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Sample records for bahamas bahrain bangladesh

  1. Society to 2050 AD: Anthropological Forecasts Extrapolating Correlates of Modernization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium BelizeBahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium BelizeBahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize

  2. Sandia Energy - SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana...

  3. The Right to Life with Dignity: Economic and Social Rights Respect in the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolp, Felicity Ann

    2010-01-01

    Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium BelizeRep. Albania Georgia Belgium Barbados Serbia and MontenegroIsrael Belgium Denmark Barbados Bulgaria France Hungary

  4. Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and...

  5. Bahamas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ), created in order to serve as the primary governing body for electronic communications in the Bahamas. The URCA is to assume responsibility for the electricity...

  6. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    226 Map of Bangladesh highlighting areasmodel for Bangladesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4Resistivity of synthetic Bangladesh water . . . . . . . .

  7. Intern experience at Electricity Directorate of Bahrain: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljamea, Najeeb Ahmad

    2013-03-13

    at Electricity Directorate of Bahrain. (May 1985) Najeeb Ahmad Aljarnea, B.S., Texas A&M University, M.E. Texas A&'M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. K. Ayoub Dr. B. D. Russell This report describes the author's experience... with the Electricity Directorate of Bahrain from September 19X3 to December 198U During this internship period, the author worked as a Senior Engineer in the System Operations and Planning Department. The intent of this report is to demonstrate that this experience...

  8. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  9. Food grain policy in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausser, Gordon C.

    1981-01-01

    ~o. FOOD GAAIN POLICY IN BANGLADESH by Gordon C. Rausser ;.period of time before Bangladesh becomes self-sufficient. Infor Food Grains in Bangladesh, Unpublished Ph.D. thesis,

  10. Succulent and spiny : the Bahamas' quest for a sustainable lobster fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rood, Jennifer E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    The Caribbean spiny lobster fishery is one of the most important industries in the economy of the Bahamas, and in turn it is one of the largest lobster industries in the world. The natural geography of the Bahamas makes ...

  11. Flood Exposure and Child Health in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttenheim, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Growth and Malnutrition: Bangladesh. Retrieved June 2005,young children in rural Bangladesh. Demography, 19(4), 447-Change in India and Bangladesh. Population and Development

  12. Municipal Wastewater Characteristics of Sylhet City, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Raquibul; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Chowdhury, Md. Aktarul Islam; Nath, Suman Kanti

    2006-01-01

    Banglapedia (2006), National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh.Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. Davis, M.L. , & Cornwell,the People’s Republic of Bangladesh. Metcalf & Eddy. (1995).

  13. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Bahamas (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to the Commonwealth of the Bahamas - a country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays, and islets - of which only 30 are actually inhabited. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  14. Arsenic in Bangladesh Decision analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Arsenic in Bangladesh Decision analysis Regression models Take-home points Arsenic and old models 2007 Andrew Gelman Arsenic and old models #12;Arsenic in Bangladesh Decision analysis Regression models Take-home points Contents Aresenic in Bangladesh Decision analysis Regression models Andrew Gelman

  15. People, Policy, and Perpetuity: Sustainability Indicators of Bangladesh Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed; Kabir, M. A.; Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    Future wood requirement and bamboo usage in Bangladesh.In Proceedings of the second Bangladesh National Conferenceon Forestry, Dhaka, Bangladesh. FAO. (1981). Forest

  16. Screening of wheat genotypes for boron efficiency in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, S; Jahiruddin, M; Islam, M A; Islam, M R; Brown, P H; Gustafson, J P

    2009-01-01

    of wheat cultivars. Bangladesh Journal Agricultural Scienceimportant cereal crop in Bangladesh. Its yield is very low,of boron deficiency in Bangladesh soils. Boron deficiency

  17. Arsenic Mitigation in Bangladesh: A Houseold Labor Market Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Richard T; Koundouri, Phoebe; Nauges, Céline

    2009-01-01

    Rural Households in Bangladesh. ” Journal of EnvironmentalDepartment of Public Health Engineering of Bangladesh. 2001.of Groundwater in Bangladesh. Kinniburgh, D. , and P.

  18. Dynamic bargaining in households (with application to Bangladesh)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ligon, Ethan

    2002-01-01

    rural credit programs in Bangladesh. World Development 24 (the Grameen bank in Econ­ Bangladesh. Technical Report 65,household allocation in Bangladesh. The model resolves a

  19. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    State of A?airs in Bangladesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Methods and Results from Bangladesh TripResults from Bangladesh Trip

  20. Appetite for Nicotine: An Economic Analysis of Tobacco Control in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Rahman, Atiur; Rahman, Taifur

    2003-01-01

    Prevalence of smoking. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics,expenditure survey 1995–96. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics,Statistical yearbook of Bangladesh 1996. Bangladesh Bureau

  1. Policy Implications and Implementation of Environmental ICTPs in Developing States: Examples from Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Mahbubul; Rashid, A.Z.M. Manzoor; Furukawa, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Technology, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh. Yasushi Furukawa is anReferences BBS ( 1999). Statistical year book of Bangladesh.Dhaka, Bangladesh: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics. BBS (

  2. Flood Exposure and Child Health in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttenheim, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Roy, D. K. (2001). The 1998 Floods in Bangladesh: Disasterterm impact of the 1998 flood on nutrition in Bangladesh.F. , & Kovats, S. (2004). Floods, health and climate change:

  3. BAHAMAS: new SNIa analysis reveals inconsistencies with standard cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shariff, H; Trotta, R; van Dyk, D A

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained by applying our BAyesian HierArchical Modeling for the Analysis of Supernova cosmology (BAHAMAS) software package to the 740 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae type Ia (SNIa) from the "Joint Light-curve Analysis" (JLA) dataset. We simultaneously determine cosmological parameters and standardization parameters, including host galaxy mass corrections, residual scatter and object-by-object intrinsic magnitudes. Combining JLA and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, we find significant discrepancies in cosmological parameter constraints with respect to the standard analysis: we find Omega_M = 0.399+/-0.027, 2.8\\sigma\\ higher than previously reported and w = -0.910+/-0.045, 1.6\\sigma\\ higher than the standard analysis. We determine the residual scatter to be sigma_res = 0.104+/-0.005. We confirm (at the 95% probability level) the existence of two sub-populations segregated by host galaxy mass, separated at log_{10}(M/M_solar) = 10, differing in mean intrinsic magnitude by 0.055+...

  4. iSTEP Bangladesh 2010 Sarah Belousov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iSTEP Bangladesh 2010 Sarah Belousov Yonina Cooper M. Bernardine Dias M. Freddie Dias Jen Horwitz) in Chittagong, Bangladesh to research two projects. The first project explored educational technol- ogy tools project investigated needs of the visually impaired population in Bangladesh and corresponding

  5. Assessment of lead contamination in Bahrain environment. I. Analysis of household paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madany, I.M.; Ali, S.M.; Akhter, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of lead in household paint collected from various old buildings in Bahrain is reported. The atomic absorption spectrophotometric method, both flame and flameless (graphite furnace) techniques, were used for the analysis. The concentrations of lead in paint were found in the range 200 to 5700 mg/kg, which are low compared to the limit of 0.5% in UK and 0.06% in USA. Nevertheless, these are hazardous. Recommendations are reported in order to avoid paint containing lead. 17 references, 1 table.

  6. Child Health in a Post-Flood Period in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttenheim, Alison M

    2007-01-01

    young children in rural Bangladesh. Demography, 19(4), 447-young children in rural Bangladesh. Genus, 47(1-2), 193-204.nutritional status in rural Bangladesh. American Journal of

  7. GeoArabia, 2013, v. 18, no. 2, p. 141-176 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    as representing the deeply weathered top of a salt diapir, whose emplacement had a strong tectonic fault141 GeoArabia, 2013, v. 18, no. 2, p. 141-176 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain Salt intrusions in Jabal, is attributed to deep weathering and dissolution similar to that seen at the surface-piercing salt domes

  8. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An...

  9. Bangladesh-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bangladesh-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development...

  10. Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh:...

  11. Flood Exposure and Child Health in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttenheim, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    region and national anthropometry surveys in Bangladesh fromor both survey rounds. The anthropometry module recorded thewere marked absent during anthropometry in round 1. In the

  12. Whose land is it anyway? : an analysis of the management and distribution of Crown Land in the Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Nakeischea Loi

    2007-01-01

    Like many islands throughout the Caribbean, The Bahamas are now experiencing rapid growth and development in the form of large-scale luxury resorts and second homes. Consistent with a long history going back to the colonial ...

  13. Can Ecotourism Help Achieve Sustainable Development? A SWOT Analysis of the Marine Ecotourism Sector on Andros Island, Bahamas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baller, Joshua

    2014-11-27

    sustainable development in small island states. This will be carried out through an analysis of the marine ecotourism sector on Andros Island, The Bahamas, using SWOT Analysis to determine whether or not ecotourism is viable as a sustainable development option...

  14. Cross-Cultural Comparison of Marriage Relationship between Muslim and Santal Communities in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uddin, Md. Emaj

    2009-01-01

    Muslim and Santal Communities in Rural Bangladesh Md. EmajMuslim and Santal communities in rural Bangladesh. For thisselected between the communities in rural Bangladesh. This

  15. ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh--Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan E.A.

    2010-01-01

    of groundwater in Bangladesh." WC/00/19, British Geologicalplain aquifers in Bangladesh." Bulletin of Environmentalarsenic contamination in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India."

  16. Cross-Cultural Age Ascription between Muslim and Santal Communities in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uddin, Emaj Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    in rural ecological system of Bangladesh. 6. REFERENCESSociety and Culture in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Book House. Alam,Z. M. Family Values. Dhaka: Bangladesh Cooperative Society

  17. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    Ganges-Brahmaputra Region: Bangladesh Perspective. ” NaturalBrahmaputra-Barak Basins, Bangladesh Unnayan Parishad,Development Studies; Dhaka: Bangladesh Unnayan Parishad.

  18. The Implications of Family Systems and Economic Context for Intergenerational Transfers in Indonesia and Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Kuhn, Randall

    2004-01-01

    and Women’s Work in Bangladesh. ” Population and DevelopmentPublication No. 35. Dhaka, Bangladesh: Pioneer. Feeney,of the Elderly in Rural Bangladesh. ” Population Studies 53:

  19. Training Traditional Birth Attendants in Bangladesh: A New Model for Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowen, Tami S

    2007-01-01

    emergency obstetric care in Bangladesh. Qual Saf Health Care79. Development. USAF I. Bangladesh Population and Health.Pro?le on Reproductive Health in Bangladesh: World Health

  20. An Exploratory Analysis of Transportation Household Expenditures in the Greater Sylhet Area in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Pamela; Sikder, Saiyid Hassan; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    2008-01-01

    10. The World Factbook – Bangladesh. Central IntelligenceNations Population Fund, Bangladesh. http://www.unfpa-Economic Growth - Growth in Bangladesh. The World Bank.

  1. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2010-01-01

    of Jessore District, Bangladesh. ” Current Science. Vol 74,optimum solution to the Bangladesh arsenic crisis. ” Socialin drinking water in Bangladesh. ” American Journal of

  2. Achieving gender equality in learning outcomes: Evidence from a non-formal education program in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gee, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    University. Cambridge, MA. Bangladesh Bureau of Educationalquality education in rural Bangladesh: Unpublished Report.R. K. (2003). Equity gains in Bangladesh primary education.

  3. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Safe Drinking Water in Bangladesh. ” World Bank Water andof Jessore District, Bangladesh. ” Current Science. Vol 74,optimum solution to the Bangladesh arsenic crisis." Social

  4. Cross-Cultural Comparison of Marriage Relationship between Muslim and Santal Communities in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uddin, Md. Emaj

    2009-01-01

    Bulletin. World Bank Bangladesh: A Proposal for RuralVillage Women of Bangladesh: Prospects of Change. New York:Society and Culture in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Book House. Alam.

  5. NCCPB-2005 Independent University, Bangladesh 264 BENGALI HANDWRITTEN CHARACTER RECOGNITION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Paul

    NCCPB-2005 © Independent University, Bangladesh 264 BENGALI HANDWRITTEN CHARACTER RECOGNITION USING. Hashem** Southtech Limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh *Grassroots IT Ltd, Dhaka, Bangladesh **Department of Computer Science and Engineering Khulna University of Engineering & Technology, Khulna, Bangladesh Abstract

  6. Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhi, Hassan; Sharples, Stephen

    2013-01-15

    On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

  7. Multi-factor impact analysis of agricultural production in Bangladesh with climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-factor impact analysis of agricultural production in Bangladesh with climate change Alex C, Washington, DC, United States d Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS), Dhaka, Bangladesh e Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council (BARC), Dhaka, Bangladesh f Institute of Water Modelling (IWM), Dhaka, Bangladesh

  8. A Forgotten Dimension: The Significance of Power Dynamics in Assessing Female Employment and Empowerment in Urban Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Carolyn; Luna, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Gender and Class in Bangladesh. ” Culture & Agriculture 13,Purdah Trap in Rural Bangladesh: Implications for Women’sand Change in Rural Bangladesh. ” Population Studies 52, no.

  9. Cross-Cultural Comparison of Family Size and Composition between Muslim and Santal Communities in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uddin, Md. Emaj

    2008-01-01

    and P. C. Sarker Beliefs and Fertility in Bangladesh. Dacca:Disease research, Bangladesh. Udry, J. Richard, and R. L.Fertility Patterns in Bangladesh. Rajshahi: Popular Press.

  10. Nutrient and Residue Management for Improving Productivity and N Use Efficiency of Rice-Wheat-Mungbean Systems in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Md. Ilias

    2009-01-01

    proper management in Bangladesh. Further on farm adaptivewarranted. References BARC (Bangladesh Agricultural ResearchPakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh (Timsina and Connor 2001).

  11. What Can Open Access Do for Me? Personal Perspectives of KU Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Greenberg, Marc L.; Torrance, Andrew W.; Goddard, Stephen

    2010-10-21

    , Belgium, Belarus, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bahrain, Austria, Australia, Aruba, Argentina, Algeria, Albania … town@ku.edu ..., Belgium, Belarus, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bahrain, Austria, Australia, Aruba, Argentina, Algeria, Albania … town@ku.edu ...

  12. Arsenic incorporation into authigenic pyrite, Bengal Basin sediment, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arsenic incorporation into authigenic pyrite, Bengal Basin sediment, Bangladesh Heather A. Lowers a, CA, USA c U.S. Geological Survey, MS 980, Denver, CO, USA d Geological Survey of Bangladesh, Segenbagicha, Dhaka, Bangladesh Received 11 October 2006; accepted in revised form 22 March 2007; available

  13. 2006 International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    © 2006 International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh J HEALTH POPUL NUTR 2006, including Inner Mongolia, Thailand, Cambodia, and Bangladesh (2-4). In all these regions, the main source suggests the presence of arsenic in ground- water in India and Bangladesh throughout the region defined

  14. Empowering Women: The Role of Economic Development, Political Culture and Institutional Design in the World’s Societies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Amy C.

    2007-01-01

    Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bolivia, Botswana, Bulgaria,75 th Argentina, Bahamas Barbados, Belize Bolivia, BrazilUnited States Argentina, Barbados, Bolivia, Botswana,

  15. Sedimentary iron cycling and the origin and preservation of magnetization in platform carbonate muds, Andros Island, Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    carbonates provide, in their stratigraphy and sedimentology, a local record of changing environmental of Pleistocene aeolianites in the Triple Goose Creek region of northwest Andros Island, Bahamas. Sedimentological directions and magnetofossil stratigraphies. © 2007 Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: sedimentary

  16. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from

  17. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Coal Products (t) Exports Imports Angola Argentina Australia II Austria Bahrain Bangladesh Belgium Brazil Bulgaria Burma (Myanmar) Belarus Canada

  18. Geo-Information Systems for the Middle EastGeoArabia, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2000 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    295 Geo-Information Systems for the Middle EastGeoArabia, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2000 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain Design and Development of Information Systems for the Geosciences: An Application to the Middle are developing a comprehensive Solid Earth Information System (SEIS). The complex nature of the solid earth

  19. Investigation of Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls on Arsenic Mobilization Using Distributed Sensing at a Field Site in Munshiganj, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    a field site in Munshiganj, Bangladesh Nithya Ramanathan 2 ,groundwater extraction in bangladesh. Science, (298):1602–

  20. Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) Diversity in Bangladesh: Land Use and Artificial Selection1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagenius, Stuart

    Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) Diversity in Bangladesh: Land Use and Artificial, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh 3 Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe, IL, USA 4 Northwestern University, Plant Biology and Conservation, Evanston, IL, USA 5 Gono University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh

  1. Asset-based poverty analysis in rural Bangladesh: A comparison of principal component analysis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mound, Jon

    1 Asset-based poverty analysis in rural Bangladesh: A comparison of principal component analysis Bangladesh: A comparison of principal component analysis and fuzzy set theory © Sonia Ferdous Hoque, 2014-based poverty analysis in Bangladesh ........................................... 17 Discussion

  2. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh Ben Crow andIndia, tensions over water with Pakistan and Bangladesh mayso that both India and Pakistan could use the water, within

  3. Corporate governance reform in a developing country : the case of Bangladesh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobhan, Md. Abdus

    2014-07-02

    Bangladesh reformed its corporate governance by adopting Bangladesh Corporate Governance Guidelines-2006 (the BCGG-2006 hereafter) due to pressures from international financial institutions (IFIs). However, there is huge ...

  4. Deposition of carbonate mud beds within high-energy subtidal sand Dunes, Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, R.F.; Steinen, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Laminated, carbonate mud beds are being deposited in the interisland channels of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. They are associated with stromatolites and interbedded with ooid sands that form large migrating subtidal dunes on flood tidal deltas and bars. Currents up to 3 knots sweep in and out of the 4-8 m deep channels 3 hours out of every 6 hours, creating a high-energy bank margin environment not usually considered to be the site of mud-sized particle deposition. Mud deposits reach thicknesses of 1 m and have individual beds 2-5 cm thick. When exposed to flowing seawater, bed surfaces become encrusted with carbonate cement and algal mats. The white interior of mud beds between the crusts appears homogeneous, is soft, and has the consistency of ''tooth paste.'' Loose uncemented ooid sand is found above and below the mud beds, showing that both are occupying the same depositional environment. Rip-up clasts of the crusted mud beds, formed by scour of underlying sands, are carried throughout the channels and accumulate as a lag deposit within the troughs of migrating dunes. Some clasts are colonized by algal mats that trap ooid and skeletal sands forming stromatolite structures that can grow up to 2 m high.

  5. Cyclone shelters and cyclone resilient design in coastal areas of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Zheng, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of those countries that are most vulnerable to tropical cyclones. In recent decades, cyclone mitigations by the Government of Bangladesh and international organizations have greatly increased the coastal ...

  6. BAND AID, le film Les inondations les plus catastrophiques au Bangladesh sont lies une conjonction de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BAND AID, le film Les inondations les plus catastrophiques au Bangladesh sont liées à une- Bramapoutre-Meghna au Bangladesh et à l'adaptation des populations au changement climatique. Ce projet

  7. Achieving gender equality in learning outcomes: Evidence from a non-formal education program in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gee, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    controlled trial in education. Evaluation and Programproduction function Education, income, and human capital (children with quality education in rural Bangladesh:

  8. Mineralogical and chemical variability of fluvial sediments 1. Bedload sand (GangaBrahmaputra, Bangladesh)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najman, Yani

    ­Brahmaputra, Bangladesh) Eduardo Garzanti a, , Sergio Andò a,1 , Christian France-Lanord b,2 , Giovanni Vezzoli a,1

  9. Cases of Research and Education Network (REN) Initiatives: BDREN and A New Era in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Cases of Research and Education Network (REN) Initiatives: BDREN and A New Era in Bangladesh Higher Education Cases of Research and Education Network (REN) Initiatives: BDREN and A New Era in Bangladesh Conf. on Computer and Information Technology, ICCIT 2008 Khulna, Bangladesh, December 27th, 2008 REN

  10. The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh, we examine the interannual variability of the monsoon rains of Bangladesh, an area greatly affected of Bengal storm surge. For the twentieth century, we found Bangladesh monsoon rainfall (BMR

  11. DESIGN OF A RURAL WATER PROVISION SYSTEM TO DECREASE ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BANGLADESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    DESIGN OF A RURAL WATER PROVISION SYSTEM TO DECREASE ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BANGLADESH Johanna Louise in South Asia. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of Bangladesh, ARUBA reduced groundwater arsenic concentrations as high as 680 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Key results from three trips

  12. TITLE: Shifting Agrarian Landscapes: Climate Change and Adaptation in Bangladesh HOSTS: Jason Cons and Shelley Feldman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    TITLE: Shifting Agrarian Landscapes: Climate Change and Adaptation in Bangladesh HOSTS: Jason Cons fragile lowland areas of the Ganges Delta, in which the vast majority of Bangladesh is situated. For rural and water resources are rapidly reorganizing village-life and changing Bangladesh's agrarian landscapes. Far

  13. A 110-Day Ensemble Forecasting Scheme for the Major River Basins of Bangladesh: Forecasting Severe Floods of 200307*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    A 1­10-Day Ensemble Forecasting Scheme for the Major River Basins of Bangladesh: Forecasting Severe of the Brahmaputra and Ganges Rivers as they flow into Bangladesh; it has been operational since 2003. The Bangladesh points of the Ganges and Brahmaputra into Bangladesh. Forecasts with 1­10-day horizons are presented

  14. Applicability of Telemedicine in Bangladesh: Current Status and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nessa, Ahasanun; Ullah, Sana; Kwak, Kyung Sup

    2009-01-01

    Telemedicine refers to the use of information and communication technology to provide and support health care mainly for the purpose of providing consultation. It is also a way to provide medical procedures or examinations to remote locations. It has the potential to improve both the quality and the access to health care services delivery while lowering costs even in the scarcity of resources. Understanding the potentiality of telemedicine, many developing countries are implementing telemedicine to provide health care facility to remote area where health care facilities are deficient. Bangladesh is not an exception to this either. In this paper we mention the reasons why Bangladesh has to move for telemedicine. We also present the past and on-going telemedicine activities and projects in Bangladesh. Analyzing these projects we have found out some factors which should be assessed carefully for successful implementation of telemedicine application. Finally we propose a prototype telemedicine network for Banglad...

  15. Temporal and spatial variability of ooid sand shoals: Comparison of Mississippian of Kentucky and Quaternary of Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA))

    1989-08-01

    An examination of the lithology and topography of Andros Island, Bahamas, reveals it is a Pleistocene ooid sand shoal. A comparison with Joulters Cays (a modern ooid sand shoal directly to the north) shows that much of the original depositional topography is preserved through at least one cycle of sea level highstand and lowstand. Both the Pleistocene and the Holocene ooid sand bodies are a few kilometers to tens of kilometers wide. The total vertical relief of a single episode of Quaternary ooid sand deposition is more than 10 m and includes accumulation in tidal channels, shallow flat areas, and eolian dunes. Today, much of Andros Island is within 2 m of present sea level and is the site of a belt several kilometers wide consisting of muddy tidal flat sediments overlying an exposure surface. The site of ooid sand deposition and shoal complex formation is not continuous along shorelines, especially windward margins, but shifts abruptly along the margins of platforms as a result of minor fluctuations of sea level. Thus, it should be expected that ooid sand shoals (ancient and modern) should be in direct lateral and vertical contact with lagoons, tidal flats, and reefs. The Mississippian Slade Formation contains many of the features of Quaternary ooid sand accumulation: abrupt vertical and lateral gradations between oolitic grainstones, packstones, and lime mudstones, vertical relief of individual oolitic sedimentary packages up to 30 m (perhaps with eolian dunes) and numerous exposure surfaces of varying intensities. These characteristics suggest that this formation represents a time of rapid fluctuations of relative sea level and abrupt shifts in the sites of ooid sand shoal complexes.

  16. Estimating the Size of Populations at High Risk of HIV in Bangladesh Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Estimating the Size of Populations at High Risk of HIV in Bangladesh Using a Bayesian Hierarchical the numbers of injecting drug users and female sex workers in Bangladesh. Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Methods of Intravenous Drug Users in Bangladesh in 2004 7 3.1 Results from the multiplier method

  17. PROFILE OF BENGALI CINE ICON -SUCHANDA APT # C7, Eastern Garden, 2/A Eskaton Garden, Ramna, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    , Ramna, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh. Mobile: 880-1711522166, Phone: 880-2-9362256 Kohinoor Akhter Suchanda in Bangladesh. A house hold name Suchanda for millions of Bangladeshi at Home and around the world had her part of the historic War of Liberation in 1971 giving birth to Bangladesh in the world atlas. Suchanda

  18. Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development in Bangladesh (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Sandor, D.; Butheau, M.

    2013-11-01

    Bangladesh is widely considered to be one of the nations most threatened by climate change. With two-thirds of the country less than 20 feet above sea level, the intrusion of salt into freshwater wells, frequent flooding, and the displacement of people from their homes is an ongoing threat. At the same time, the country's cities are rapidly growing, and the demand for energy is increasing at a corresponding rate.

  19. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency Allan H. Smith,1 Elena O. Lingas,2 & Mahfuzar Rahman3 The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh contamination. Studies in other countries where the population has had long-term exposure to arsenic

  20. Country Location AFGHANISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /31 $124 BAHRAIN SOUTHWEST ASIA ADMIN SPT UNIT 01/01 12/31 $124 BANGLADESH CHITTAGONG 01/01 12/31 $71 BANGLADESH DHAKA 01/01 12/31 $90 BANGLADESH SYLHET 01/01 12/31 $69 BANGLADESH [OTHER] 01/01 12/31 $71

  1. Regulations, Policies and Strategies for LLRW Management in Bangladesh - 12368

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2012-07-01

    Low level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated from various nuclear applications in Bangladesh. The major sources of radioactive waste in the country are at present: (a) the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor; (b) the radioisotope production facility; (c) the medical, industrial and research facilities that use radionuclides; and (d) the industrial facility for processing monazite sands. Radioactive waste needs to be safely managed because it is potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. According to Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act-93, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the governmental body responsible for the receipt and final disposal of radioactive wastes in the whole country. Waste management policy has become an important environmental, social, and economical issue for LLW in Bangladesh. Policy and strategies will serve as a basic guide for radioactive waste management in Bangladesh. The waste generator is responsible for on-site collection, conditioning and temporary storage of the waste arising from his practice. The Central Waste Processing and Storage Unit (CWPSU) of BAEC is the designated national facility with the requisite facility for the treatment, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste until a final disposal facility is established and becomes operational. The Regulatory Authority is responsible for the enforcement of compliance with provisions of the waste management regulation and other relevant requirements by the waste generator and the CWPSU. The objective of this paper is to present, in a concise form, basic information about the radioactive waste management infrastructure, regulations, policies and strategies including the total inventory of low level radioactive waste in the country. For improvement and strengthening in terms of operational capability, safety and security of RW including spent radioactive sources and overall security of the facility (CWPSF), the facility is expected to serve waste management need in the country and, in the course of time, the facility may be turned into a regional level training centre. It is essential for safe conduction and culture of research and application in nuclear science and technology maintaining the relevant safety of man and environment and future generations to come. (authors)

  2. Spatial variability of arsenic in 6000 tube wells in a 25 km2 of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    [van Geen et al., 2002]. A comparison of the cost of installing such a well ($US$50 for a typical 50-ft well) with the per capita GNP of Bangladesh of US$1400, after adjusting for purchasing power [World

  3. Effect of hydrological flow pattern on groundwater arsenic concentration in Bangladesh by Khandaker Ashfaque.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashfaque, Khandaker

    2007-01-01

    Widespread arsenic contamination of groundwater has become a major concern in Bangladesh since the water supply, particularly in rural areas, is heavily dependent on groundwater. However, relative to the extent of research ...

  4. The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B

    2010-01-01

    The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

  5. Climate Change and the Preparation of the Government of Bangladesh: Support Environmental Migration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quasem, Saad

    2012-01-01

    As a coastal area that is susceptible to sea level rise and other stresses of climate change, its status as the most densely populated country, crowded cities and rocketing poverty levels-spread mostly across the rural areas, Bangladesh seems...

  6. Role of the state in implementing IFRSs in a developing country : the case of Bangladesh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nurunnabi, Mohammad

    2012-11-27

    The purpose of this study is to examine what factors have been affecting the implementation of IFRSs in Bangladesh from 1998 to 2010. The study seeks to answer these specific research questions: (1) What is the relative ...

  7. Returning International Labor Migrants from Bangladesh: The Experience and Effects of Deportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibria, Nazli

    This paper reports on the findings of a study of former or returned international migrant workers from Bangladesh. The analysis focuses on the economic situation and return experiences of those who had been deported or ...

  8. Anti-Sex Trafficking Movement of Bangladesh and the Theories of Transnational Social Movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwary, Afroza

    2007-01-01

    Using reports, interview data, and participant observation, this research examines the anti-sex trafficking movement in Bangladesh, analyzing the effects of internationalization and the growth of regional and transnational efforts to curb sex...

  9. Architecture as evocation of place : thoughts on an architectural "beginning" in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashraf, Kazi Khaleed

    1988-01-01

    This thesis is a trajectory of a quest of trying to understand certain fundamental notions of architecture, triggered initially by the cultural conditions of Bangladesh: How does an architectural position really find ...

  10. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Qazi, Shefah; Agogino, Alice M.

    2009-09-14

    Researchers have invented a material called ARUBA -- Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash -- that effectively and affordably removes arsenic from Bangladesh groundwater. Through analysis of studies across a range of disciplines, observations, and informal interviews conducted over three trips to Bangladesh, we have applied mechanical engineering design methodology to develop eight key design strategies, which were used in the development of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to removearsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analysed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than US$2/day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  11. Scenario of solid waste reuse in Khulna city of Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, Quazi H.; Mahbub Hassan, K.; Haque, R.

    2012-12-15

    The reuse and recycling of waste materials are now sincerely considered to be an integral part of solid waste management in many parts of the world. In this context, a vast number of options ranging from small scale decentralized to larger scale centralized plants have been adopted. This study aimed at investigating the waste reuse schemes in Khulna city located in the southern part of Bangladesh and ranked third largest city in the country. The shops for reusable material (SRM) were mostly situated around railway, waterway, and truck station markets which provided easy transportation to further locations. For the reuses of waste materials and products, a chain system was found to collect reusable wastes under a total number of 310 identified SRM with 859 persons directly or indirectly involved in the scheme. This was a decentralized waste management system with self sufficient (autonomous) management. According to mass balance, about 38.52 tons d{sup -1} solid wastes were reused in Khulna city area, accounting for 7.65% of the total generated wastes. This study revealed that apparently a silent, systematic, smooth, and clean reuse chain has been established in Khulna city area under private initiatives, whose sustainability was confirmed over the years in the country without any official or formal funds. However, proper adjustment between the higher and lower chain in the materials flow path, as well as personal hygiene training for the workers, would further improve the achievements of the established reuse scheme.

  12. Stromatolites, ooid dunes, hardgrounds, and crusted mud beds, all products of marine cementation and microbial mats in subtidal oceanic mixing zone on eastern margin of Great Bahama Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, R.F.; Kendall, C.S.C.G.; Steinen, R.P.

    1989-03-01

    The interisland channels along the eastern margin of the Great Bahamas Bank contain lithified structures that owe their origin to recent marine cementation. This cementation appears to be commonly associated with a complex microbial community of plants and microorganisms living within a bank-margin oceanographic mixing zone. In this region, reversing tidal and wind-driven currents flow up to 3 knots (150 cm/sec) three hours out of each six-hour tidal period. Here, marine-cement crusted, carbonate mud beds are found interbedded within migrating ooid sand bars and dunes and are associated with growing, lithified stromatolites up to 2 m in height. These laminated mud beds are found with thicknesses of up to 1 m in subtidal depths of 4 to 8 m (12 to 25 ft). The muds appear to be homogeneous, but closer examination by SEM and under a microscope reveals they are composed of pelletoid aggregates of needle-shaped aragonite crystals with diameters of up to 50 ..mu... The size of these soft pellets is similar to the smaller grains of ooid sands that are abundant in the area. This size similarity could explain why both the mud beds are found in similar high-energy hydraulic regimes as the ooid sands, but does not suggest how or why the aggregates of pure aragonite needles form. A high production of ooid sand within this bank margin environment permits the formation of natural levees along the margins of tidal channels. The back sides of these levees are being lithified by marine cements to form hardgrounds. Skeletal and ooid sand dunes stabilized by Thallasia in channel bottoms also are becoming lithified. Grapestones form at the distributaries of flood tidal deltas of ooid sand. All of these features have a common attribute: they are continually in contact with the turbulent mixing-zone waters.

  13. The Framework for Implementing ECommerce: The Role of Bank and Telecom in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laisuzzaman, Ijaj Md; Nahid, Abdullah Al; Ziaul, Md; Alim, Md Abdul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an effective framework for adapting electronic commerce or e-commerce services in developing countries like Bangladesh. The internet has opened up a new horizon for commerce, namely electronic commerce (e-commerce). It entails the use of the internet in the marketing, identification, payment and delivery of goods and services. At present internet facilities are available in Bangladesh. Slowly, but steadily these facilities are holding a strong position in every aspects of our life. E-commerce is one of those sectors which need more attention if we want to be a part of global business. Bangladesh is far-far away to adapt the main stream of e-commerce application. Though government is shouting to take the challenges of e-commerce, but they do not take the right step, that is why e-commerce dose not make any real contribution in our socio-economic life. Here we propose a model which may develop the e-commerce infrastructure of Bangladesh.

  14. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-07

    Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) a material that effectively and affordably removes high concentrations of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate?bottom ash from coal fired power plants?is a waste material readily available in South Asia. During fieldwork in four sub-districts ofBangladesh, ARUBA reduced groundwater arsenic concentrations as high as 680 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Key results from three trips in Bangladesh and one trip to Cambodia include (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from contaminated water within the first five minutes of contact, andcontinues removing arsenic for 2-3 days; (2) ARUBA?s arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through fractionated dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well; and (4) the amount of arsenic removed per gram of ARUBA is linearly related to the initial arsenic concentrationof the water. Through analysis of existing studies, observations, and informal interviews in Bangladesh, eight design strategies have been developed and used in the design of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analyzed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than $2 per day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  15. Up to the waist in mud! : the assessment and application of earth-derivative architecture in rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, K. Iftekhar

    1991-01-01

    This thesis is about architecture that uses earth as the prime· building material in the context of rural Bangladesh. In extreme environmental conditions of annual floods, rain and atmospheric humidity, the use of earth, ...

  16. ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh--Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addy, Susan E.A.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Kostecki, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Today, 35-77 million Bangladeshis drink arsenic-contaminated groundwater from shallow tube wells. Arsenic remediation efforts have focused on the development and dissemination of household filters that frequently fall into disuse due to the amount of attention and maintenance that they require. A community scale clean water center has many advantages over household filters and allows for both chemical and electricity-based technologies to be beneficial to rural areas. Full cost recovery would enable the treatment center to be sustainable over time. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) is compatible with community scale water treatment for rural Bangladesh. We demonstrate the ability of ECAR to reduce arsenic levels> 500 ppb to less than 10 ppb in synthetic and real Bangladesh groundwater samples and examine the influence of several operating parameters on arsenic removal effectiveness. Operating cost and waste estimates are provided. Policy implication recommendations that encourage sustainable community treatment centers are discussed.

  17. Upgradation of nuclear medical equipment in the developing countries and its impact in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahangir, S M; Haque, M A S; Hoq, M; Mawla, Y; Morium, T; Uddin, M R; Xie, Y

    2002-01-01

    Bangladesh has thirteen Nuclear Medical Centres and one Institute of Nuclear Medicine in the country which are being run and maintained by the physicians scientists and engineers of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission. The peaceful application of atomic energy was initiated through all these Centres with the use of clinical isotopes for thyroid and kidney studies. The equipment used for these purposes were the thyroid uptake system, rectilinear scanner and the multiprobe renogram system. The first gamma camera was installed in the country in 1980 at the Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Dhaka. That was the turning point for the country in the field of nuclear medicine. Presently all the nuclear medical establishments are equipped least with a gamma camera, thyroid uptake system and a renogram system. In the last two decades there has been a tremendous development in the design of nuclear medical equipment. Most of the old equipments were slow and manually operated. In the beginning of nineties of the past centur...

  18. Software Development Standard and Software Engineering Practice: A Case Study of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begum, Zerina; Hafiz, Mohd Zulfiquar; Islam, Md Saiful; Shoyaib, Md; 10.3329/jbas.v32i2.2432

    2010-01-01

    Improving software process to achieve high quality in a software development organization is the key factor to success. Bangladeshi software firms have not experienced much in this particular area in comparison to other countries. The ISO 9001 and CMM standard has become a basic part of software development. The main objectives of our study are: 1) To understand the software development process uses by the software developer firms in Bangladesh 2) To identify the development practices based on established quality standard and 3) To establish a standardized and coherent process for the development of software for a specific project. It is revealed from this research that software industries of Bangladesh are lacking in target set for software process and improvement, involvement of quality control activities, and standardize business expertise practice. This paper investigates the Bangladeshi software industry in the light of the above challenges.

  19. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER — RESULTS OF PROTOTYPE FIELD TESTS IN BANGLADESH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowolik, K; Addy, S.E.A.; Gadgil, A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 50 million people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-laden water, making it the largest case of mass poisoning in human history. Many methods of arsenic removal (mostly using chemical adsorbents) have been studied, but most of these are too expensive and impractical to be implemented in poor countries such as Bangladesh. This project investigates ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) as an affordable means of removing arsenic. Experiments were performed on site in Bangladesh using a prototype termed “sushi”. This device consists of carbon steel sheets that serve as electrodes wrapped into a cylinder, separated by plastic mesh and surrounded by a tube-like container that serves as a holding cell in which the water is treated electrochemically. During the electrochemical process, current is applied to both electrodes causing iron to oxidize to various forms of iron (hydr)oxides. These species bind to arsenic(V) with very high affi nity. ECAR also has the advantage that As(III), the more toxic form of arsenic, oxidizes to As(V) in situ. Only As(V) is known to complex with iron (hydr)oxides. One of the main objectives of this research is to demonstrate the ability of the new prototype to reduce arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater from >200 ppb to below the WHO limit of 10 ppb. In addition, varying fl ow rate and dosage and the effect on arsenic removal was investigated. Experiments showed that ECAR reduced Bangladeshi water with an initial arsenic concentration as high as 250 ppb to below 10 ppb. ECAR proved to be effective at dosages as high as 810 Coulombs/Liter (C/L) and as low as 386 C/L (current 1 A, voltage 12 V). These results are encouraging and provide great promise that ECAR is an effi cient method in the remediation of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. A preliminary investigation of arsenic removal trends with varying Coulombic dosage, complexation time and fi ltration methods is also presented.

  20. Exploring scaling up community-based adaptation: A case study with the PRODUCE Project in Rangpur, Bangladesh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsoyo, Dwi, L. R.

    2012-11-29

    with PRODUCE, a development project initiated by CARE in Rangpur, Bangladesh. The field results from this study illustrate that scaling up is not an end in itself, but rather as a means to extend the benefit beyond the pilot phase. It also argues that knowledge...

  1. Rice Field Geochemistry and Hydrology: An Explanation for Why Groundwater Irrigated Fields in Bangladesh are Net Sinks of Arsenic from Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B.

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated groundwater transfers tens of cubic kilometers of water and thousands of tons of arsenic from aquifers to rice fields each year. Here we combine observations ...

  2. Lived Islam in Bangladesh: contemporary religious discourse between Ahl-i-Hadith, "Hanafis? and authoritative texts, with special reference to al-barzakh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarrington, Matthew D

    2010-11-25

    Contemporary north-west Bangladesh is the scene of a religious contest between the self-described 'Hanafis‘, who include various expressions of Islamic faith and practice, and Salafi reformist groups known as Ahl-i-Hadith. Occasionally labelled...

  3. Bahrain: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece: EnergyMontana)DistrictTransport Jump to:Strategy

  4. Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, M.R.; Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M.; Takai, K.; Haniu, H.

    2011-09-15

    In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

  5. Suspended sediment transport in the Ganges-Brahmaputra River System, Bangladesh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Stephanie Kimberly

    2009-05-15

    . (Data from the Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority) 16 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 Januar y F ebr uar y Ma r c h Ap r i l Ma y J une Jul y A ugust S ept em ber O c t ober N o v e m ber D e cem ber W a t e r di... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Beth L. Mullenbach Wilford D. Gardner Committee Members, Mary Jo...

  6. Impact of mineralogy on potassium dynamics and retention behavior in Bangladesh soils used in rice cropping systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Sumitra Bose

    2008-10-10

    Journal. 2 Most soils in the IGP, including those in Bangladesh, are usually regarded as high in K due to high rainfall, irrigation water and release from K-rich clay minerals (Dobermann et al., 1996a, 1996b, 1999). Potassium removal is large... influence K + release from minerals by carrying away reaction products and converting micas to 2:1 expandible layer silicates if the leaching water chemistry is favorable for this kind of reaction. Oxidation and reduction phenomena are of great...

  7. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  8. Macroalgal distribution at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jill Christie

    1997-01-01

    The preservation of coral reef communities has become a major concern to scientists and environmentalists due to the increase in coral diseases and reef degradation on a worldwide basis. As a result of coral mortality and the removal of herbivores...

  9. Cuba, Jamaica and the Bahama Islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodd, Mead & Company

    1907-01-01

    in equine genomics and the genetics of athletic performance in humans have opened up the possibility of investigating this important trait in the Thoroughbred. Initially, 46 candidate genes associated with human athletic performance were mapped in the equine...

  10. Bahamas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuels Brasil Jump to:Babette JeeBaca2EnergyBagnore

  11. UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar Carnegie Mellon University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Healthcare Benefits International/ In Network US Out of Network US Hospital Charges Nursing, accommodation Immunizations Paid in Full Paid in Full Adult Travel Vaccinations Paid in Full Paid in Full Adult Preventive

  12. Bahrain National Gas and Oil Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSAEngineering LLC Jump to:SunOasis

  13. Bangladesh S M Ullah

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock time hourly

  14. BAHAMA ISLANDS Christian JUBERTHIE* and Thomas M. ILIFFE**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , encouraging karst erosion. There are numerous caves and sinkholes, occasionally reaching depths of 100 m

  15. Bahamas-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece: EnergyMontana)DistrictTransport Jump to:Strategy |

  16. Bahamas-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State Office JumpUtahPlcBackyardResilience

  17. Bangladesh Country report Description of dosimetry services in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollah, A S

    1996-01-01

    Radionuclides are being widely used in medicine, agriculture, industry and research and development nowadays, and are likely to be incorporated to hazardous levels in the course of work. In order to ensure that the radiation doses received by the occupational workers, due to internal exposures, do not exceed the prescribed safe limits, proper internal contamination monitoring programmes are required. Internal doses due to incorporated radioactivity can conveniently be assessed directly through the in vivo measurement of body radioactivity externally by using a whole body counter (WBC) comprising of an appropriate detector assembly. Body monitoring provides direct information on the amount of radioactivity present inside the body in the case of most radionuclides and is an important part of the radiation protection programme. Body monitoring can be placed into two categories by energy: 1) low energy ( 100 keV) photon emitting radionuclides. The former category includes only a few radionuclides and requires muc...

  18. Bangladesh: Case Studies Bangladesh: Case Studies Renewable Energy Research Centre, Dhaka University, Bangladesh

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy InformationclockStudies

  19. GeoArabia, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2008 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    regime took place in the Late Eocene-Miocene but gradually shifted to become N-S to NE-SW. This shift

  20. Meeting Our Partners in Saudi Arabia and U.S. Military Forces in Bahrain |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING Release date:MeetMeet

  1. The Impact of Climate Change on The Bahamas a Review of Early Forecasts By Neil Sealey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    . Changes due to Sea Level Rise: Sea level will rise because more polar and glacial ice will melt than warming, it is not simply warming that causes glaciers to melt. All glaciers are melting to some degree at their terminuses, but whether they are advancing or retreating is determined by the balance between melting

  2. Underwater Mirror Exposure to Free-Ranging Naïve Atlantic Spotted Dolphins (Stenella frontalis) in the Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delfour, Fabienne; Herzing, Denise

    2013-01-01

    false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) and Californiafalse killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) and sea lions (

  3. ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY OF TROPICAL REEF SYSTEMS: ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN THE EXUMA CAYS, BAHAMAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY OF TROPICAL REEF SYSTEMS: ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE TOURISM destination in the wider Carib- bean and entertains two tourism markets: 1) cruise ship and resort (overnight to that which will sustain rather than destroy the environment, the very product marketed and sought. In order

  4. Organic matter preserved in modern ooids from Shark Bay and the Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Aimée L

    2013-01-01

    Ooids - small, concentrically laminated carbonate grains - are an important component of the sedimentary rock record, yet many details of their formation are not well understood. In particular, the role of microorganisms ...

  5. Tourism-related drivers of support for protection of fisheries resources on Andros Island, The Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    to create a poverty trap by providing a minimum income thereby removing incentive to invest in education or take risks necessary to escape poverty (Delacote, 2009). Protecting fisheries resources can ensure the poverty trap effect caused by overreliance on extraction. Fisheries protection measures (e.g., protected

  6. Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

    2012-02-14

    in the interior of the island (Raeisi and Mylroie, 1995). This mixing of water masses has aggressive dissolutional properties and aids in the forming of karstic features such as flank margin caves. Mylroie et al., (2001) proposed and developed the ?Carbonate... towards the geologic development and glacial eustatic events on the island. 10 Anchialine Environment Anchialine habitats are known to exist throughout the world often underground, forming a halocline where freshwater mixes with the intruding...

  7. Mapping bathymetry and depositional facies on Great Bahama PAUL M. (MITCH) HARRIS*, 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    of Earth and Life Sciences, Sedimentology and Marine Geology Group, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Associate. Sedimentology © 2014 International Association of Sedimentologists Sedimentology (2014) doi: 10.1111/sed.12159

  8. Stratigraphic Heterogeneity of a Holocene Ooid Tidal Sand Shoal: Lily Bank, Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Andrew

    2011-08-31

    ........................................................................................................................ 5 Regional Trends in Reflectors and Units .................................................................................................. 7 SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE HOLOCENE SUCCESSION... ...................................................................... 8 Lagoon Sedimentology and Stratigraphy .................................................................................................. 8 Channel (Inter-bar) Sedimentology and Stratigraphy...

  9. Mapping bathymetry and depositional facies on Great Bahama PAUL M. (MITCH) HARRIS*, 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    of Earth and Life Sciences, Sedimentology and Marine Geology Group, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Associate. Sedimentology © 2014 International Association of Sedimentologists Sedimentology (2015) 62, 566­589 doi: 10

  10. Constructing Pillars of Islamic Banking: Creating and Sustaining Specialized Financial Centers in Bahrain and the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dicce, Ryan P

    2015-04-27

    The Islamic financial industry has risen out of Muslim discomfort with the practices of conventional finance – interest-based trading, speculation, inequitable transactions, and investment in products that violate the religion – and posits itself...

  11. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    Economics, 85 (1-2), 349–349. Mameri, N. , Yeddou, A. R. ,et al. , 2001), ?uorine (Mameri et al. , 1998), polymericThis e?ect was noted by Mameri et al. (1998) while studying

  12. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    2-line ferrihydrite (2L FH), goethite, and scorodite. Arrows6-line ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, and akaganeiteof arsenate on/from goethite. Soil Science, 166 (3), 197–

  13. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    of EGA sludge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195As mapping of EGA sludge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chemical analysis of waste EGA sludge . . . . . . . . .

  14. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    see text). . . . . . 68 Pourbaix diagram for iron. AssumespH of the actual scan. A pourbaix diagram composed by Bangspecies in solution. A Pourbaix diagram is often used to

  15. Municipal Wastewater Characteristics of Sylhet City, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Raquibul; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Chowdhury, Md. Aktarul Islam; Nath, Suman Kanti

    2006-01-01

    of waste water samples of waste water samples taken from3: Quantity of solids of waste water taken from differentof alkalinities of waste water samples taken from different

  16. Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBaileyBandgap

  17. Bangladesh: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBaileyBandgapWorld Bank

  18. Faculty of Health Sciences MPH Program Policies and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    region (Algeria, Bahrain, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya Arab Jamahiriya

  19. A Novel Comprehensive Database for Arabic Off-Line Handwriting Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suen, Ching Y.

    such as Algeria, Bahrain, The Comoros, Chad, Egypt, Eritrea, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco

  20. Life in the Living Laboratory: An Anthropological Investigation of Environmental Science, Tourism, and Design in the Contemporary Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    of what he calls positive “ modes of subject formation. ”These interdependent modes are 1) subject formation through

  1. Life in the Living Laboratory: An Anthropological Investigation of Environmental Science, Tourism, and Design in the Contemporary Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    the vulnerability of island systems, the geographicallymake a real impact in island energy systems and brand bothexpense of Eleuthera’s island energy system, and by the fact

  2. Foreign Fishery Developments u.s. Tuna Imports From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caribbean Caribbean Bahamas! 529.7 Bahamas' $ 175.2 Barbados 680 Barbados $ 222.2 Bermuda' 6.300.7 4

  3. WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2011: Warning about the dangers of tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHO

    2011-01-01

    Albania, Australia, Barbados*, Bhutan, Burkina Faso*,countries (Bahamas, Barbados, Iran, Panama, and Trinidad andArgentina Bahamas Barbados Belize Bolivia (Plurinational

  4. Security and United States Immigration Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Totten, Robbie James

    2012-01-01

    from the Bahamas, Barbados, Canada, Jamaica, Mexico, andworkers were imported from Barbados, 18,423 workers werelaborers from the Bahamas, Barbados, Honduras, and Jamaica

  5. Acid Violence in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zia, Taiba

    2013-01-01

    Jordan. “Acid Attacks: Bangladesh’s Efforts to Stop thesubcontinent, especially in Bangladesh and Pakistan, and inon acid crimes in Bangladesh, for instance). Reliable data

  6. Tectonic subsidence and uplift history of UAE foreland basinGeoArabia, vol. 14, no. 2, 2009, p. 17-44 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    17 Tectonic subsidence and uplift history of UAE foreland basinGeoArabia, vol. 14, no. 2, 2009, p extension, and the flexural effects of ophiolite load emplacement. The tectonic subsidence and uplift for the general exponential decrease that is observed in the tectonic subsidence and uplift between 210 Ma and 95

  7. Phytologia (April 2008) 90(1) 103 THE EVOLUTION OF CARIBBEAN JUNIPERUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    (endemic to Bermuda); J. barbadensis (endemic to St. Lucia, extinct on Barbados); J. lucayana (Bahamas

  8. Countries with "low incidence" of tuberculosis. Students who have resided in any country other than those listed below in the past 5 years must check yes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    to have a tuberculin skin test. Albania Andorra Antigua and Barbuda Australia Austria Bahamas Barbados

  9. Residential childcare: the experiences of young people in Bangladesh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Md. Tuhinul

    2013-07-02

    Residential childcare has had an image which, at the very least, is not a positive one. It has been blamed for weakening family links and leading to poor educational and health outcomes for children (Biehal et al. 1995; ...

  10. Illegal Immigration from Bangladesh to India: The Emerging Conflicts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandy, Chandan

    Population movements have been a constant feature of the evolution of human civilisation. For a variety of reasons – social, political, economic, natural and climatic -migration occurs within the geographical limits of ...

  11. Child Health in a Post-Flood Period in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttenheim, Alison M

    2007-01-01

    regional and national anthropometry surveys in Bangladeshheight measurements. The anthropometry module recorded thepredictors of missing anthropometry in Round 3 conditional

  12. Bangladesh-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:Bajo en Carbono, Mexico JumpElectric

  13. Bangladesh-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:Bajo en Carbono, Mexico JumpElectricInformation

  14. Bangladesh-USAID Climate Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:Bajo en Carbono, Mexico

  15. Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhono SolarPlexus Sol JumpLowLowBeyond | Open

  16. Renewable Energy Policy of Bangladesh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFURecentCenter JumpProject Jump to:of

  17. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectricColorado: EnergyLamartine Navarro

  18. Transport Policy Note-Bangladesh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, searchTransCanada

  19. A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in Bangladesh | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |Recent ExplorationInformation Synthesis of

  20. Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Information

  1. Bangladesh-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock time hourlyDLR

  2. Bangladesh-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock time

  3. Bangladesh-Feed the Future | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock timeFeed the

  4. Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock timeFeed

  5. Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock

  6. Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary

  7. Bangladesh-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBaileyBandgap Engineering

  8. Bangladesh-GTZ Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Programme | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBaileyBandgap EngineeringEnergy

  9. Bangladesh-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State OfficeBaileyBandgapWorld Bank Climate

  10. CURRICULUM VITAE AFSAR ALI, Ph. D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Afsar

    , Bangladesh B. S. in Soil Microbiology, 1983. University of Dhaka, Bangladesh PROFESSIONAL POSITION HELD 07 Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR, B), Dhaka, Bangladesh. 12/85-7/86 - Quality Control Microbiologist, Bangladesh Organon Limited (Multinational Pharmaceutical Industry), Dhaka

  11. Statistisches Bundesamt VIB/32134000 und VIB/32135100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    Bahrain, auch Bahrein 460 Bangladesch 322 Barbados 320 Barbuda, Antigua und - 149 Bäreninsel, zu Norwegen

  12. Department of Energy, Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    country (Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, or Singapore); 61 November 2012...

  13. Seeing Like a Stakeholder: Measures of International NGO Accountability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Shannon Adair

    2012-01-01

    Empowerment in Rural Bangladesh." World Development 40:610-Theory and Evidence from Bangladesh." Journal of Developingfood-security program in Bangladesh to illustrate how these

  14. Migrants’ Remitting beyond Altruism and Self-Interest: A Study of Remitting Practices among Bangladeshi Migrants in Tokyo and Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmud, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Workers' Remittances in Bangladesh: An Empirical Study. MPRAof Migration (IOM). (2009). Bangladesh Remittance HouseholdSurvey 2009. Dhaka, Bangladesh. Iskander, N. (2010).

  15. Drinking Water Quality and Child Health in South Asia: The Role of Secondary Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ercumen, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    Clusters  Survey  Bangladesh  2009.  Key  Findings.  of  groundwater  in  Bangladesh.  Kinniburgh,  D.G.   and  effectiveness  in  Bangladesh.  Am.  J.  Trop.  Med.  Hyg.  

  16. The Final Frontier: Embedding Networked Sensors in the Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    been travelling yearly to Bangladesh over the past 5 years.the arsenic problem in bangladesh. doctoral thesis, divisionwe have undertaken: in Bangladesh, and in California at the

  17. Bugs, Drugs & Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHO

    2012-01-01

    therapy of cholera among Bangladesh refugees. The Johnscentimetres long Photo 1.6. Bangladesh, 1975. A volunteercould defeat it anywhere – in Bangladesh, in Pakistan and in

  18. The Pursuit of Balance in Sequential Randomized Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiteras, Raymond P.; Levine, David I.; Polley, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    intervention in Dhaka, Bangladesh, the first time the methodintervention in Dhaka, Bangladesh (Guiteras et al. , 2014),in slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh. To our knowledge, this study

  19. Civil Wars With or Without an End: Postwar Violence and Civil War Recurrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omae, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Amnesty International. 2000. Bangladesh: Human Rights in theInternational. 2004. Bangladesh: Chittagong Hill Tracts: ain the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh. ” In Genocide of

  20. Arsenic Mobilization and Sorption in Subsurface Environments: Experimental Studies, Geochemical Modeling, and Remediation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafeznezami, Saeedreza

    2015-01-01

    processes of arsenic within Bangladesh sediments. Chemicalrisk and geochemical sources in Bangladesh. EnvironmentMatlab, south-eastern Bangladesh: Insight from experimental

  1. Fixing Faults with Confidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, Nithya

    2008-01-01

    the arsenic problem in bangladesh. doctoral thesis, divisiondeployments, undertaken in Bangladesh in January, 2006.in a rice paddy in Bangladesh to help scientists evaluate

  2. Arsenic in Drinking Water and Lung Disease in Chile, California and Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauphine, David

    2015-01-01

    among Children in Bangladesh. Environ. Health Perspect.contaminated well water in Bangladesh. Int. J. Environ.and morbidity in rural Bangladesh. Toxicol. Lett. 185 (3),

  3. Protesting the contest : election boycotts around the world, 1990-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaulieu, Emily Ann

    2006-01-01

    Australia). 1996. Bangladesh hit by poll violence. Februaryvoter turnout in Bangladesh …………………………… 91 Figure 4.3:groups is quite loose. In Bangladesh, for example, the two

  4. Constitutional Environment and Entrepreneurship: An Empirical Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Australia Austria Bangladesh Barbados Belgium Belize BoliviaAustralia Austria Bangladesh Barbados Belgium Belize BoliviaAustralia Austria Bangladesh Barbados Belgium Belize Bolivia

  5. WHO REPORT ON THE GLOBAL TOBACCO EPIDEMIC, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHO World Health Organization

    2013-01-01

    Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada,Argentina*, Australia, Barbados, Bhutan, Brazil*, BruneiArgentina Bahamas Barbados Belize Bolivia (Plurinational

  6. CURRICULUM VITAE EUGENE C. RANKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .C.RankeyC.V. October20132 2. Sparks, A.G., and Rankey, E.C., 2013, Relations between geomorphic form and sedimentologic a Holocene analogue, Little Bahama Bank, Bahamas: Sedimentology. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3091.2012.01338.x 4, Southeast Bahamas: An alternative to the humid channeled belt model: Sedimentology, 59, 1902-1925. 5. Rankey

  7. Deaf people, modernity, and a contentious effort to unify Arab sign languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Fityani, Kinda

    2010-01-01

    countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Iraq,at this workshop are Comoros, Mauritania, Morocco, andeconomically impoverished Comoros, Mauritania, and Somalia.

  8. Section - - SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR USE IN MOST GRANTS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and United Kingdom; (2) A Free Trade Agreement (FTA) country (Australia, Bahrain,...

  9. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    national treatment for trade in natural gas with Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco,...

  10. Normgeber: Finanzministerium Aktenzeichen: VD3 15 43/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    Australien -Canberra 48 158 -Sydney 49 186 -im Ã?brigen 46 133 Bahrain 30 70 Bangladesch 25 75 Barbados 48 179

  11. Increasing the Competitiveness of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-5.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  12. DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of...

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 3 Free on Board. See Glossary. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  14. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    pentanes plus, petroleum coke, and waxes. d Formerly Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500...

  15. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No data reported. W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  16. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    by climate change and glacial melting. Several of theseassumptions have changed. Glacial melting and climate changeof these changes. Glacial melting and climate change The

  17. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

  18. The Bangladesh Risk of Acute Vascular Events (BRAVE) Study: objectives and design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Rajiv; Alam, Dewan S.; Fakir, Ismail Ibrahim; Adnan, Sheikh Daud; Naheed, Aliya; Tasmin, Ishrat; Monower, Md Mostafa; Hossain, Farzana; Hossain, Fatema Mahjabin; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Afrin, Sadia; Roy, Anjan Kumar; Akter, Minara; Sume, Sima Akter; Biswas, Ajoy Kumer; Pennells, Lisa; Surendran, Praveen; Young, Robin D.; Spackman, Sarah A.; Hasan, Khaled; Harshfield, Eric; Sheikh, Nasir; Houghton, Richard; Saleheen, Danish; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Raqib, Rubhana; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Danesh, John; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele

    2015-05-01

    transported daily to the local laboratory where they are stored in cryogenic vials at -80 ?C, following temporary storage for few hours at the laboratory of the recruitment hospital at-40 ?C. From January 2013, toenail clippings have been taken fromall ten... chil- ling) to sample separation (with immediate freezing) was about 15 min. The median (interquartile range) time recorded between the time of participant’s last meal and blood collection was 4.2 (2.4–7.3) h. 48 % of participants reported living...

  19. ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh--Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Susan E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemosphere, 55(9): 1245-1252. Mameri, N. et al. , 1998. "et al. , 2000), and fluorine (Mameri et al. , 1998) among

  20. Achieving gender equality in learning outcomes: Evidence from a non-formal education program in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gee, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    education on girls’ achievement and only one examines gender differences in the context of Yemen’s early childhood

  1. Sustainable water supply: rainwater harvesting for multistoried residential apartments in dhaka, bangladesh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultana, Farzana

    2009-05-15

    implications of supplying non-potable demand nodes with either recycled greywater or rainwater. It is suggested that: ? Commercially available simulation tools can be used to represent gross water flows through a new development and to explore different...

  2. Meaning in architecture : an investigation of the indigenous environment in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haq, Saif-ul

    1992-01-01

    A meaningful environment forms a necessary and essential part of a meaningful existence. Meaning is an interpretive problem, and meaning in architecture is difficult to grasp. Theoretical insights into meaning have to be ...

  3. Achieving gender equality in learning outcomes: Evidence from a non-formal education program in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gee, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    student ratios and school performance in Udaipur, India: Aperformance includes a level-1 student model, a level-2 teacher/schoolschools achieve, on average, scores on each subject area that are comparable to boys’ scores, with no discernible differential in performance

  4. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    hydro. International Hydro Power and Dam Construction.suggested) Supply of hydro-electric power * Supply of waterrights ? Supply of hydro-electric power ? Supply of water

  5. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    dug wells, PSFs, rainwater harvesting, and deep tubewells.burden than both rainwater harvesting and deep tubewells,

  6. Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh: prospective cohort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    13 million residents in the United States.1 Although the International Agency for Research on Cancer Death from cardiovascular disease. Results 198 people died from diseases of circulatory system, accounting for 43% of total mortality in the population. The mortality rate for cardiovascular disease

  7. Technology enabled re-engineering : a business strategy for advancing Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Abdullah

    2003-01-01

    A strategy is presented to rapidly advance a developing nation utilizing the power of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). A banking institution is chosen to be the anchor tenant to spread ICT. A radical ...

  8. Training Traditional Birth Attendants in Bangladesh: A New Model for Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowen, Tami S

    2007-01-01

    traditional birth attendant training improve referral ofA, Finger, W.R. TBA training may reduce Maternal Mortality.Complications:does training traditional birth attendants

  9. Training Traditional Birth Attendants in Bangladesh: A New Model for Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowen, Tami S

    2007-01-01

    years. Their new training module emphasizes the importancemidwifery text and training modules created by other NGOs.

  10. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arsenic Standards for Drinking Water . . . . . . . . . .Water Storage before

  11. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    2009 T ABLE 1: L ARGER HYDROELECTRIC AND DIVERSION PROJECTSin the promotion of hydroelectric power is not known. Bothwas primarily focused on hydroelectric power coming from the

  12. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    and Reuse Leachate Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MCL Standards and Un-Coated Coal Ash Leachate Results (MCL Standards and ARUBA Leachate Results (ppb) Introduction

  13. Policy Implications and Implementation of Environmental ICTPs in Developing States: Examples from Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Mahbubul; Rashid, A.Z.M. Manzoor; Furukawa, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD). Later in 1997,Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), the policyis significant trend of desertification in the northwestern

  14. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    in the promotion of hydroelectric power is not known. Bothwas primarily focused on hydroelectric power coming from theirrigation and hydroelectric power generation schemes better

  15. Bangladesh-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:Bajo en Carbono, Mexico JumpElectric Coop,Open

  16. Low-Carbon Society Development: Towards 2025 in Bangladesh | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds,Asia-Pacific Developing Countries

  17. Bangladesh-NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuelsOpen Energy Informationclock timeFeedNIES

  18. Brief Profile On Tobacco Health Warnings in the South-East Asia Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco Use Disorder. 5. Bangladesh. 6. Bhutan. 7. India. 8.of People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Ministry of Health andof People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Ministry of Health and

  19. Bangladeshi Muslims in Mississippi: Impression Management Based on the Intersectionality of Religion, Ethnicity, and Gender

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shams, Tahseen

    2015-01-01

    McMillan. CIA (2014) Bangladesh. The World Factbook, May 12,am Muslim; that I come from Bangladesh, a country most of mymajority countries (including Bangladesh) to be registered,

  20. SIT Workshops 1995 2011 Page 1 of 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , MD General Standards and Conformity Assessment Antigua & Barbuda Bahamas Barbados Dominica Grenada Barbados Belize Bolivia Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominica Ecuador El Salvador Grenada Guatemala Guyana

  1. The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    apprentices in Montserrat and Barbados are free]” (June 9,their enterprises, from Barbados to South Carolina, forVincent, Trinidad, Anti- gua, Barbados, and the Bahamas. 11.

  2. Project 2012: Increasing Female Representation in Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    Panama Mongolia T.F.Y.R. of Macedonia Andorra Bahamas Cubambodia* eria e F.Y.R. of Macedonia ypt man* prus minican

  3. An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blank, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Eluthera Island, Bahamas). Sedimentology 51, 745–765. Eiler,and eukaryotic algae. Sedimentology 45, Friedman, I. , andPliocene, central Spain). Sedimentology 48, 897–915. Geets,

  4. International reserves management and the current account

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Azerbaijan Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Bosnia & Herzegovinaand Barbuda Argentina Barbados Belize Botswana Chile CostaKingdom of Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin

  5. Has Democracy Reduced Inequalities in Child Mortality? An analysis of 5 million births from 50 developing countries since 1970.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Antonio Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Pakistan Paraguay Indonesia Turkey Mali Ghana Cote d IvoireKyrgyzstan Bangladesh Niger Mali Ethiopia PhilippinesBangladesh Nigeria Niger Mali Uganda Philippines Turkey

  6. Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries: Bangladesh AgencyCompany...

  7. Nazia Sarwat Islam e-mail: nazia1357@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    on developing an audio annotation tool in Matlab 2010 Intern, Rahimafrooz Renewable Energy, Dhaka, Bangladesh Conference, New Delhi, India, 2007 Scholarship National Education Board, Dhaka, Bangladesh: National merit

  8. TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY OF THE BAHAMAS Version 1.2. April 2006 #12;TOOLS Sealey, K, K. Semon, N. Cushion, E.Wright, C. Kaplan, and B. Carpenter. 2006. Tools and Methods for Coastal Ecological Studies of The Bahamas. University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fl. 33124. 111 pp. #12;TOOLS

  9. JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 25(1): 8194, 2005 NEW SPECIES OF THE GENUS TYPHLATYA (DECAPODA: ATYIDAE) FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    : ATYIDAE) FROM ANCHIALINE CAVES IN MEXICO, THE BAHAMAS, AND HONDURAS Fernando Alvarez, Thomas M. Iliffe Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Apartado Postal 70-153, Me´xico 04510 D.F., Me´xico (FA, correspondence caves in Mexico (T. dzilamensis), the Bahamas (T. kakuki), and Honduras (T. utilaensis) are described

  10. Myodocopid Ostracoda (Halocypridina, Cladocopina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    in the Bahamas, Canary Islands, and Mexico Louis S. Kornicker and Thomas M. Iliffe SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS (Halocypridina, Cladocopina)fromAnchialine Caves in the Bahamas, Canary Islands, and Mexico. Smithsonian, 1995, from a lava tube in Lanzarote, Canary Islands. One specimen of the cladocopid Polycopiellafromthe

  11. Jara S. D. Schnyder1 Gregor P. Eberli1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    ,Talence Cedex fig. 6 landslide duration fig. 7 terminal velocity slope failures potential for tsunami generation by submarine slope failures along the western Great Bahama Bank jschnyder@rsmas.miami.edu fig. 1 The western slope of Great Bahama Bank shows slope failures at various scales (fig. 1).Three land- slides were

  12. Country Location AFGHANISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASIA ADMIN SPT UNIT 01/01 12/31 $124 BANGLADESH CHITTAGONG 01/01 12/31 $71 BANGLADESH DHAKA 01/01 12/31 $90 BANGLADESH SYLHET 01/01 12/31 $69 BANGLADESH [OTHER] 01/01 12/31 $71 BARBADOS BARBADOS 04/16 12

  13. Brothers Furniture's city factory catches fire * * * Dhaka urges int'l community to take steps for Saturday, 26 January 2013 Reported by: UNBconnect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    Podcast Mobile RSS Feeds Home Blogs Bangladesh International Sports Business Health Lifestyle Technology

  14. The Relationship of Student Dispositions and Teacher Characteristics with the Mathematics Achievement of Students in Lebanon and Six Arab Countries in TIMSS 2007. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younes, Rayya

    2013-03-22

    . The second study examines the mathematics performance in TIMSS 2007 of 8th grade students in seven Arab countries: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Tunisia. The effects of positive affect towards mathematics, valuing mathematics, self...

  15. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: Creating a global corporate network to undermine public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, PA; Intinarelli, G; Malone, RE

    2008-01-01

    tid/ pdx81a99]. 199. Bacon D, Tobacco BA: TobaccoHoel D, Shook Hardy & Bacon: Bahrain papers. 24 Sep. PhilipCovington MW: Shook, Hardy & Bacon office in Europe. 12 Aug.

  16. NONLINEARITY AND MARKET EFFICIENCY IN GCC STOCK MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alharbi, Abdullah M. H.

    2009-07-31

    ): Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), using three robust and highly regarded nonlinearity tests. In addition, the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) was tested in this dissertation for the GCC stock markets using...

  17. Somatic growth functions are critical parameters for understanding the life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    181300 Corpus Christi, Texas 78480 Wendy G. Teas Wayne N. Witzell Southeast Fisheries Science Center growth rates was tested in a population of green turtles, Chelonia mydas, in the south- ern Bahamas

  18. Blue Bonnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Anchialine blue holes found in the interior of the Bahama Islands have distinct fresh and salt water layers, with vertical mixing, and dysoxic to anoxic conditions below the halocline. Scientific cave diving exploration and microbiological...

  19. WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2011: Warning about the dangers of tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHO

    2011-01-01

    Barbuda, the Bahamas, the Comoros, Cook Islands, Ecuador,African Republic Chad Comoros Congo Côte d’Ivoire DemocraticAfrican Republic Chad Comoros Congo Côte d'Ivoire Democratic

  20. Allan w. Stoner Kirsten C. Schwarte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :171-179 (1994) Queen conch (Strombus gigas), once abundant throughout the Car- ibbean region, have been fished). To the west and south of the Cays lies the Great Bahama Bank, a shallow, sand- and seagrass-covered platform

  1. ELSEVIER Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 150 (1999) 223246 Marine saline ponds as sedimentary archives of late Holocene climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    ELSEVIER Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 150 (1999) 223­246 Marine saline ponds sedimentation is preserved in shallow ponds on Lee Stocking Island, Exuma Cays, Bahamas. Details throughout the remaining history of saline pond development. Foraminiferal isotope stratigraphy is compatible

  2. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2015: Raising taxes on tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2015-01-01

    Argentina, Australia, Barbados, Bhutan, Brazil, BruneiII From 15% to 19.9% Barbados Less than 15% Belize BoliviaArgentina Bahamas** Barbados WHO REPORT ON THE GLOBAL

  3. Evaluating the national HIV counseling and testing (CT) program of St. Lucia: a study to determine coverage, utilization, successes, and gaps in service delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asrat, Anjabebu S.

    2010-01-01

    quot;“""°5 ‘ -M ~ Barbados 0 200 Kilometers ‘ .Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada,Tobago 2.6% Guyana 2.4% Barbados 1.5% Jamaica 1.5% Dominican

  4. Three Essays On Agricultural and Forestry Offsets In Climate Change Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Siyi

    2012-07-16

    , New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Vanuatu 17 RCAM Antigua Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras...

  5. Novel Application of Metering Pump on Diesel Aftertreatment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guyan a The Bahamas Cuba Dominican Republic Panama Costa Rica Nicaragu a Honduras Guatemala El Salv ador T rinidad and Tobag o Jam. Haiti Puerto Rico (US) Greenland (Den.)...

  6. K. Sullivan Sealey 10/3/2006 What I did on my summer vacation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    and submersible hangars, fully equipped machine shop, fume hoods, uninterruptable power supply, air conditioning more lab space that the entire College of The Bahamas, and likely more computing capacity! The power

  7. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    climate vulnerability and resilience into national policies and plans consistent with poverty reduction and sustainable development goals." Bangladesh Supporting Documentation...

  8. Slide 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Antonio, TX Agreements for Peaceful Nuclear Cooperation * Argentina * Australia * Bangladesh * Brazil * Canada * China * Colombia * Egypt * EURATOM * IAEA * Indonesia * Japan *...

  9. Program Cycle Category Study Title G&P (PRF) Fall 2012 1 Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: defining the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejerano, Gill

    Safety and Efficacy of Probiotics in Infants and Children in Bangladesh G&P (PRF) Fall 2012 4 Molecular

  10. 1590 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS, VOL. 39, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2009 A New Constructive Algorithm for Architectural and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    1590 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS, VOL. 39, NO. 6 of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh, and also with the Department of Human and Artificial- neering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh. Md. F. Amin

  11. International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh/pp. I 149-151 Section I: Energy 149

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    in the energy sector of the world. At present, LNG and compressed natural gas are being used as a transportation potential application in transport sector may be fuel cells in which natural gas can provide the source, Import and Export INTRODUCTION A network of sophisticated pipeline systems transports oil, natural gas

  12. chariots of fire Tom McNab recalls the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    communities? malcolm baird As I remember it Strathclyde A u T u M N 2 0 0 7 Improving world health Why. And that's no idle boast. Triple accreditation puts us in the top 1% of the world's schools. It IS ALSO AT BAHRAIN DUBAI ABU DHABI HONG KONG GREECE MALAYSIA OMAN SHANGHAI SINGAPORE ZURICH THE ELITE 1

  13. When Governments Hack Opponents: A Look at Actors and Technology William R. Marczak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxson, Vern

    When Governments Hack Opponents: A Look at Actors and Technology William R. Marczak UC Berkeley Gamma's FinSpy and Hacking Team's Remote Control Sys- tem (RCS). We describe their use in Bahrain of these campaigns via strong circumstantial evidence linking hacking to arrests, interrogations, and imprisonment. 1

  14. Design wiki: a system for design sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design wiki: a system for design sharing Wael A. Abdelhameed, Yoshihiro Kobayashi #12;Wael of Bahrain. His research areas are 3D Modeling Systems, Computing Architecture, Virtual Reality, Design Process, Visual Design Thinking and Digital and Manual Media Interaction. Yoshihiro Kobayashi is a Faculty

  15. recently read an important study that left me in awe of the knowledge demo-graphics of our planet. In Educating All Children: A Global Agenda, Joel Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    of societies. Indeed, Egypt is a living testimony to the link between the power of knowledge and the impact obvious. The children of Facebook have ignited an intifada to plant democracy in Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain) who lived ca. 965­1040 in Iraq and Egypt. He developed concepts in optics, later used by Descartes

  16. The Arab Spring: The Economic Conditions that Bred a Political Uprising 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kimberly Ann

    2014-08-07

    : Youth bulge boiling over......................................................................... 10 Libya: Oil rich failure ......................................................................................... 13 Jordan: The eye... Asia includes Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Cyprus, Georgia, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Palestine, Syria, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Yemen. 0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 0 -4 5 -9...

  17. Has Democracy Reduced Inequalities in Child Mortality? An analysis of 5 million births from 50 developing countries since 1970.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Antonio Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Mozambique Kenya Kazakhstan Comoros Togo Uzbekistan Southsuch as Kazakhstan, Comoros, Togo. Uzbekistan, and Southfor Bangladesh,1975 for Comoros and 1976 for Vietnam ; all

  18. 25/06/2010 15:28Is Giving Genetic? | Children Page 1 of 7http://children.foreignpolicyblogs.com/2010/03/19/2918/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reece, Sarah

    and Proliferation Bangladesh Brazil Caucasus Central Asia Children China Climate Change Corruption America Law and Security Strategy Lebanon Media and Foreign Policy Mexico Middle East Middle East Media

  19. WHO Technical Manual on Tobacco Tax Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    of tobacco taxation in Ukraine. Paris: International UnionBangladesh, Turkey, Russia, Ukraine, EU). In Indonesia, upKazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine apply different specific

  20. Ironic Mirroring: Sufis, Hijras, Artists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussaini, Sara Haq

    2012-01-01

    Bilchik, Nadia. "Pakistan's Dual Gender Tax Collectors."Sufi Shrine in Central Pakistan. ” The Long War Journal. 3of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh). The term hijra

  1. The power of the family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alesina, Alberto; Giuliano, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Great Britain,ties Croatia Algeria Finland Sweden Latvia Czech RepublicRep. South Africa (Union of) Finland Korea Mexico Bangladesh

  2. Social disruption caused by tobacco growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marty Otanez

    2008-01-01

    scholarly literature, documentary films, and tobaccojournalist, in the 2003 documentary film “Smoke Sacrifice:Bangladesh. 85 In the documentary film “Tobacco’s Children,”

  3. Center for Research in Wireless Communications Clemson Home > Home > People > Staff > James H. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    -5903 Professional preparation: B.S., Electrical Engineering, with honors, Clemson University President's Class Bureau of Standards. Foreign Governments: Greece, Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka

  4. A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Name A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change...

  5. CX-010258: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bangladesh Meteorological Instrumentation Installation CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. Albania-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  7. Jamaica-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  8. Georgia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  9. South Africa-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  10. Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  11. Malawi-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  12. Guatemala-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  13. Costa Rica-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  14. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oman, Peru, or Singapore); or (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  15. Indonesia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  16. Microsoft Word - TOC Section I Conformed thru Mod 274.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua, or Singapore); (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African...

  17. Thailand-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  18. Vietnam-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  19. Zambia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  20. Colombia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  1. Malaysia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  2. Moldova-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  3. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Conditions Page 29 of 33 (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  4. AES Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oman, Peru, or Singapore); or (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  5. CI-OFF Ex A (Rev. 0.2, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oman, Peru, or Singapore); or (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad,...

  6. Kazakhstan-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  7. Philippines-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has established joint EC-LEDS work programs with 13 countries, including Albania, Bangladesh, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, the...

  8. South Asia Regional Initiative for Energy Cooperation and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.usaid.govourwork Country Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bhutan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Maldives Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia,...

  9. The Use of Language and Culture: Does Speaking a Non-English

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Australia, Austria, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cambodia,countries include Australia, Barbados, Canada, Ghana, Honglanguage(s) are Australia, Barbados, Canada, Ghana, Hong

  10. Invisible Men: Constructing Men Who Have Sex with Men as a Priority at UNAIDS and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Government of Bangladesh. Government of Barbados. 2012. “Global AIDS Response Progress Report 2012, Barbados. ”Government of Barbados. Government of Malawi. 1994. “

  11. AT&T USADirect Travel Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    -800-99-0011 French Guiana 0-800-99-0011 specified. Bangladesh 157-0011 Barbados 1-800-225-5288 {Spanish} 01

  12. Biostromal Coral Facies -A Miocene Example from the Leitha Limestone (Austria) and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahamas (Andros,Exu- ma Cays)and theArabian Gulf(Dubai, UAE).Accordingto the model presented of benthic biota in the Arabian Gulf (JebelAli, Dubai, UAE)wasusedto illustrate the likely lateral, 1991;Piller et al.,1996).The coralsgrewona shoal or closeto a string of islands, in a relatively low

  13. Commercializing/Financing OTEC Dr. Ted Johnson, Executive Director and VP of OTEC/SDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance Architecture 6 (Baha Mar SDC Project & Bahamas Electricity Corporation OTEC power plants) Top (equivalent to ~42,000 tons CO2) per year, reducing electricity consumption by over 80% · Energy Services, LLC (NJ, USA) is a proven leader in the development of Central Energy Cooling, Combined Heat and Power

  14. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  15. Animal vocal sequences: not the Markov chains we thought they were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kershenbaum, Arik; Bowles, Ann E.; Freeberg, Todd M.; Jin, Dezhe Z.; Lameira, Adriano R.; Bohn, Kirsten

    2014-08-20

    ://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/prsb Submitted to Proceedings of the Royal Society B: For Review Only Pilot whale permits: US NMFS 1121-1900, 981-1578, Bahamas 01/09, 02/07, 02/08; 425 funding: SERDP, ONR, NOAA, US Navy Environmental Readiness Division; call 426 classification: Laela Sayigh...

  16. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Turks & Caicos (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile presents a snapshot of the electricity generation and reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to Turks and Caicos - a British overseas territory consisting of two groups of islands located southeast of the Bahamas. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  17. Insights on Psittacine Nutrition through the Study of Free-living Chicks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornejo, Juan

    2012-07-16

    sampled the crops from free-living chicks of scarlet macaws and red-and-green macaws from southeastern Peru, Cuban parrots from the Bahamas, lilac-crowned parrots from northwestern Mexico, and thick-billed parrots from northern Mexico. The predicted...

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 101 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institutions, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 101 PRELIMINARY REPORT BAHAMAS James A. Austin, Jr. Co-Chief Scientist

  19. BIOLOGY OF UNDERWATER CAVES by Tom IlifJe, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , Canary Islands and Western Australia. 63 #12;· Thermosbaenaceans - small (4 mm or less), eyeless or eye and volcanic caves, mostly on islands, around the Caribbean, Med- iterranean and Indo-Pacific. Seven of the ten marine, oxygen-deficient waters in caves in the Bahamas, Caicos Islands, Cuba, Yucatan Pen- insula

  20. Sustainable Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    . Policies (1/3) Create transportation systems compatible with native habitats and species and help restore-fossil light duty vehicles #12;#12;Hawaii's Many Challenges Most dependent on oil among 50 states... Big Island level #12;Island Population 1 Azores-San miguel 140,000 2 Bahamas-N.Providence 307,000 3 Big Island 148

  1. Characterization of tropical near-shore fish communities by coastal habitat status on spatially complex island systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    complex island systems Vanessa L. Nero & Kathleen Sullivan Sealey Coastal Ecology Project, Department communities for Andros Island, Bahamas, a complex coastal-reef island system. Benthic assessments and beach available to fishes on island bank systems. Since habitat mapping is often incorpo- rated into marine

  2. 1) Comparative Sedimentology Laboratory, Miami, FL, United States; 2) Center for Applied Coastal Research, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    , Bordeaux, Talence cedex, France Potential for tsunami generation by submarine slope failures along the western Great Bahama Bank Introduction Multibeam and seismic data reveal repeated slope failures scars indicate slope instabilities that will lead to large-scale slope failures in the near future

  3. h-DDSS: Heterogeneous Dynamic Dedicated Servers Scheduling in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    , time and energy efficiency, and pay as you go policy have increased the usage of cloud computing over@ou.edu Md. Shohrab Hossain mshohrabhossain@cse.buet.ac.bd Mohammed Atiquzzaman atiq@ou.edu School, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh Abstract--Simplicity of usage

  4. E-NEWSLETTER FOR THE ITC ALUMNI COMMUNITY ITC UPDATE -ISSUE 2012-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Induced Ground Shaking and Associated Secondary Hazards for Earthquake Vulnerability Reduction (Pakistan FOR ALUMNUS MEDANI BHANDARI How do India, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Pakistan engage in addressing environmental: A Case Study of India, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Read more VACANCIES PhD Research position

  5. MOLECULAR SUPPORT FOR THE TAXONOMIC CONCLUSIONS OF McCORD AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engstrom, Tag N.

    from Pakistan to Bangladesh. Here we present DNA sequence data from mitochondrial ND4 gene, which broad range from Pakistan to Bangladesh. This apparent genetic uniformity is an interesting from across the known range of the genus from Pakistan to the islands of Sumatra and Java

  6. An IntemationalJoumal Available online at:www.sciencedirect.com computers &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaykobad, M.

    .elsevier.com/locat e/camwa Search Trees and Stirling Numbers A. H. MANOB American International University Bangladesh AND M. KAYKOBAD Department of Computer Science and Engineering Bangladesh University of Engineering certain parameters of search trees in terms of Stirling numbers. We also introduce two new inversion

  7. 04/17/2007 10:06 PMDHL: Track details Page 1 of 2http://track.dhl-usa.com/TrackRslts.asp?nav=TrackRslt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholdi III, John J.

    Date and Time Status Location 4/17/2007 10:17 am Shipment delivered. Baghdad, Iraq Why is this? 8:36 am With delivery courier. Baghdad, Iraq 4/16/2007 5:23 pm Arrived at DHL facility. Baghdad, Iraq 5:21 pm Arrived at DHL facility. Baghdad, Iraq 11:39 am Depart Facility. Manama, Bahrain 4/15/2007 9:36 am Arrived at DHL

  8. Lab Research Yields the Biggest Chill Lab Research Yields the Biggest Chill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gets Insurance Cover Against Ecological Disasters q Rising Sea Levels Erode Half Of Bangladesh's Biggest Island: Study q White House Environment Adviser's Move To ExxonMobil Criticized q Analysis: Bush

  9. PETER S. K. KNAPPETT, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Geology & Geophysics, Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacteria and Pathogens to Aquifers in Rural Bangladesh" Graduate Courses: Advanced Soil Chemistry, Contaminant Hydrogeology, Field Methods in Hydrogeology, Groundwater Modeling, Centrifuge Techniques in Groundwater, Advanced Immunology Advisor: Monica B. Emelko Honours Bachelor of Science, Earth Science Minor

  10. Editors Kirsten Halsns & Amit Garg ENERGY, CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors Kirsten Halsnæs & Amit Garg ENERGY, CLIMATE Sustainable Development, Energy and Climate Development, Energy and Climate Exploring Synergies and Tradeoffs Methodological Issues and Case Studies from Brazil, China, India, South Africa, Bangladesh and Senegal Editors Kirsten Halsnæs & Amit Garg ENERGY

  11. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 7, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-11-01

    Quarterly magazine with articles on recent additions to the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Station Locator database, biodiesel buying co-ops, and developing the CNG infrastructure in Bangladesh. Also a memo from CIVITAS 2003.

  12. Making climate adaptation work : strategies for resource constrained South Asian mega-cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta-Koehler, Madhu Chhanda

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation compares the responses of Dhaka, Bangladesh and Kolkata, India to the serious challenges posed by climate change, particularly in the water sector. Drawing on the theories of "adaptation as development" ...

  13. Using Systems Biology Approaches to Elucidate the Mechanisms of Arsenic Reduction in Shewanella Sp. ANA-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Ruth Pamela Tilus

    2015-01-01

    A. Bangladesh. (2011). Microbes enhance mobility of arsenicof an arsenic respiring microbe from Mono Lake, CA AbstractOF AN ARSENIC RESPIRING MICROBE FROM MONO LAKE, CA A BSTRACT

  14. Essays on development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruthbah, Ummul Hasanath

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three independent papers in empirical development economics. The first chapter studies the effect of a family planning program in Bangladesh, which successfully reduced fertility, on ...

  15. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Latin American countries that year. A possible eighth pandemic may be incubating in Bangladesh, where a new strain of the bacterium V. cholerae was identified in 1992. The risks...

  16. Impacts of Biofuel Production and Navigation Impediments on Agricultural Transportation and Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmedov, Zafarbek

    2013-08-22

    , Paraguay, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, Uganda, Ukraine, Uruguay Excess Demand Regions (Importing Countries) Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, France...

  17. Nation 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Afghanistan 2 1 1 2 1 0 -100%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    % Bangladesh 24 27 26 26 30 33 38% Barbados 7 7 4 8 9 10 43% Bassas da India 0 1 1 0 0 0 0% Belarus 3 9 13 10

  18. Designing Wireless Sensor Networks as a Shared Resource for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    upon work supported by the WSN node control device for cablefor our water quality WSN in Bangladesh. The cheapestWe are involved with two ongoing WSN deployments related to

  19. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [February 25, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-02-25

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Canada, Nigeria, China, Japan, Argentina, Brazil, Jamaica, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Egypt, Sudan, Ireland, France, Turkey, United Kingdom, and Federal Republic of Germany.

  20. 82nd Field Artillery in Box Canyon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many developing nations such as Taiwan and Bangladesh. Currently, no oral binding agent exists for the mitigation of arsenic toxicity. The goals of this research were to 1) screen ...

  1. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    research in Vietnam, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Philippines, Indo- nesia, Egypt and India. Vietnam and Japan both initiated hybrid rice re- search in 1983, although Japanese scientists had been studying hybrid rice production since the 1950s. Ja- pan released...

  2. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  3. GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO SELF-DETERMINATION MOVEMENTS: A CASE STUDY COMPARISON IN INDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hariharan, Pritha

    2014-12-31

    Bangladesh in 1971. The years after Independence through the 1950s were full of turmoil with protests and strikes in different parts of the country. Using the combination of an iron hand and the States Reorganization Act of 1956, the leaders of newly... international attention, other movements that are associated with multiple fatalities and human rights abuses are largely ignored. In the northeast, India shares borders with China to the north, Myanmar (Burma) to the east, Bangladesh to the southwest...

  4. Growth, Development and Natural Resources: New Evidence Using a Heterogeneous Panel Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti, T. V. V.; Mohaddes, K.; Raissi, M.

    which are not endowed with oil, natural gas, minerals and other non-renewable resources. Therefore, resource abun- dance is believed to be an important determinant of economic failure, which implies that oil abundance is a curse and not a blessing... that the results are not driven by a few outliers in the sub-samples, we look at country-speci?c estimations for the OPEC and EX countries. Overall the coe¢ cients 15Bahrain, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, India, Iran, Italy, Japan...

  5. Middle Cretaceous (Cenomanian Ostracoda from the Wasia Formation of Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Furiah, A. A. F.

    1983-09-21

    in strata of the same age in Kuwait and Bahrain by Al-Abdul-Raz- zaq (1979) and Al-Abdul-Razzaq and Grosdi- dier (1981), and in Iran by Grosdidier (1973). This supports the suggestion of Al-Abdul-Raz- zaq and Grosdidier (1981) that these ostracodes... five members are named after formations in southeastern Kuwait. The lowest two members are named after areas in Saudi Arabia where they have greatest economic significance. These two lowest members can also be traced northward, where together...

  6. Global warming and the regions in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvi, S.H.; Elagib, N.

    1996-12-31

    The announcement of NASA scientist James Hansen made at a United States Senate`s hearing in June 1988 about the onset of global warming ignited a whirlwind of public concern in United States and elsewhere in the world. Although the temperature had shown only a slight shift, its warming has the potential of causing environmental catastrophe. According to atmosphere scientists, the effect of higher temperatures will change rainfall patterns--some areas getting drier, some much wetter. The phenomenon of warming in the Arabian Gulf region was first reported by Alvi for Bahrain and then for Oman. In the recent investigations, the authors have found a similar warming in other regions of the Arabian Gulf and in several regions of Sudan in Africa. The paper will investigate the observed data on temperature and rainfall of Seeb in Oman, Bahrain, International Airport in Kuwait as index stations for the Arabian Gulf and Port Sudan, Khartoum and Malakal in the African Continent of Sudan. Based on various statistical methods, the study will highlight a drying of the regions from the striking increase in temperature and decline of rainfall amount. Places of such environmental behavior are regarded as desertifying regions. Following Hulme and Kelly, desertification is taken to mean land degradation in dryland regions, or the permanent decline in the potential of the land to support biological activity, and hence human welfare. The paper will also, therefore, include the aspect of desertification for the regions under consideration.

  7. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  8. Available at: http://publications.ictp.it IC/2010/018 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the processes/protocols of administration of isotope dosage and waste management in place in a nuclear medicine FOR THEORETICAL PHYSICS RADIATION MONITORING IN A NEWLY ESTABLISHED NUCLEAR MEDICINE FACILITY Kamila Afroj1 Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 158, Dhaka

  9. AA GGlloobbaall PPeerrssppeeccttiivvee oonn UUnniivveerrssiittyy LLiibbrraarriieess aanndd aa RRooaaddmmaapp ffoorr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Federated Digital Library...............................................10 4 Trends and Issues Facing://medianet.kent.edu/technicalreports.html Digital Library Consortium of Bangladesh Proposal 2 The library connects us with the insight and knowledge be tested by how well we support our libraries. -- Cosmos Carl SAGAN #12;Technical Report 2006

  10. Everything we know is wrong On 1 April 2057, workers found the body of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    such promise for reversing the effects of global warming, winning him the Nobel and numerous other awards unintelligible message, but in truth he left two, both perfectly intelligible. Many people concluded his last by the Sinai LTC facility. But global temperatures continued to rise. Venice was lost, along with Bangladesh

  11. Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols on the Indian Monsoon GERALD A. MEEHL, JULIE M. ARBLASTER,* AND WILLIAM D. COLLINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arblaster, Julie

    radiation reaching the surface during the dry season, as noted in previous studies. The increased meridional, Thailand, and Malaysia, as seen in observations. During the summer monsoon season, the model experiments of India, Bangladesh, Burma, and Thailand. Analysis of single ensemble members from the multiple

  12. Distribution and dynamics of mangrove forests of South Asiaq Chandra Giri a,*, Jordan Long b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    57198, USA c World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Pakistan d The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. These forests provide important ecosystem goods and services to the region's dense three case studies in Indus Delta (Pakistan), Goa (India), and Sundarbans (Bangladesh and India

  13. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Bourkina (Upper Volta), Brazil, Burma, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, French Guiana, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields, Appendix II, Phytomass Files, and References.

  14. UKERC Project Final Report Climate change and energy security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose, Joemon M.

    UKERC Project Final Report Climate change and energy security: Assessing the impact of information security Climate change and energy security Catherine Happer Research Associate, Glasgow University Media to the Bangladesh climate refugee and Glasgow flood scenarios 10 4. Audience studies: Energy security 12 Awareness

  15. Sarah Glynn (2006) This article was published in Socialist History Journal 29 pp5675

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Bangladesh. This study explores the nature and impact of that movement, and its continuing legacy for the British Bengalis. This study explores the nature and impact of the independence movement, and its layers, and how the dictates of `popular frontism' and revolutionary `stages theory' allowed

  16. Institute of Geography Online Paper Series: GEO-020 The Spirit of '71: how the Bangladeshi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangladesh. This study explores the nature and impact of that movement, and its continuing legacy, and how the dictates of `popular frontism' and revolutionary `stages theory' allowed the radical socialism' and revolutionary `stages theory' allowed the radical socialism of the intellectual leadership to become subsumed

  17. Natural Disasters and Adaptation to Climate Change Edited by Sarah Boulter, Jean Palutikof, David Karoly, and Daniela Guitart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batterbury, Simon

    wave: impacts, public health adaptation and response in France 189 Mathilde Pascal, Alain Le Tertre cyclone Sidr in Bangladesh 264 Bimal K. Paul and Munshi K. Rahman 18 Coffee, disasters, and social-ecological resilience in Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico 276 Hallie Eakin, Helda Morales, Edwin Castellanos, Gustavo Cruz

  18. Nepal's Maoists: Purists or Pragmatists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Crisis Group

    2007-05-18

    , Nepal’s Maoists: Their Aims, Structure and Strategy, ?? ??????? ???? ??????????? ????????? ?????? ????? ????????? ?????? ????? ????????? ??????? ??. ???, Nepal: From People Power to Peace?, ?? ?? ????, ?????? ??? ????? ??????? ??. ???, Nepal’s Peace... ), Communist Party of Afghanistan, Communist Party of Bangladesh (Marxist-Leninist), Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), Communist Party of Peru, Communist Party of Turkey Marxist-Leninist, Marxist-Leninist Communist Organisation of Tunisia, Maoist Communist...

  19. Comment on "Arsenic Mobility and Groundwater Extraction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Asish R.

    -season vertical hydraulic gradients in Bangladesh. Fig. 2 shows weekly measure- ments of water level between 1967 and pre-bomb atmospheric tritium levels of 5 tritium units (TU)], similar to those estimated by Harvey et irrigation pumping took place, clearly indicate that vertical hydraulic gradients and dry-season recharge did

  20. Fi in Gulf Pidgin Arabic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Eric; Alanazi, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Gulf Pidgin Arabic (GPA) is a simplified communication system established by the non-Arabic immigrants to Gulf countries in the Middle East. In the past decades, millions of people with no Arabic skills have come from countries such as Bangladesh...

  1. CX-100064 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NREL – Bangladesh Wind Resources Assessment Project: NREL Tracking No. 14-020 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/11/2014 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Golden Field Office

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS, VOL. 38, NO. 3, JUNE 2008 771 Bagging and Boosting Negatively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART B: CYBERNETICS, VOL. 38, NO. 3, JUNE 2008 for the Promotion of Sciences (JSPS). The work of X. Yao was supported in part by the Engineering and Physical Editor N. Chawla. M. M. Islam is with the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technol- ogy (BUET

  3. Factors influencing the efficiency of arsenic extraction by phosphate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yean, Su Jin

    2005-11-01

    of this study were to examine the relationships between phosphate-extractable arsenic and soil iron-oxide composition and to investigate the experimental factors which might influence arsenic-extraction efficiency from rice-paddy soils of Bangladesh by phosphate...

  4. WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION SEA/EH/504 Regional Office for South-East Asia 21 April 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , including identification of patients by the National Institute of Preventive and Social Medicine (NIPSOM jointly with NIPSOM, Rajshahi University and the Dhaka Community Hospital. The present report focuses as formulate an appropriate method/technique to evaluate arsenic problems in Bangladesh. (2) To develop risk

  5. S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Richard

    S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated With Childhood households. We used survey data from sites in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan to estimate the costs borne by households due to childhood diarrhea, including direct medical costs, direct nonmedical costs

  6. Swapan Kumar Gayen Physics Department, The City College of New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Swapan Kumar Gayen Physics Department, The City College of New York 160 Convent Avenue, New York, Bangladesh, 1975 EMPLOYMENT Professor, Physics, City College of New York, New York, New York, 2007-present, 2003 ­ Present Associate Professor, Physics, City College of New York, New York, New York, 2001

  7. Middle Eastern power systems; Present and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Middle Eastern Power systems have evolved independently of each other over many decades. The region covers a wide geographical area of over 4 million square kilometers with an estimated population in 1990 of over 120 million people. This paper discusses the present status and future power system developments in the Middle East with emphasis on the Mashrequ Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Interconnections within MAC and possible extensions to Turkey, Europe, and Central Africa are discussed. A common characteristic of the MAC power systems is that they are all operated by government or semi-government bodies. The energy resources in the region are varied. Countries such as Iraq, Egypt, and Syria have significant hydro power resources. On the other hand, the GCC countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel reserves.

  8. Reduction of ruminant methane emissions - a win-win-win opportunity for business, development, and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes research efforts of The Global Livestock Producers Program (GLPP) in establishing self-sustaining enterprises for cost-effective technologies (i.e., animal nutrition and genetic improvement) and global methane emissions reductions in developing world nations. The US Environmental Protection Agency has funded several studies to examine the possibilities of reducing ruminant methane emissions in India, Tanzania, Bangladesh, and Brazil. The results of the studies showed that: (1) many developing countries` production systems are inefficient, and (2) great potential exists for decreasing global methane emissions through increasing animal productivity. From this effort, the GLPP established livestock development projects in India, Zimbabwe, and Tanzania, and is developing projects for Bangladesh, Nepal, and Brazil. The GLPP has developed a proven methodology for assessing ruminant methane and incorporating methane emissions monitoring into viable projects.

  9. Endohelminths from six rare species of turtles (Bataguridae) from Southeast Asia confiscated by international authorities in Hong Kong, China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Rebecca Ann

    2004-09-30

    is distributed from the Nicabar Islands, Bangladesh, and Assam, south through Burma, Thailand, Kampuchea, Vietnam, and Malaya, east in Indonesia to Sulawesi and Amboina. It is also located in the Philippines and Celebes. It inhabits lowland water bodies... vulnerable species (Hilton-Taylor, 2000). Cyclemys dentata The Asian leaf turtle is one of two members of the genus Cyclemys. It is distributed from northern India, southward through Burma, Thailand, Kampuchea, Vietnam, and Malaya, to Sumatra, Java...

  10. Gulf Cooperation Council: Arabia's model of integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etaibi, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study is an analysis of the foundations and emergence in 1981 of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), which consists of six traditional Arab Gulf states (the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar, and Kuwait). It finds the GCC to be a unique case among twentieth-century integrative schemes. The study also identifies and analyzes relevant local, regional, and international forces. Among the local forces are traditional religio-political systems, economic dependence on a depletable resource, and the presence of a large number of foreign residents. On the regional level, this study takes into consideration such issues as the Arab League, Arab Nationalism, and the Islamic revolutionary movement in Iran. On the international level, the influence of the superpowers and the major industrialized nations on the emergence and future of the GCC Community are analyzed. Throughout the past decade there has been a growing scholarly interest in the Gulf region. In preparation for this study, the author relied heavily on the literature generated by this new research, as well as on documents and official publications, mostly in Arabic. A survey was conducted among a limited number of GCC graduate students during the summer of 1983. In addition, interviews with selected members of the GCC Secretariat-General and various member-state officials were conducted during a research trip in the region in the spring of 1984.

  11. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Husseini, M. [Gulf PetroLink, Manama (Bahrain); Chimblo, R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  12. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  13. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  14. Changing structure of the world refining industry: implications for the United States and other major consuming regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    There are five chapters in this publication. Chapter I on refining industry in transition covers refining history highlights, and OPEC's downstream operations. Chapter II on demand for oil and oil products discusses supply and demand for OPEC oil, demand for oil products, historical growth trends, future growth trends and the case of East Asia - emergence of a fuel oil glut. Chapter III on the US and other traditional refining centers begins with an introduction on the structure of refining and continues on to cover the refining industry in OECD countries, USA, Western Europe, Japan, Singapore and Caribbean and closes with some conclusions. Chapter IV is on refining expansions in OPEC and the third World Nations. The following are covered: (1) nations of the Gulf (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, United Arab Emirates); (2) OPEC members beyond the Gulf (Indonesia, Africa, Libya, Algeria, Nigeria and Gabon, South America, Venezuela); (3) other major exporters (China, Egypt, Malaysia, Mexico); (4) non-OPEC developing countries - trends in the refining sector. The chapter ends with a short summary on capacity prospects and comparative economics. The final chapter has conclusions and recommendations on: price interactions between crude and products; product exports - impact on OPEC's internal; prices and market influence; importers and exporters - decisions; and course of action of the United States. 18 figures, 40 tables.

  15. Electric network interconnection of Mashreq Arab Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Amin, I.M.; Al-Shehri, A.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Power system interconnection is a well established practice for a variety of technical and economical reasons. Several interconnected networks exist worldwide for a number of factors. Some of these networks cross international boundaries. This presentation discusses the future developments of the power systems of Mashreq Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Yemen. Mac power systems are operated by government or semigovernment bodies. Many of these countries have national or regional electric grids but are generally isolated from each other. With the exception of Saudi Arabia power systems, which employ 60 Hz, all other MAC utilities use 50 Hz frequency. Each country is served by one utility, except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi Consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The energy resources in MAC are varied. Countries such as Egypt, Iraq, and Syria have significant hydro resources.The gulf countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel, The variation in energy resources as well as the characteristics of the electric load make it essential to look into interconnections beyond the national boundaries. Most of the existing or planned interconnections involve few power systems. A study involving 12 countries and over 20 utilities with different characteristics represents a very large scale undertaking.

  16. A Dharani-mantra in the Vinaya-vastu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathak, Suniti K.

    1989-01-01

    offence (Vinaya-pitaka, Culla-vagga, V. 8.2. (PTS edn). See also' KevaUa SuUa (No. 11) Vol. p 214 (PTS edn). 4. Dutt, N. Early Monastic Buddhism p. 153-158, Calcutta, 1960. 5. Sukomal Choudhuri : Contemporary Buddhism in Bangladesh pp 116... dag gis zas sbyar na ji Ita bu yin pa ma ses nasI de rnams kyi sman pa la dris pa dan{ des _ smras pal 'phags pa dag kyed nyid kyi Slon pa beom Idan 'das ei thams cad (46b:2) mkhyen pa thams edd gzigs pa kho ns nyid yin tel de nyid mkhyen Ie zhes...

  17. Policies to Spur Energy Access. Executive Summary; Volume 1, Engaging the Private Sector in Expanding Access to Electricity; Volume 2, Case Studies to Public-Private Models to Finance Decentralized Electricity Access

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, Terri; Rai, Neha; Esterly, Sean; Cox, Sadie; Reber, Tim; Muzammil, Maliha; Mahmood, Tasfiq; Kaur, Nanki; Tesfaye, Lidya; Mamuye, Simret; Knuckles, James; Morris, Ellen; de Been, Merijn; Steinbach, Dave; Acharya, Sunil; Chhetri, Raju Pandit; Bhushal, Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Government policy is one of the most important factors in engaging the private sector in providing universal access to electricity. In particular, the private sector is well positioned to provide decentralized electricity products and services. While policy uncertainty and regulatory barriers can keep enterprises and investors from engaging in the market, targeted policies can create opportunities to leverage private investment and skills to expand electricity access. However, creating a sustainable market requires policies beyond traditional electricity regulation. The report reviews the range of policy issues that impact the development and expansion of a market for decentralized electricity services from establishing an enabling policy environment to catalyzing finance, building human capacity, and integrating energy access with development programs. The case studies in this report show that robust policy frameworks--addressing a wide range of market issues--can lead to rapid transformation in energy access. The report highlights examples of these policies in action Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Mali, Mexico, and Nepal.

  18. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  19. Strategies of Asian oil-importing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.

    1997-04-01

    Various strategies are used by oil-importing countries to reduce their economic dependence on imported oil: national oil production, energy conservation, and the change of economic structures from high energy intensity sectors to low ones. In this article, the roles of these different strategies have been identified for 10 selected oil-importing countries in Asia: Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Thailand, Hong Kong, R.O Korea, and Taiwan. The results show that most of the selected countries (although Hong Kong and Taiwan are independent economic entities, for simplicity, the author refers to them as countries) have succeeded in reducing their national economy dependence on imported oil since 1973. Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India are among the most successful countries, with more than 40% reduction in their economic dependence on imported oil.

  20. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  1. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  2. Elevated levels of plasma Big endothelin-1 and its relation to hypertension and skin lesions in individuals exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Islam, Khairul; Yeasmin, Fouzia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Karim, Md. Rezaul [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mashiur; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Aziz, Abdul; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Sheikh, Afzal; Haque, Abedul; Hossain, M. Tofazzal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mostaque [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh)] [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh); Haris, Parvez I. [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)] [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Ikemura, Noriaki; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan); Hossain, Khaled, E-mail: khossain69@yahoo.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)

    2012-03-01

    Chronic arsenic (As) exposure affects the endothelial system causing several diseases. Big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), the biological precursor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a more accurate indicator of the degree of activation of the endothelial system. Effect of As exposure on the plasma Big ET-1 levels and its physiological implications have not yet been documented. We evaluated plasma Big ET-1 levels and their relation to hypertension and skin lesions in As exposed individuals in Bangladesh. A total of 304 study subjects from the As-endemic and non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. As concentrations in water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The plasma Big ET-1 levels were measured using a one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay kit. Significant increase in Big ET-1 levels were observed with the increasing concentrations of As in drinking water, hair and nails. Further, before and after adjusting with different covariates, plasma Big ET-1 levels were found to be significantly associated with the water, hair and nail As concentrations of the study subjects. Big ET-1 levels were also higher in the higher exposure groups compared to the lowest (reference) group. Interestingly, we observed that Big ET-1 levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive and skin lesion groups compared to the normotensive and without skin lesion counterpart, respectively of the study subjects in As-endemic areas. Thus, this study demonstrated a novel dose–response relationship between As exposure and plasma Big ET-1 levels indicating the possible involvement of plasma Big ET-1 levels in As-induced hypertension and skin lesions. -- Highlights: ? Plasma Big ET-1 is an indicator of endothelial damage. ? Plasma Big ET-1 level increases dose-dependently in arsenic exposed individuals. ? Study subjects in arsenic-endemic areas with hypertension have elevated Big ET-1 levels. ? Study subjects with arsenic-induced skin lesions show elevated plasma Big ET-1 levels. ? Arsenic-induced hypertension and skin lesions may be linked to plasma Big ET-1 levels.

  3. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

  4. Nuclear energy: Where do we go from here?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muslim, Dato’ Dr Noramly

    2015-04-29

    As Malaysia progresses towards 2020, the depleting resource of oil and gas has forced a re-look at alternatives to replace fossil fuels as energy sources. Among the viable options is nuclear energy, enabling us to meet energy needs and sustain national development in the twenty-first century. Three essential steps Malaysia must take to introduce nuclear power into its energy mix are: energy planning, infrastructure development, and deployment. Malaysia has to face a series of challenges, including public acceptance, waste management, minimizing proliferation risk, and ensuring the security of nuclear plants and materials. Timely development of qualified and competent manpower is a key limiting factor in the development and transfer of nuclear technologies — and education and training take time, effort and money. There is a need for political will. Within the Asian region, China, Korea and Japan are in the forefront in utilizing nuclear power to meet electricity demands. Countries such as UAE, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Turkey are moving ahead with the nuclear option for electricity generation and they have begun planning and construction of nuclear power plants. Against this backdrop, what are Malaysia’s moves? This paper discusses various options and challenges, obstacles and repercussions in meeting future energy demands.

  5. South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

    2000-04-01

    To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

  6. Energy-conservation-investment decision making in developing countries: A review of project implementation in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Despite recent efforts in a number of developing countries to promote energy conservation (EC) and efficiency, only a fraction of EC potential has been captured, especially for projects that require significant investments. The document analyzes EC efforts in 11 countries where energy audit and/or feasibility study programs have been carried out (Bangladesh, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Pakistan, Panama, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka), covering some 1,500 EC projects involving 242 industrial companies. Cost and length of payback seem to be the determining factors for companies considering EC measures; no-cost or low-cost projects with paybacks of less than a year (such as power factor improvement projects) had the highest rate of implementation, while expensive, complicated projects (e.g., cogeneration or fuel substitution projects) were most often rejected. The document concludes, however, that the rate of implementation of EC programs has been quite high, and recommends that inexpensive, short-term projects be featured in future EC programs and increased levels of TA and financial assistance be made available to companies implementing long-term EC measures.

  7. Impacts of different cumulus physics over south Asia region with case study tropical cyclone Viyaru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahad, Abdullah Al

    2015-01-01

    Tropical Cyclone Viyaru, formerly known as Cyclonic Storm Mahasen was a rapidly intensifying, category 01B storm that made landfall in Chittagong, Bangladesh on the 16th of May, 2013. In this study, the sensitivity of numerical simulations of tropical cyclone to cumulus physics parametrization is carried out with a view to determine the best cumulus physics option for prediction of the cyclones track, timing, and central pressure evolution in the Bay of Bengal. For this purpose, the tropical cyclone Viyaru has been simulated by WRF ARW in a nested domain with NCEP Global Final Analysis(FNL) data as initial and boundary conditions. The model domain consists of one parent domain and one nested domain. The resolution of the parent domain is 36 km while the nested domain has a resolution of 12 km. Five numerical simulations have been done with the same micro-physics scheme (WSM3), planetary boundary layer scheme,NOAH land surface scheme but different Cumulus Parametrization scheme. Four cumulus Parametrization sc...

  8. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially-viable fashion presents a variety of challenges. Beyond the technology itself (and, especially, the effects on the technology of the harsh oceanic environment), it is important to consider the possible environmental impacts of commercial-scale implementation of oceanic energy extraction. Further, because such implementation represents a completely new undertaking, the human resources required do not exist, so education and training programs are critical to eventual success. This project, establishing a national open-ocean energy laboratory, was designed to address each of these three challenges in a flexible framework allowing for adaptive management as the project proceeded. In particular: ? the technology challenge, including resource assessment, evolved during the project to recognize and address the need for a national testing facility in the ocean for small-scale prototype MRE systems developed by industry; ? the environmental challenge became formalized and expanded during the permitting process for such a testing facility; and ? the human resources/societal challenges, both in terms of the need for education and training and in terms of public acceptance of MRE, stimulated a robust outreach program far beyond that originally envisioned at SNMREC. While all of these activities at SNMREC are ongoing, a number of significant milestones (in addition to the contributions listed in the appendices) were achieved under the auspices of this award. These include: ? Planning and site selection for the first-phase test facility, offshore of Dania Beach, FL, including some equipment for the facility, submission of an Interim Policy Lease Application to the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and completion of an Environmental Assessment by BOEM and a positive Consistency Determination by the State of Florida; ? Measurements using acoustic profilers of the current structure and variability in the vicinity of the site under a variety of weather conditions, seasons and time durations; ? Design and implementation of instrument

  9. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90°C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group – Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 ± 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs’ Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  10. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  11. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/11: Cooperative Environmental Monitoring in the Coastal Regions of India and Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajen, Gauray

    1999-06-01

    The cessation of hostilities between India and Pakistan is an immediate need and of global concern, as these countries have tested nuclear devices, and have the capability to deploy nuclear weapons and long-range ballistic missiles. Cooperative monitoring projects among neighboring countries in South Asia could build regional confidence, and, through gradual improvements in relations, reduce the threat of war and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. This paper discusses monitoring the trans-border movement of flow and sediment in the Indian and Pakistani coastal areas. Through such a project, India and Pakistan could initiate greater cooperation, and engender movement towards the resolution of the Sir Creek territorial dispute in their coastal region. The Joint Working Groups dialogue being conducted by India and Pakistan provides a mechanism for promoting such a project. The proposed project also falls within a regional framework of cooperation agreed to by several South Asian countries. This framework has been codified in the South Asian Seas Action Plan, developed by Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. This framework provides a useful starting point for Indian and Pakistani cooperative monitoring in their trans-border coastal area. The project discussed in this paper involves computer modeling, the placement of in situ sensors for remote data acquisition, and the development of joint reports. Preliminary computer modeling studies are presented in the paper. These results illustrate the cross-flow connections between Indian and Pakistani coastal regions and strengthen the argument for cooperation. Technologies and actions similar to those suggested for the coastal project are likely to be applied in future arms control and treaty verification agreements. The project, therefore, serves as a demonstration of cooperative monitoring technologies. The project will also increase people-to-people contacts among Indian and Pakistani policy makers and scientists. In the perceptions of the general public, the project will crystallize the idea that the two countries share ecosystems and natural resources, and have a vested interest in increased collaboration.

  12. South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification of sites within the region at which water quality data are to be collected; (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process; and, (5) training of partners in the use of water quality monitoring equipment.

  13. The mediation of environmental assessment's influence: What role for power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashmore, Matthew; Axelsson, Anna

    2013-02-15

    Considerable empirical research has been conducted on why policy tools such as environmental assessment (EA) often appear to have 'little effect' (after Weiss) on policy decisions. This article revisits this debate but looks at a mediating factor that has received limited attention to-date in the context of EA - political power. Using a tripartite analytical framework, a comparative analysis of the influence and significance of power in mediating environmental policy integration is undertaken. Power is analysed, albeit partially, through an exploration of institutions that underpin social order. Empirically, the research examines the case of a new approach to policy-level EA (essentially a form of Strategic Environmental Assessment) developed by the World Bank and its trial application to urban environmental governance and planning in Dhaka mega-city, Bangladesh. The research results demonstrate that power was intimately involved in mediating the influence of the policy EA approach, in both positive (enabling) and negative (constraining) ways. It is suggested that the policy EA approach was ultimately a manifestation of a corporate strategy to maintain the powerful position of the World Bank as a leading authority on international development which focuses on knowledge generation. Furthermore, as constitutive of an institution and reflecting the worldviews of its proponents, the development of a new approach to EA also represents a significant power play. This leads us to, firstly, emphasise the concepts of strategy and intentionality in theorising how and why EA tools are employed, succeed and fail; and secondly, reflect on the reasons why power has received such limited attention to-date in EA scholarship. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conducts empirical research on the neglected issue of power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Employs an interpretation of power in which it is viewed as a productive phenomenon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses the influence of power in the trial application of a new approach to policy environmental assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrates the importance of power dynamics in understanding the successes and failures of environmental assessment.

  14. Product Quality Assurance for Off-Grid Lighting in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    World Bank; Mills, Evan; Mills, Evan

    2008-07-13

    Although the emergence of markets for high efficiency off-grid lighting technologies holds promise, realizing the potential of this opportunity on a long-term, sustainable basis requires careful attention to issues of product quality, consumer protection, and the potential for significant 'market spoiling', in anticipation of increases of sales of low cost, low performance off-grid lighting products. The goal of the Lighting Africa quality assurance workshop was to articulate strategies to mitigate the dangers of market spoiling and to explore ways to protect consumers from misleading advertising for sales of inferior, off-grid lighting products in the context of Lighting Africa's overarching objective to support the industry in developing a robust off-grid lighting market in Africa. The workshop resulted in the identification of two strategic approaches for meeting Lighting Africa quality assurance programmatic needs. The first strategy is intended to meet a short-term programmatic need for quality associated with requests for lighting products by bulk procurement agents, such as in a World Bank-financed project. The development of procurement specifications and test procedures that could be used in a quality/usability screening method in order to provide guidance for forthcoming large volume purchases emerged as the best solution to meet this need. Such approaches are used in World Bank-financed solar home systems (SHSs) projects in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and China, among others. However, unlike the SHSs which have multiple balance-of-system (BOS) components warranting the need for an array of specifications for individual components, stand alone lighting systems require specifications that are amenable to individual light points. To test this approach, Lighting Africa elected to use the technical specifications issued by the Photovoltaic Global Approval Program for solar lanterns that use CFL bulbs (PVRS11A) as the basis of qualifying such products. A contract has been competitively awarded to the Global Approval Program for Photovoltaics (PV GAP) under the Lighting Africa Program to select and test ten solar lantern product models. Lantern selection will be determined based on a number of criteria, among them, the ability to provide a daily duty cycle of at least 3 hours of light, the number of days of autonomy of battery, the volume of sales (especially in Africa), and whether or not the manufacturing facility is ISO 9000 certified. Those that are confirmed as meeting the specifications may be eligible to receive a PVGAP quality seal. The work is being carried out in partnership with the Photovoltaic and Wind Quality Test Center in Beijing, China and TUV Rhineland in Koeln, Germany. As off-grid LED-based stand-alone lighting products is in a nascent stage of development compared to CFL-based lanterns, Lighting Africa will support the development of a 'Quality Screening' approach to selecting LED lighting, in order not to delay consumers benefiting from such advances. The screening methodology could be used by procurement agencies to qualify LED lighting products for bulk or programmatic procurements. The main elements of this work comprises of developing a procurement specification and test procedure for undertaking a 'quick' quality/usability screening to be used for procuring LED lights and to test up to 30 LED-based lights to screen products that meet the requirement. The second strategy is intended to meet a longer-term need associated with creating a self-sustaining product quality assurance program that will effectively protect the African consumer, prevent significant market spoiling, adapt with expected technological advancements over the long-term--in other words, give consumers the ability to detect quality products and the information needed to find products that meet their specific needs from among the myriad of lighting products that become available commercially. Workshop discussions and the discussions evolving from the workshop led the Lighting Africa team to opt for an approach similar to that of th