We collected 48 blood and 61 feather samples from nestling bald eagles at 42 nests and adult feather samples from 20 nests in north and central Florida during 1991-93. We obtained 32 liver, 10 feather, and 5 blood samples from 33 eagle carcasses recovered in Florida during 1987-93. For nestlings, mercury concentrations in blood (GM = 0.16 ppm wet wt) and feather (GM = 3.23 ppm) samples were correlated (r = 0.69, P = 0.0001). Although nestlings had lower mercury concentrations in feathers than did adults (GM = 6.03 ppm), the feather mercury levels in nestlings and adults from the same nest were correlated (r = 0.63, P eagles (GM = 0.23 ppm) was similar to Florida nestlings but some Florida nestlings had blood mercury concentrations up to 0.61 ppm, more than twice as high as captive adults. Feather mercury concentrations in both nestlings and adults exceeded those in captive eagles, but concentrations in all tissues were similar to, or lower than, those in bald eagles from other wild populations. Although mercury concentrations in Florida eagles are below those that cause mortality, they are in the range of concentrations that can cause behavioral changes or reduce reproduction. We recommend periodic monitoring of mercury in Florida bald eagles for early detection of mercury increases before negative effects on reproduction occur. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Wood, P.B.; Wood, J.M. [Wes Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); White, J.H. [Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Eustis, FL (United States)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High rates of nonbreeding adult bald eagles in southeastern Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Present knowledge of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) demography is derived primarily from populations in environments that have been drastically altered by man. Most reproductive studies were done in the 1960's and 1970's when chemical toxins were inhibiting bald eagle productivity. Earlier, the removal of old-growth forests and decimation of anadromous fish runs by Euro-Americans may have greatly reduced bald eagle abundance from presettlement levels. Historical trends in this species are of interest because fundamental differences may exist between populations in pristine and man-altered environments. One difference may be breeding rate. Surpluses of nonbreeding adult bald eagles during the nesting season are rarely mentioned in the literature. Most surveys of reproductive success focus exclusively on eagles at nest sites, which assumes nearly all adults attempt to breed each year. The authors report that a majority of adults in the relatively pristine habitats of southeastern Alaska do not breed annually. This finding is important because if surpluses of non-breeding adults are a natural feature of the population, then hypotheses on density dependent population regulation and the evolution of delayed maturation are suggested. If, on the other hand, the abundance of nonbreeders is an artifact of recent environmental perturbations, serious population declines may occur in southeastern Alaska.

Hansen, A.J.; Hodges, J.I. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Bald eagles of the Hanford National Environmental Research Park  

SciTech Connect

Since 1961, near-yearly aerial surveys of bald eagles along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River have been conducted. Prey resources available to the eagles have also been monitored and we have thus been able to examine predator-prey relationships in a statistical fashion. We report on a unique set of data which provides insight into one of the factors (prey availability) controlling bald eagle wintering populations. The winter distribution of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has been reported to closely follow the availability of prey (Servheen 1975, Southern 1963, Shea 1973, Spencer 1976). Fitzner and Hanson (1979) compared twelve years of eagle winter survey data on the Hanford DOE Site with waterfowl numbers and salmon redd densities over the same period and provided some statistical evidence that eagle wintering numbers varied somewhat dependently with changing salmon redd numbers but not with changing waterfowl numbers. This report re-examines Fitzner and Hanson's (1979) twelve year data set and supplies two additional years of data for the Hanford DOE Site in order to gain additional insight into predator-prey interactions.

Fitzner, R.E.; Watson, D.G.; Rickard, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

GRR/Section 12-FD-b - Bald & Golden Eagle Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-FD-b - Bald & Golden Eagle Permit GRR/Section 12-FD-b - Bald & Golden Eagle Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-FD-b - Bald & Golden Eagle Permit 12FDBBaldGoldenEaglePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Fish and Wildlife Service Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act National Environmental Policy Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12FDBBaldGoldenEaglePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Bald and Golden Eagle Act prohibits anyone from "taking" bald eagles.

8

Environmental contaminants in bald eagles in the Columbia River estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eggs, blood, and carcasses of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and fish were collected and breeding success of eagles was monitored in the Columbia River estuary, 1980-87, to determine if contaminants were having an effect on productivity. High levels of dichloro diphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were found in eggs, blood from adults, and 2 eagle carcasses. Detectable levels of DDE and PCB's were found in blood of nestlings indicating they were exposed to these contaminants early in life. Increasing concentrations of DDE and PCB's with age also indicated accumulation of these contaminants. Adult eagles also had higher levels of mercury (Hg) in blood than subadults or young indicating accumulation with age. The high levels of DDE and PCB's were associated with eggshell thinning ([bar x] = 10%) and with productivity ([bar x] = 0.56 young/occupied site) that was lower than that of healthy populations (i.e., [ge]1.00 young/occupied site). DDE and PCB's had a deleterious effect on reproduction of bald eagles in the estuary. The role dioxins play in eagle reproduction remains unclear, but concentrations in eagle eggs were similar to those in laboratory studies on other species where dioxins adversely affected hatchability of eggs. Probable source of these contaminants include dredged river sediments and hydroelectric dams, and the proper management of each may reduce the amount of contaminants released into the Columbia River estuary. 46 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Anthony, R.G.; Garrett, M.G. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States)); Schuler, C.A. (Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Salt River Project`s participation in Arizona`s bald eagle conservation efforts  

SciTech Connect

Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) conservation in Arizona, USA, is a prime example of a successful, cooperative environmental management effort. The Salt River Project (SRP) is an active participant in the statewide bald eagle management activities. This paper summarizes the major components of the statewide program and highlights SRP`s participation in these efforts. The Southwestern Bald Eagle Management Committee (SWBEMC) was formed as a means of coordinating interagency projects. Chaired by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), the SWBEMC is comprised of 15 state, federal, tribal, and private agencies. Together, these agencies sponsor the Nest Watch Program, a unique and effective program dedicated to the study, conservation, and recovery of bald eagles in the southwest. Other significant components of the bald eagle management program include nest monitoring, nest search activities, winter counts, and demography studies. 7 refs., 4 figs.

Nobel, T.A. [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bald eagle survival and population dynamics in Alaska after the Exxon Valdez oil spill  

SciTech Connect

We investigated age-specific annual survival rates for 159 bald eagles (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) radiotagged from 1989 to 1992 in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. We monitored radio-tagged eagles for {le}3 years beginning 4 months after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. There was no difference (P > 0.10) in survival rates between eagles radiotagged in oiled areas and eagles radiotagged in unoiled areas of PWS. Pooled annual survival rates were 71% for first-year eagles, 95% for subadults, and 88% for adult bald eagles. Most deaths occurred from March to May. We found no indication that survival of bald eagles radiotagged >4 months after the oil spill in PWS was directly influenced by the spill and concluded that any effect of the spill on survival occurred before eagles were radiotagged. A deterministic life table model suggests that the PWS bald eagle population has an annual finite growth rate of 2%. Given the cumulative effects of direct mortality and reduced productivity caused by the oil spill, we predicted that the bald eagle population would return to its pre-spill size by 1992. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Bowman, T.D.; Bernatowicz, J.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, AK (United States); Schempf, P.F. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Juneau, AK (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ban of DDT and subsequent recovery of Reproduction in bald eagles  

SciTech Connect

Reproduction of bald eagles in northwestern Ontario declined from 1.26 young per breeding area in 1966 to a low of 0.46 in 1974 and then increased to 1.12 in 1981. Residues of DDE in addled eggs showed a significant inverse relation, confirming the effects of this toxicant on bald eagle reproduction at the population level and the effectiveness of the ban on DDT. The recovery from DDE contamination in bald eagles appears to be occurring much more rapidly than predicted.

Grier, J.W.

1982-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

Relationship of diets and environmental contaminants in wintering bald eagles. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the relationship between diets and potential hazards in contaminants of wintering bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Klamath Basin of northern California and southern Oregon. We studied diets by identifying remains of 913 prey items found at perches, examining 341 castings collected from communal night roots, and observing foraging eagles. We determined residues of organochlorine compounds, lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg) in bald eagles and their prey by analyzing eagle blood samples and carcasses and 8 major prey species. Bald eagles fed largely on waterfowl by scavenging cholera-killed ducks and geese and on microtine rodents during mid- to late winter. Residues of organochlorine pesticides and Hg in prey were low, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) were detected in low concentrations in 9% of prey samples. Means Pb concentrations in prey ranged from 0.15 to 4.79 ppm. Mercury was detected in all eagle blood samples, and Pb was detected in 41% of the bald eagle blood samples. Mean Pb concentration in livers of dead eagles was 2.09 ppm and ranged as high as 27 ppm in an eagle that died of Pb poisoning. Prey of the eagles were relatively free of contaminants with the possible exception of embedded Pb shot in waterfowl, which may present a potential for Pb poisoning of eagles.

Frenzel, R.W.; Anthony, R.G. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Behavioral ecology of bald eagles along the northwest coast: a landscape perspective. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the range of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has been subjected to anthropogenic disturbance of greater magnitude than the natural regimes of pre-European settlement times. Consequently, many eagle populations are depauperate. Eagle populations are large and stable, however, along the relatively pristine Pacific Northwest Coast of North America. This study examines: (1) the behavior and ecology of bald eagles along the northwest coast; and (2) the effects of environmental disturbance and resource dynamics on the ecology and evolution of eagles. The ephemeral nature of food supplies along the northwest coast apparently results in eagles being limited primarily by food stress. The foraging behavior of eagles was analyzed using evolutionary game theory as a theoretical construct. Productivity was found to be variable and generally declining in southeast Alaska. Eagles maximized energy input for survival by feeding opportunistically, making broad-scale movements to find food patches, locating food within a patch by searching for prey or for conspecifics with prey, assessing prey profitability, acquiring food by hunting and stealing, and by defending food through threat displays or fighting. Eagles obtain food for reproduction by defending feeding territories and by storing food in their nests. These strategies and adaptations translate up scale and influence characteristics of the regional population. 34 figs., 21 tabs.

Hansen, A.J.; Dyer, M.I.; Shugart, H.H.; Boeker, E.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effects of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill on bald eagles. Bird study number 4. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimated that about 8000 bald eagles (Halieetus leucocephalus) inhabited the area affected by the spill at the time of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. We conducted a 3-year study to determine effects of the spill on the bald eagle population and reproduction and survival of adults and fledglings. The greatest injuries to bald eagles occurred in 1989 and were manifested by direct mortality of bald eagles throughout the spill area and significantly reduced reproduction in PWS. We could not discern negative effects on the population or reproduction of eagles after 1989.

Bowman, T.D.; Schempf, P.F.; Bernatowicz, J.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Bald eagle habitat suitability on Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area around Melton Hill Reservoir and sections of the Clinch River along the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide suitable habitat for bald eagles for both breeding and wintering activities. Primary limitations on habitat suitability appear to be human activity in aquatic habitats and along shoreline areas, and human development along shoreline areas. ORR provides the majority of the suitable habitat because shoreline development is very limited. Four eagle management strategies discussed for ORR include planning development away from high-quality habitats, allowing forest stands near water to mature, conducting timber stand improvement to foster growth and development in pines and hardwoods, and using introductions to foster the development of a breeding population. The primary objective of this project was to make a qualitative assessment of bald eagle habitat suitability along Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River and in adjacent areas on the ORR, including the proposed Advanced Neutron Source site. This survey`s aim was to provide ORR managers with an indication of whether suitable habitat exists and, if so, where it occurs on ORR. This information should provide the basis for incorporating eagle management into the overall ORR land management plan.

Buehler, D.A. [Univ., of Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fighting behavior in Bald Eagles: a test of game theory. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven predictions of evolutionary game theory were examined in field studies of foraging behavior of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) wintering in the Chilkat Valley, Alaska. A cost/benefit analysis revealed that the frequencies of two foraging strategies (hunting and stealing from conspecifics) were balanced such that the payoffs of the two were nearly equal. Asymmetries in probable correlates of fighting ability (size and, possibly, spatial position (being in the air vs. on the ground), but not age) and expected gain in victory (hunger level) influenced the outcome of contests over food. Individuals used conditions strategies: small or young birds appeared to hung (rather than steal) relatively more often than others. Pirating eagles often assessed the size and hunger level of food defenders and attacked those most likely to retreat. Contrary to prediction, ritualized displays served to advertise expected gain in victory and were good indicators of subsequent behavior. The level of escalated fighting was inversely related to resource availability. Finally, a graphical model shows that pirating frequency may or may not be influenced by changes in food abundance. The results generally support the predictions of game theory and explain several aspects of Bald Eagle foraging behavior.

Hansen, A.J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Assessing cumulative impacts to wintering Bald Eagles and their habitats in western Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) of Washington, the largest wintering population in the lower 48 states, are subject to numerous pressures and impacts from human activites. An evaluative method potential cumulative impacts of multiple hydroelectric development and logging activities on known and potential eagle use areas. Four resource components include food supply, roost sites, mature riparian forest, and disturbance. In addition to actual estimates of losses in food supply (fish biomass in kg) and habitat (km/sup 2/) in one river basin, impact levels from 0 (none) to 4 (high) were assigned for each development and for each component based on the impacts anticipated and the estimated value of the site to eagles. Midwinter eagle surveys, aerial photography, topographic and forest stand maps, and site visits were used in the analysis. Impacts were considered additive for all but the disturbance component, which was adjusted for potential synergism between developments. Adjustments were made for mitigation before the impacts were aggregated into a single, dimensionless cumulative impact score. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Witmer, G.W.; O'Neil, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effects of the Cabinet Gorge Kokanee Hatchery on Wintering Bald Eagles in the Lower Clark Fork River and Lake Pend, Oreille, Idaho: 1986 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The abundance and distribution of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on the lower Clark Fork River, Lake Pend Oreille, and the upper Pend Oreille River, Idaho, were documented during the winters of 1985--86 and 1986--87. Peak counts of bald eagles in weekly aerial censuses were higher in 1985--86 (274) and 1986--87 (429) than previously recorded in mid-winter surveys. Differences in eagle distribution within and between years were apparently responses to changes in prey availability. Eight bald eagles were captured and equipped with radio transmitters in the winter and spring of 1986. Residencies within the study area averaged 13.9 days in 1985--86 and 58.3 days for the four eagles that returned in 1986-87. The eagles exhibited considerable daily movement throughout the study area. After departing the area, one eagle was later sighted approximately 1185 km to the southwest in northern California. Eagle behavioral activity was recorded at time budget sessions at areas of heavy use. Perching in live trees was the most common behavior observed. 34 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs.

Crenshaw, John G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Eagles and Buzzards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The head, neck and tail of the adult is pure white, the body being sooty brown and the wing nearly black. Immature bald eagles, however, until they are three years old and...

20

Golden Eagles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golden Eagles Name: Karen Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am in first grade.Can you please tell me where do golden eagles eat. Replies: Golden eagles are birds of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT FOR BALD EAGLES FOR LICENSE RENEWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is evaluating an application submitted by Virginia Electric and Power Company (VEPCo) for the renewal of the operating licenses for an additional 20 years for its Surry Power Station (SPS), Units 1 and 2. The SPS is located on the Gravel Neck Peninsula in Surry County, Virginia. The current license for Unit 1 will expire on May 25, 2012, and for Unit 2 on January 29, 2013. License renewal will extend the operating license for each unit an additional 20 years past the above dates. The proposed action would include the continued operation and maintenance of the existing facilities at the SPS site and the transmission corridor that connects the SPS, Units 1 and 2, to the regional electrical grid. The proposed action will not include any new construction or onsite disturbance. The NRC is preparing a supplement to its 1996?Generic Environmental Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants ” (NUREG-1437) for this proposed license renewal. As part of the renewal review, we evaluate potential impacts to Federally listed, proposed, or candidate species, as well as designated or proposed critical habitat. In a letter to the Virginia Field Office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) dated January 24, 2002, the NRC staff requested a list of Federally protected species and any critical

John P. Wolflin; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A pilot golden eagle population study in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orloff and Flannery (1992) estimated that several hundred reports are annually killed by turbine collisions, wire strikes, and electrocutions at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The most common fatalities were those of red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), American kestrels (Falco sparvatius), and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), with lesser numbers of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), common ravens (Corvus corax), bam owls (Tyto alba), and others. Among the species of raptors killed at Altamont Pass, the one whose local population is most likely to be impacted is the golden eagle. Besides its being less abundant than the others, the breeding and recruitment rates of golden eagles are naturally slow, increasing their susceptibility to decline as a result of mortality influences. The golden eagle is a species afforded special federal protection because of its inclusion within the Bald Eagle Protection Act as amended in 1963. There are no provisions within the Act which would allow the killing ``taking`` of golden eagles by WRA structures. This report details the results of field studies conducted during 19941. The primary purpose of the investigation is to lay the groundwork for determining whether or not turbine strikes and other hazards related to energy at Altamont Pass may be expected to affect golden eagles on a population basis. We also seek an understanding of the physical and biotic circumstances which attract golden eagles to the WRA within the context of the surrounding landscape and the conditions under which they are killed by wind turbines. Such knowledge may suggest turbine-related or habitat modifications that would result in a lower incidence of eagle mortality.

Hunt, G. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Predatory Bird Research Group

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Photo of the Week: The Eagle Has Landed | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: The Eagle Has Landed Photo of the Week: The Eagle Has Landed Photo of the Week: The Eagle Has Landed July 3, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis While our National Laboratories and other research centers across the U.S. house some of the nation's most advanced technology and research facilities, the Department of Energy is also working to preserve the wildlife and ecosystems surrounding these locations. This image from 1992 is from another remarkable science and innovation center, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. This photo is in a series of remarkable shots documenting the daily lives of two of the most famous residents: the southern bald eagles that inhabit an enormous nest on the Kennedy Parkway North. Each fall, eagles take up residence in the nest to breed a new generation. That year, a rare and unique event was captured by a camera hidden in the tree -- a second clutch of eggs was laid, even though a healthy eaglet was born just one month earlier. While it is impossible to determine if it is the same eagles returning each year, the continued tolerance shown by this pair to the human presence seems to indicate that they are the same couple.

24

Baldness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the medical term for loss of hair. Factors involved are heredity, hormones, and aging. Women sometimes have the same type of hair loss in men, but not as severe, and...

25

Bald Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.365833333333°, -120.2425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.365833333333,"lon":-120.2425,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Response of wintering bald eagles to industrial construction in southeastern Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Columbia River at the Hanford Site is a regionally important refugium for overwintering birds. Some of the river shoreline has been designated by the U.S. Department of Energy for environmental clean-up following past production of materials for nuclear weapons. We evaluated the effects of soil remediation on winter birds at six inactive nuclear reactor areas. Remediation activities consisted of daily removal of approximately 1,035 t of contaminated soil from previously herbicided and denuded areas located between 30 m and 400 m and in partial line-of-sight of the river shoreline. Remediation activities had no apparent effect on numbers of riverine or terrestrial birds using adjacent undisturbed shoreline and riparian habitat.

Becker, James M.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

29

Code development with the EAGLES engineering problem-solving environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EAGLES is a set of computer programs which assist in the development and use of engineering analysis and simulation codes. This paper introduces EAGLES to the developers of engineering codes. EAGLES' capabilities, functions, and tools for code development are explained.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.

1986-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Assessment of Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Eagle Ford play in south Texas is currently one of the hottest plays in the United States. In 2012, the average Eagle Ford rig… (more)

Gong, Xinglai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Category:Eagle County, CO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle County, CO Eagle County, CO Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Eagle County, CO" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Eagle County CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment Eagle County CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVMidriseApartment Eag... 67 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Eagle County CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 63 KB SVSecondarySchool Eagle County CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVSecondarySchool Eagl... 68 KB SVStandAloneRetail Eagle County CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVStandAloneRetail Eag... 67 KB SVHospital Eagle County CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVHospital Eagle Count...

32

Prevention of Golden Eagle electrocution. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eagle electrocutions on distribution lines were documented in six western states by examination of carcasses found below the lines. Golden eagles represented 82.5% of the 416 carcasses found during the study. Fifty-one of the eagles were fresh enough to determine age and time and cause of death. Of these, 80.6% died of electrocution during the winter months, and only 5.8% of these were adult birds. More eagles were electrocuted in areas of cottontail rabbit habitat than in other areas: 36% of the poles in cottontail rabbit habitat had carcasses under them during the time of the study, 21.9% of the poles with mixed cottontail-jack rabbit habitat had eagle carcasses, and 14% of the poles in jack rabbit-only habitat had eagle carcasses (significant at P = 0.001). Poles placed on topographic salients had more eagle mortalities than poles at low points (P = 0.001). None of the carcasses found had gunshot wounds. Measures found to lower incidence of eagle electrocution inlcude routing lines around preferred prey habitat, locating power poles in topographically low areas, and insulating conductors on corner and transformer poles.

Benson, P.C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Eagle County, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VA WA | WI Eagle County, Colorado Three Resort Communities in Colorado Get Smart With Energy Upgrades Photo of a ski lodge with snow surrounding it. An image of a map of the...

35

Bull Hill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hill Hill Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Hill Facility Bull Hill Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner First Wind Developer First Wind Energy Purchaser NSTAR Location Hancock County ME Coordinates 44.723076°, -68.170852° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.723076,"lon":-68.170852,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Golden Eagle Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on AddThis.com...

37

Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bull Creek Wind Farm Bull Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Creek Wind Farm Facility Bull Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser Market Location Near Gail TX Coordinates 32.933099°, -101.584425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.933099,"lon":-101.584425,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Bull Moose Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Place San Diego, California Sector Biomass Product Focused on development of biomass waste energy projects. References Bull Moose Energy LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

39

Eagle, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle, AK) Eagle, AK) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 64.7880556°, -141.2° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7880556,"lon":-141.2,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

EAGLES: An interactive environment for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAGLES Project is creating a computing system and interactive environment for scientific applications using object-oriented software principles. This software concept leads to well defined data interfaces for integrating experiment control with acquisition and analysis codes. Tools for building object-oriented systems for user interfaces and codes are discussed. Also the terms of object-oriented programming are introduced and later defined in the appendix. These terms include objects, methods, messages, encapsulation and inheritance.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.; Shectman, R.M.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EAGLES: An interactive environment for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAGLES Project is creating a computing system and interactive environment for scientific applications using object-oriented software principles. This software concept leads to well defined data interfaces for integrating experiments control with acquisition and analysis codes. Tools for building object-oriented systems for user interfaces and codes are discussed. Also the terms of object-oriented programming are introduced and later defined in the appendix. These terms include objects, methods, messages, encapsulation and inheritance.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.; Shectman, R.M.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geology and Hydrothermal Alteration of the Gold Eagle Deposit: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, there have been many discoveries in the district including the Gold Eagle occurrence, located to the southwest of the old Cochenour-Willans mine ...

43

,"Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

44

Solasta aka The Eagle Axis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Solasta (aka The Eagle Axis) Place Newton, Massachusetts Zip 2458 Sector Efficiency, Solar Product Start-up planning to produce high-efficiency solar cells using...

45

Bull Moose Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bull Moose Energy Bull Moose Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Moose Energy Address P.O. Box 231501 Place Encinitas, California Zip 92023 Sector Biomass Product Developing a 23 MW power plant fueled by biomass waste Website http://bullmooseenergy.com/ Coordinates 33.0368°, -117.2914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0368,"lon":-117.2914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Preventing Voltage Collapse with Protection Systems that Incorporate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Weatherford. 1996. Habits of Bald Eagles wintering along the upper John Day River, Oregon. Northwest Science

47

Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bald Mountain Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Ketchum, Idaho Coordinates 43.6807402°, -114.3636619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

48

Eagle County - Solar Energy Rebate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Eagle County - Solar Energy Rebate Program This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being...

49

Eagle Vision : new directions in K-12 GIS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eagle Vision is an NSF-funded three-year project that instructs High School teachers working in tribal schools in GIS and GIT, and in GIS-based curriculum design.… (more)

Wiley, Cody

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

TriEagle Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name TriEagle Energy, LLC Place Texas Utility Id 19126 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form...

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Golden Eagle Delivers Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on AddThis.com... Aug. 3, 2013 Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks

52

Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility 1366 Technologies Description of Proposed Action: The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action is for the use of a federal loan guarantee by 1366 Technologies (1366) to support the renovation of an existing building, located at 159 Wells Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts, into a solar wafer production facility. The new facility would constitute Phase 1 of Project Eagle and accommodate 20 megawatts (MW) of multi crystalline silicon wafer production, laboratory areas, offices, and ancillary spaces. Phase 2 of Proje~y an existing DOE Categorical Exclusion and would occur at a site in _ _ _ _ . The Phase 1 facility in Newton, MA is an existing building of 50,600 square feet on a site approximately 4.7 acres. 1366 would renovate the interior of the facility to provide office

53

Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Suzhou Eagle Electric Vehicle Manufacturing Co Ltd Place Suzhou, China Sector Vehicles Product China-based manufacturer of golf carts, industrial and other 4-wheel electric vehicles. Coordinates 31.3092°, 120.613121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.3092,"lon":120.613121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name EaglePicher Horizon Batteries, LLC Place Dearborn, Michigan Zip MI 48126 Product Joint Venture developing, manufacturing and distributing a breakthrough, high performance sealed lead-acid battery. Coordinates 39.520064°, -94.770486° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.520064,"lon":-94.770486,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

DOE/EIS-0342; Wanapa Energy Center Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WILDLIFE SURVEY AND ASSESSMENTS A-1 Biological Assessment for Anadromous Fish Species The following are excerpts from the Biological Assessment conducted by NMFS. Section numbering reflects the format of the original document. 1.4 Analysis Summary The NMFS and USFWS provided a list of threatened, endangered, and proposed candidate species that may occur within the Wanapa Energy Center study area in letters dated July 23, 2003. The list included bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), and seven anadromous fish species. This BA addresses potential impacts on the Pacific salmon and steelhead species. NMFS is responsible for endangered, threatened, and candidate anadromous fish species under NOAA Fisheries' jurisdiction in Oregon. Bull trout and the bald eagle are addressed in a

56

EA-1905: Double Eagle Water System, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA, prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office and adopted by DOE, evaluates the expansion and upgrade of the City of Carlsbad’s Double Eagle Water System.

57

Eagle-Vail, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle-Vail, Colorado: Energy Resources Eagle-Vail, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.618904°, -106.4847619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.618904,"lon":-106.4847619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Science Requirements for EAGLE for the E-ELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an overview of the EAGLE science case, which spans spatially-resolved spectroscopy of targets from five key science areas - ranging from studies of heavily-obscured Galactic star clusters, right out to the first galaxies at the highest redshifts. Here we summarise the requirements adopted for study and also evaluate the availability of natural guide stars in example fields, which will impact on the adaptive optics performance and architecture.

C. J. Evans; M. D. Lehnert; J. -G. Cuby; S. L. Morris; A. M. Swinbank; W. D. Taylor; D. M. Alexander; N. P. F. Lorente; Y. Clenet; T. Paumard

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Eagle Ford oil and natural gas well starts rose sharply in first ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New well starts in the Eagle Ford region in Texas increased 110% from January through March 2012 compared to the same period in 2011, according to reporting and ...

60

ARACOR Eagle-matched Operations and Neutron Detector Performance Tests  

SciTech Connect

A test campaign was undertaken during April 16-19 in LaHonda, California to match the operational performance of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)Varitron accelerator to that of an ARACOR Eagle accelerator. This Eagle-matched condition, with the INEEL Varitron, will be used during a concept demonstration test at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This operational characterization involved the use of similar electron beam energies, similar production of photoneutrons from selected non-nuclear materials, and similar production of photofissionbased, delayed neutrons from an INEEL-provided, depleted uranium sample. Then using the matched operation, the Varitron was used to define detector performances for several INEEL and LANL detectors using the depleted uranium target and Eagle-like, bremsstrahlung collimation. This summary report provides neutron measurements using the INEEL detectors. All delayed neutron data are acquired in the time interval ranging from 4.95 to 19.9 ms after each accelerator pulse. All prompt neutron data are acquired during 0.156 to 4.91 ms after each accelerator pulse. Prompt and delayed neutron counting acquisition intervals can still be optimized.

Jones, James Litton; Haskell, Kevin James; Hoggan, Jerry Matkin; Norman, Daren Reeve

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Animal species of concern reported from the Oak Ridge Reservation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heron NM Egretta thula snowy egret NM Ixobrychus exilis least bittern NM KITES, HAWKS, EAGLES, & allies Haliaeetus leucocephalus bald eagle d NM Circus cyaneus northern harrier NM...

62

Animal species of special concern reported from the Oak Ridge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NM Egretta caerulea little blue heron NM Egretta thula snowy egret NM KITES, HAWKS, EAGLES, & allies Haliaeetus leucocephalus bald eagle d NM Circus cyaneus northern harrier NM...

63

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and bald eagles following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. In:oil, seabirds, eagles, Exxon Valdez, oil spill. Americanshorelines following the Exxon Valdez spill. In: Proceedings

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 4 -2 0 0 5 CIRA ANNUAL REPORT FY 04/05  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for fractal extent, applied to the coastal distribution of bald eagle nests in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

65

Microsoft Word - MillerBaldTaftPR_Lines_CX Memo.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2013 4, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dave Tripp Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Bald Mountain, Miller Peak, Lines Creek, and Taft Passive Repeater Communication Upgrades Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.19 Microwave, meterological amd radio towers Location: Mineral and Missoula counties, Montana; Shoshone County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace the analog communication system with a new digital communication system at four existing communication sites in Montana and Idaho to enable the connection of the digital circuits and ensure communication reliability. All of the sites are located on land managed by

66

COMMENTS ON THE COUNTING AND SIZING OF BULL SPERMATOZOA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in determining volumes with this apparatus which have not been mentioned in earlier publications. It is these difficulties which induced us to write this report. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fresh bull ejaculates were diluted I spermatozoa (BEDFORD, i965). Formaldehyde (0.1 per cent w/v) was added to prevent growth of bacteria and algae

Recanati, Catherine

67

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; White River Bull Trout Enumeration Project Summary, Progress Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first year of a three-year bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on the White River and is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The White River has been identified as an important bull trout spawning tributary of the upper Kootenay River in southeastern British Columbia. The objective was to collect information on the returning adult spawning population to the White River through the use of a fish fence and traps, and to conduct redd surveys at the conclusion of spawning to provide an index of spawning escapement and distribution. The fence was installed on September 9th, 2003 and was operated continuously (i.e. no high-water or breaching events) until the fence was removed on October 9th, 2003. Estimation of the spawning population of White River bull trout was incomplete. This was due to a larger and more protracted out-migration than expected. As a result, the bull trout spawning population of the White River was estimated to be somewhere above 899 fish. In comparison, this represents approximately one third the population estimate of the 2003 Wigwam River bull trout spawning population. Based on redd index data, the number of bull trout per redd was over twice that of the Wigwam River or Skookumchuck Creek. This was expected as the index sites on the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek cover the majority of the spawning area. This is not true on the White River. From previous redd counts, it is known that there are approximately twice as many redds in Blackfoot Creek as there are in the index site. Additionally, given the large size of the White River watershed and in particular, the large number of tributaries, there is a high likelihood that important bull trout spawning areas remain unidentified. Both floy tag and radio-telemetry data for the White River bull trout have identified extensive life history migrations. Similar data for the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek populations illustrate there is considerable overlap and mixing among these three local populations within their over-wintering and feeding habitat. The upper Kootenay River, Lake Koocanusa and the lower Bull River provide overwintering and feeding habitat for the White River, Skookumchuck Creek and Wigwam River bull trout. Recommendations to improve escapement estimates and spawning distribution are provided. An accurate population estimate is especially important to provide baseline for any potential impacts due to wildfire and subsequent salvage logging that is currently underway immediately adjacent to and upstream of important spawning and rearing habitat in the Middlefork of the White River. Identification of important spawning habitat is important to meet management objectives for the White River.

Cope, R.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

70

ELM-IT: EAGLES Specifications for Italian morphosyntax Lexicon Specification and Classification Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the present document is to offer a concrete example of how the EAGLES recommendations for the encoding of morphosyntactic information in lexicons presented in the document by Monachini and Calzolari 1995 are applied to Italian. In particular, ...

Monica Monachini

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Integrating Depositional Facies and Sequence Stratigraphy in Characterizing Unconventional Reservoirs: Eagle Ford Shale, South Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Mid-to-Late Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale of South Texas is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate, unconventional resource play with considerable oil and natural gas. Characterization of… (more)

Workman, Seth Jordan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of a multi-year research project studying aspects of bull trout life history, ecology and genetics. This report covers the activities of the project in 1996. Results and analysis are presented in the following five areas: (1) analysis of the genetic structure of Oregon bull trout populations; (2) distribution and habitat use of bull trout and brook trout in streams containing both species; (3) bull trout spawning surveys; (4) summary and analysis of historical juvenile bull trout downstream migrant trap catches in the Grande Ronde basin; and (5) food habits and feeding behavior of bull trout alone and in sympatry with brook trout.

Bellerud, Blane L.; Gunckel, Stephanie; Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Final Addendum Appendix AD4: Bull Trout Species Report Walla Walla Subbasin Plan AD4-1 November 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and other bull trout, depending on availability (Delacy and Morton 1943; Jeppson 1963; Pratt 1992; Roos 1959

75

City of Eagle River, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River, Wisconsin (Utility Company) River, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Eagle River Place Wisconsin Utility Id 5551 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less)-Net Energy Billing Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service between 50kW and 200kW

76

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Bull Frog Green Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frog Green Energy LLC Frog Green Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Frog Green Energy LLC Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92009 Product A company, probably an individual, which has filed to develop large-scale PV projects on California Desert District land. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

A population study of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource area. Second-year progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since January 1994, the Predatory Bird Research Group, University of California, Santa Cruz, has been conducting a field investigation of the ecology of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The 190 km{sup 2} facility lies just east of San Francisco Bay in California and contains about 6,500 wind turbines. Grassland and oak savanna habitats surrounding the WRA support a substantial resident population of golden eagles. Each year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service receivers reports from the wind industry of about 30 golden eagle casualties occurring at the WRA, and it is probable that many more carcasses go unnoticed. Over 90 percent of the casualties are attributed to collisions with wind turbines. The main purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of turbine-related mortality on the golden eagle population of the area. Assessing the impact of the WRA kills on the population requires quantification of both survival and reproduction. To estimate survival rates of both territorial and non-territorial golden eagles, we tagged 179 individuals with radio-telemetry transmitters expected to function for about four years and equipped with mortality sensors. Population segments represented in the tagged sample include 79 juveniles, 45 subadults, 17n floaters (non-territorial adults), and 38 breeders. Effective sample sizes in the older segments increase as younger eagles mature or become territorial. Since the beginning of the study, we have conducted weekly roll-call surveys by airplane to locate the tagged eagles in relation to the WRA and to monitor their survival. The surveyed area extends from the Oakland Hills southeast through the Diablo Mountain Range to San Luis Reservoir about 75 km southeast of the WRA. The surveys show that breeding eagles rarely enter the WRA while the non-territorial eagles tend to move about freely throughout the study area and often visit the WRA.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Microsoft PowerPoint - Bull Shoals U1 repair MSB edit 3.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Switchyard Feeder Repair Mark Dixson Little Rock District US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Original Equipment - 52 years old. * Unit 1 Oil filled cable pothead failed and exploded on Sept 6 2006. * Resulting fire and fire suppression damaged oil insulated cable system * Minor damage to power plant. Background Background Background US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Transformer Unit 2 damaged and removed from service. * Cause of fire - Failure of Pothead stress cone assembly and build up of combustible gas * Power Plant lost all power and went in the

80

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated channel with a well-developed floodplain. The presence of an undisturbed riparian ecosystem dominated by mature, coniferous forest, combined with a high percentage of coarse particles in the stream bank, result in stable stream banks with low sediment supply. The results of the habitat assessment concur with the stable stream channel type and channel disturbance features noted were infrequent and minor in nature. Detailed summaries of channel profile, pattern, dimension and materials are provided in Appendices. It was recommended that a fourth index site representing tributary spawning and rearing habitat be established in lower Sandown Creek and included for baseline data collection in year two.

Cope, R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be stable in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings from the third year (2000) of the multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, genetics, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek by night snorkeling. In the Warm Springs R. juvenile bull trout were slightly more numerous than brook trout, however, both were found in low densities. Relative densities of both species declined from 1999 observations. Juvenile bull trout vastly out numbered brook trout in Shitike Cr. Relative densities of juvenile bull trout increased while brook trout abundance was similar to 1999 observations in eight index reaches. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs R. for the second year. Mean relative densities of both species, within the index reaches was slightly higher than what was observed in a 2.4 km control reach. Mill Creek was surveyed for the presence of juvenile bull trout. The American Fisheries Society ''Interim protocol for determining bull trout presence'' methodology was field tested. No bull trout were found in the 2 km survey area.

Brun, Christopher

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Population Study of Golden Eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Population Trend Analysis, 1994-1997  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry has annually reported 28-43 turbine blade strike casualties of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, and many more carcasses have doubtless gone unnoticed. Because this species is especially sensitive to adult survival rate changes, we focused upon estimating the demographic trend of the population. In aerial surveys, we monitored survival within a sample of 179 radio-tagged eagles over a four-year period. We also obtained data on territory occupancy and reproduction of about 65 eagle pairs residing in the area. Of 61 recorded deaths of radio-tagged eagles during the four-year investigation, 23 (38%) were caused by wind turbine blade strikes. Additional fatalities were unrecorded because blade strikes sometimes destroy radio transmitters. Annual survival was estimated at 0.7867 (SE=0.0263) for non-territorial eagles and 0.8964 (SE=0.0371) for territorial ones. Annual reproduction was 0.64 (SE=0.08) young per territorial pair (0.25 per female). These parameters were used to estimate population growth rates under different modeling frameworks. At present, there are indications that a reserve of non-breeding adults still exists, i.e., there is an annual territorial reoccupancy rate of 100% and a low incidence (3%) of subadults as members of breeding pairs.

Predatory Bird Research Group, Long Marine Laboratory

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Diet Overlap of Top-Level Predators in Recent Sympatry: Bull Trout and Nonnative Lake Trout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decline (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley and Shepard 1989; Spencer et for adult lake trout and bull trout (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley:1160­1171. Jeppson PW, Platts WS. 1959. Ecology and control of the Columbia River squawfish in northern Idaho lakes

McMahon, Thomas E.

86

2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents in extracts of Baltic white-tailed sea eagles  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-(TCDD) equivalents were measured in extracts of Baltic white-tailed sea eagle tissues. Extracts of salmon, ringed seal, and grey seal were analyzed as other predatory species of the same area. Concentrations in eagle and seal tissues were greater than those in salmon. Concentrations of TCDD equivalents (TCDD-EQs) determined by the H4IIE bioassay were compared with toxic equivalents (TEQs) derived from instrumental chemical analyses in fractions containing polychlorinated dibenzo-P-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) or coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Toxic equivalents were calculated by use of an additive model in which the product of the concentrations of instrumentally measured individual congeners were multiplied by their TCDD equivalency factors and were summed to give a total concentration of TEQs. The TCDD-EQs were compared with TEQs to develop a mass balance to determine whether all the TCDD-like activity was accounted for. The TEQs determined by chemical analyses for coplanar PCBs was 770 pg/g fw, and that of PCDD/PCDFs was 270 pg/g fw in this eagle. Thus, concentrations of TCDD-EQs were approx. 20% greater than those of TEQs. The true difference in activities is probably greater because of lower recoveries and infra-additivities among congeners in the bioassay. This indicates that there are compounds present in the extracts that can contribute to the total concentrations of TCDD-EQs in white-tailed sea eagle eggs to the no-observable-adverse-effect concentration, ranged from 7.3 to 141. This indicates that current concentrations of TCDD-EQs in these eggs are likely causing adverse effects in the Baltic populations of white-tailed sea eagles. This study indicated that the H4IIE bioassay is useful for monitoring the presence and biological activity of TCDD-like compounds in environmental samples like white-tailed sea eagles.

Koistinen, J.; Giesy, J.P. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Koivusaari, J. [Western Finland Regional Environment Centre, Vaasa (Finland); Nuuja, I. [Milieu-Data Cc, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Vuorinen, P.J. [Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Inst., Helsinki (Finland); Paasivirta, J. [Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the 2011 Energy Information Agency (EIA) global assessment, Mexico ranks 4th in shale gas resources. The Eagle Ford shale is the formation with the greatest expectation in Mexico given the success it has had in the US and its liquids-rich zone. Accurate estimation of the resource size and future production, as well as the uncertainties associated with them, is critical for the decision-making process of developing shale oil and gas resources. The complexity of the shale reservoirs and high variability in its properties generate large uncertainties in the long-term production and recovery factors of these plays. Another source of uncertainty is the limited production history. Given all these uncertainties, a probabilistic decline-curve analysis approach was chosen for this study, given that it is relatively simple, it enables performing a play-wide assessment with available production data and, more importantly, it quantifies the uncertainty in the resource size. Analog areas in the US Eagle Ford shale were defined based on available geologic information in both the US and Mexico. The Duong model coupled with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology was used to analyze and forecast production of wells located in the previously defined analog sectors in the US Eagle Ford shale. By combining the results of individual-well analyses, a type curve and estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) distribution for each of the defined analog sectors was obtained. These distributions were combined with well-spacing assumptions and sector areas to generate the prospective-resources estimates. Similar probabilistic decline-curve-analysis methodology was used to estimate the reserves and contingent resources of existing wells. As of March 2013, the total prospective resources (P90-P50-P10) for the Eagle Ford shale in Mexico (MX-EFS) are estimated to be 527-1,139-7,268 MMSTB of oil and 17- 37-217 TSCF of gas. To my knowledge, this is the first oil estimate published for this formation in Mexico. The most attractive sectors based on total estimated resources as well as individual-well type curves are located in the southeast of the Burgos Basin and east-west of the Sabinas basin. Because there has been very little development to date, estimates for reserves and contingent resources are much lower than those for prospective resources. Estimated reserves associated with existing wells and corresponding offset well locations are 18,375-34,722-59,667 MMSCF for gas and zero for oil. Estimated contingent resources are 14-64-228 MSTB of oil and 8,526-13,327- 25,983MMSCF of gas. The results of this work should provide a more reliable assessment of the size and uncertainties of the resources in the Mexican Eagle Ford shale than previous estimates obtained with less objective methodologies.

Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Influence of Bull Traits and Bull to Female Ratio on Reproductive Perfromance in Beef Females and of Nutrition During Gestation on Calving Difficulty in Primiparous Beef Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments that were conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde, TX (semi-arid environment) from 2006 to 2008. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls ( n = 39; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous Bonsmara and Bonsmara-influenced females (n = 1013) during a 90-day breeding season in 2006, 2007, and 2008 to quantify the effects of a reduction in bull to female ratio on reproductive performance. Bulls were also placed with primiparous beef females ( n = 142). Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, social rank, serving capacity, and seminal traits to one of two bull to female (BFR) treatments: Low (1:30-1:45; n = 10 pastures) or Conventional (1:16-1:26; n = 12 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.36), calving date (P = 0.24), and calving rate (P = 0.25) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. The current experiment demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without negatively affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, Bonsmara heifers (3/4, 7/8, and full bloods) were exposed to Bonsmara bulls from April 15 to July 15 during each of the two years. Heifers were weighed, rectally palpated for pregnancy, and scored for BCS (1 thin - 9 fat) and frame score (1 short - 9 tall) in December (end of second trimester) during years 1 and 2. Heifers were stratified on expected calving date and randomly allotted to one of two levels of nutrition for the remainder of gestation. In year 1, heifers were allotted to range forage (n=31, low nutrition, LN) or to non-irrigated oat pasture (n=31, high nutrition, HN). In year 2, heifers were placed onto the same range environment as in year 1 (n=31, LN) or onto irrigated ryegrass pasture (n=31,HN). Heifers in the LN groups were supplemented with 20% CP cubes at the rate of 0.9 kg/heifer/day from January 2 until calving while HN heifers were not supplemented. Within 4 hr of birth, calves were weighed, and calf vigor and calving difficulty scores were recorded. Heifers were weighed within 72 hours of parturition. From treatment initiation through calving, HN heifers gained 48.6 kg whereas the LN females lost 15 kg. Twice as many HN heifers required major assistance at calving as compared to LN heifers. Calves born to the HN females weighed 3.7 kg more at birth than those born to LN females. These differences resulted in HN heifers having (P = 0.005) more calving difficulty than LN heifers (mean calving difficutly of 2.3 for HN and 1.6 for LN). The calves of the HN females were also less vigorous (P = 0.005) after birth than the calves from LN females (calf vigor score of 2.2 for HN and 3.3 for LN). Consequently, the level of nutrition during the third trimester of gestation can affect calving difficulty, calf vigor, and female weight.

Bloomberg, Blake David

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

91

CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC�������¢����������������s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot�������¢����������������s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Using Bulls-Eye Commissioning to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building system commissioning comes highly recommended by energy efficiency experts; however, it is rarely undertaken due to the cost and care needed to do a comprehensive job. Many existing utility meters provide whole-building 15-minute interval data that can be used to pinpoint fan control and HVAC schedule problems. Bulls-eye commissioning uses interval metering to focus detailed commissioning efforts. This paper concentrates on a single customer and how bulls-eye commissioning can be applied to focus the commissioning process. Significant energy savings were found by using interval data in conjunction with outside air temperature to isolate problems with schedules and in the economizer controls. Evaluation of main meter profiles allows detailed commissioning work to be better focused and more effective without the wait and expense of full commissioning services. Bulls-eye commissioning can be applied on its own or can be coordinated with traditional commissioning. In either case, the main meter profile shows what will directly impact total energy use and the customer's bill.

Price, W.; Hart, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Stockton C4I Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stockton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant Stockton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 1051 Sperry Road Stockton, CA 95206 The Stockton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant opened in 1957. Until 1987, the plant made asbestos and cement pipe, and by 1972 the plant made the conversion to PVC pipe in a wide range of sizes and uses. Recent upgrades have added HTPE and corrugated manufacturing capacity. The Stockton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in September 2010. This plant achieved a 12.6% energy intensity reduction in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from empowering employees at Green Team meetings to look for and implement energy conservation and environmental responsibility improvements, initially focused on repairing air leaks from the

94

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 10807 U.S. 59 Road Wharton, TX 77488 The Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant, located on an old cattle field, opened in 1985 by first manufacturing PVC pipe. The manufacturing of injection molding was added in 1988, corrugated pipe was added in 2009, and corrugated fittings were added in 2011. There are expectations for the plant to expand into manufacturing PE pipe fittings in the future. The Wharton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from an energy conservation program that focused on not operating equipment other than that needed for current production,

95

Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are native to many tributaries of the Snake River in southeast Washington. The Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS) have identified bull trout as a species of special concern which means that they may become threatened or endangered by relatively, minor disturbances to their habitat. Steelhead trout/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha) are also native to several tributaries of the Snake river in southeast Washington. These species of migratory fishes are depressed, partially due to the construction of several dams on the lower Snake river. In response to decreased run size, large hatchery program were initiated to produce juvenile steelhead and salmon to supplement repressed tributary stocks, a practice known as supplementation. There is a concern that supplementing streams with artificially high numbers of steelhead and salmon may have an impact on resident bull trout in these streams. Historically, these three species of fish existed together in large numbers, however, the amount of high-quality habitat necessary for reproduction and rearing has been severely reduced in recent years, as compared to historic amounts. The findings of the first year of a two year study aimed at identifying species interactions in southeast Washington streams are presented in this report. Data was collected to assess population dynamics; habitat utilization and preference, feeding habits, fish movement and migration, age, condition, growth, and the spawning requirements of bull trout in each of four streams. A comparison of the indices was then made between the study streams to determine if bull trout differ in the presence of the putative competitor species. Bull trout populations were highest in the Tucannon River (supplemented stream), followed by Mill Creek (unsupplemented stream). Young of the year bull trout utilized riffle and cascade habitat the most in all four streams. Juvenile bull trout utilized scour pool and run habitat the most in all four streams. YOY bull trout preferred plunge pool and scour pool habitat, as did juvenile bull trout in all four streams. These data show that while in the presence of the putative competitors, bull trout prefer the same habitat as in the absence of the putative competitors. Juvenile bull trout preferred mayflies and stoneflies in Mill Creek, while in the presence of the competitor species they preferred caddisflies, stoneflies, and Oligochaeta. It is felt that this difference is due to the differences in food items available and not species interactions, bull trout consume what is present. Adult bull trout were difficult to capture, and therefore it was difficult to determine the migratory habits in the Tucannon River. It is recommended that future studies use radio telemetry to determine the migratory habitat of these fish. The age, condition, and growth rates of bull trout differed only minimally between streams, indicating that if competitive interactions are occurring between these species it is not reflected by: (1) the length at age of bull trout; (2) the length-weight relationship of bull trout; or (3) the rate of growth of bull trout. The spawning habits of bull trout and spring chinook salmon are similar in the Tucannon River, however it was found that they spawn in different river locations. The salmon spawn below river kilometer 83, while 82% of bull trout spawn above that point. The peak of spawning for salmon occurred 10 days before the peak of bull trout spawning, indicating that very little competition for spawning locations occurs between these species in the Tucannon River. Future species interactions study recommendations include the use of electrofishing to enumerate bull trout populations, snorkeling to identify micro-habitat utilization, seasonal diet analysis, and radio transmitters to identify seasonal migration patterns of bull trout.

Martin, Steven W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Bald Face Hornets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

said he has a nest where he works that is active all year. I have two small children & a dog who play in the yard where this nest is will this nest be OK until after the first...

97

Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

EAGLES 1.1: A microcomputer software package for analyzing fuel efficiency of electric and gasoline vehicles  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s electric/hybrid vehicle research program, Argonne National Laboratory has developed a computer software package called EAGLES. This paper describes the capability of the software and its many features and potential applications. EAGLES version 1.1 is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of battery performance in electric-vehicle applications, or the estimation of fuel economy for a gasoline vehicle. The principal objective of the electric-vehicle analysis is to enable the prediction of electric-vehicle performance (e.g., vehicle range) on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The model provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified velocity/time or power/time profile, taking into consideration the effects of battery depth-of-discharge and regenerative braking. Alternatively, the software package can be used to determine the size of the battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements (e.g., range and driving patterns). For gasoline-vehicle analysis, an empirical model relating fuel economy, vehicle parameters, and driving-cycle characteristics is included in the software package. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance can be simulated. The software package includes many default data sets for vehicles, driving cycles, and battery technologies. EAGLES 1.1 is written in the FORTRAN language for use on IBM-compatible microcomputers.

Marr, W.M.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams. Final Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed.

Underwood, Keith D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Tennessee Valley Authority Eagle Bend 161-kV delivery point environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eagle Bend is an area located in a bend of the Clinch River about one mile southeast of Clinton, Tennessee, in Anderson County. This area, including an industrial park, is supplied electric power by the Clinton Utilities Board (UB) through its 69-kV system, which is in turn supplied by TVA over a 69-kV transmission line from Norris Hydro Plant. Studies of the power supply in the area indicate that there will likely be significant load growth both in the Clinton area in general and the industrial park in particular. Studies further show that if this new load is supplied at 69-kV, the TVA transformer at Norris Hydro which supplies this load will be overloaded by the summer of 1993 and no feasible alternate source which would maintain the quality and reliability of the power delivered to the Clinton system exists to accept this load. Clinton UB also needs to transfer load from its Clinton substation in the same time period to prevent overloading. Additional studies and consultation between TVA and Clinton UB have indicated that the best solution to this problem is to supply this load at 161-kV at a new delivery point for Clinton UB. This would require the construction of a new 161/13-kV substation by Clinton UB and the construction by TVA of a new 161-kV transmission line to connect this substation to the existing TVA 161-kV transmission system.

Not Available

1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

ASSOCIATION AMONG FLUID, GRAIN INTAKE AND WEIGHT GAIN IN HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine water intake. Forty-four Holstein bull calves were evaluated to investigate the effects of starter intake, body weight, temperature and time to predict water intake. A model was developed using PROC GLM in SAS. Least square means separation were used to identify significant effects. Starter intake was a significant variable (P water intake of a calf, especially after day 21 when starter intake and water intake were both increasing. Water intake was increased by calves with fecal scores of 1 and 2. However, water intake was significantly different for calves with fecal scores of 3 or 4 with a (P water intake. The interaction between scours and fecal score were not significant. Water intakes significantly differ in calves that had scour and in calves not experimented scours.

Gonzalez Ferreira, Marcelo A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The influence of tropical adaptation and breedtype on adrenal and testicular function in beef bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulls of various breedtypes including Angus (Bos taurus), Bonsmara (Sanga X Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), Romosinuano (Criollo), Tuli (Sanga) and Wagyu (Japanese Bos taurus) were utilized to evaluate the influence of tropical adaptation on adrenal and testicular function. The objectives were to determine if tropical adaptation influenced: a) response to management stressors, b) organ and gland weights, adrenal and testis StAR and P450 content and total adrenal, medullary and cortical areas, c) basal and hCG-induced testosterone and d) testis and epididymal sperm concentrations. Blood samples were obtained within 5 min before and after transportation and during restraint every 15 min for 6 h to evaluate cortical response. Angus, Brahman and Romosinuano bulls were slaughtered following sexual maturity. Cortical responses to transportation and restraint were not influenced by tropical adaptation. Response to these stressors could be categorized into high responders (Angus, Brahman), intermediate responders (Romosinuano, Tuli) and low responders (Wagyu, Bonsmara). Tropically-adapted breedtypes were not categorized into a single group; therefore, cortical responses to management stressors were influenced by breedtype, but not by tropical adaptation. Most organ and gland weights (actual weight and weight corrected for BW) and the steroid precursors, StAR and P450, were not influenced by tropical adaptation, but were by breedtype. Paired adrenal gland weight, total adrenal area, medullary and cortical areas were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had lighter glands and smaller areas than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes. All breedtypes except Wagyu had similar basal concentrations of plasma testosterone prior to hCG administration; therefore, basal testosterone was not influenced by tropical adaptation, but only by breedtype. Wagyu had greater basal concentrations of testosterone than other breedtypes. Testosterone concentrations following hCG administration was similar between adaptation groups and breedtypes. As expected, testis and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had greater testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes during the summer months. In summary, adrenal weight and area and testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Cortical response to management stressors, basal testosterone and StAR and P450 content were influenced by breedtype, not tropical adaptation.

Koch, Jeffrey William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that use these areas include anhingas, great egrets, little blue herons, and bald eagles. A few species, including wood ducks, mallards, and great blue herons, are year-round...

107

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of which may be the future tenant of the Nepese Marsh platform. There are also bald eagles nesting on Randall Road in Batavia, which is a short flight. Perhaps, if the nesting...

108

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is not doom and gloom, though. Several predatory birds, such as Cooper's hawks, bald eagles, peregrine falcons and ospreys, seem to be making a comeback at Fermilab. This is...

109

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Carson-Eagle valleys and Big Smoky Valley, Nevada. First annual report, May 1, 1979-May 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two geothermal investigations were completed in three Nevada locations. The regions studied were selected from areas outlined as having direct utilization potential (Trexler and others, 1979) and included the Carson-Eagle Valley, Bis Smoky Valley and Caliente. Studies were organized around the completion of a group of tasks in each area. These tasks included: geologic reconnaissance, gravity surveys, aerial photography, fluid sampling and analysis, shallow depth temperature probe surveys, soil mercury surveys, shallow electrical resistivity measurements, and temperature gradient hole drilling. Goals of the project were to provide regional information about the nature and extent of the resources and to offer a critical evaluation of the techniques employed. Results from the work in the Carson-Eagle Valley and Big Smoky Valley are presented. (MHR)

Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.

Matheney, Kara J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Born-Oppenheimer and Extended  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular February 25, 2003 In ab initio molecular dynamics, whenever information about the potential energy surface advances for both approaches are discussed. Key Words : Ab initio molecular dynamics, Direct classical

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

112

On Eagle's Wings - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The snare of the fowler will never capture you and famine will bring you no fear: under his wings your refuge, his faithfulness your shield. And he will raise you ...

113

User`s guide to EAGLES Version 1.1: An electric- and gasoline-vehicle fuel-efficiency software package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EAGLES is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of fuel efficiency in electric-vehicle (EV) applications or the estimation of fuel economy for a gasoline vehicle. The principal objective of the EV analysis is to enable the prediction of EV performance on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The EV model included in the software package provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified vehicle velocity/time or power/time profile. The capability of the battery is modeled by an algorithm that relates the battery voltage to the withdrawn (or charged) current, taking into account the effect of battery depth-of-discharge. Alternatively, the software package can be used to determine the size of the battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements. For gasoline vehicles, a generic fuel-economy model based on data from EPA Test Car List 1991 is included in the software package. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance, including range penalty for EVs, can be studied. Also available is an option to estimate the time needed by a specified vehicle to reach a certain speed with the application of a constant power and an option to compute the fraction of time and/or distance in a driving cycle at speeds exceeding a specified value. Certain parameters can be changed interactively prior to a run.

Marr, W.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effects of conventional or low bull to female ratio and utilization of reproductive tract scores in extensively-managed, natural mating breeding groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments which were conducted at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Uvalde (semi-arid environment) from 2002 to 2004. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls (n = 19; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous, crossbred females (n =586) for 90 d in 2003 and 2004. Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, seminal traits, social rank, and serving capacity to one of two bull to female ratio (BFR) treatments: Conventional (1:21-1:29; n = 6 pastures) or Low (1:47-1:52; n = 2 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.33), calving rate (P = 0.26), and calving date (P = 0.22) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. Post-breeding evaluation of bulls in 2002 (n = 16) indicated that social rank, but not seminal traits, was significantly correlated with pre-breeding values (P < 0.05). The current study demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in single- and multisire, 90-d breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without adversely affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, yearling, one-half or three-quarter Bonsmara heifers (n = 106; 11-14 mo of age) were palpated per rectum and assigned a reproductive tract score (RTS) immediately prior to the beginning of the breeding season. Reproductive performance was measured in their two subsequent breeding years in order to estimate the value of the RTS system in extensively-managed, natural mating, 90-d breeding season programs. RTS was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with frame score (r = 0.25), age (r = 0.31), weaning weight (r = 0.47), and the weight of the heifer on the day of RTS exam (r = 0.56). The RTS means by dam parity also differed (P < 0.03). A lower (P < 0.01) percentage of females conceived during each of their first two breeding seasons for heifers of RTS 1 and 2 (65.2%) than for heifers of RTS 3, 4, and 5 (91.2%). Females with a RTS of 1 had a lower pregnancy rate over each of their first two breeding seasons, conceived later during their first breeding season, weaned lighter first calves, and remained lighter each year for fall body weight and body condition score than did heifers with RTS of 2 to 5 (P < 0.05). Collectively, the results of the current study indicate that heifers with a RTS of 1 immediately prior to a 90-d breeding season should be culled. Consideration should also be given to eliminating RTS 2 heifers, but further studies will be needed to confirm the potential economic advantage of this practice.

Rathmann, Ryan James

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Response of Red-Tailed Hawks and Golden Eagles to Topographical Features, Weather, and Abundance of a Dominant Prey Species at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California: April 1999-December 2000  

SciTech Connect

Studies have shown that raptors flying within the Altamont Pass WRA are vulnerable to fatal turbine collisions, possibly because of their specific foraging and flight behavior. Between June 1999 and June 2000, I conducted 346.5 hours of raptor observations within the Atlamont Pass WRA. Behavior was recorded in relation to characteristics of the topography (slope aspect, elevation, and inclination), the weather, and ground squirrel abundance, as determined by active burrow entrances. The most significant finding of this study revealed that red-tailed hawks and golden eagles flew more in strong winds than in weak winds, particularly along hillsides facing into prevailing winds (as opposed to hillsides shielded from the wind). This is likely a result of the birds' use of declivity currents for lift during flights. These results suggest that certain combinations of topography and weather produce wind currents that are sought out by foraging red-tailed hawks and golden eagles within the Altamont Pass WRA. To decrease raptor mortality, mitigation measures can be targeted to specific areas likely to attract foraging raptors because of their capacity to create particularly favorable wind currents.

Hoover, S.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Common Name Scientific Name Double-crested Cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green-winged Teal Anas crecca Hooded Merganser Lophodytes cucullatus Common Merganser Mergus merganser Accipter striatus Cooper's Hawk Accipiter cooperii Northern Harrier Circus cyaneus Broad-winged Hawk Buteo platypterus Red-tailed Hawk Buteo jamaicensis Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus American Kestrel Falco

Sharp, Kim

117

Eagles nest performs for skiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The building named Niu de l'Aliga, located in the Pyrenees at an altitude of 2530 meters, has performed satisfactorily since its completion in the summer of 1985. During the cold and dry winter months, this restaurant and refuge has enjoyed hot and cold running water and constant electrical supply, as well as an acceptable indoor temperature. And all this has been achieved using only the natural resources of sun, wind and snow or rain. The performance of that shelter is discussed.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of Heat Stress and Increased Protein Fed in Milk Replacers on the Health and Growth Parameters of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives of the study were to evaluate if calves fed 6 L of high protein milk replacer (HPMR; 1135 g/d, 28% crude protein (CP), 20% fat) had improved performance and health as compared to calves fed 4 L of a conventional milk replacer (CMR; 454 g/d, 20% CP, 20% fat) in heat stress and non heat stress environments. Holstein bull calves (n=52) Water consumption (WC) in mL and starter intake (SI) in grams was measured daily. Feed conversion (FC) was also calculated for each nutritional treatment and environment. Fecal scores (FS) of 1 to 4 (1=hard, firm, 2=soft, firm, 3=no form, and 4=watery) were recorded daily. Calves with a FS of >3 were considered to have diarrhea and required treatment. Respiration rates (RR) were recorded at 0630 (AM) and 1830 (PM) to monitor respiratory challenges while rectal temperatures (RT) were also measured using a digital thermometer daily in AM and PM to monitor febrile events. If RT was greater than 39.2 degrees C for NHS calves and 39.7 degrees C for HS calves, they were treated for febrile events (FE). Data was analyzed using PROC MIXED (SAS 9.2). HPMR had a greater (P < 0.01) WH, HG, BL, HH, ADG, WC, and FS than the CMR (0.15 vs. 0.11, 0.37 vs. 0.28, 0.27 vs. 0.22, 0.21 vs. 0.14, 0.82 vs. 0.58, 4235 vs. 2656, and 2.05 vs. 1.73, respectively). HS had a greater (P < 0.01) WC than NHS (4365 vs. 2526, respectively). CMR had a greater SI and FC (P < 0.05) than HPMR (0.942 vs. 0.437, and 1.99 vs. 1.78, respectively). HS had a higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM (P<0.01) than NHS (38.87 vs. 38.77, 39.03 vs. 38.79, 35.79 vs. 32.77, and 55.73 vs. 38.57, respectively. Calves in NHS had a higher FE (P<0.01) than the HS calves (6.24 vs. 2.33). There was no significant difference in growth parameters in HS or NHS in calves of like feeding strategies. The results show calves in HS experienced higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM. The increased protein and energy fed to the HPMR calves resulted in greater FS and increased growth.

Krenek, Andrew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Eagle, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

552634°, -106.8286507° 552634°, -106.8286507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6552634,"lon":-106.8286507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

Eagle, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

880556°, -141.2° 880556°, -141.2° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7880556,"lon":-141.2,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Eagle Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy LLC Energy LLC Place Cincinnati, Ohio Zip 45211 - 4439 Product Holding company of Front Range Energy. Coordinates 39.106614°, -84.504552° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.106614,"lon":-84.504552,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

124

Eagle, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho: Energy Resources Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6954424°, -116.3540138° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6954424,"lon":-116.3540138,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Eagle, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

94563°, -88.474265° 94563°, -88.474265° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8794563,"lon":-88.474265,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

126

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the above mentioned EISs and RODs. Pursuant to its obligations under the Endangered Species Act, BPA has made a determination of whether its proposed project will have any effects on any listed species under the jurisdiction of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). A species list was obtained from USFWS on June 12, 2003, identifying bald eagles, Canada lynx, and bull trout as potentially occurring in the project area. A site assessment was conducted on July 15, 2003 to determine if these species were present and the potential effects of project activities. A ''No Effect'' determination was made for all ESA-listed species. There were no listed species under the jurisdiction of NOAA Fisheries present in the project area. As management activities proceed in the future, BPA will annually re-assess potential effects of planned activities on listed species. The Burns-Paiute Tribe conducted a literature search for historic and archaeological sites on the property on January 11, 1999. No known sites were identified. Further site-specific surveys will be conducted for individual ground disturbing activities. The results of these surveys will be sent to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and BPA. BPA will annually summarize and submit a report to the State Historic Preservation Office. On December 29, 1999, Fred Walasavage of BPA completed a Phase I Site Assessment and concluded that the site did not reveal any environmental factors that would pose a significant liability for remedial action or cleanup under the Comprehensive Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act. A public meeting was held when the property was initially acquired where the property acquisition and proposed activities were discussed. Subsequent public involvement was conducted on July 23, 2002 for commenting on the proposed Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan.

N /A

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning, Dworshak Reservoir : Final Report FY 1987.  

SciTech Connect

The impact to wildlife and habitat losses due to the construction and operation of Dworshak Dam on bald eagles and osprey were investigated for the 54 miles of the North Fork Clearwater River that was inundated by Dworshak Reservoir. Down stream impacts, and habitat losses due to Dworshak Dam were investigated for all target wildlife species that utilize the riparian area along the 42.5 miles of North Fork and lower Clearwater Rivers from the dam site to the confluence with the Snake River. The investigation was restricted to existing information. Changing the riverine habitat along the North Fork Clearwater River to one with unique reservoir characteristics has changed the ability of the North Fork Drainage to support past and present wildlife species that inhabited the area. The historical breeding grounds of bald eagles were reduced by increased human activities facilitated by the open access to Dworshak Reservoir and the permanent loss of historical salmon runs up the North Fork Clearwater River. The permanent loss of historical anadromous fish runs have had a negative impact on wintering eagles. The introduction of kokanee, however, has provided a replacement prey base, but only if the fishery is stable and reliable. 47 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Kronemann, Loren A.; Lawrence, Keith P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Eagle Mountain, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3141169°, -112.006882° 3141169°, -112.006882° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3141169,"lon":-112.006882,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Eagle Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4383653°, -107.3244921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4383653,"lon":-107.3244921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in September 2010. This plant achieved a 12.6% energy intensity reduction in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the...

138

East Wind Events at Double Eagle II Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East canyon wind events are notorious for their strength and sudden onset in New Mexico’s Rio Grande Valley. Locations below canyons opening into the valley from the east commonly experience surface winds at speeds from 15 to 25 mph with gusts around 35 mph during east canyon wind events, and these gap winds can be much stronger depending on the strength of the

David L. Craft

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

140

Trends in Eagle Ford drilling highlight the search for oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... In major shale plays, drilling activity depends largely on the resource mix and relative fuel ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge...

142

Microsoft Word - Wireless - Eagle Junction CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Description of the Proposed Action: The proposed project includes construction and operation of Clearwire wireless facilities on the Chemawa-Salem 1 & 2 transmission line,...

143

Eagle Point, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point, Oregon: Energy Resources Point, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.4726258°, -122.8028177° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4726258,"lon":-122.8028177,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Eagle County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9.576406°, -106.7234639° 9.576406°, -106.7234639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.576406,"lon":-106.7234639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Ecological baseline study of the Yakima Firing Center proposed land acquisition: A Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A baseline census was conducted from October 1987 to Janurary 1988 on the property identified for possible expansion of the Yakima Firing Center. These studies provide general descriptions of the major plant communities presentand animal inhabitants during the late fall and winter study period. A vegetation map derived from a combination of onsite surveillance and remotely sensed imagery is also provided as part of this report. Through January 1988, 13 wildlife species of special interest to state and federal agencies, in addition to ducks and geese, were observed on the proposed expansion area. Then raptorial bird species were observed in the area, including bald eagles, golden eagles, and prairie falcons. Upland game bird species, such as sage grouse, California quail, chuckars, and gray (Hungarian) partridge were present. Loggerhead shrikes, a species of special interest, were also observed on the site. Estimates of waterfowl abundance are included for the Priest Rapids Pool of the Columbia River, which includes the proposed river crossing sites. The number of waterfowl on the proposed crossing areas were comparatively low during the winter of 1986 to 1987 and high in 1987 to 1988. Bald eagles ad common loons were observed on the crossing areas. Six small mammal species were captured during this study period;one, the sagebrush vole, is a species of special interest. Two large animal species, mule deer and elk, were noted on the site. Beaver were the only furbearig animals noted to date. Rainbow trout were the only fish species collected within the proposed northern expansion area. The distribution of fall chinook salmon spawning areas was documented within the proposed river crossing areas. 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Rogers, L.E.; Beedlow, P.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Dauble, D.D.; Fitzner, R.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Bull Run Fossil Plant Online Coal Flow Adjustable Riffler Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler optimization at fossil-fired power plants would be enhanced if the flow of coal and air in individual pulverizer fuel delivery lines could be balanced. The static splitter devices currently in service do not adequately maintain coal balance, especially when plant conditions change. This report summarizes the results of a test program to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel riffler to make online adjustments to a stream of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal at a working plant. The demon...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

Bulls, Bears and Excess Volatility: can currency intervention help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

”, in G.M. Constantinides, M. Harris and R. Stulz (eds), Handbook of the Eco- nomics of Finance, Elsevier Science. [4] Bergsten, C. F. (1997), “The Dollar and the Euro” , Foreign Affairs, 76(40), 83-93. [5] Corrado, L., Miller, M. H. and L. Zhang (2002... ): “Exchange Rate Monitoring Band: Theory and Policy”, CEPR DP 3337. [6] Corsetti G., A. Dasgupta, S. Morris and H. S. Shin (2004), “Does One Soros Make a Difference? A Theory of Currency Crises with Large and Small Traders,” Review of Economic Studies, 71...

Corrado, Luisa; Miller, Marcus; Zhang, Lei

148

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sensitive Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitive Species Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the impact of Laboratory activities on sensitive species, LANL can potentially reduce the possibility of these species being upgraded to federal protection. April 12, 2012 sensitive species The bald eagle is one of our sensitive species. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Sensitive species are plants and animals that are protected at the state or local level. Keeping sensitive species safe We strive to minimize the impact of Laboratory operations on sensitive species, which are plants and animals not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but are protected on state or local levels.

150

EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

853 853 Federal Register Vol. 66, No. 11 Wednesday, January 17, 2001 Title 3- The President Executive Order 13186 of January 10, 2001 Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in furtherance of the purposes of the migratory bird conventions, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703-711), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts (16 U.S.C. 668-668d), the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661-666c), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531-1544), the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-4347), and other pertinent statutes, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. Migratory birds are of great ecological and economic

151

GRR/Section 12 - Flora & Fauna Resource Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12 - Flora & Fauna Resource Assessment Process GRR/Section 12 - Flora & Fauna Resource Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12 - Flora & Fauna Resource Assessment Process 12 - FloraFaunaResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Fish and Wildlife Service US Army Corps of Engineers Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Marine Mammal Protection Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act Endangered Species Act State species protection acts Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12 - FloraFaunaResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf 12 - FloraFaunaResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

152

Category:Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Jump to: navigation, search This category includes companies and information related to oil (petroleum) or natural gas. Pages in category "Oil and Gas" The following 114 pages are in this category, out of 114 total. A Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Al Furat Petroleum Company Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Algeria Ministry of Energy and Mining Archaeological Resource Protection Act Archaeological Resources Protection Act Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission B Bahrain National Gas and Oil Authority Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act C California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources California Environmental Quality Act

153

DOE/EA-1635: Environmental Assessment for Pre-approval Review Williston to Tioga Transmission Line Project (March 2010)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for Pre-approval Review DOE/EA - 1635 Williston to Tioga Transmission Line Project Environmental Assessment for Pre-approval Review DOE/EA - 1635 Williston to Tioga Transmission Line Project Environmental Assessment for Pre-approval Review DOE/EA - 1635 March 2010 Acronyms and Abbreviations °C degrees Celsius AAQS Ambient Air Quality Standards AIRFA American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 amsl above mean sea level APLIC Avian Power Line Interaction Committee BEPC Basin Electric Power Cooperative BFE Base Flood Elevation BGEPA Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act BMP best management practice CFR Code of Federal Regulations CO 2 carbon dioxide Council Advisory Council on Historic Preservation CRP Conservation Reserve Program

154

Microsoft Word - Final Enivornmental Assessment.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DECEMBER 2010 DOE/EA-1782 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DECEMBER 2010 DOE/EA-1782 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ABPP Avian and Bat Protection Plan CFR Code of Federal Regulations BGEPA Bald and Golden Eagle Act dBA A-weighted decibel dB decibel DNREC (Delaware) Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) DOI U.S. Department of the Interior

155

Sandy Ridge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandy Ridge Sandy Ridge Facility Sandy Ridge Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Algonquin Power Developer Gamesa Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Bald Eagle PA Coordinates 40.75088201°, -78.23842764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.75088201,"lon":-78.23842764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

156

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

160

R E P O R T Soils of Eagle Crater and Meridiani Planum at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of vesicular clasts may represent basaltic sand sources. Eolian ripples, armored by well-sorted hematite

Glotch, Timothy D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Risk Analysis Framework for Golden Eagle Population Responses to Wind Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of quick “snapshot” metrics that can serve as reliable diagnostic tools for assessing avian population status has great appeal. In this study, stochastic simulation modeling and tree-structured regression analyses were used to evaluate the reliability of two proposed snapshot metrics in territorial birds: the floater/breeder ratio and the rate of nest occupancy by immature subadults. The demographic model, parameterized with field data from an intensively studied ...

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Bulk Dissolution Standard Operating Procedure Written by: Meagan Eagle, May 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of extracts. In the procedure reported here biological tissues are digested with nitric acid using an aluminum solid and liquid transfers and reduce equipment requirements. Nitric acid was used for all digestions as it has previously been shown that nitric acid quantitatively releases trace elements from biological

Paytan, Adina

163

Clipping the Eagle's Wings: The Limiting of the Korean Air War, 1950-1953  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose: This work examines the transition in aerial warfare that took place during the Korean War (1950-1953). Before the conflict, air power was conceived of primarily an instrument of unlimited, or total, warfare. Yet Korea, and all subsequent air wars, have been limited. The transitional nature of the Korean air war has not yet been adequately explored by historians. Methods: The story of this shift is presented in two parts, the first examining the doctrines of the United States Air Force (USAF) immediately before the Korean War, the second comparing them to the USAF’s actual campaigns in Korea. This focus on the USAF reflects both its status as the principal air service in Korea and its influence on the theories and doctrines of all air arms in the post-World War Two era. The USAF’s planning immediately before the Korean War focused on its role in a possible total war between the United States and the Soviet Union. It was thus unprepared and ill-equipped for the limited war in Korea and had to improvise its operations there. Findings: The inability of the USAF to conduct an unlimited war in Korea frustrated many Americans, who could not understand the political considerations that limited the conflict, seeing only that the USAF, the world’s most powerful air arm, was prevented from using all of its resources. While the resulting controversy contributed to a change of administration in the United States, it had less of an effect on the USAF. After the Korean War ended, its leadership continued to focus on unlimited war, dismissing the conflict as an aberration from which little about the operation of aircraft in war could be learned. Conclusions: The failure to recognize the lessons of the Korean War has had serious consequences. There have been no total wars since 1945; every air war of the past sixty years has been limited. Limited warfare is defined by restrictions on air power. The USAF and other air arms were slow to adapt to the changing conditions. The Korean War was a more significant event in the history of aerial warfare than is generally appreciated.

Horky, Roger Karl

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Production patterns in Eagle Ford Shale (Decline Curve Analysis) Muoz Torres, J.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there were vast natural gas resources in unconventional reservoirs like coal seams, tight sand and shales in the United States and elsewhere. That's the positive surprise. On the negative side, the severity of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico could well turn the global public against oil and natural gas exploration

Texas at Austin, University of

165

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

166

Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S., Schwartz, M.K., McKelvey, K.S., Foresman, K.R., Pilgrim, K.L., Giddings, B.J., and Lofroth, E.C. 2006. When

167

Wilson Bull., 95(4), 1983, pp, 628-635 GENERAL NOTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of young hatched during the preceding breeding season (Ketterson and Nolan 1976; Auk %:532-536, 1979; Auk about 31 December by inspection of

168

Appendix 67 A Review of Bull Trout Life-History and Habitat Use in Relation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The Tui System", Univ. of British Columbia, 1996. [11] Pradeep K. Sinha, "Distributed operating systems;Pipeline input task T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 bitvector to indicate supported PE Types Light Medium Heavy Pipeline Pipeline output task 1 1 0 01 0 0 0 1 0 0 01 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 Type 3RHType 2 Type 1

169

4.1 Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus) 4.1.1 Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, energy, climate change, and disasters before turning our attention to the role of gender in climate) November 13 ­ Gender, Energy and Climate Change · Mark D. Smith (2007). Chapter 4: Mitigation of Climate Kelkar (2007). Appropriate Gender-Analysis for Unpacking the Gender-Energy-Poverty Nexus. Gender

170

Another Bull Market Consolidation or Have Oil Prices Headed South for the Winter?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation was given at the New York Energy Forum on September 5, 2006. It explores the reasons behind rising oil prices over the last few years and discusses whether the drop in oil prices seen in late August and early September 2005 is the start of a long-running trend or is only a temporary decline.

Information Center

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

171

I. Bulls and Bears One of the timeliest and most prescient books  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Antonio shouts: "Hang, cur! Hang, you whoreson, insolent noise-maker! We are less afraid to be drowned a look of destiny about him and that the fate of someone so insolent as this cannot be an anonymous consulted for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Hart's primary research interests are early

Hemmers, Oliver

172

The influence of energy and protein level on the carcase and lean quality in young bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tallow, and meat which is light in colour. To furfil these requirements it is necessary to know how, is more or less the same, irrespective of the slaughter weight or energy level. The percentage of tallow

Recanati, Catherine

173

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

Sather-Blair, Signe

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Project Management Plan for the "Dilling Addition".  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) for management of the Pend Oreille Wetland Wildlife Mitigation project II (Dilling Addition) for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on Kalispel Ceded Lands. Albeni Falls Dam is located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington-Idaho border, about 25 miles upstream of the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The dam controls the water level on Lake Pend Oreille. The lake was formerly the center of subsistence use by the Kalispel Tribe. Flooding of wetlands, and water fluctuations both on the lake and downstream on the river, has had adverse impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. An extensive process was followed to formulate and prioritize wildlife resource goals. The Kalispel Natural Resource Department provided guidance in terms of opportunities onsite. To prioritize specific goals, the Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Caucus were consulted. From this process, the top priority goal for the Kalispel Tribe is: Protect and develop riparian forest and shrub, and freshwater wetlands, to mitigate losses resulting from reservoir inundation and river level fluctuations due to Albeni Falls Dam. Indicator species used to determine the initial construction/inundation loses and mitigation project gains include Bald Eagle (breeding and wintering), Black-capped Chickadee, Canada Goose, Mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer, and Yellow Warbler.

Entz, Ray D.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Eagles and dragons at sea: The inevitable strategic collision between the United States and China. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collision is imminent. To advance China`s expanding maritime interests, the Chinese Navy is altering its strategic direction from ground-support missions to open-water operations. Meanwhile, the U.S. Navy is maintaining a steady course to strongly affirm the U.S. continuing commitment in the region. Thus, on the `offshore` waters of the Western Pacific, the strategies of these two navies will inevitably collide. East Asia remains vital to America`s economic renewal. It has the world`s fastest-growing economies. It is also the U.S. biggest export market. Therefore, America`s continued economic growth is tied to the region`s enduring prosperity and security. But, all is not well in East Asia. There are a number of `hot spots` that threaten regional stability. More importantly, behind almost every flash point in the area, China`s shadow looms large in the distance. China is an emerging maritime power with towering aspirations. Clearly, the Chinese Navy will play a crucial role in promoting those ambitions. However, as the Chinese fleet prepares to sail away from its familiar shores, it is quickly discovering that the U.S. Navy`s shadow looms even larger in the not too distant horizon.

Zalamea, U.O.

1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Istiophorid billfishes in the Atlantic Ocean experience considerable fish-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model was the Eagle Claw L2004EWF, size 8/0 (Eagle Claw, Denver, CO). As is typical for this fish- ery

Hartley, Troy W.

179

Bull Valcanol (1987) 49:765-775 Voliaology Springer-Verlag 1987 Variation in peperite textures associated with differing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

masses of the basaltic intrusions up to 1 m in size were dispersed for distances up to 3 m into host pipes in tuff breccia above the lower sill provides evidence for meter-scale fluidization of the host. The contact zone between the basaltic magma and the shelly micrite host resembles a mixture of two viscous

Busby, Cathy

180

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine foundations (Patrick and Henderson) was commissioned to design a foundation. More detailHull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation", the largest wind turbine (660 kW) yet installed in the state. That project proved to be so popular that HMLP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The Rio Bravo fault, a major late Oligocene left-lateral shear zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

splays classified by age (courtesy of PEMEX modified). Thin lines is gravimetric contouring of figure 7 des reservoirs pétroliers classés par âge (courtoisie de PEMEX, figure modifiée). Le contourage en base provided mainly by PEMEX. We have used both 2D and 3D seismic interpretations to built

Husson, Laurent

182

MOUVEMENT D'UNE BULLE DANS UN LIQUIDE APPLICATIONS DE L'EFFET FUSE (FONCTIONNEMENT DES POMPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dans l'écoulement d'une émulsion à l'intérieur d'une pompe centrifuge, dans l'érosion de cavitation électroérosion, dans la formation des aérosols et dans quelques autres cas possibles. Abstract. 2014 A gas relative to the flow of emulsions in centrifugal pumps, to cavitation erosion, to some problems

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

183

Influence of fat supplementation in diets for bull-calves on growth rate and skeletal muscle metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was to investigate the influence of addition of tallow, sunflower oil or rapeseed oil to the diet of 30-180 day % of tallow, sunflower oil or rapeseed oil respectively, on the dry matter basis. Once a month as well

Recanati, Catherine

184

Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 1998-1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1999, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued developing techniques for the captive rearing of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Techniques under development included protocols for rearing juveniles in freshwater and saltwater hatchery environments, and fieldwork to collect brood year 1998 and 1999 juveniles and eggs and to investigate the ability of these fish to spawn naturally. Fish collected as juveniles were held for a short time at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and later transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery for rearing. Eyed-eggs were transferred immediately to the Eagle Fish Hatchery where they were disinfected and reared by family groups. When fish from either collection method reached approximately 60 mm, they were PIT tagged and reared separately by brood year and source stream. Sixteen different groups were in culture at IDFG facilities in 1999. Hatchery spawning activities of captive-reared chinook salmon produced eyed-eggs for outplanting in streamside incubation chambers in the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=2,297) and the East Fork Salmon River (N=1,038). Additionally, a number of these eggs were maintained at the Eagle Fish Hatchery to ensure adequate brood year 1999 representation from these systems, and produced 279 and 87 juveniles from the West Fork Yankee Fork and East Fork Salmon River, respectively. Eyed-eggs were not collected from the West Fork Yankee Fork due to low adult escapement. Brood year 1998 juveniles were collected from the Lemhi River (N=191), West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=229), and East Fork Salmon River (N=185). Additionally, brood year 1999 eyed-eggs were collected from the Lemhi River (N=264) and East Fork Salmon River (N=143). Sixty-two and seven maturing adults were released into Bear Valley Creek (Lemhi River system) and the East Fork Salmon River, respectively, for spawning evaluation in 1999. Nine female carcasses from Bear Valley Creek were examined for egg retention, and of these five were spawned out, one was partially spawned, and three died before depositing eggs. However, much of the spawning related behavior observed involved female chinook salmon paired with male bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Two female carcasses from the East Fork Salmon River were recovered and examined for egg retention. One of these had spawned and one had not.

Hassemer, Peter F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1999, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued developing techniques for the captive rearing of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Techniques under development included protocols for rearing juveniles in freshwater and saltwater hatchery environments, and fieldwork to collect brood year 1998 and 1999 juveniles and eggs and to investigate the ability of these fish to spawn naturally. Fish collected as juveniles were held for a short time at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and later transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery for rearing. Eyed-eggs were transferred immediately to the Eagle Fish Hatchery where they were disinfected and reared by family groups. When fish from either collection method reached approximately 60 mm, they were PIT tagged and reared separately by brood year and source stream. Sixteen different groups were in culture at IDFG facilities in 1999. Hatchery spawning activities of captive-reared chinook salmon produced eyed-eggs for outplanting in streamside incubation chambers in the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=2,297) and the East Fork Salmon River (N=1,038). Additionally, a number of these eggs were maintained at the Eagle Fish Hatchery to ensure adequate brood year 1999 representation from these systems, and produced 279 and 87 juveniles from the West Fork Yankee Fork and East Fork Salmon River, respectively. Eyed-eggs were not collected from the West Fork Yankee Fork due to low adult escapement. Brood year 1998 juveniles were collected from the Lemhi River (N=191), West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=229), and East Fork Salmon River (N=185). Additionally, brood year 1999 eyed-eggs were collected from the Lemhi River (N=264) and East Fork Salmon River (N=143). Sixty-two and seven maturing adults were released into Bear Valley Creek (Lemhi River system) and the East Fork Salmon River, respectively, for spawning evaluation in 1999. Nine female carcasses from Bear Valley Creek were examined for egg retention, and of these five were spawned out, one was partially spawned, and three died before depositing eggs. However, much of the spawning related behavior observed involved female chinook salmon paired with male bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Two female carcasses from the East Fork Salmon River were recovered and examined for egg retention. One of these had spawned and one had not.

Hassemer, Peter F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Detroit Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project, North Santiam River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Detroit/Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project (Detroit Project) on the North Santiam River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1939, 1956, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each time period were determined. Ten wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Detroit Project extensively altered or affected 6324 acres of land and river in the North Santiam River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 1,608 acres of conifer forest and 620 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Detroit Project included the loss of winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, pileated woodpecker, spotted owl, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Detroit Project. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

Noyes, J.H.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Conservative Nutrition: The Industrial Food Supply and Its Critics, 1915-1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Significance. NRC Bull. No. 109. Washington: NRC, 1943.NRC Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on NutritionTheir Techniques and Value. NRC Bull. No. 17. Washington:

Renner, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Sweep-Twist Blade Design and Fabrication with Atmospheric Test Verification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's subcontract with Knight & Carver to develop a sweep-twist adaptive balde to reduce loads and allow a larger more productive rotor.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gas Mileage of 1984 Vehicles by American Motors Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 American Motors Corporation Vehicles 4 American Motors Corporation Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 19 City 20 Combined 22 Highway 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 19 City 21 Combined 23 Highway 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 6 cyl, 4.2 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 15 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 6 cyl, 4.2 L, Manual 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 16 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1984 American Motors Corporation Eagle 4WD 6 cyl, 4.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline

194

Population Structure, Status and Life Histories of Upper Columbia Steelhead, Spring and Summer/fall Chinook, Sockeye, Coho Salmon, Bull Trout, Westslope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the state of Washington's effort to identify larger groups of populations (or stocks), Busack and Marshall, Edson 1958), just as they are irregularly distributed now in the Hanford Reach (Swan et al. 1988 from the Hanford Reach and downstream from Chief Joseph Dam except in the Okanogan River. Summer

195

Bull. Disas. Prey. Res. Inst., Kyoto Univ., Vol. 45, Part 2, 3 No. 389, February, 1996 27 Active Rift System in the Okinawa Trough and Its Northeastern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active Rift System in the Okinawa Trough and Its Northeastern Continuation By Masaaki KIMURA (Manuscript investigations have revealed that the present central rift system of the Okinawa Trough which is an active Okinawa Trough can be distinguished. The crustal thinning and thus eastward drifting of the Ryukyu Arc may

Takada, Shoji

197

A Mechanism for Coronal Hole Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fan. We argue that the time-dependent evolution of this scenario will be very dynamic since the change from a bald patch to null point topology cannot occur via a simple ideal evolution in the corona. We discuss the implications of these findings for recent Hinode XRT observations of coronal hole jets and give an outline of planned time-dependent 3D MHD simulations to fully assess this scenario.

D. A. N. Mueller; S. K. Antiochos

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is NOT routinely open to the public, public events allowing access are being planned. Eagles - Jim Evans, TWRA During the mid-winter eagle survey on January 11, Jim Evans saw...

199

Remembering Edgar Bowers: The Years of Friendship with Elroy L. Bundy, 1967-1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sometimes eagle, sometimes anaconda--perceived Roy and hisof Douanier Rousseau, The anaconda…..” Edgar then names theEdgar, the would-be eagle-anaconda and warm, responsive,

Bundy, Barbara

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Winter Garden area in the south. In the Eagle Ford Shale play, fracking is used to create pathways

Althoff, David M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sullivan County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania Dushore, Pennsylvania Eagles Mere, Pennsylvania Forksville, Pennsylvania Laporte, Pennsylvania Retrieved from...

202

Evaluation of Preg-Robbing in Goldstrike Carbonaceous Ore Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agnico-Eagle Laronde Plant: Metallurgical Challenges Present and Future · An Alternative Automated Electron Beam Technology for Gold Characterization.

203

The Mineralogy and Predictive Metallurgy of Major Types of Gold Ores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agnico-Eagle Laronde Plant: Metallurgical Challenges Present and Future · An Alternative Automated Electron Beam Technology for Gold Characterization.

204

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom BearCrosswindEaglePelican General Motors - 3.0L Fuel Type: CNG Displacement: 3...

205

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc., Crowder College, Moark Productions, Talbot Industries, Freeman Neosho Hospital, Brass Eagle Paintball Products, Crowder Industries, BRANCO Enterprises, Inc., Sunbeam...

206

Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

Bruce A. Wright

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.  

SciTech Connect

The construction of Albeni Falls Dam was completed in 1955. Prior to construction, the dam was expected to alter approximately 6,300 acres. However, the loss assessment addressed the losses in terms of Habitat Units (HUs) (Martin et al. 1988). HUs are derived by multiplying the Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) by the number of acres in question. The HSI, in turn, is an index to the habitat carrying capacity for a specific species or guild of species based on a set of habitat performance measures and can be used to assess changes, both positive and negative, in habitat quantity and quality (USFWS 1980, 1980a). The HSI is derived though a HEP that is completed according to species or guild specific models. Variables defined in the models are measured on the landscape; and those measured values are rated according to the model to produce an index to the habitat's suitability. The HSI index ranges from 0.0 to 1.0. An HSI of 0.3 indicates that habitat quality/carrying capacity is marginal while an HSI of 0.7 suggests that habitat quality/carrying capacity is relatively good. Thus an acre of optimum habitat (HSI = 1.0) results in 1 HU. The construction and inundation of Albeni Falls Dam resulted in a loss of 28,587 HUs. This HU ledger was the sum of the losses for each of the chosen target species, which were 5,985 mallard HUs, 4,699 Canada goose HUs, 3,379 redhead HUs, 4,508 breeding bald eagle HUs, 4,365 wintering bald eagle HUs, 2,286 black-capped chickadee HUs, 1,680 white tailed deer HUs, and 1,756 muskrat HUs. The PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND CONSERVATION ACT (1980) made mitigating against the HU ledger associated with the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), of which Albeni Falls is a part, the responsibility of BPA. The Act also established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), which is responsible for, among other things, establishing the Fish and Wildlife Program to direct the mitigation process. The Bonneville Power Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The Bonneville Power Administration was guaranteed a minimum of 364 protection HUs for th

Green, Gerald I.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Alongshore advection and marine reserves: consequences for modeling and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the 2 systems (Hockey & Branch 1994, Simberloffworld fisheries. Bull Mar Sci Hockey PAR, Branch GM (1994)

Kaplan, David M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

CERN Program Library Long Writeup W5013 GEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, divorce, sex, therapy, or about objects such as the furniture, drinks, their wedding photo, the brass bull (referring to) the brass bull (a gift from Trip's lover), the current Italy beat goal will immediately stop mid-performance, and the brass bull global mix-in will begin performing, at whichever tier that hot

210

Reconstruction and Analysis of Spring Rainfall over the Southeastern U.S. for the Past 1000 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tree-ring chronologies can provide surprisingly accurate estimates of the natural variability of important climate parameters such as precipitation and temperature during the centuries prior to the Industrial Revolution. Bald cypress tree-ring ...

David W. Stahle; Malcolm K. Cleaveland

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Sweep-Twist Blade Design and Fabrication with Atmospheric Test Verification  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes NREL's subcontract with Knight & Carver to develop a sweep-twist adaptive balde to reduce loads and allow a larger more productive rotor.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

CX-010146: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bald Mountain, Miller Peak, Lines Creek, and Taft Passive Repeater Communication Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/24/2013 Location(s): Montana, Montana, Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

213

MAGAZINder Heinrich-Heine-Universitt Dsseldorf 1 2008 als wir die Titelgeschichte(n) planten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Düsseldorf bald das deutsche China-Zentrum? . . . . . . . . . 10 China ­ auf ein Wort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Integrierter deutsch-französischer Studiengang . . . . . . . . 21 Philosophische Fakultät ,,Will Neurowissenschaften: Prof. Schnitzler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Pharmazeutische Chemie: ,,Tatort": Hörsaal

Schiller, Stephan

214

Das knstliche Schilf bei der Neuenburger Arteplage wiegt sich bereits im Wind. Hier knnen sich bald auch die Expo-Besucher mit dem intelligenten Raum der Zrcher Hochschulen auseinandersetzen. F O T O S : N A N A P E R N O D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(IMK-IFU), Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (4) Institut fĂĽr Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle (IMK-IFU), Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (4) Institut fĂĽr Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle

215

Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporation: 20,500 for upgrades to existing accounting software and training Three Eagles Development Corporation, Picuris Pueblo: 10,800 to update computer and account...

216

Overcoming Complexity in the Teaching and Learning Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

217

Energy Recovery Opportunities in Pyroprocessing of Nickel Laterites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

218

Thunderstorms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofs, bare hillsides and cultivated fields on sunny days. It is these columns which eagles, hawks, and buzzards utilize to soar effortlessly. Glider pilots also use them and...

219

Physical Chemistry of Sulfide Self-Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geology and Hydrothermal Alteration of the Gold Eagle Deposit: A New Discovery in the Red Lake Camp, Canada · Green State Joining of Silicon Nitride to Itself ...

220

In-Vivo Evaluation of 13-93 Bioactive Glass Scaffolds Made by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-vitro, the compressive strength of the SLS scaffolds was measured as a function of time for up to three months when immersed in Dubelcos Modified Eagles ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Review of Pyro, Hydro and Electro-metallurgical Processes for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

222

2000 Electronic Materials Conference: Technological Exhibition - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cree, Inc. Philips Analytical. Digital Instruments, Riber, Inc. Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. SAES Pure Gas, Inc. EPI MBE Products Group, SVT Associates, Inc.

223

Engineering and Human Resource Development: Design as a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

224

Environmental Degradation Meeting 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 14, 2005 ... Location: Cliff Lodge, Golden Cliff/Eagle's Nest. All meeting attendees are invited to a welcoming reception gathering. Additional details will be ...

225

Dehydration of Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

226

Frontiers in Biological and Biomedical Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011... Dubelcos Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) at 38şC. In-vivo, the cylindrical scaffolds with and without bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), ...

227

B&W awards college scholarship to local student | Y-12 National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Band and Orchestra Association. At Tennessee Tech, Jones is a member of the Golden Eagles marching band. B&W scholarships are awarded based on academic achievement and...

228

The Structure of Peirce-Smith Converting Schedules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

229

COM 2011 (held with the World Gold Conference), POSTER SESSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geology and Hydrothermal Alteration of the Gold Eagle Deposit: A New Discovery in the Red Lake Camp, Canada · Green State Joining of Silicon Nitride to Itself ...

230

Process-scale Converter Experiments on High Pressure Tuyere ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

231

Automobile Catalytic Converters: Purpose, Reactions and Recycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

232

Developments in the Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

233

2006 TMS Annual Meeting: Special Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Her career ranged from the “one woman engineer” on the “Eagle” minicomputer design project at Data General to vice president of product management and ...

234

Five companies received funding through new venture acceleration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proposals and those receiving funding included: San Ildefonso Development Corp., Three Eagles Development Corp., Cochitit Pueblo Development Corp., Sunbeam Indian Art and Avanyu...

235

First 15 Years of Operation of the Noranda Converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

236

1999 Electronic Materials Conference: Exhibit Information - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 1999 ... Charles Evan & Associates Cree Research Digital Instruments Eagle-Picher Technologies, LLC Emcore Corporation EPI MBE Products Group

237

Flotation Hydrodynamic Measurements for Circuit Benchmarking at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transfer and Consumption of Oxygen in Gold-bearing Sulfide Ores: Agnico-eagle Mines Trials · Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...

238

Experiments with Oval: A Radically Tailorable Tool for Cooperative Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-333), Cambridge, MA 02139; email: malone@eagle.mit. edu; K.-Y. Lai, McKinsey & Company, 18/F Two Exchange Square

239

Hydraulic fracture orientation for miscible gas injection EOR in the Elm Coulee field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is tremendous potential for shale oil reservoirs, such as the Bakken Formation, Eagle Ford and Niobrara to have a lasting impact on the U.S… (more)

Xu, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

G:arrFIELD CODE 6 FILESPreliminary Section 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

craig dome moffat craig 168047 denova washington de nova 183727 florence fremont florence-canon city 245815 golden eagle las animas purgatoire river ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

G:arrFIELD CODE 5 FILESPreliminary Section 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

craig dome moffat craig 168047 denova washington de nova 183727 florence fremont florence-canon city 245815 golden eagle las animas purgatoire river ...

242

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Danville Facility (Tape) Intertape Polymer Corporation 1101 Eagle Springs Road Danville, Virginia 24540 The Intertape...

243

U.S. monthly crude oil production reaches highest level since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Eagle Ford formation in South Texas and the Permian Basin in West Texas. North Dakota's increase in oil production comes from the Bakken formation in the ...

244

EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County,...

245

Microsoft Word - CSP_RP_PhaseI_051305.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

*(2) Eagle Operating, Inc. Encore Acquisition Company Fischer Oil & Gas, Inc. Marathon Oil Company Occidental Petroleum Oxy Permian Ltd. Saskatchewan Industry and Resources...

246

Michigan's 15th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC Energy Options Solutions Ford Ford Electric Battery Group Integrated Sensing Systems Inc ISSYS Masco Masco Home ServicesWellHome...

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom BearCrosswindEaglePelican Ford Motor Co. - 2.5L Propane Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 2.5 liters...

248

Search by Make for 1994 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini Land Rover...

249

Search by Make for 1996 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Select Make... Acura Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln...

250

Search by Model for 1993 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Autokraft Limited BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CX Automotive Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti...

251

Search by Model for 1990 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Consulier Industries Inc Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Evans Automobiles Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai...

252

Search by Make for 1997 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Select Make... Acura Aston Martin Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini Land Rover...

253

Search by Make for 1989 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Bertone BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CX Automotive Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Environmental Rsch and Devp Corp Evans...

254

Search by Model for 1989 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Bertone BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CX Automotive Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Environmental Rsch and Devp Corp Evans...

255

Search by Model for 1994 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini Land Rover...

256

Search by Make for 1993 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Autokraft Limited BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CX Automotive Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti...

257

Search by Model for 1995 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dabryan Coach Builders Inc Dodge Eagle Federal Coach Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu...

258

Search by Model for 1988 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Aurora Cars Ltd Bertone BMW Buick Cadillac CCC Engineering Chevrolet Chrysler CX Automotive Dacia Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Ferrari...

259

Search by Make for 1998 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Select Make... Acura Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Daewoo Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini...

260

Search by Make for 1988 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Aurora Cars Ltd Bertone BMW Buick Cadillac CCC Engineering Chevrolet Chrysler CX Automotive Dacia Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Ferrari...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Search by Make for 1992 Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Autokraft Limited BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Consulier Industries Inc CX Automotive Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford...

262

Search by Model for 1996 Vehicles  

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6 Select Make... Acura Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln...

263

Search by Model for 1991 Vehicles  

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264

Search by Model for 1992 Vehicles  

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2 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Autokraft Limited BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Consulier Industries Inc CX Automotive Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford...

265

Search by Model for 1998 Vehicles  

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8 Select Make... Acura Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Daewoo Dodge Eagle Ferrari Ford GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Kia Lamborghini...

266

Search by Model for 1997 Vehicles  

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267

Search by Make for 1990 Vehicles  

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90 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Consulier Industries Inc Daihatsu Dodge Eagle Evans Automobiles Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai...

268

Search by Make for 1991 Vehicles  

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269

Search by Make for 1995 Vehicles  

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5 Select Make... Acura Alfa Romeo Audi BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dabryan Coach Builders Inc Dodge Eagle Federal Coach Ferrari Ford Geo GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Isuzu...

270

Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 35, No. 5, October 2012, pp. 767772. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Anti-tumor activity of self-charged (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beijing, Beijing 100083, China Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing 100191, China School of Applied Science, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China #Department. In recent years, studies of anti-tumor drugs mainly focused on nanomaterials. Seve- ral nanomaterials

Volinsky, Alex A.

271

Acknowledgements NATURE CURE AND NATURAL METHODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ecosystem health: Is the distribution of Martial Eagle nests in the Karoo, South Africa, influenced) breeding on electricity transmission pylons in the central and southwestern Karoo, South Africa distances, 7 km vs. 12 km, p ÂĽ 0:025). This study shows that (i) large eagle distributions in the Karoo

Sanyal, Sugata

272

Sediment facies classification of a sandy shoreline by means of airborne imaging spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne imaging spectroscopy data (AISA Eagle and HyMap) were applied to classify the sediments of a sandy beach in seven sand type classes. On the AISA-Eagle data, several classification strategies were tried out and compared with each other. The best ...

B. Deronde; P. Kempeneers; R. Houhuys; J. -P. Henriet; V. Van Lancker

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Richardson Acts to Save DOE's Research Parks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In ''Preserving DOE's Research Parks'' (Issues, Winter 1997-98 ), we argued that some of the nation's most irreplaceable outdoor laboratories for scientific research and education are at risk of being disposed of by the Department of Energy (DOE). We are pleased that Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson has recently acted to protect the unique values of DOE property, but we believe that more steps should be taken. Since June 1999, Richardson has set aside lands in five of the seven DOE research parks for wildlife preservation, research, education, and recreation. Management plans have been or are being established for 1,000 acres at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, 57,000 acres at the Hanford Nuclear Reserve in Washington, 10,000 acres at the Savannah River Site in Georgia, 74,000 acres at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory, and 3,000 acres at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. These sites are to be managed as biological and wildlife preserves, allowing opportunities for research, education, and, for most of them, recreation. ''In places of rare environmental resources,'' Richardson said, ''we have a special responsibility to the states and communities that have supported and hosted America's long effort to win the Cold War and we owe it to future generations to protect these precious places so that they can enjoy nature's plenty just as we do''. The preserves are home to several rare wildlife species, including bald eagles and loggerhead shrike, as well as numerous other animal and plant species. The only population of one rare plant, the White Bluffs bladder pod, occurs at the Hanford site. Under Richardson's plan, traditional Native American cultural uses of these sites will continue. The preserves will also continue to provide a safety buffer for DOE facilities. Despite these promising moves, the long-term viability of the management arrangements that have been established varies across the sites. For example, because of various constraints, the DOE agreement with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency for management of the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Refuge on the Oak Ridge Reservation is for only five years, compared to the 25-year agreement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Hanford. Further, some Oak Ridge city leaders have opposed establishing the refuge, because they want the land to be used for housing and industrial development. Pressure to develop these unique lands is likely to continue to mount. Although DOE is required to identify surplus property according to the terms of Executive Order 12512, we have asked that this process occur without compromising long-term research, conservation, and education opportunities, including possible new facilities. To date, we feel that these values have not been given adequate weight and have not been integrated into national environmental goals. We also believe that retaining the research parks is a cost-effective means of bolstering President Clinton's Lands Legacy Initiative. Research park lands near communities can serve as buffers against sprawl as well as offering nearby urban residents diverse educational and recreational opportunities, such as hiking, biking, hunting, and nature walks. We further recommend that DOE develop a long-term management plan for protecting opportunities for energy-related research, conservation, and education in the DOE research parks. This plan should include an outreach program specifying ways for the community, educators, and scientists to take advantage of the user facilities of the parks. For example, local science camps could be expanded to become national opportunities for students and educators to learn about energy use, conservation, and the environment. We envision that DOE's ''EcoCamps'' could be just as popular as NASA's Space Camps.

Dale, V.H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Research and Recovery of Snake River Sockeye Salmon, 1995-1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Initial steps to recover the species include the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s Eagle Fish Hatchery in Eagle, Idaho. Research and recovery activities for sockeye conducted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game at the Eagle Fish Hatchery during the period April 1, 1995 to April 1, 1996 are covered by this report. The performance of all captive broodstock groups held at Eagle Fish Hatchery is included in this report. No anadromous adults returned to Redfish Lake in 1995. Three adult residual males were captured in a merwin trap and used in the spawning of captive residual females held at Eagle Fish Hatchery.

Pravecek, Jay J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Transport Dependence on Safety Factor Profile in DIII-D Steady-state Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618305

Holcomb, C.T.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling Steady-State DIII-D Plasmas for Tearing Stability Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617155

Turco, F.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Optimization of the Internal Magnetic Configuration for High Bootstrap Current Fraction and High Beta for Steady-state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616775

Ferron, J.R.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effect of Peeling Ballooning Stability on Steady-State ELM-Free  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 291 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613275

Osborne, T.H.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer in Current Mode on DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 380 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618665

Zhu, Y.B.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

High q_min Steady State Scenario Development Using Off-Axis Neutral Beam Injection on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 97 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618967

Holcomb, C.T.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of State-Space Model-Based Kalman Filter for n?1 Resistive Wall Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 165 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614365

In, Y.

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Steady-State High-Performance Operation of DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 110 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613105

Politzer, P.A.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Developing Depleted Uranium and Gold Hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 339 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613300

Wilkens, H.L.

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fueling ITER - Pellet Launch From the Transformer Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 131 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611820

Perkins, F.W.

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Investigating the structure of the core-mantle boundary region using S and P diffracted waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure in the central aleutian islands. J. Geo- physicalevents in the central aleutian islands. Bull Seism. Soc.particularly in the Aleutians. Introduction Earthquake

Manners, Ursula J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., and McDowell, F. W., 1978. Subduction of the Kula Ridge at the Aleutian Trench. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 89

289

Finite Orbit Monte Carlo Simulation with Full Wave Fields for ICRF Wave Heating Experiments in DIII-D, NSTX, KSTAR and ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 62 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618200

Choi, M.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of Off-Normal and Fault Event Detection and Response Techniques for ITER and DEMO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 164 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617180

Walker, M.L.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Progress in Developing ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 305 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616745

Doyle, E.J.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

ITER Current Channel Control Under Disturbances and Disruptions with Implications from DIII-D Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618320

Humphreys, D.A.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Modeling Tokamak Discharges During Startup in DIII-D and Predictions for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 166 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616675

Budny, R.V.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Demonstration of ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 140 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615385

Doyle, E.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

295

ITER Vertical Stability Guidance from Multi-machine Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 84 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615495

Humphreys, D.A.

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Error Field Measurement Techniques for ITER Using Plasma Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 375 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618575

Strait, E.J.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

QH-Mode in Low Rotation, ITER-Similar Plasmas Using Static Non-Axisymmetric Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 97 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618958

Garofalo, A.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Simulation of the ITER Rampdown Scenario on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 304 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617060

Politzer, P.A.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

ITER MSE Calibration System Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 261 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615595

Mezzacappa, A.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Experimental and Model Validation of ITER Operational Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 202 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615345

Casper, T.A.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Iterated Finite Orbit Monte Carlo Simulation with Full Wave Fields for Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 254 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616715

Choi, M.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Demonstration of ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 84 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615675

Politzer, P.A.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Assessment of Collateral Effects to Tokamak Systems During Planned Air Baking of DIII-D to Simulate ITER Tritium Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 257 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615415

Fitzpatrick, B.W.N.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Scaled Experiment of ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617035

Park, J.M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Operating ITER Robustly Without Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 189 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618969

Humphreys, D.A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Plans for ECE Diagnostic Components for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 189 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618929

Austin, M.E.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

307

Spectral Effects on Plasma Performance in ITER Similar DIII-D RMP H-modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 142 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615400

Evans, T.E.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Progress in Demonstration of the ITER Baseline Scenario on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 344 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618235

Doyle, E.J.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Metrics to Quantify Magnetic Field Stochasticity for DIII-D and ITER Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 294 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618993

Orlov, D.M.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

SOL Width Studies for ITER Ramp-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 185 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617090

Rudakov, D.L.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Transport Stiffness of TGLF and Its Impact on ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 282 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618975

Kinsey, J.E.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Influence of Rotation and Error Field on Tearing Stability in Low Torque ITER-like Plasmas in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 200 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615335

Buttery, R.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

L-H Transition Studies on DIII-D to Determine H-mode Access for Operational Scenarios in ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618275

Gohil, P.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Experimental Investigation of ITER Startup and Rampdown Scenarios in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 144 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615515

Jackson, G.L.

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Predictions of ITER Steady State Scenario Using Scaled Experimental Edge Profiles in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616975

Murakami, M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Overview of Recent DIII-D Results in Support of ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 200 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615455

Greenfield, C.M.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

317

ELM Control Coils for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 143 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615705

Schaffer, M.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Equilibrium and Braking of Fully Avalanched Runaway Electron Currents: a New Disruption Mitigation Strategy for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 334 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618465

Parks, P.B.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Numerical Analysis of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations ELM Control in ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 376 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618450

Orlov, D.M.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

DIII-D Research in Support of ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 140 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615765

Strait, E.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Tracking of Current and Rotation Profile Evolution in the DIII-D Tokamak via System Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 132 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618635

Wehner, W.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Developing a Commercial Production Process for 500,000 Targets Per Day - a Key Challenge for Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 308 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612090

Goodin, D.T.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fusion Development Facility Divertor Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615435

Garofalo, A.M.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fusion Blanket Development in FDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 260 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615840

Wong, C.P.C.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fusion Development Facility Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615760

Stambaugh, R.D.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fusion Development Facility - Mission and Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 221 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614610

Stambaugh, R.D.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fusion Development Facility Machine Design Aspects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615735

Smith, J.P.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Realizing Steady State Tokamak Operation for Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 19 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616940

Luce, T.C.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Distribution of Particulate Sizes Observed in DIII-D During Normal Plasma Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 151 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999611985

Burkart, J.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Conservation Tillage:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hosford, R.M. Jr. 1976. Fungal Leaf Spot Diseases of Wheat in North Dakota. N.D. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull.

Today Andtomorrow Southern; Southern Region; No-till Conference; Thomas J. Gerik; Thomas J. Gerik; Bill L. Harris; Bill L. Harris

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Confinement Trends in DIII-D High Performance Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 161 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616995

Neff, A.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gyrokinetic Energy Moment Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 43, 1723 (1998)40th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics New Orleans Louisiana, US, 1998933010745

Hinton, F.L.

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electron Thermal Transport and Multi-scale Turbulence in Low Collisionality H-mode Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 346 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618515

Schmitz, L.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermal Ion Orbit Loss and Intrinsic Toroidal Velocity Near the Last Closed Flux Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618225

deGrassie, J.S.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermal Ion Loss From Confined QH-Mode Plasma in the Presence of Alfven Eigenmodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 78 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612200

Lasnier, C.J.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

STAR Power, an Interactive Educational Fusion CD With a Dynamic, Shaped Tokamak Power Plant Simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 183 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000974822817

Leuer, J.A.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

Physics Optimization of the ARIES-RS Fusion Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 79 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999945102922

Chan, V.S.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Long-Term Reduction of Divertor Carbon Sources in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 171 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999948925415

Whyte, D.G.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Sources for Carbon Production in the DIII-D Divertors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 222 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000974748335

Isler, R.C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reduction of Tile Heating, Particle, and Carbon Sources With the New DIII-D Divertor-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 222 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000974749120

Lasnier, C.J.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Divertor Impurity Sources and Core Content During ELM Controlled Regimes in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 113 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612870

Fenstermacher, M.E.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Carbon Sources and Fluxes in the DIII-D Divertor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 171 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999944764286

Isler, R.C.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fueling Sources, ELMs, and Optimizing Density Control in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48, 184 (2003)45th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Albuquerque New Mexico, US, 2003999609465

Watkins, J.G.

2003-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

Carbon Sources and Core Plasma Carbon Content on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 43, 1851 (1998)40th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics New Orleans Louisiana, US, 1998997296119

West, W.P.

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Commissioning of the Off-Axis Neutral Beamline on the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 300 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619005

Scoville, J.T.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

346

Commissioning of the 110 GHz ECH System on DIII-D for Physics Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 220 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000997290589

Lohr, J.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Magnetic and Thermal Energy Flow During Disruptions in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41, 1433 (1996)38th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 1996933011219

Hyatt, A.W.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Restoring Transmission of Irradiated Image Fiber Bundles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 344 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618943

Chrobak, C.P.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

IMFIT Integrated Modeling Applications Supporting Experimental Analysis: Multiple Time-Slice Kinetic EFIT Reconstructions, MHD Stability Limits, and Energy and Momentum Flux Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 129 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618215

Collier, A.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy Confinement Improved with Neon Injection in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 42, 1923 (1997)39th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, US, 1997933003369

Staebler, G.M.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of an IMFIT Energy Transport Module and Modeling of DIII-D Energy Transport with and without MHD Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 254 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615530

Jeon, Y.M.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Target Fabrication in Support of Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Physics Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 354 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614070

Back, C.A.

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Pitch and Energy Resolved Fast Ion Losses in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 348 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618675

Pace, D.C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Scaling of Type-I ELM Divertor Energy, Heat Flux, and Profile Width in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 257 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616920

Lasnier, C.J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Energy and Particle Transport in Long-Pulse High-Performance Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 150 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000996510275

Politzer, P.A.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Particle and Energy Transport in the SOL of DIII-D and NSTX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 237 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612805

Boedo, J.A.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Real-Time Control of Plasma Rotation and Stored Energy in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 267 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612895

Gohil, P.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Scaling of Energy Confinement With Rotation for Advanced Inductive Plasmas in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 239 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618998

Politzer, P.A.

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

359

Improving Diamagnetic Flux Temporal Resolution to Measure ELM Energy Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 130 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618525

Sieck, P.E.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

ELM Energy Transport in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 225 (2001)43rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Long Beach CA, US, 2001999606765

Leonard, A.W.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gas Balance in Ohmic Discharges on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 140 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615835

West, W.P.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Momentum Model of Gas Jet Penetration in Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 80 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612285

Parks, P.B.

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Local Gas Puff Effects on Fast Wave Antenna Loading in H-mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 167 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616985

Nagy, A.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

364

Massive Gas Injection System for Disruption Mitigation on the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 80 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612160

Jernigan, T.C.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fast Plasma Shutdowns by Massive Hydrogen, Noble and Mixed-Gas Injection in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 141 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615830

Wesley, J.C.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

DIII-D Studies of Massive Gas Injection for Disruption Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 271 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612925

Hollmann, E.M.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Rapid Shutdown Methods for Runaway Electron Suppression by Large Shattered Pellets and Massive Gas Injection in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618345

Jernigan, T.C.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Theoretical Progress on Runaway Electron Suppression by Massive Gas Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 171 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614500

Parks, P.B.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

The role of siderophores in algal-bacterial interactions in the marine environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

66 3.3.2. Catecholformation of borate with catechol and L-dopa, Bull. Chem.A. (1999) Purification of catechol siderophores by boronate

Amin, Shady Ahmed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solenoid-free Startup of DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 59 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616930

Leuer, J.A.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

A New Approach to Quantitative NIF GXD Image Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 117 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618315

Huang, H.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Measuring Dopant Concentration in Graded NIF Targets Through Quantitative Contact X-Radiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 107 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612135

Huang, H.

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

Dilation X-ray Imager (DIXI) - A Sub-10ps X-ray Framing Camera for the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 261 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618966

Hilsabeck, T.J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sigma Xi DC Area Current Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Sigma Xi Year-End Banquet. The 35th Annual Banquet of Sigma Xi (NIST Chapter) will be held at The Golden Bull on June 10th. ...

375

Dust Production by Impulsive ELM Heating During Plasma Discharges at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 141 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615325

Bray, B.D.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ContAddr 2600 Bull Street + IncentiveContDept South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control + IncentiveContDiv Ocean & Coastal Resource Management + Incentive...

377

Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permitting program. Policy Contact Department South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Division Ocean & Coastal Resource Management Address 2600 Bull...

378

Mode Content and Transmission Measurements on Components of the ECH Transmission Lines on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 162 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619001

Richenderfer, A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Alignment of RF Beams to the Waveguide Transmission Lines at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618280

Gorelov, Y.A.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to compute land subsidence, 11 Bull. Intl. Assn.geothermal production and subsidence history of the Wairakei5. Geertsma, J. , 1973, Land subsidence above compacting oil

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Penning Gauge Sensitivity and Spectra for Use in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 132 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615730

Sheffield, T.Y.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Upgraded Two-Color Heterodyne Interferometer System on DIII-D and Its Use as a Fluctuation Diagnostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 158 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611905

Van Zeeland, M.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An Isolated Divertor for Reactor Scale Tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 297 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618982

Leonard, A.W.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity fro Non-Axisymmetric Magnetic Fields Allows ELM-free, Quiescnt H-mode Operation in DIII-D Under Reactor-relevant Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 358 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618937

Burrell, K.H.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radiosonde measurements of turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Cranwell, Lincolnshire, W. H. Pick and G. A. Bull, 1926. 3 Talk structure * Geomagnetic sensors to measure orientation * Orientation variability as a turbulence measure *...

386

Shock-Clump Interaction Studies in the Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 27 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615315

Blue, B.E.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Plasma Response and Transport Associated with RMP ELM Suppression on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 186 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619025

Wade, M.R.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

Pedestal Plasma Control With Small 3D Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 293 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618952

Evans, T.E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

389

Plasma Response to Complex External Magnetic Perturbations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618210

Chu, M.S.

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Plasma Equilibrium Response to Slowly Rotating 3D Magnetic Perturbations in DIII0D RMP Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 295 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618979

Lao, L.L.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Linear Plasma Response Model Based on the Solution to a Perturbed Grad-Shafranov Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 350 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618640

Welander, A.S.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Experiments and ELM-Suppression in Double-Null DIII-D Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 295 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618981

Lazarus, E.A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock District, Southwestern Division Steps to Implementation * Lakeside facility modification at Norfork is complete. Bull Shoals lakeside facility modification is in progress....

394

Carbon Transport Studies in the Edge and Divertor of DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 106 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611890

Stangeby, P.C.

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

Carbon Source Studies in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 266 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611660

Elder, J.D.

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbon Sources, Scrape-Off layer Transport and Deposition in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 177 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613260

Groth, M.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility Design Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 105 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617140

Stambaugh, R.D.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selectivity 2. Design and develop bulls-eye energy harvesting structures Need for new sensing technologies to meet the requirements for zero emission energy sources Why do...

399

Temporal Variation in Fish Communities off Santa Cruz Island, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blacksmith, Chromis punctipinnis, a planktivorous reef fish.U.S. Fish Bull Brooks AJ, Schmitt RJ, Holbrook SJ.2002. Declines in regional fish populations: have species

Graves, Michelle R.; Larson, Ralph J.; Alevizon, William S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Investigation of Ion Cyclotron Emissions on DIII-D During Neutral Bem Injection and Fast Wave Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 160 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616640

Axley, A.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Beams, Brightness and Background - Using Active Spectroscopy Techniques for Precision Measurements in Fusion Plasma Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 58 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619019

Thomas, D.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Multifluid interpenetration mixing in directly driven inertial confinement fusion capsule implosionsa...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An alternative to a Paper BI2 4, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48, 21 2003 . b Invited speaker. Electronic mail: dcw

403

Effect of Test Blanket Module on Triton Burn-up in DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 348 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618670

Zhu, Y.B.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

Test of a Model for Limits to Pedestal Pressure Gradient in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 271 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616805

Groebner, R.J.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

Experimental Test of the Neoclassical Theory of Poloidal Rotation in Tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 179 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612355

Solomon, W.M.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) Error Field Experiments in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 185 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617095

Schaffer, M.J.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Test of a Pedestal Height Model in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 144 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615460

Groebner, R.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 23 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618510

Schaffer, M.J.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Physics of Edge Stochastic Magnetic Fields in Hot Tokamak Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 102 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612065

Evans, T.E.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Enhancing Physics Operations and Increasing Physics Productivity at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 145 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615500

Hyatt, A.W.

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Physics Issues at the Initial Phase of Robust RWM Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 162 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617000

Okabayashi, M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

New Physics Capabilities for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 75 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999611965

Boivin, R.L.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

Physics-Based Performance Projections for Fusion Development Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 222 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614120

Chan, V.S.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

Physics Modeling of ARIES-AT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 340 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619015

St John, H.E.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

Physics Issues for Extending the Pulse Length of High f_NI DIII-D Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 344 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618265

Ferron, J.R.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

420.ps - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 14, 2001... uses BCP, a state of the art Branch-Cut-Price framework designed ...... Lagrangian relaxation and cutting-planes, COAL Bull, 21 (1992),. pp.

417

Closed-Loop Simulation of Model-Based Current Profile Control with the DIII-D Plasma Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618145

Barton, J.E.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

The DIII-D Plasma Control System as a Scientific Research Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 111 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612935

Hyatt, A.W.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

New Plasma Discharge Development Tools for the DIII-D Plasma Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 299 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619032

Welander, A.S.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Diamond Windows on the 110 GHz Gyrotrons at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 161 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611700

Gorelov, I.A.

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Performance of Diamond Gyrotron Windows at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 268 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612095

Gorelov, I.A.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Effect of Hydrogen Minority on the Power Balance for Fast Wave Heating in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 340 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618999

Prater, R.

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

An Interpretation of 'Puff & Pump' Radiative Divertor Experiments in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 351 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617120

Stacey, W.M.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evaluation of a DNB for ITER-Based on Common Long-Pulse Positive Ion Source Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 219 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614645

Thomas, D.M.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Carbon Co-Deposition Studies in DIII-D L- and H-Mode Plasmas and Implications to the ITER Tritium Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 27 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612245

McLean, A.G.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Studies in DIII-D of High Beta Discharge Scenarios Appropriate for Steady-State Tokamak Operation with Burning Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 201 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615410

Ferron, J.R.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

428

REWAS 2008: Conference Organizers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subodh K. Das (Fifth International Symposium on Recycling of Engineered Materials) Director University of Kentucky Center for Aluminum Technology 1505 Bull ...

429

Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of ambient aerosol particles, EnvironmentalParticle Measurement of Ambient Aerosol Particles Containingfor quantifying direct aerosol forcing of climate, Bull. Am.

Moffet, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Improved Efficiency of the ECH Transmission Lines on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618190

Cengher, M.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Performance Measurements for the ECH Transmission Lines on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 341 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618940

Cengher, M.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Analysis of Pedestal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 270 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616690

Callen, J.D.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Transport Analysis of Bat-eared T_e Profile Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618135

Austin, M.E.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Impact of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on Turbulence Drive, Damping, and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 63 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618415

Moyer, R.A.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

Magnetic Transport Barriers in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 160 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616890

Kessler, J.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

TGLF Transport Modeling With PTRANSP/GCNMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 117 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617150

St John, H.E.

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Particle Transport Analysis Using Modulated Gas Puff Technique in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618655

Zeng, L.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Heat Transport in Off-Axis EC-Heated Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 59 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616630

Austin, M.E.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

Turbulent SOL Transport in Limited Versus Diverted L-mode Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 297 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619003

Rudakov, D.L.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

How Accurate is Analytic Theory of Neoclassical Ion Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618645

Wong, S.K.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effect of Self-consistent Poloidal Electric Field on Neoclassical Angular Momentum Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 267 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617205

Wong, S.K.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

442

Discoveries From the Exploration of Gyrokinetic Momentum Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 238 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618545

Staebler, G.M.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

Documentation and Search for Missing Near Edge L-Mode Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 343 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619027

Waltz, R.E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

Energetic Particle Transport by Microturbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 344 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617230

Zhang, W.L.

2009-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Development of an IMFIT Particle Transport Module and Modeling of Tokamak Particle Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 255 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615645

Pan, C.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fast Ion Transport during Sawteeth in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 160 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616980

Muscatello, C.M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Gyrokinetic Simulation Tests of Tracer and Quasilinear Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 253 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615815

Waltz, R.E.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

Transport of Energetic Ions Due to Interaction With Microturbulence in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 269 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617030

Pace, D.C.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

449

Particle Transport Modification Due to Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 56 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618988

Mordijck, S.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

450

Sensitivity of Transport and Stability to the Current Profile in Steady-State Scenario Plasmas in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 359 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619021

Turco, F.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

451

Predictions of the Confinement in DIII-D Hybrids Using the TGLF Transport Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 169 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616900

Kinsey, J.E.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

Laser Welding Micro-Holes in Beryllium Capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 107 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999611935

Alexander, N.B.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

Dependence of Laser Energy Coupling and Fast Electron Source Characteristics on the Buried Cone Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 146 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619014

Stephens, R.B.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Laser Heating of Solid Matter by Light Pressure-Driven Shocks as Ultra-Relativistic Intensities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 147 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614060

Akli, K.U.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

Robust Control of the Spatial Current Profile in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 299 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618930

Barton, J.E.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

456

Robust Control of Resistive Wall Mode in DIII-D Based on Eigenmode Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 165 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614140

Dalessio, J.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Backstepping Control of the Current Profile in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 300 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618933

Boyer, M.D.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Robust Control of the Toroidal Rotation and Safety Factor Profiles in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 300 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619007

Shi, W.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

Particle Control and Carbon Transport Experiments on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 57 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616625

Allen, S.L.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

Density Control Using the New Divertor Pumping Configuration in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 61 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613085

Petrie, T.W.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Control of Current Profile Evolution During the Ramp-Up Phase at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 144 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615635

Ou, Y.

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

462

Not-So-Precious: Stripping Gold From AFM Probes Allows ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... AB Churnside, RMA Sullan, DM Nguyen, SO Case, MS Bull, GM King and TT Perkins. Routine and timely sub-piconewton ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

463

Improved Error Field Correction in High Performance Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 299 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618970

In, Y.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Evaluate the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur Subbasin, Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has the following chapters: (1) Synopsis of 2000-2008 Stream Temperature Monitoring with Implications for Bull Trout Recovery in the Upper Malheur Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Property, 2008; (2) Bull Trout Spawning Survey Report, 2008; (3) 2008 Efforts to Trap and Haul Entrained Bull Trout Salvelinus confluentus over Agency Valley Dam on the North Fork Malheur River, Oregon; (4) Distribution and Abundance of Redband Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Malheur River Basin, 2008; and (5) Spatial Patterns of Hybridization between Bull Trout, Salvelinus confluentus, and Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis in an Oregon Stream Network.

Abel, Chad; Brown, Daniel; Schwabe, Lawrence [Burns Paiute Tribe Natural Resources Department Fisheries Division

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Reproductive Potential of the Protogynous Teleost, California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) at Nine Populations across Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fishes on a southern California artificial reef. Bull MarFIGURES FIGURE Page 1. California sheephead collection sites2. Size frequency of California sheephead at nine southern

Loke, Kerri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 A 2 A P R I L 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY In January, OE's energy infrastructure monitoring capability was offically given the name Environment for Analysis of Geo-Located Energy Information (EAGLE-I). Through EAGLE-I, OE's Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) division has developed the capability to monitor the Nation's energy infrastructure in near real-time and to geospatially map energy assets and systems, tying together a variety of data sources into one visualization platform. EAGLE-I provides ISER staff with automated alert notifications when abnormal conditions are detected. Through e-mail, text

467

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

468

The design and evaluation of a mobile sensor/actuator network for autonomous animal control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates a mobile, wireless sensor/actuator network application for use in the cattle breeding industry. Our goal is to prevent fighting between bulls in on-farm breeding paddocks by autonomously applying appropriate stimuli when one bull ... Keywords: application, autonomous animal control, sensor/actuator networks

Tim Wark; Chris Crossman; Wen Hu; Ying Guo; Philip Valencia; Pavan Sikka; Peter Corke; Caroline Lee; John Henshall; Kishore Prayaga; Julian O'Grady; Matt Reed; Andrew Fisher

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Passage of a Weak Thunderstorn Downburst over an Instrumented Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 5 November 1977 a weak downburst associated with a multicell storm passed over an instrumented tower at Bald Hills, a suburb of Brisbane, Australia. Associated with the thunderstorm was a dome of cold air estimated to be 1200 to 1800 m deep. ...

Douglas J. Sherman

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

RECOVERY OF THORIUM FROM A WYOMING ORE  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of Bald Mountain, Wyo. ore was conducted in which it was found that the monazite concentrate prepared from this conglomerate can be decomposed by the conventional sulfuric acid-cure treatment. The resultant acid leach liquor can be processed by primary amine solvent extraction to yield a 99% ThO/sub 2/ product. (J.R.D.)

Borrowman, S.R.; Rosenbaum, J.B.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Wildlife-Salmonid Relationships Table F1. Wildlife species in the Yakima subbasin, Washington that eat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare Incubation - eggs and alevin Rare Carcasses Green-winged Teal Anas crecca Rare Incubation - eggs Indirect Incubation - eggs and alevin Red-tailed Hawk Buteo jamaicensis Rare Carcasses Golden Eagle Aquila

472

Birds' Nests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are pressed into place and reinforced with blades of dead grass. With the exception of eagles and certain hawks it is one of the few birds that uses the same nest more than one...

473

TMS Foundation Focus, 4 (1): Torrey Pines Golf Course Hosts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... participants were given the experience of playing the course in much the same condition that saw Tiger Woods seal his victory with an eagle on the 18th hole.

474

Bird Beaks and Feet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a bird gives a good clue to its feeding habits. Carnivorous birds like hawks, owls and eagles have strong hooked beaks for tearing flesh. Herons, egrets and kingfishers, with their...

475

Eyes of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"simple" eyes for close vision. Birds have the keenest eyes and those of the hawks, eagles and vultures can see small objects at incredible distances. By their eyes ye shall...

476

Schedule of Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2 to 6 p.m.. Registration. Cliff Lodge, Ballroom Lobby. 6 to 7 p.m.. Welcome Reception. Cliff Lodge, Golden Cliff/Eagle's Nest. Monday, August 15. 7 a.m. to 5 p.m..

477

Large Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"ear" tufts. The nest is usually a remodeled hawk or owl's nest, but they even drive eagles from their eyries and take over. The food is extremely varied; mostly mice, rabbits...

478

Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams County, North Dakota...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

collaborated with Eagle Operating, Inc. to complete the test in the Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams County, North Dakota. The "huff-and-puff" EOR method consists of three...

479

Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation, 2011-2040 (million barrels per day) Permian Basin Bakken Eagle Ford

480

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Oil production thousand barrelsday Eagle Ford 0 50 100 Oct 1,069 Mbbld Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Nov 1,093...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bald eagle bull" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Isotopes of helium, hydrogen, and carbon as groundwater tracers in aquifers along the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey Data Series. Google.com Maps, 2009 Ground Water Atlasand Yuma highlighted. (Google.com) NEEDLES Eagle Peak 2 kmto furthest from river. (Google.com) BLYTHE 5km Figure 6:

Haber, Samuel Ainsworth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

NCNR BT5-USANS Instrument Schedule D. Mildner Tel: (301) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dow Chem) Jun 14 6 L Anovitz(Tenn)+ D 17989 multiscale porosity in 6CB Mildner Cole(OSU)+ G U29-15 the Eagle Ford gas shale Rother(ORNL ...

483

NCNR NG3-SANS Instrument Schedule B. Hammouda Tel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Star Polymers Jun 14 3 L Anovitz (Oak 17954 Multiscale Porosity in 9P Mildner Ridge)+D Cole+ A S29-49 the Eagle Ford Gas Shale Swift (Ohio ...

484

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

CrosswindEaglePelican Applications: Street sweeper, Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Propane Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ford Motor Co. - 2.5L Propane...

485

Flycatchers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a crow, a hawk, or even an eagle. We saw one, with its nest in an apple tree, attack a dog and, another time, the hat of a man passing underneath. The Eastern Phoebe has almost...

486

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DT0003144 NETL SOD FE Eagle Design SOD 2012 210 days David A. Schmidt NETL: South Park Twp, PA B94 Hazardous Gas Alarms Providing gas alarm monitoring sensing systems into Labs...

487

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 CX-007677: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct WaferCell Solar Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 01242012 Location(s): Massachusetts...

488

Large-scale semidefinite programs in electronic structure calculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), and eagle (4 × 375MHz. Power3-II with level two cache of size 8MB, and 2GB of memory per ...

489

CX-010444: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Technology Integration Program - Field Trial Site Two - Eagle Ford Shale, DeWitt County, Texas CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 06192013 Location(s):...

490

CX-010194: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Integration Program Phase II Field Trial: Site One - Eagle Ford Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 04152013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy...

491

CX-000012: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-000012: Categorical Exclusion Determination Eagle Junction Clearwire Wireless Communication Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.15, B1.19 Date: 12022009...

492

career services Gordon Hall, 74 Union Street 613 533 2992 careers.queensu.ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.aecon.com Agnico-Eagle Mines www.agnico-eagle.com Alberici www.alberici.com/ Aversan Inc. www.aversan.com BRP www.prairiefyre.com Proctor & Gamble http://www.pg.com/en_CA/index.shtml Sherritt Coal www.sherritt.com Schlumberger.spartancontrols.com Statoil Canada Ltd. www.statoil.com StonCor Group www.stoncor.ca Teck Coal Ltd. www.teck.com Trane www

Graham, Nick

493

Attribution Bias, Market Condition, and Trading Behavior of Individual Investors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory predicts that attribution bias creates overconfident traders and thus causes excessive trading in the market. This paper tests this prediction by comparing the trading behavior of individual investors in different market conditions. In a bull market, investors suffer more from attribution bias and therefore should be more overconfident and trade more excessively. Using the trading records of Chinese individual investors from January 2005 to November 2008, we find that individual investors trade more excessively in a bull market than in a bear market, where excessive trading is measured following Odean (1999) and Barber and Odean (2001). Specifically, we find that in the bull market the securities bought by individual investors significantly underperform those sold in the subsequent periods of one and three months. In the bear market, however, individual investors do not make the similar suboptimal trading decisions as they do in the bull market. In addition, the poor trading decisions made in the bull market are due to poor security selection, and not due to poor market timing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individual investors turn their portfolios more frequently and their performance measured by market abnormal returns is significantly worse in the bull market than in the bear market. Overall, these results provide strong evidence that attribution bias creates overconfident traders and thus causes excessive trading in the market. Key words: Attribution bias, individual trading behavior, bull market, and bear market.

Zhen Shi A; Na Wang B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bovine Vision Bovine Vision Name: Peggy Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: Spring 2010 Question: How is a cows vision, I mean do they see in black and white or color? Replies: Peggy A common misconception about cattle (particularly bulls) is that they are enraged by the color red (something provocative is often said to be "like a red flag to a bull"). This is incorrect, as cattle are red-green color-blind.[31][32] The myth arose from the use of red capes in the sport of bullfighting; in fact, two different capes are used. Please refer to the following URL for the rest of the story. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle It is not the color of the cape that angers the bull, but rather the movement of the fabric that irritates the bull and incites it to charge.

495

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division CURRENT STATUS * * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork Norfork (May (May 2009) 2009) 2009) 2009) * * TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed * * TMDL for Lake TMDL for Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo was approved by the EPA was approved by the EPA TMDL for Lake TMDL for Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo was approved by the EPA was approved by the EPA for low dissolved oxygen on 30 December 2010 for low dissolved oxygen on 30 December 2010 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division DISTRICT POSITION * * Full Full understanding of understanding of the sources the sources

496

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2010 (final).pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division CURRENT ISSUES * * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork Norfork (May 2009) (May 2009) * * TMDL's for Dardanelle and Lake TMDL's for Dardanelle and Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo are still being developed are still being developed Little Rock District, Southwestern Division DISTRICT POSITION * * Full Full understanding of understanding of the sources the sources contributing to the low DO have not contributing to the low DO have not contributing to the low DO have not contributing to the low DO have not been identified. been identified. * * Options identified are costly

497

Mercury, Cadmium and Lead Biogeochemistry in the Soil–Plant–Insect System in Huludao City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YE, Ketris MP (2005a) Mercury in coal: a review part 1of total and methyl mercury by arthropods. Bull Environ259 DOI 10.1007/s00128-009-9688-6 Mercury, Cadmium and Lead

Zhang, Zhong-Sheng; Lu, Xian-Guo; Wang, Qi-Chao; Zheng, Dong-Mei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Standard Reference Materials: SRM 1453, Expanded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The distribution of thicknesses is random as shown by the tight cluster (“bull's-eye”) of data points in the center of the lag ... Ambient gas Cold plate 2 ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

499

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Antone (Tony) L. Brooks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A.L. and Couch, L.A. 2002 Workshop: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Brooks, A.L., Bull, R.J., and...

500

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z