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1

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Wednesday, 25 August 2010 00:00 Scientists have...

2

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing...

3

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

4

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

5

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

6

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

7

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

8

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

9

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

10

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

11

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms The Role of Bacterial Biofilms and Surface Components in Plant-Bacterial Associations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The role of bacterial surface components in combination with bacterial functional signals in the process of biofilm formation has been increasingly studied in recent years. Plants support a diverse array of bacteria on or in their roots, transport vessels, stems, and leaves. These plant-associated bacteria have important effects on plant health and productivity. Biofilm formation on plants is associated with symbiotic and pathogenic responses, but how plants regulate such associations is unclear. Certain bacteria in biofilm matrices have been found to induce plant growth and to protect plants from phytopathogens (a process termed biocontrol), whereas others are involved in pathogenesis. In this review, we systematically describe the various components and mechanisms involved in bacterial biofilm formation and attachment to plant surfaces and the relationships of these mechanisms to bacterial activity and survival.

Pablo C. Bogino; Mara De Las Mercedes Oliva; O G. Sorroche; Walter Giordano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Laser-Generated Shockwaves for the Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history at the biofilm and polystyrene interface for energyhistory between water and pigskin for the lowest energyhistory between water and pigskin for the lowest energy

Navarro, Artemio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Inter- and Intra-kingdom Signaling in Bacterial Chemotaxis, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell-cell communication between bacteria, belonging to the same species or to different species (Intra-kingdom signaling), or communication between bacteria and their animal host (Inter-kingdom signaling) is mediated through different chemical signals that are synthesized and secreted by bacteria or the host and is crucial for the survival of bacteria inside their host. The overall goal of this work was to understand the role of inter- and intra-kingdom signaling in phenotypes such as chemotaxis, colonization and biofilm formation, and virulence that are associated with infections caused by the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract pathogens. A part of our work also aimed at developing microfluidics-based models to study inter- and intra-kingdom signaling in biofilm formation, inhibition, and dispersal. We showed that norepinephrine (NE), an important host signal produced during stress, increases human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, motility, attachment, and virulence, and also showed that the actions of NE are mediated primarily through the LasR, and not the RhlR QS system. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the chemo-sensing of the intra-kingdom signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2) by pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by performing different chemotaxis assays (capillary, microPlug and microFlow assays), and discovered that AI-2 is a potent attractant for E. coli and S. typhimurium, and that the Tsr chemoreceptor and periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LsrB are necessary for sensing AI-2, although uptake of AI-2 into the cytoplasm is not required. We concluded that LsrB, when bound to AI-2, interacts directly with the periplasmic domain of Tsr primarily at the Thr-61 and Asp-63 residues of LsrB, making LsrB the first known periplasmic-protein partner for Tsr. We fabricated a simple user-friendly microfluidic flow cell (microBF) device that can precisely measure the effect of a wide range of concentrations of single or combinations of two or more soluble signals on bacterial biofilm formation and development. We also constructed a synthetic biofilm circuit that utilizes the Hha and BdcA dispersal proteins of E. coli along with a quorum sensing (QS) switch that works based on the accumulation of the signal N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-o-C12HSL) and implemented it in an upgraded ?BF device. We showed that a QS system may be utilized with biofilm dispersal proteins to control consortial biofilm formation by removing an existing biofilm and then removing the biofilm that displaced the first one. These types of synthetic QS circuits may be used to pattern biofilms by facilitating the re-use of platforms and to create sophisticated reactor systems that will be used to form bio-refineries.

Hegde, Manjunath

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Engineering Escherichia coli to Control Biofilm Formation, Dispersal, and Persister Cell Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofilms are formed in aquatic environments by the attachment of bacteria to submerged surfaces, to the air/liquid interface, and to each other. Although biofilms are associated with disease and biofouling, the robust nature of biofilms; for example, their ability to tolerate chemical and physical stresses, makes them attractive for beneficial biotechnology applications such as bioremediation and biofuels. Based on an understanding of diverse signals and regulatory networks during biofilm development, biofilms can be engineered for these applications by manipulating extracellular/intercellular signals and regulators. Here, we rewired the global regulator H-NS of Escherichia coli to control biofilm formation using random protein engineering. H-NS variant K57N was obtained that reduces biofilm formation 10-fold compared with wild-type H-NS (wild-type H-NS increases biofilm formation whereas H-NS K57N reduces it) via its interaction with the nucleoid-associated proteins Cnu and StpA. H-NS K57N leads to enhanced excision of the defective prophage Rac and results in cell lysis through the activation of a host killing toxin HokD. We also engineered another global regulator, Hha, which interacts with H-NS, to disperse biofilms. Hha variant Hha13D6 was obtained that causes nearly complete biofilm dispersal by increasing cell death by the activation of proteases. Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) systems are important components of a wide variety of engineered biological devices, since autoinducers are useful as input signals because they are small, diffuse freely in aqueous media, and are easily taken up by cells. To demonstrate that biofilms may be controlled for biotechnological applications such as biorefineries, we constructed a synthetic biofilm engineering circuit to manipulate biofilm formation. By using a population-driven QS switch based on the LasI/LasR system and biofilm dispersal proteins Hha13D6 and BdcAE50Q (disperses biofilms by titrating cyclic diguanylate), we displaced an existing biofilm and then removed the second biofilm. Persisters are a subpopulation of metabolically-dormant cells in biofilms that are resistant to antibiotics; hence, understanding persister cell formation is important for controlling bacterial infections. Here, we engineered toxin MqsR with greater toxicity and demonstrated that the more toxic MqsR increases persistence by decreasing the ability of the cell to respond to antibiotic stress through its RpoS-based regulation of acid resistance, multidrug resistance, and osmotic resistance systems.

Hong, Seok Hoon

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Small molecule modulators of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm development1 Uyen T. Nguyen, Iwona B. Wenderska, Matthew A. Chong, Kalinka Koteva, Gerard D. Wright2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION43 Among the key issues in the food industry is prevention of the proliferation of food-borne44. monocytogenes104 biofilm development on food-grade stainless steel were confirmed using scanning electron105 Scanning electron microscopy of L. monocytogenes 568 on stainless steel.192 L. monocytogenes 568 biofilms

Burrows, Lori

16

Development of New Soft Ionization Mass Spectrometry Approaches for Spatial Imaging of Complex Chemical and Biological Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical and Biological Systems Research Team: Julia Laskin, Ljiljana Pasa-Toli, Brandi Heath, Ingela Laskin (PNNL) Purpose Multimodal chemical characterization of microbial biofilms focused bacterial colonies Develop novel mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging capabilities broadly applicable

17

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon to Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem, and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's second year was to chemically modify the major antigens of Renibacteirium salmoninarum, immunize coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to test the immunogenicity of the preparations used. Immunogenicity of the antigenic material was tested by (1) admixture experiments, using whole KD cells with muramyl dipepetide, Vibrio anguillarum extract, E. coli lipopolysaccharide, or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Freund's complete adjuvant. In addition to these goals a number of important techniques have been developed in order to facilitate the production of the vaccine. These procedures include: (1) the use of the soluble antigen for diagnosis in the ELISA and Western blot analysis, (2) detection of salmonid anti-KD antibodies by an ELISA technique, (3) detection of cellular immune responses to the soluble antigen, and (4) development of immersion challenge procedures for bacterial kidney disease (BKD).

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon of the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon of Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem,and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's third year was to test the immunogenicity and prophylactic value in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) of various chemical conjugates of Renibacterium salmoninarum cells and major antigens. This was accomplished by assessing the serum antibody response, the cellular immune response (cellular proliferation), and the kinetics of mortality after Lethal injections of the bacterium. An important facet of this research is the identification and isolation of virulence factors. These studies are not only important to the dissection of the mechanism of pathogenesis of bacterial kidney disease, but the purification of such a factor(s) will insure the production of a more potent vaccine. The studies completed this year have: (1) identified antigenic material which protect; (2) identified antigenic material which can exacerbate the disease; (3) identified a possibly major mechanism of pathogenesis via the interference with antibody; (4) the general ability to produce delineated a western blot technique for identification of infected fish; (5) described the use of monoclonal antibodies for antigenic analysis; and (6) identified an unusual and dramatic effect of R. salmoninarum cells on phagocytic function.

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Mathematical Description of Microbial Biofilms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe microbial communities denoted biofilms and efforts to model some of their important aspects, including quorum sensing, growth, mechanics, and antimicrobial tolerance mechanisms. Keywords: antimicrobial tolerance, biofilms, biomechanics, quorum sensing

Isaac Klapper; Jack Dockery

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Artificial teeth : dental biofilm analysis on a chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, an "artificial teeth" microfluidic device is developed that provides unprecedented control over the conditions required to simulate the growth of complex dental biofilm. Dental plaque formation is not only ...

Lam, Raymond Hiu-wai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data presented here demonstrate that there is some variability to the antigenic structure of KDB. Although gel filtration of all antigenic preparations revealed a wide range of sizes for antigens, resolution on a denaturing gel revealed relatively few protein bands and immunological assays revealed the same (3) low number of antigens. It is of particular interest that there seems to be a protein of 60 kd in all preparations, but that there are not larger individual molecular species. This, in turn indicates that the larger molecular weight species detected in gel filtration are most likely aggregates or membrane fragments composed of a lower molecular weight subunit. Use of ultrafiltration of KDM-2 medium appears to be successful in eliminating contamination of high molecular weight material found in KDM-2. There appears to be no alteration in the number of soluble antigens produced by growth in either medium, nor in the number of proteins, as detected by SDS-PAGE. However, soluble antigens isolated from UF-KDM-2 does appear to have greater heterogeneity in their isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns than those from UF-KDM-2. Also, although there does appear to be an extended lag period in KDB growth on UF-KDM-2, there is no alteration in final O.D. or wet weight of cells. Thus, it appears that UF-KDM-2 may be an alternate medium for those wishing to isolate purified bacterial proteins or antigens. ELISA assays have been developed for the detection of soluble KDB antigens. This system is currently being developed as a sensitive measure of the presence of soluble antigen in serum and tissues of fish. Such a sensitive assay may also allow for the detection of KD+ spawners by the testing of ovarian fluid or serum. ELISA assays have also been developed to detect antibodies to soluble and cellular antigens of KDB. These systems have been proven successful in the detection of rabbit and murine monoclonal antibodies against KDB antigens. Future work will develop the use of anti-fish immunoglobulin (Ig) reagents to detect the presence of fish antibodies to KDB. This would be an extremely useful tool to be used in monitoring the immune response of salmon to the various test vaccines. The various antigens characterized in this study, along with whole KDB cells are currently being conjugated to various immunopotentiating agents. Testing of these prototype vaccines is currently under study.

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development and validation of a citrate synthase directed quantitative PCR marker for soil bacterial communities  

SciTech Connect

Molecular innovations in microbial ecology are allowing scientists to correlate microbial community characteristics to a variety of ecosystem functions. However, to date the majority of soil microbial ecology studies target phylogenetic rRNA markers, while a smaller number target functional markers linked to soil processes. We validated a new primer set targeting citrate synthase (gtlA), a central enzyme in the citric acid cycle linked to aerobic respiration. Primers for a 225 bp fragment suitable for qPCR were tested for specificity and assay performance verified on multiple soils. Clone libraries of the PCR-amplified gtlA gene exhibited high diversity and recovered most major groups identified in a previous 16S rRNA gene study. Comparisons among bacterial communities based on gtlA sequencing using UniFrac revealed differences among the experimental soils studied. Conditions for gtlA qPCR were optimized and calibration curves were highly linear (R2 > 0.99) over six orders of magnitude (4.56 10^5 to 4.56 10^11 copies), with high amplification efficiencies (>1.7). We examined the performance of the gtlA qPCR across a variety of soils and ecosystems, spanning forests, old fields and agricultural areas. We were able to amplify gtlA genes in all tested soils, and detected differences in gtlA abundance within and among environments. These results indicate that a fully developed gtlA-targeted qPCR approach may have potential to link microbial community characteristics with changes in soil respiration.

Castro Gonzalez, Hector F [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Austin, Emily E [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crawford, Kerri M [Rice University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1988 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease of salmonids is a very complex disease which appears to exploit a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. An understanding of these mechanisms is essential to the development of efficacious vaccines. It has become well established from the studies published .in this report and those of others that soluble antigens which are secreted by Renibacterium salmoninarum have toxigenic potential. If they are found to be responsible for mortality, the development of toxoid(s) could be paramount to the production of a vaccine. One must, however, be circumspect in producing a vaccine. A thorough knowledge, not only of the pathogen, but also of the immune system of the host is an absolute requirement. This becomes of particular importance when dealing with fish diseases, since the field of fish immunology is still within its infancy. This lack of knowledge is particularly felt when the induction of a prophylactic immune response concomitantly leads to pathological side effects which may be as destructive as the original infection. Indeed, it appears that some aspects of BKD may be due to the induction of hypersensitivity reactions. If such immunopathologies are expressed, it is prudent to thoroughly evaluate the nature of the immunoprophylaxis to insure that these harmful sequelae do not occur. Evaluation of a variety of antigens, adjuvants, immune responses, and survival data leads us to recommend that attempts at prophylaxis against BKD should center upon the elicitation of cellular immunity utilizing preparations of Mycobacterium chelonii. The choice of this species of mycobacteria was made because of its effectiveness, ease of maintenance and production, and the lack of need for its propagation within containment facilities. These assets are important to consider if large scale vaccine production is to be profitable. As can be seen from the data provided, M. chelonii alone is capable of producing prophylaxis to BKD, however, this is likely due to the induction of non-specific immunity and not to the existence of crossreactive antigens. Therefore, future studies should be devoted to further work on the induction of specific immunoprophylaxis incorporating this agent.

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

In situ biofilm coupon device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Laser-Generated Shockwaves for the Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization by modified Laser Spallation Technique (The Basic Laser Spallation Technique (Modified Laser Spallation Technique: Top-Down

Navarro, Artemio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Three-Dimensional Imaging and Quantification of Biomass and Biofilms in Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to resolve biofilms in three dimensions in porous media using high-resolution synchrotron-based x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) has been developed. Imaging biofilms in porous media without disturbing the natural spatial arrangement of the porous media and associated biofilm has been a challenging task, primarily because porous media generally precludes conventional imaging via optical microscopy; x-ray tomography offers a potential alternative. One challenge for using this method is that most conventional x-ray contrast agents are water-soluble and easily diffuse into biofilms. To overcome this problem, silver-coated microspheres were added to the fluid phase to create an x-ray contrast that does not diffuse into the biofilm mass. Using this approach, biofilm imaging in porous media was accomplished with sufficient contrast to differentiate between the biomass- and fluid-filled pore spaces. The method was validated by using a two-dimensional micro-model flow cell where both light microscopy and CMT imaging were used to im age the biofilm. The results of this work has been published in Water Resources Research (Iltis et al., 2010). Additional work needs to be done to optimize this imaging approach, specifically, we find that the quality of the images are highly dependent on the coverage of the biofilm with Ag particles, - which means that we may have issues in dead-end pore space and for very low density (fluffy) biofilms. What we can image for certain with this technique is the biofilm surface that is well-connected to flow paths and thus well-supplied with nutrients etc.

Dorthe Wildenschild

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Development of bacterial cultures which can metabolize structural analogs of dioxin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widely present in the environment, the highly-toxic compound 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been found to resist microbial biodegradation. To develop an anaerobic biodegradation approach for soils and sediments contaminated with TCDD, methanogenic and denitrifying cultures were established on a variety of chloroaromatic substrates, including 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,3-dichlorophenol, 3,4-dichlorophenol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol and catechol, using an inoculum from Newtown Creek (New York, NY). Dehalogenation was observed, with monochlorophenols producing phenol and dichlorophenols producing monochlorinated phenols and phenol. Based on gas production, the chlorinated catechol did not appear to undergo biodegradation under any condition, while catechol was degraded under methanogenic conditions. Select cultures amended with a mixture of chloroaromatics and n-butanol, a solubilizing agent, exhibited depressed gas production under both anaerobic conditions. Biodegradation of TCDD adsorbed onto particles of gallium oxide is under investigation with an amalgamation of the active single-substrate methanogenic cultures. 29 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Rugge, C.D. (SRE, Inc., Pine Brook, NJ (United States)); Ahlert, R.C. (Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)); O'Connor, O.A. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Utilization of microbial biofilms as monitors of bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

A down-well aquifer microbial sampling system was developed using glass wool or Bio-Sep beads as a solid-phase support matrix. Here we describe the use of these devices to monitor the groundwater microbial community dynamics during field bioremediation experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Programs Field Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During the 6-week deployment, microbial biofilms colonized glass wool and bead internal surfaces. Changes in viable biomass, community composition, metabolic status, and respiratory state were reflected in sampler composition, type of donor, and groundwater pH. Biofilms that formed on Bio-Sep beads had 2-13 times greater viable biomass; however, the bead communities were less metabolically active [higher cyclopropane/monoenoic phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) ratios] and had a lower aerobic respiratory state (lower total respiratory quinone/PLFA ratio and ubiquinone/menaquinone ratio) than the biofilms formed on glass wool. Anaerobic growth in these systems was characterized by plasmalogen phospholipids and was greater in the wells that received electron donor additions. Partial 16S rDNA sequences indicated that Geobacter and nitrate-reducing organisms were induced by the acetate, ethanol, or glucose additions. DNA and lipid biomarkers were extracted and recovered without the complications that commonly plague sediment samples due to the presence of clay or dissolved organic matter. Although microbial community composition in the groundwater or adjacent sediments may differ from those formed on down-well biofilm samplers, the metabolic activity responses of the biofilms to modifications in groundwater geochemistry record the responses of the microbial community to biostimulation while providing integrative sampling and ease of recovery for biomarker analysis.

Peacock, Aaron D. [University of Tennessee; IstokD., Jonathan [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Krumholz, Lee R. [University of Oklahoma; Geyer, Roland [ORNL; Kinsall, Barry Lee [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Sublette, K. [University of Tulsa; White, David C. [University of Tennessee

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ALSNews Vol. 312  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Almost all bacteria can form biofilms--dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers. Coordinated...

32

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bacterial Foraging Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bacterial foraging optimization BFO algorithm mimics how bacteria forage over a landscape of nutrients to perform parallel nongradient optimization. In this article, the author provides a tutorial on BFO, including an overview of the biology of bacterial ... Keywords: Bacteria Foraging, Bacteria Foraging Optimization, Bacteria Motility, Control, Distributed Control, Optimization

Kevin M. Passino

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis and Simulation of a Meso-scale Model of Diffusive Resistance of Bacterial Biofilms to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microenvironment and macroenvironment structural environment food identification & records housing social

Demaret, Laurent

35

Analysis and Simulation of a Meso-scale Model of Diffusive Resistance of Bacterial Biofilms to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spatial or temporal macroenvironment). Our linkage equilibrium assumption and the defini-across loci, so "macroenvironments" (e.g., spatial environmen- (49) #12;1062 M. Turelli and N. H. Barton Thus, for any positive B, K

36

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Moscow, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Retention capacity of bio-films formed on the surface of nuclear and basaltic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The role of the bacteria in the various compartments of a repository site was still not extensively studied. It is likely that most known bacteria cannot develop on the surface of radioactive materials but one must consider that 10% only of the bacteria species are known. As an example, a research group has recently discovered an isolated community of bacteria nearly two miles underground that derives all of its energy from the decay of radioactive rocks (LIN et al., 2006). It is generally accepted that alterations of rocks and anthropogenic products are not exclusively driven by the interaction with water or mineral aqueous solutions. Organic compounds as well as microorganisms are important in mineral degradation processes, and secondary mineralization. However, the exact role of bio-films in these processes remains unclear. The study of (AOUAD, 2006) will be presented as an example. Two materials were tested: the reference French nuclear glass SON68 17 LIDC2A2Z1 and a tholeiitic basaltic glass (natural analogue). Experiments were carried out for 19 weeks at 25 deg. C. A specific growth medium were developed which allows both the growth of Pseudomonas bacterium and a precise measurement, using ICP-MS, of trace elements solubilized from both glasses (AOUAD et al., 2005) The thickness of bio-films, analyzed by confocal laser microscopy was 40 {mu}m for both materials. These bio-films are able to efficiently trap most of the glass constituents. They also form a protective barrier at the solid/solution interface. (authors)

Crovisier, Jean Louis [EOST-CGS, 1, rue Blessig, Strasbourg, 67000 (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Why sequence soil bacterial communities?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as part of this project. Principal Investigators: Stephanie Eichorst, Los Alamos National Laboratory Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence soil bacterial communities...

39

Development of a novel algae biofilm photobioreactor for biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert carbon dioxide and sunlight into biomass that can be used for biofuel production. Although they are usually cultivated in (more)

Ozkan, Altan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Innovative Porous Media Approach in Modeling Biofilm Applications, Human Eye and Nanofluid Based Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biofilm is a dominant form of existence for bacteria in most natural and synthetic environments. Depending on the application area, they can be useful or (more)

Shafahi, Maryam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modeling biofilm processes using the immersed boundary method  

SciTech Connect

Biofilm processes are of interest to researchers in a variety of fields including bioremediation, oil recovery, waste water treatment, medicine, and dentistry. In this paper we describe how this complex, dynamic, fluid-structure interaction can be modeled successfully using the immersed boundary method. The model presented here includes the coupling of hydrodynamics; substrate reaction, diffusion, and convection; as well as the chemotactic response of swimming microbes. Cell-cell aggregation and cell-substratum adhesion are modeled by generating appropriate binding forces between discrete representations of organisms that may hold them together, or if fluid stresses are large, may yield and release the organisms. In this paper, we show two-dimensional numerical simulations to demonstrate several different types of scenarios that may be modeled using immersed boundary methods. These simulations indicate the variety of different phenomena one might expect in biofilm processes. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Dillon, R.; Fauci, L. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States); Fogelson, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Treatment of Wine Distillery Wastewater Using an Anaerobic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor with Low Density of Polyethylene Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor filled with small and low density polyethylene support as biofilm carrier was operated to treat wine distillery wastewater for nearly 8 months. The support packed in the reactor is Bioflow 30 with density 0.92g/cm3 ... Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, moving bed biofilm reactor, low density polyethylene support, wine distillery wastewater

Chai Sheli; Rene Moletta

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ALSNews Vol. 312  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms, coupling infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the...

44

Single-cell bioluminescence and GFP in biofilm research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using flow cells and a combination of microscopy techniques, we can unequivocally identify single bacterial cells that express bioluminescent and fluorescent bioreporters. We have shown that, for attached cells, bioluminescence output within a bacterial strain can vary greatly from cell to cell.

Palmer, R.J. Jr, Sayler, G., White, D.C. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States), Ctr. Env. Biotech; Phiefer, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States), Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms (CCURB) That Secrete Antimicrobials and Corrosion Inhibitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report covers the second year of research on the CCURB (Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms) project. This work seeks solutions to corrosion through the use of protective biofilms. To this end, the team has studied the use of both natural and genetically-engineered bacteria for corrosion inhibition of mild steel, aluminum, brass, and copper.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in Aquatic Systems: Interactions with Radionuclides (234Th (IV), 129 I) and Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of laboratory and field investigations were carried out to elucidate the importance of natural organic matter in aquatic systems, i.e., trace element scavenging (e.g., 234Th) by exopolymeric substances (EPS), formation of biofilms, as well as interactions with 129I. A method involving cross flow ultrafiltration, followed by a three-step cartridge soaking and stirred-cell diafiltration, was developed for isolating EPS from phytoplankton cultures, especially in seawater media. EPS isolated from a marine diatom, Amphora sp. was then subjected to semi-quantitative (e.g., carbohydrate, proteins) and quantitative analysis (e.g., neutral sugars, acidic sugars, sulfate). It appeared that Th (IV) binding by EPS was dominated by the acidic polysaccharides of fraction. For EPS of biofilms collected from polluted streams, hydrophobic proteins were the most abundant components in EPS, followed by more hydrophilic carbohydrates. However, chemical composition of carbohydrates or proteins, i.e., monosaccharides and amino acids, respectively, varied with environmental conditions and substrata applied, which suggests that the formation of biofilms on different substrates is regulated by specific properties of microorganisms, environmental conditions and nature of substratum. No correlation between relative hydrophobicity of substratum and development of biofilm was found in this study. A sensitive and rapid GC-MS method was developed to enable the determination of isotopic ratios (129I/127I) of speciated iodine in natural waters. At the F-area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), iodine species in the groundwater consisted of 48.8 percent iodide, 27.3 percent iodate and 23.9 percent organo-iodine. Each of these iodine species exhibited vastly different transport behavior in the column experiments using surface soil from the SRS. Results demonstrated that mobility of iodine species depended greatly on the iodine concentration, mostly due to the limited sorptive capacity for anions of the soil. EPS, especially enzymes (e.g., haloperoxidases) could facilitate the incorporation of iodide to natural organic carbon. At high input concentrations of iodate (78.7 ?M), iodate was found to be completely reduced and subsequently followed the transport behavior of iodide. The marked reduction of iodate was probably associated with natural organic carbon and facilitated by bacteria, besides inorganic reductants (e.g., Fe2 ) in sediments and pore water.

Zhang, Saijin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Proteomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of EPS with redox-active metals and radionuclides. Both bound and loosely associated EPS were extracted from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms prepared using a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, membrane lipids, and fatty acids in both bound and loosely associated EPS. Using a global proteomic approach, a total of 58 extracellular and outer membrane proteins were identified in the EPS. These included homologues of multiple S. oneidensis MR-1 proteins that potentially contribute to key physiological biofilm processes, such as biofilm-promoting protein BpfA, surface-associated serine protease, nucleotidases (CpdB and UshA), an extracellular lipase, and oligopeptidases (PtrB and a M13 family oligopeptidase lipoprotein). In addition, 20 redox proteins were found in extracted EPS. Among the detected redox proteins were the homologues of two S. oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA, which have been implicated in extracellular electron transfer. Given their detection in the EPS of Shewanella sp. HRCR 1 biofilms, c-type cytochromes may contribute to the possible redox activity of the biofilm matrix and play important roles in extracellular electron transfer reactions.

Cao, Bin; Shi, Liang; Brown, Roslyn N.; Xiong, Yijia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Why sequence denitrifying bacterial isolates?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

denitrifying bacterial isolates? denitrifying bacterial isolates? Nitrates are contaminants at nuclear waste sites and can also seep into the groundwater from sources such as agricultural runoff, wastewater treatment plants and septic tanks. As the increasing global population boosts demand for drinking water, it is important to maintain and protect these resources. Photo: courtesy of Stefan Green The project calls for sequencing six anaerobic bacteria samples known to be capable of breaking down nitrate contaminants that have been isolated from the Oak Ridge-Integrated Field Research Center, one of the sites established by the U.S. Department of Energy to study the roles various microbes play in breaking down environmental contaminants over time. From a bioremediative perspective, the genomic information could be used to

49

Role of TapY1 and PlsB in Biofilm formation in aeromonas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Type IV pili in Aeromonas are involved in biofilm formation and colonization of biotic and aboitic surfaces. The tapY1 gene in Aeromonas encodes a type (more)

Khan, Mohammed Repon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations augmented by phylogenetic representations of relatedness will not and enzootic outbreaks noted through international outbreak surveillance systems, and 'representative' genetic sequences from each outbreak. (5) Interpretation of genetic comparisons between an attack strain and reference strains requires a model for the network structure of maintenance foci, enzootic outbreaks, and human outbreaks of that disease, coupled with estimates of mutational rate constants. Validation of the model requires a set of sequences from exemplary outbreaks and laboratory data on mutation rates during animal passage. The necessary number of isolates in each validation set is determined by disease transmission network theory, and is based on the 'network diameter' of the outbreak. (6) The 8 bacteria in this study can be classified into 4 categories based on the complexity of the transmission network structure of their natural maintenance foci and their outbreaks, both enzootic and zoonotic. (7) For B. anthracis, Y. pestis, E. coli O157, and Brucella melitensis, and their primary natural animal hosts, most of the fundamental parameters needed for modeling genetic change within natural host or human transmission networks have been determined or can be estimated from existing field and laboratory studies. (8) For Burkholderia mallei, plausible approaches to transmission network models exist, but much of the fundamental parameterization does not. In addition, a validated high-resolution typing system for characterizing genetic change within outbreaks or foci has not yet been demonstrated, although a candidate system exists. (9) For Francisella tularensis, the increased complexity of the transmission network and unresolved questions about maintenance and transmission suggest that it will be more complex and difficult to develop useful models based on currently available data. (10) For Burkholderia pseudomallei and Clostridium botulinum, the transmission and maintenance networks involve complex soil communities and metapopulations about which very little is known. It is not clear that these pathogens can be brought into the in

Velsko, S P

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bacterial Production of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanoparticles ...  

... on the selection and tailoring of bacterial strains Applications and Industries Production of fine particulates of ceramic powders used by indus ...

52

Fluid dynamics of bacterial turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-sustained turbulent structures have been observed in a wide range of living fluids, yet no quantitative theory exists to explain their properties. We report experiments on active turbulence in highly concentrated 3D suspensions of Bacillus subtilis and compare them with a minimal fourth-order vector-field theory for incompressible bacterial dynamics. Velocimetry of bacteria and surrounding fluid, determined by imaging cells and tracking colloidal tracers, yields consistent results for velocity statistics and correlations over two orders of magnitude in kinetic energy, revealing a decrease of fluid memory with increasing swimming activity and linear scaling between energy and enstrophy. The best-fit model parameters allow for quantitative agreement with experimental data.

Jrn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Henricus H. Wensink; Markus Br; Raymond E. Goldstein

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties. The estimated Youngs modulus of cellulose microfibrils by experimental and theoretical approaches is up to 220 GPa [3, 4]. Cellulose has deeply integrated with our society in applications such as paper, cotton, lubricants, fillers, adhesives... and visualisation [15, 16]. The chapter 7 of this thesis explores the effect of various additives on the bacterial cellulose microstructure. Work has been directed towards developing a rationale to modify cellulose microstructure. In situ modification has also...

Khandelwal, Mudrika

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Aquatic microenvironments in bacterial ecology and diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular surveys have revealed tremendous bacterial diversity in the world's oceans; yet how do these diverse bacteria with the same essential nutrient requirements co-exist in the same environment? This study examines ...

Hunt, Dana E., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

ForPeerReview Microbiology and performance of a methanogenic biofilm reactor during the1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Biofilm, Anaerobic digestion, Bioreactor start-up, Microbial population21 dynamics, Methanogenesis-00615442,version1-19Aug2011 #12;ForPeerReview 3 Introduction1 Anaerobic digestion is an effective method). The limitation of4 anaerobic digestion processes resides in the duration and instability of their transitory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

56

Escherichia coli Enhanced Hydrogen Production, Genome-wide Screening for Extracellular DNA, and Influence of GGDEF Proteins on Early Biofilm Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escherichia coli is the best characterized bacterium; it grows rapidly, and it is easy to manipulate genetically. An increased knowledge about the physiology of this model organism will facilitate the development of engineered E.coli strains for applications such as production of biofuels and biofilm control. The aims of this work were the application of protein engineering to increase E. coli hydrogen production, the identification of the proteins regulating extracellular DNA production (eDNA), and the evaluation of the effect of the proteins synthesizing the signal 3'-5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) on biofilm formation. The Escherichia coli hydrogen production rate was increased 9 fold through random mutagenesis of fhlA. Variant FhlA133 (Q11H, L14V, Y177F, K245R, M288K, and I342F) enhances hydrogen production by increasing transcription of the four transcriptional units regulated by FhlA. The amino acid replacements E363G and L14G in FhlA increased hydrogen production 6 fold and 4 fold, respectively. The complete E. coli genome was screened to identify proteins that affect eDNA production. The nlpI, yfeC, and rna mutants increased eDNA production and the hns and rfaD mutants decreased eDNA production. Deletion of nlpI increases eDNA 3 fold while overexpression of nlpI decreases eDNA 16 fold. Global regulator H-NS is required for eDNA with E. coli since deletion of hns abolished eDNA production while overexpression of hns restored eDNA to 70 percent of the wild-type levels. Our results suggest that eDNA production in E. coli is related to direct secretion. Deletions of the genes encoding the diguanylate cyclases YeaI, YedQ, and YfiN increased swimming motility and eDNA as expected for low c-di-GMP levels. However, contrary to the current paradigm, early biofilm formation increased dramatically for the yeaI (30 fold), yedQ (12 fold), and yfiN (18 fold) mutants. Hence, our results suggest that c-di-GMP levels should be reduced for initial biofilm formation because motility is important for initial attachment to a surface.

Sanchez Torres, Viviana

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Lubricating bacteria model for branching growth of bacterial colonies, Phys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various bacterial strains (e.g. strains belonging to the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Serratia and Salmonella) exhibit colonial branching patterns during growth on poor semi-solid substrates. These patterns reflect the bacterial cooperative self-organization. Central part of the cooperation is the collective formation of lubricant on top of the agar which enables the bacteria to swim. Hence it provides the colony means to advance towards the food. One method of modeling the colonial development is via coupled reaction-diffusion equations which describe the time evolution of the bacterial density and the concentrations of the relevant chemical fields. This idea has been pursued by a number of groups. Here we present an additional model which specifically includes an evolution equation for the lubricant excreted by the bacteria. We show that when the diffusion of the fluid is governed by nonlinear diffusion coefficient branching patterns evolves. We study the effect of the rates of emission and decomposition of the lubricant fluid on the observed patterns. The results are compared with experimental observations. We also include fields of chemotactic agents and food chemotaxis and conclude that these features are needed in order to explain the observations. 1 I.

Yonathan Kozlovsky; Inon Cohen; Ido Golding; Eshel Ben-jacob

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Interaction Between Toxic Metals and Complex Biofilm/Mineral/Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights highlights title by Alexis S. Templeton, Thomas P. Trainor, and Gordon E. Brown, Jr., Stanford University Sorption reactions on particle surfaces can dramatically affect the speciation, cycling and bioavailability of essential micronutrients (i.e. PO43-, Cu, Zn etc.) and toxic metals and metalloids (i.e. Pb, Hg, Se, As) in soils and aquatic environments. Considerable attention has been focused on understanding metal sorption reactions at a molecular/mechanistic level and the effects of metal concentration, pH, ionic strength, and complexing ligands on the ways in which metal ions bind to the surfaces of common mineral phases such as Fe-, Mn- and Al-(hydr)oxides and clays. However, a significant fraction of mineral surfaces in natural environments are extensively colonized by microbial organisms, which can also be potent sorbents for metals due to the large number of reactive functional groups that decorate the cell walls and outer membranes of bacterial surfaces.

59

Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

Iyer, Rashi S.; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

2000-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comparison of bacterial adherence on standard orthodontic brackets and titanium miniscrew implants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fixed orthodontic appliances including standard brackets and titanium minscrews have the ability to introduce mechanical plaque (biofilm) traps. These orthodontic appliances impair plaque removal, proper (more)

Jackfert, Lindsay.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Optimal multilevel thresholding using bacterial foraging algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conventional multilevel thresholding methods are efficient for bi-level thresholding. However, they are computationally expensive extending to multilevel thresholding since they exhaustively search the optimal thresholds to optimize the objective ... Keywords: Bacterial foraging, Histogram, Image segmentation, Kapur's function, Multilevel thresholding, Otsu's function

P. D. Sathya; R. Kayalvizhi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print Wednesday, 31 January 2007 00:00 For the first time, scientists have determined the structure of the initiator of bacterial DNA replication. It is already known that such replication is controlled by a protein known as DnaA, a member of the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. What has now been discovered is that the core of the initiator is not the closed-ring structure expected for this system. Instead, DnaA forms an open right-handed helix. In addition, the architecture indicates that this AAA+ superhelix will wrap coils of the DNA around its exterior, causing the DNA double helix to deform as a first step in the separation and unwinding of its strands. Eukaryotic and archaeal initiators also have the structural elements that promote open-helix formation, indicating that a spiral, open-ring AAA+ assembly is a conserved element from a common evolutionary ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.

64

The effect of sulfide inhibition and organic shock loading on anaerobic biofilm reactors treating a low-temperature, high-sulfate wastewater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In order to assess the long-term treatment of sulfate- and carbon- rich wastewater at low temperatures, three anaerobic biofilm reactors were operated at 20C, (more)

McDonald, Heather Brown

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Selenium Speciation in Biofilms from Granular Sludge Bed Reactors Used for Wastewater Treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Se K-edge XAFS spectra were collected for various model compounds of Se as well as for 3 biofilm samples from bioreactors used for Se-contaminated wastewater treatment. In the biofilm samples, Se is dominantly as Se(0) despite Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy cannot easily distinguish between elemental Se and Se(-I)-bearing selenides. EXAFS spectra indicate that Se is located within aperiodic domains, markedly different to these known in monoclinic red selenium. However, Se can well occur within nanodivided domains related to monoclinic red Se, as this form was optically observed at the rim of some sludges. Aqueous selenate is then efficiently bioreduced, under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

van Hullenbusch, Eric; /Marne la Vallee U.; Farges, Francois; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur., Paris; Lenz, Markus; Lens, Piet; /Wageningen U.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Identification of circular codes in bacterial genomes and their use in a factorization method for retrieving the reading frames of genes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a statistical method that allows each trinucleotide to be associated with a unique frame among the three possible ones in a (protein coding) gene. An extensive gene study in 175 complete bacterial genomes based on this statistical approach ... Keywords: Bacterial genome, Circular code, Frame

Gabriel Frey; Christian J. Michel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a Model for Understanding Bacterial Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial Mercury Methylation Contact: Cynthia Gilmour (gilmourc@si.edu, 443-482-2498) DOE/Office of Science Contact: Cynthia Gilmour (gilmourc@si.edu, 443-482-2498) DOE/Office of Science/Biological & Environmental/Biological & Environmental Research ·The ORNL Mercury Science Focus Area is developing the Hg-methylating bacterium

70

Rapid Real-Time PCR Method for Bacterial Source Tracking Using DNA FRET Probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid Real-Time PCR Method for Bacterial Source Tracking Using DNA FRET Probes Jeff Brady, Research have developed a 10 locus genotyping method using real-time PCR with adjacent-hybridizing DNA: real-time PCR, FRET, Microbial Source Tracking #12;

71

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print For the first time, scientists have determined the structure of the initiator of bacterial DNA replication. It is already known that such replication is controlled by a protein known as DnaA, a member of the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. What has now been discovered is that the core of the initiator is not the closed-ring structure expected for this system. Instead, DnaA forms an open right-handed helix. In addition, the architecture indicates that this AAA+ superhelix will wrap coils of the DNA around its exterior, causing the DNA double helix to deform as a first step in the separation and unwinding of its strands. Eukaryotic and archaeal initiators also have the structural elements that promote open-helix formation, indicating that a spiral, open-ring AAA+ assembly is a conserved element from a common evolutionary ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.

72

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print For the first time, scientists have determined the structure of the initiator of bacterial DNA replication. It is already known that such replication is controlled by a protein known as DnaA, a member of the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. What has now been discovered is that the core of the initiator is not the closed-ring structure expected for this system. Instead, DnaA forms an open right-handed helix. In addition, the architecture indicates that this AAA+ superhelix will wrap coils of the DNA around its exterior, causing the DNA double helix to deform as a first step in the separation and unwinding of its strands. Eukaryotic and archaeal initiators also have the structural elements that promote open-helix formation, indicating that a spiral, open-ring AAA+ assembly is a conserved element from a common evolutionary ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.

73

Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen Toxins Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen Toxins The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen Toxins The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes

74

Expanded Intermediate-State Structure of a Bacterial Mechanosensitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanded Intermediate-State Structure of a Bacterial Mechanosensitive Channel Human and other animals rely on the senses of touch and hearing to perceive mechanical stimuli, a...

75

A bacterial factory for the production of MEMBRANE PROTEINS  

Office of Technology Transfer A bacterial factory for the production of MEMBRANE PROTEINS Cell membranes are important biological structures as they ...

76

Genomic Sequencing of Single Bacterial Cells (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Tanja Woyke from the DOE JGI on the "Genomic Sequencing of Single Bacterial Cells" on March 26, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Woyke, Tanje

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantige...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. Available for thumbnail of Technology Transfer (505) 665-9090 Email...

78

Why sequence metatranscriptomic analysis of bacterial-algal interactio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metatranscriptomic analysis of bacterial-algal interactions? Freshwater algae, here used to refer to both true algae and cyanobacteria, serve as a natural carbon sink and are a...

79

Production of a granular compost carrier for bacterial inoculants .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bacterial inoculants play an important role in both agriculture and bioremediation. The long-term use of Rhizobium inoculants in agriculture has resulted in increased demands on (more)

Wall, Cindy Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations  

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. Piceno, and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Measuring Cellular-scale Nutrient Distribution in Algal Biofilms with Synchrotron Confocal Infrared Microspectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microscope and infrared spectrometer are two of the most useful tools for the study of biological materials, and their combined analytical power far exceeds the sum of the two. Performing molecular spectroscopy through a microscope superimposes chemical information onto the physical microstructure obtained from the optical microscope when visible and infrared information are collected under the same conditions. The instrument developments that enable current infrared microspectroscopic studies began with the introduction of the first research-grade infrared microscope, patented in 1989 (1). By 1993, published reports using this method to determine macroalgae (seaweed) cell-wall composition appeared (2-4). Since these initial reports, the use of infrared microspectroscopy (IMS) in microalgal (single cells or groups of cells) research has grown. Primarily, cultured algae have been used to hone IMS methodology and evaluate its capabilities in algal research (5-8). Studies involving natural, mixed species assemblages, which can utilize the spatial resolution potential of this technique fully are rare (9-11). For instance, in a recent review of IMS microalgal ecological research (12), only 3 of the 29 peer-reviewed publications investigated natural algal assemblages. Both thermal and synchrotron infrared sources provide a resolution capable of measuring individual algae in mixed species assemblages, and each has its advantages. For example, thermal source IMS is more accessible, allowing more samples to be analyzed than synchrotron IMS. However, synchrotron IMS with confocal masking provides superior resolution, which can be critical in isolating small or contiguous cells. Algal ecology is the study of the interaction between algae and their environment. Infrared microspectroscopy addresses a major logistical problem in this field, obtaining species-specific cellular biochemical information from natural, mixed-species assemblages (11,12). Benthic (bottom-dwelling) algae, for example, grow in a three-dimensional matrix (biofilm) composed of different cell sizes, shapes, and configurations. The optical and ecological challenge of studying algae is apparent from Figure 1, which shows a photomicrograph of algal chlorophyll fluorescence on a rock. Several issues make it difficult to obtain single species measurements with standard techniques: cell sizes can vary over an order of magnitude; species can occur as single cells, long filaments, or globular colonies; a number of different species can be found within a few square millimeters; and fluorescence can vary across cells (that is, the physiological state varies across cells). Synchrotron IMS is a tool that can be used to begin to overcome these spatially related challenges by giving a species- and location-specific measurement of an individual alga's relative chemical composition and distribution. This technique enables algal ecologists to focus on new, ecologically relevant questions such as what level (that is, cell, colony, and population) best defines a species' response to environmental change. For instance, many species occur as single cells and thus can be measured as individual organisms. However, the variety of growth forms and sizes can make it difficult to define the best unit to measure multicellular groups in terms of its functional role such as primary productivity (that is, carbon incorporation) and nutrient cycling. Understanding how individual algal species within a diverse community respond to environmental changes can help predict how changes in assemblage structure will impact overall assemblage function.

J Murdock; W Dodds; J Reffner; D Wetzel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Modelling respirometric tests for the assessment of kinetic and stoichiometric parameters on MBBR biofilm for municipal wastewater treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) technology is a suitable option for up-grading and retro-fitting wastewater treatment plants. Although being introduced in late 80s, design and operational guidelines of MBBR are mainly based on empirical approaches. ... Keywords: MBBR, Modelling, Municipal wastewater, Respirometry, Storage

Martina Ferrai; Giuseppe Guglielmi; Gianni Andreottola

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Steps in the bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bacterial flagellar motor is a highly efficient rotary machine used by many bacteria to propel themselves. It has recently been shown that at low speeds its rotation proceeds in steps [Sowa et al. (2005) Nature 437, 916--919]. Here we propose a simple physical model that accounts for this stepping behavior as a random walk in a tilted corrugated potential that combines torque and contact forces. We argue that the absolute angular position of the rotor is crucial for understanding step properties, and show this hypothesis to be consistent with the available data, in particular the observation that backward steps are smaller on average than forward steps. Our model also predicts a sublinear torque-speed relationship at low torque, and a peak in rotor diffusion as a function of torque.

Thierry Mora; Howard Yu; Yoshiyuki Sowa; Ned S. Wingreen

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reconstruction of a Bacterial Genome from DNA Cassettes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This basic research program comprised two major areas: (1) acquisition and analysis of marine microbial metagenomic data and development of genomic analysis tools for broad, external community use; (2) development of a minimal bacterial genome. Our Marine Metagenomic Diversity effort generated and analyzed shotgun sequencing data from microbial communities sampled from over 250 sites around the world. About 40% of the 26 Gbp of sequence data has been made publicly available to date with a complete release anticipated in six months. Our results and those mining the deposited data have revealed a vast diversity of genes coding for critical metabolic processes whose phylogenetic and geographic distributions will enable a deeper understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling, microbial ecology, and rapid rate evolutionary processes such as horizontal gene transfer by viruses and plasmids. A global assembly of the generated dataset resulted in a massive set (5Gbp) of genome fragments that provide context to the majority of the generated data that originated from uncultivated organisms. Our Synthetic Biology team has made significant progress towards the goal of synthesizing a minimal mycoplasma genome that will have all of the machinery for independent life. This project, once completed, will provide fundamentally new knowledge about requirements for microbial life and help to lay a basic research foundation for developing microbiological approaches to bioenergy.

Christopher Dupont; John Glass; Laura Sheahan; Shibu Yooseph; Lisa Zeigler Allen; Mathangi Thiagarajan; Andrew Allen; Robert Friedman; J. Craig Venter

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Role of Bacterial Attachment to Metal Substrate and Its Effects ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Templates Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on 316L...

86

Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm Integrating Tabu Search for Motif Discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extracting motifs in the sea of DNA sequences is an intricate task but have great significance. We propose an alternative solution integrating bacterial foraging optimization (BFO) algorithm and Tabu Search (TS) algorithm namely TS-BFO. We modify the ...

Linlin Shao; Yuehui Chen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Motor-Driven Bacterial Flagella and Buckling Instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many types of bacteria swim by rotating a bundle of helical filaments also called flagella. Each filament is driven by a rotary motor and a very flexible hook transmits the motor torque to the filament. We model it by discretizing Kirchhoff's elastic-rod theory and develop a coarse-grained approach for driving the helical filament by a motor torque. A rotating flagellum generates a thrust force, which pushes the cell body forward and which increases with the motor torque. We fix the rotating flagellum in space and show that it buckles under the thrust force at a critical motor torque. Buckling becomes visible as a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the thrust force. A second buckling transition occurs at an even higher motor torque. We attach the flagellum to a spherical cell body and also observe the first buckling transition during locomotion. By changing the size of the cell body, we vary the necessary thrust force and thereby obtain a characteristic relation between the critical thrust force and motor torque. We present a sophisticated analytical model for the buckling transition based on a helical rod which quantitatively reproduces the critical force-torque relation. Real values for motor torque, cell body size, and the geometry of the helical filament suggest that buckling should occur in single bacterial flagella. We also find that the orientation of pulling flagella along the driving torque is not stable and comment on the biological relevance for marine bacteria.

Reinhard Vogel; Holger Stark

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

89

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

90

IMPACT OF THE DURATION OF BACTERIAL EXPOSURE ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY  

SciTech Connect

These tests indicated that: (1) duration of exposure to bacterial strain CL0145A of Pseudomonas fluorescens is a key variable in obtaining zebra mussel mortality; (2) that given a choice of exposure periods up to 96 hr, the longer the exposure period, the higher the mean mortality that will be achieved; (3) that the first few hours that the mussels are exposed to the bacteria are the most important in achieving kill; (4) that the mortality achieved by exposure periods {>=}72 hr may be somewhat amplified by the degraded water quality conditions which can develop in recirculating water systems over such extended time periods.

Daniel P. Molloy

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modified bacterial foraging algorithm based multilevel thresholding for image segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilevel thresholding is one of the most popular image segmentation techniques. In order to determine the thresholds, most methods use the histogram of the image. This paper proposes multilevel thresholding for histogram-based image segmentation using ... Keywords: Bacterial foraging, Histogram, Image segmentation, Kapur's function, Multilevel thresholding, Otsu's function

P. D. Sathya; R. Kayalvizhi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Sequence comparison and environmental adaptation of a bacterial endonuclease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The periplasmic/extracellular bacterial enzyme endonuclease I was chosen as a model system to identify features that might be responsible for temperature- and salt adaptation. A statistical study of amino acid sequence properties belonging to endonuclease ... Keywords: Amino acid property, Cold adaptation, Endonuclease I, Halophilic enzymes, Sequence analysis

Bjrn Altermark; Steinar Thorvaldsen; Elin Moe; Arne O. Smals; Nils P. Willassen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A simulation tool for the study of symmetric inversions in bacterial genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the tool SIB that simulates genomic inversions in bacterial chromosomes. The tool simulates symmetric inversions but allows the appearance of nonsymmetric inversions by simulating small syntenic blocks frequently observed on bacterial genome ...

Ulisses Dias; Zanoni Dias; Joo C. Setubal

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Why sequence metagenome function of the Earthworm egg capsule bacterial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metagenome function of metagenome function of the Earthworm egg capsule bacterial community? Earthworms are common soil organisms that influence the fertility of soils by altering the nutrient availability to plants. These nutrients include forms of nitrogen, phosphorous and carbon. The microbial community within earthworms releases nitrous oxide, degrades cellulose, and stimulates the growth of fungi that can break down cellulose. The earthworm egg capsule microbial community represents the seed population for the juvenile, and then adult, organism. Acquiring the complete set of genetic data from the earthworm metagenome will provide a resource for future studies in a variety of areas. Understanding the bacterial component of earthworm eggs is relevant to understanding the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the soil, which in turn influence the levels

96

Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS  

SciTech Connect

In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how agent composition relates to media composition. After these baseline analyses are performed, the data should be assessed to determine the potential forensic utility of elemental analyses. If promising, validation studies using bulk or NanoSIMS analysis would be necessary.

Weber, P; Holt, J

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.  

SciTech Connect

Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Gladden, John Michael

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A structural basis for electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Triplet data for the primary donor in single crystals of bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are interpreted in terms of the corresponding x-ray structures. The analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance data from single crystals (triplet zero field splitting and cation and triplet linewidth of the primary special pair donor of bacterial reaction centers) is extended to systems of a non-crystalline nature. A unified interpretation based on frontier molecular orbitals concludes that the special pair behaves like a supermolecule in all wild-type bacteria investigated here. However, in heterodimers of Rb. capsulatus (His/sup M200/ changed to Leu or Phe with the result that the M-half of the special pair is converted to bacteriopheophytin) the special pair possesses the EPR properties more appropriately described in terms of a monomer. In all cases the triplet state and cation EPR properties appear to be dominated by the highest occupied molecular orbitals. These conclusions derived from EPR experiments are supplemented by data from Stark spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rb. capsulatus. 41 refs., 3 tabs.

Norris, J.R.; DiMagno, T.J.; Angerhofer, A.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit  

SciTech Connect

Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along nanowire appendages. We present a 3.2 crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split ?-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Metabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterial symbiosis of sharpshooters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metabolic Complementarity and Genomics of the Dual BacterialMetabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterialthe other. ) Comparative genomics. The predicted proteomes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The recombinant expression and potential applications of bacterial organophosphate hydrolase in Zea mays L.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organophosphate hydrolase (OPH, EC 3.1.8.1) is a bacterial enzyme with a broad spectrum of potential substrates that include organophosphorus pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents. OPH has been expressed successfully in bacterial, fungal, and insect cell culture systems; however, none of these systems produces amounts of enzyme suitable for applications outside of the research laboratory. Therefore, a transgenic Zea mays L. (maize) system was developed to express OPH as an alternate to the current OPH expression systems. The bacterial gene encoding the OPH protein was optimized for transcriptional and translational expression in maize. The optimized gene was inserted into the maize genome under the control of embryo specific, endosperm specific, and constitutive plant promoters. Select transformants were analyzed for the expression of OPH. Expression was observed in the seeds of plants transformed with each of the three constructs with the highest expression observed with the embryo specific and constitutive promoter constructs. The highest OPH expressing lines of transgenic maize had expression levels higher than those reported for the E. coli expression system. OPH was purified from transgenic maize seed and analyzed for posttranslational modification and kinetic properties. OPH was observed to undergo a glycosylation event when expressed in maize that yielded at least two forms of OPH homogolous dimer. The glycosylated form of OPH bound tightly to the Concanavalin A sepharose and remained active after months of storage at room temperature. OPH activity was checked against a number of organophosphate herbicides. Enzymatic activity was observed against the herbicide Amiprophos-methyl and kinetic properties were measured. Enzymatic activity was also tested against the organophosphate Haloxon. Transgenic maize callus, leaf, and seed tissue could be screened for the presence of the optimized opd gene by enzymatic activity. Comparison of the growth of transgenic and control callus on media containing organophosphates showed that the transgenic callus was resistant to the herbicidal effects of haloxon. Transgenic plants expressing OPH were also resistant to the herbicide bensulide when compared to control plants. This indicates that OPH can be used as a screenable marker in plant systems and may be a potential scorable marker system as well.

Pinkerton, Terrence Scott

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most significant environmental challenges of the new millen- nium. According to the 2010 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List, there are 318 bacterially impaired water bodies in Texas. Nonpoint sources (NPS

103

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most significant environmental challenges of the new millen- nium. According to the 2008 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List, there are 274 bacterially impaired water bodies in Texas. Nonpoint sources (NPS

Wilkins, Neal

104

Final Report: Bioelectrochemical Process Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed under the Independent Research and Development project ''Bioelectrochemical Process Development'' using Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 henceforth MR-1, a model dissimilitory metal reducing (DMRB) bacteria successfully demonstrates the following: MR-1 transfers electrons by hydrogen oxidation to solid phase electrodes; MR-1 can act as an electron transfer agent when attached to a solid metal electrode surface - a modified electrode has been developed and tested; MR-1 transfers electrons from solution to a solid electrode. DMRB grow by transferring electrons to insoluble metals. When bacteria oxidize organic compounds or hydrogen this results in electron flow from the bacterial cell for the purpose of cellular energy production. Extracellular electron transfer to solid terminal electron acceptors permits coupling this oxidation process to electrodes. As a result, detection of organic compounds and hydrogen can be accomplished by bacterial contact to an electrode. The authors have designed a process that incorporates bacterial cells onto electrodes for the purpose of hydrogen detection. In addition, this type of bio-sensor also responds to the presence of FE III thereby providing potential utility as a Fe III sensor. Immediate uses of this technology include in-situ detection and quantification of organic compounds and hydrogen in the subsurface that provide energy for growth of indigenous bacteria.

EKECHUKWU, AMY

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

The torque-speed relationship of the bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many swimming bacteria are propelled by flagellar filaments driven by a rotary motor. Each of these tiny motors can generate an impressive torque. The motor torque vs. speed relationship is considered one of the most important measurable characteristics of the motor and therefore is a major criterion for judging models proposed for the working mechanism. Here we give an explicit explanation for this torquespeed curve. The same physics also can explain certain puzzling properties of other motors. energy conversion ? mathematical model ? molecular motor ? proton motive force ? mechanochemistry The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) consists of a rotary motor embedded in the cell envelope connected to an extracellular helical propeller (see Fig. 1) (14). The motor is powered by the flow of ions down an electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane into the cell. The ions are typically H ? (protons) in Escherichia coli and Na ? in alkalophiles and marine Vibrio species. For convenience of discussion, we will focus on the proton motor, although most of the discussion applies to the sodium motor as well. The electrochemical gradient, ?? (proton-motive force or sodium-motive force), consists of a transmembrane voltage and a concentration difference across the membrane, both of which are maintained by various metabolic processes. The proton-motive force is defined as ?? ? pmf ? ?? membrane potential ? 2.303 kBT e ?pH.

Jianhua Xing; Fan Bai; Richard Berry; George Oster; Transmembrane Ion

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessment of toxicological interactions of benzene and its primary degradation products (catechol and phenol) using a lux-modified bacterial bioassay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bacterial bioassay has been developed to assess the relative toxicities of xenobiotics commonly found in contaminated soils, river waters, and ground waters. The assay utilized decline in luminescence of lux-marked Pseudomonas fluorescens on exposure to xenobiotics. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterium in the terrestrial environment, providing environmental relevance to soil, river, and ground water systems. Three principal environmental contaminants associated with benzene degradation were exposed to the luminescence-marked bacterial biosensor to assess their toxicity individually and in combination. Median effective concentration (EC50) values for decline in luminescence were determined for benzene, catechol, and phenol and were found to be 39.9, 0.77, and 458.6 mg/L, respectively. Catechol, a fungal and bacterial metabolite of benzene, was found to be significantly more toxic to the biosensor than was the parent compound benzene, showing that products of xenobiotic biodegradation may be more toxic than the parent compounds. Combinations of parent compounds and metabolites were found to be significantly more toxic to the bioassay than were the individual compounds themselves. Development of this bioassay has provided a rapid screening system suitable for assessing the toxicity of xenobiotics commonly found in contaminated soil, river, and ground-water environments. The assay can be utilized over a wide pH range is therefore more applicable to such environmental systems than bioluminescence-based bioassays that utilize marine organisms and can only be applied over a limited pH and salinity range.

Boyd, E.M. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Huntingdon (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science; Meharg, A.A.; Wright, J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Huntingdon (United Kingdom); Killham, K. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressed genes in bacterial microarray experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncoupled simulations for each data set and from 50 heavy-simulations for the ecox data set. The dashed lines in (A)In several bacterial data sets, signi?cant amounts of

Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Design, construction and characterization of a set of insulated bacterial promoters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have generated a series of variable-strength, constitutive, bacterial promoters that act predictably in different sequence contexts, span two orders of magnitude in strength and contain convenient sites for cloning and ...

Davis, Joseph H.

109

The role of siderophores in algal-bacterial interactions in the marine environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements in the common brown algae and in sea water, JournalBacterial tracking of motile algae, FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.brevis (Dinophyceae), Harmful Algae 1, 277-293. Mayali, X. ,

Amin, Shady A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Siderophore production by heterotrophic bacterial isolates from the Costa Rica upwelling dome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont) An increased understanding of heterotrophic bacterial strategies for acquiring nutrients and trace elements is critical for elucidating their impact on biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. It is estimated that iron ...

Krey, Whitney B. (Whitney Blair)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bacterial influence on uranium oxidation reduction reactions : implications for environmental remediation and isotopic composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bacterial influence on the chemistry and speciation of uranium has some important impacts on the environment, and can be exploited usefully for the purposes of environmental remediation of uranium waste contamination. ...

Mullen, Lisa Maureen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Predictions of flexible C-terminal tethers of bacterial proteins with the FLEXTAIL bioinformatics pipeline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proteins use conserved binding motifs associated with relatively unconserved flexible amino acid sequences as mobile tethers for interacting molecules, as exemplified by C-terminal sequences of bacterial chemotaxis receptors. The FLEXTAIL bioinformatics ...

Yi Lu; Jeffrey L. Ram

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Bacterial magnetosome: a novel biogenetic magnetic targeted drug carrier with potential multifunctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria have recently drawn great interest due to their unique features. BMs are used experimentally as carriers for antibodies, enzymes, ligands, nucleic acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. In ...

Jianbo Sun; Ying Li; Xing-Jie Liang; Paul C. Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Contact Versus Immersion Freezing of Freely Suspended Droplets by Bacterial Ice Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Droplets freely suspended in the air stream of a wind tunnel were nucleated with dedicated bacterial cells in either the contact or immersion mode. Immersion freezing seemed to give a noncontinuous frequency distribution of freezing with ...

Zev Levin; Saul A. Yankofsky

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active retrieval of species-specific characteristics of an analyte. Vibrational modes of constituent molecules are Raman-excited by a pair of ultrashort, femtosecond laser pulses, and then probed through inelastic scattering of a third, time-delayed laser field. We first employ the already known time-resolved CARS technique. We apply it to the spectroscopy of easy-to-handle methanol-water mixtures, and then continue building our expertise on solutions of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its salts, which happen to be marker molecules for bacterial spores. Various acquisition schemes are evaluated, and the preference is given to multi-channel frequency-resolved detection, when the whole CARS spectrum is recorded as a function of the probe pulse delay. We demonstrate a simple detection algorithm that manages to differentiate DPA solution from common interferents. We investigate experimentally the advantages and disadvantages of near-resonant probing of the excited molecular coherence, and finally observe the indicative backscattered CARS signal from DPA and NaDPA powders. The possibility of selective Raman excitation via pulse shaping of the preparation pulses is also demonstrated. The analysis of time-resolved CARS experiments on powders and B. subtilis spores, a harmless surrogate for B. anthracis, facilitates the formulation of a new approach, where we take full advantage of the multi-channel frequency-resolved acquisition and spectrally discriminate the Raman-resonant CARS signal from the background due to other instantaneous four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. Using narrowband probing, we decrease the magnitude of the nonresonant FWM, which is further suppressed by the timing of the laser pulses. The devised technique, referred to as hybrid CARS, leads to a single-shot detection of as few as 104 bacterial spores, bringing CARS spectroscopy to the forefront of potential candidates for real-time biohazard detection. It also gives promise to many other applications of CARS, hindered so far by the presence of the overwhelming nonresonant FWM background, mentioned above.

Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Compensation for L212GLU in bacterial reaction centers  

SciTech Connect

In wild-type bacterial reaction centers (RC), residue L212Glu, which is located about 5 {Angstrom} away from Q{sub B}, is involved in the delivery of the second proton to Q{sub B{sup 2}{minus}} [1-4]. We previously constructed the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala double mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus, and it is incapable of photosynthetic growth (PS{sup {minus}}) due to interruption of the proton transfer pathway to Q{sub B}[3,4]. We have isolated several photocompetent (PS{sup +}) phenotypic revertants of this L212-L213AA double mutant [3-7]. The compensatory mutations that restore function in these strains are diverse and show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is absolutely required for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer. Genotypic revertant and second-site mutations, located within the Q{sub B} binding picket or at more distant sites, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213 to restore photocompetence. One of the phenotypic revertants of the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant carries a genotypic reversion of L213Ala to Asp; the Ala substitution at L212 remains. We were intrigued that this L212Glu {yields} Ala mutant R. capsulatus is photocompetent, while the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant of R. sphaeroides is not, particularly since the sequence identity in the Q{sub B} site of these two strains is 90{percent} [8]. To this end, we constructed the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant in R. capsulatus, and it is also PS{sup {minus}}. To determine the function that is lost in the L212Gln mutant but restored by Ala at that site, we selected four PS{sup +} revertants from the L212Gln strain.

Hanson, D.K.; Deng, Y.L.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sebban, P. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif/Yvette (France). CNRS

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Tier 1 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Lab Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies Initiative (TMTI). The high-level goal of TMTI is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve those goals, TMTI has a near term need to obtain more sequence information across a large range of pathogens, near neighbors, and across a broad geographical and host range. Our role in this project is to research available sequence data for the organisms of interest and identify critical microbial sequence and knowledge gaps that need to be filled to meet TMTI objectives. This effort includes: (1) assessing current genomic sequence for each agent including phylogenetic and geographical diversity, host range, date of isolation range, virulence, sequence availability of key near neighbors, and other characteristics; (2) identifying Subject Matter Experts (SME's) and potential holders of isolate collections, contacting appropriate SME's with known expertise and isolate collections to obtain information on isolate availability and specific recommendations; (3) identifying sequence as well as knowledge gaps (eg virulence, host range, and antibiotic resistance determinants); (4) providing specific recommendations as to the most valuable strains to be placed on the DTRA sequencing queue. We acknowledge that criteria for prioritization of isolates for sequencing falls into two categories aligning with priority queues 1 and 2 as described in the summary. (Priority queue 0 relates to DTRA operational isolates whose availability is not predictable in advance.) 1. Selection of isolates that appear to have likelihood to provide information on virulence and antibiotic resistance. This will include sequence of known virulent strains. Particularly valuable would be virulent strains that have genetically similar yet avirulent, or non human transmissible, counterparts that can be used for comparison to help identify key virulence or host range genes. This approach will provide information that can be used by structural biologists to help develop therapeutics and vaccines. We have pointed out such high priority strains of which we are aware, and note that if any such isolates should be discovered, they will rise to the top priority. We anticipate difficulty locating samples with unusual resistance phenotypes, in particular. Sequencing strategies for isolates in queue 1 should aim for as complete finishing status as possible, since high-quality initial annotation (gene-calling) will be necessary for the follow-on protein structure analyses contributing to countermeasure development. Queue 2 for sequencing determination will be more dynamic than queue 1, and samples will be added to it as they become available to the TMTI program. 2. Selection of isolates that will provide broader information about diversity and phylogenetics and aid in specific detection as well as forensics. This approach focuses on sequencing of isolates that will provide better resolution of variants that are (or were) circulating in nature. The finishing strategy for queue 2 does not require complete closing with annotation. This queue is more static, as there is considerable phylogenetic data, and in this report we have sought to reveal gaps and make suggestions to fill them given existing sequence data and strain information. In this report we identify current sequencing gaps in both priority queue categories. Note that this is most applicable to the bacterial pathogens, as most viruses are by default in queue 1. The Phase I focus of this project is on viral hemorrhagic fever viruses and Category A bacterial agents as defined to us by TMTI. We have carried out individual analyses on each species of interest, and these are included as chapters in this report. Viruses and bacteria are biologically very distinct from each other and require different methods of analysis and criteria for sequencing prioritization. Therefore, we will describe our methods, analyses and conclusions separately for each category.

Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Bacterial and Archaeal Lipid Biomarkers from Anaerobically Digested Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was used in the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinone (RQ), bacterial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and archaeal phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) from anaerobically digested sludge. Bacterial RQ were determined using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Determination of bacterial PLFA and archaeal PLEL was simultaneously performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of pressure, temperature, and modifier concentration on the total amounts of RQ, PLFA, and PLEL were investigated by 23 experiments with five settings chosen for each variable. The optimal extraction conditions that were obtained through a multiple-response optimization included a pressure of 23.6 MPa, temperature of 77.6 C, and 10.6 % (v/v) of methanol as the modifier. Thirty nine components of microbial lipid biomarkers were identified in the anaerobically digested sludge. Overall, the SFE method proved to be more effective, rapid, and quantitative for simultaneously extracting bacterial and archaeal lipid biomarkers, compared to conventional organic solvent extraction. This work shows the potential application of SFE as a routine method for the comprehensive analysis of microbial community structures in environmental assessments using the lipid biomarkers profile. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13 3023

Muhammad Hanif; Yoichi Atsuta; Koichi Fujie; Hiroyuki Daimon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Functional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the emerging water contaminants: 1,4-dioxane and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

database: A comprehensive genomics resource on microbialtherefore functional genomics approaches that marry theFunctional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the

Sales, Christopher Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Transcriptional Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Transcriptional Efficiency Qin Ma, Ying Xu PII: S1672-0229(13)00008-9 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gpb.2013.01.004 Reference: GPB 52 To appear in: Please cite this article as: Q. Ma, Y. Xu, Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Transcriptional Efficiency, (2013), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gpb.2013.01.004 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process

122

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quality time-of-flight range imaging for feature-based registration using bacterial foraging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image registration is a widely tackled research topic in the computer vision and the computer graphics fields. This problem aims to find an optimal transformation or correspondence between images acquired under different conditions. Recently, a new 3D ... Keywords: 3D modelling, Bacterial foraging, Evolutionary computation, Image registration, Time of flight

E. Bermejo, O. CordN, S. Damas, J. SantamarA

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

In silico identification of Gram-negative bacterial secreted proteins from primary sequence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we focus on different types of Gram-negative bacterial secreted proteins, and try to analyze the relationships and differences among them. Through an extensive literature search, 1612 secreted proteins have been collected as a standard ... Keywords: Multi-classifier, Pseudo-amino acid composition, Sequence similarity network, Support vector machine

Lezheng Yu, Jiesi Luo, Yanzhi Guo, Yizhou Li, Xuemei Pu, Menglong Li

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

2012 Land Grant and Sea Grant National Water Conference Bacterial Detection and Tracking Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium May 22, 2012 8:00 a.m. -- 12:00 p.m. Marriott Waterfront Hotel, Portland, OR 8:00 ­ 8:15 a of Bacteroides qPCR Utility for Estimating Bacterial Loading from Cattle [Kevin Wagner, Texas Water Resources

127

Diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in dioxin-contaminated sediments from the Houston ship channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Port of Houston and the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) are highly industrialized areas along Galveston Bay, Texas. The HSC is highly polluted with a host of persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. The main objective of this study was to determine the potential for in situ bioremediation in the HSC sediments. Our study focused on the bacterial group Dehalococcoides, since it is the only known group to reductively dechlorinate dioxins. Culture independent methods were used to determine the presence or absence of Dehalococcoides in HSC sediments. Molecular methods including PCR, cloning, restriction enzyme digest, and sequencing were used to determine the diversity of Dehalococcoides as well as total bacterial diversity in HSC sediments. The metabolically active members of the microbial community in HSC sediments were also determined using the same molecular methods as described above. Dehalococcoides was detected in every sediment core and at various depths within each core. Depths ranged from 1cm (SG-6) to 30cm (11261). Dehalococcoides diversity was centered on Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 and Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. Overall bacterial diversity in HSC sediments was dominated by Proteobacteria, especially Deltaproteobacteria, and Chloroflexi, which include Dehalococcoides. Total bacterial diversity at a wetlands control site was dominated by Betaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were determined to be the major metabolically active groups within the HSC sediments. These findings indicate that the HSC sediments have great potential for successful in situ bioremediation. These results also support the use of Dehalococcoides as a biological proxy for dioxin contamination.

Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bacterial metal leaching and bioaccumulation. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning bioleaching and bioaccumulation in metal recovery systems. References study bacterial oxidation, fungal metabolism, metal extraction, and metal recovery from deposits. Gold and uranium ore treatments are discussed. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests and ultrasound pretreatment are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Poplar and its bacterial endophytes: coexistence and harmony  

SciTech Connect

Associations between plants and microorganisms are very complex and are the subject of an increasing number of studies. Here, we specifically address the relationship between poplar and its endophytic bacteria. The role and importance of endophytic bacteria in growth and development of their host plants is still underestimated. However, since many endophytes have a beneficial effect on their host, an improved understanding of the interaction between poplar and its endophytic bacteria has the potential to provide major breakthroughs that will improve the productivity of poplar. Endophytic bacteria can improve plant growth and development in a direct or indirect way. Direct plant growth promoting mechanisms may involve nitrogen fixation, production of plant growth regulators such as auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins, and suppression of stress ethylene synthesis by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. Endophytic bacteria can indirectly benefit the plant by preventing the growth or activity of plant pathogens through competition for space and nutrients, antibiosis, production of hydrolytic enzymes, inhibition of pathogen-produced enzymes or toxins, and through systemic induction of plant defense mechanisms. Examples of applications for custom endophyte-host partnerships include improved productivity and establishment of poplar trees on marginal soils and the phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. A systems biology approach to understand the synergistic interactions between poplar and its beneficial endophytic bacteria represents an important field of research, which is facilitated by the recent sequencing of the genomes of poplar and several of its endophytic bacteria.

van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; Monchy, S.; Schwender, J.; Miller, L.; Ferrieri, R.; Rogers, A.; Zhu, W.; Weyens, N.; Vangronsveld, J.; Newman, L.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

Jaing, C

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging. Final report, 1992--1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ core plugging experiments and transport experiments, using the model bacteria Leuconostoc m., have been conducted. Results demonstrated that cellular polysaccharide production increases cell distribution in porous media and caused an overall decrease in media permeability. Further, a parallel core plugging experiment was conducted and showed the feasibility of this system to divert injection fluid from high permeability zones into low permeability zones within porous media as is needed for profile modification. To implement this type of application, however, controlled placement of cells and rates of polymer production are needed. Therefore, kinetic studies were performed. A kinetic model was subsequently developed for Leuconostoc m. bacteria. This model is based on data generated from batch growth experiments and allows for the prediction of saccharide utilization, cell generation, and dextran production. These predictions can be used to develop injection strategies for field implementation. Transport and in situ growth micromodel experiments have shown how dextran allow cells to remain as clusters after cell division which enhanced cell capture and retention in porous media. Additional Damkohler experiments have been performed to determine the effects of the nutrient injection rate and nutrient concentration on the rate of porous media plugging. As shown experimentally and as predicted by a model for in situ growth, an increase in nutrient concentration and/or its injection rate will result in a faster rate of porous media plugging. Through continuum model simulations, it has been shown that the initial cell profiles play a key role on the core plugging rate. Controlling the location of the inoculating cells is thus another key factor in using bacteria for profile modification.

Fogler, H.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ti-Nb-based metastable materials with improved biomechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... memory behaviour as well as a low Young's modulus for certain Nb concentrations. ... Electrical Stimulation of Titanium for Eradication of Bacterial Biofilms.

133

Mercury and other heavy metals influence bacterial community structure in contaminated Tennessee streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High concentrations of uranium, inorganic mercury [Hg(II)], and methylmercury (MeHg) have been detected in streams located in the Department of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, TN. To determine the potential effects of the surface water contamination on the microbial community composition, surface stream sediments were collected 7 times during the year, from 5 contaminated locations and 1 control stream. Fifty-nine samples were analyzed for bacterial community composition and geochemistry. Community characterization was based on GS 454 FLX pyrosequencing with 235 Mb of 16S rRNA gene sequence targeting the V4 region. Sorting and filtering of the raw reads resulted in 588,699 high-quality sequences with lengths of >200 bp. The bacterial community consisted of 23 phyla, including Proteobacteria (ranging from 22.9 to 58.5% per sample), Cyanobacteria (0.2 to 32.0%), Acidobacteria (1.6 to 30.6%), Verrucomicrobia (3.4 to 31.0%), and unclassified bacteria. Redundancy analysis indicated no significant differences in the bacterial community structure between midchannel and near-bank samples. Significant correlations were found between the bacterial community and seasonal as well as geochemical factors. Furthermore, several community members within the Proteobacteria group that includes sulfate-reducing bacteria and within the Verrucomicrobia group appeared to be associated positively with Hg and MeHg. This study is the first to indicate an influence of MeHg on the in situ microbial community and suggests possible roles of these bacteria in the Hg/MeHg cycle.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Yang, Zamin [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Stable carbon isotopic compositions of bacterial fatty acids in a seagrass dominated system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major source of carbon to the bacterial community in a seagrass (Thalassia testudinum) dominated region of Lower Laguna Madre, Texas was determined with the isotopic composition of bacterial phospholipid fatty acids. Rough estimates of bacterial abundance were also obtained from total phospholipid fatty acid concentrations. Core samples came from three differing habitat types consisting of a bare area, a transitional area, and a vegetated area. Five depth intervals of 0-0.5 cm, 0.5-2.5 cm, 4.5-6.5 cm, 8.5-10.5 cm, and 18.5-20.5 cm from each core were used for analyses. Bacterial abundance was significantly higher in the vegetated habitat compared with bare or transitional habitats, which showed little difference from one another. The stable carbon isotope ratios ([]C) of branched chain fatty acids, iso- and anteiso-15:0 (i&a15:0) found only in bacteria were used to assess carbon utilization. The []C of total organic carbon (TOC) and the ubiquitous fatty acid 16:0 were used as a proxy of organic carbon sources to the sediment. T. testudinum above ground tissues averaged -11.80.3[0/00] and benthic microalgae, as represented by the fatty acid 20:5[]3, averaged -20.50.6[0/00]. The TOC from all habitats and depths were within 2[0/00] of T. testudinum above ground tissues suggesting the majority of organic carbon was derived from this source. The []C of i&a15:0 in all habitats and depths were within 3[0/00] of TOC. In bare and transitional habitats, C-enriched values of -9[0/00] were observed at the surface, possibly indicating the influence of degradation. These data suggest that seagrass carbon is entering the microbial loop, thereby making this carbon available to higher trophic levels.

Jones, Walter Brian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Epidemiology of Bacterial Food-borne Pathogens: Linking Intermittent Pathogen Shedding and Transmission in Their Animal Hosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most bacterial foodborne pathogens are shed intermittently from their animal hosts and are able to grow and persist in the environment. Cattle and pigs constitute the major animal reservoirs for these pathogens. The overall objective of this dissertation research was to improve understanding of the role of intermittent shedding and environmental persistence in the transmission and maintenance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in their animal host populations. This objective was addressed through five interdepended studies. The study in Chapter II, describes the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 in a dairy herd using mathematical modeling that includes indirect transmission from the contaminated environment. The model predicts that the elevated ambient temperature during summer, together with the availability of large amount of drinking water per cattle, are the major factors for increased pathogen load in water and high prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in cattle populations. The second study, in Chapter III, determined the variation in water-to-cattle ratios among feedlot pens and evaluated the association with the pen level management and environmental factors. Water-to-cattle ratio was found to vary greatly between feedlots and pens with lower water-to-cattle ratios on average had cooler drinking water. The study in Chapter IV, used a compartmental mathematical model of infection transmission, to evaluate the effect of cleaning on Salmonella Typhimurium control in a grower-finisher pig herd. Cleaning alone was not found to be an effective measure of control unless combined with other measures to reduce the level of bacterial shedding. The study in Chapter V, developed the multi-state Markov chain model to describe the fecal shedding pattern of three E. coli O157:H7 strains in cattle. One strain was not detected to shed, while the other two strains had on average different durations of host colonization, albeit not at the statistically significant level. The study in Chapter VI, used an experimental infection transmission approach to estimate and compare transmission rates for three different strains of E. coli O157:H7 in steers. The results revealed that the transmission rate of E. coli O157:H7 increases significantly with increasing levels of environmental contamination. Collectively, the five studies have highlighted the role of these pathogen characteristics in their transmission. The improved understanding of these characteristics will allow for better design of control measure to ensure food safety.

Gautam, Raju

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the precipitation of metal phosphates.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we test the potential for passive cell wall biomineralization by determining the effects of non-metabolizing bacteria on the precipitation of uranyl, lead, and calcium phosphates from a range of over-saturated conditions. Experiments were performed using Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. After equilibration, the aqueous phases were sampled and the remaining metal and P concentrations were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES); the solid phases were collected and analyzed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). At the lower degrees of over-saturation studied, bacterial cells exerted no discernable effect on the mode of precipitation of the metal phosphates, with homogeneous precipitation occurring exclusively. However, at higher saturation states in the U system, we observed heterogeneous mineralization and extensive nucleation of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) mineralization throughout the fabric of the bacterial cell walls. This mineral nucleation effect was observed in both B. subtilis and S. oneidensis cells. In both cases, the biogenic mineral precipitates formed under the higher saturation state conditions were significantly smaller than those that formed in the abiotic controls. The cell wall nucleation effects that occurred in some of the U systems were not observed under any of the saturation state conditions studied in the Pb or Ca systems. The presence of B. subtilis significantly decreased the extent of precipitation in the U system, but had little effect in the Pb and Ca systems. At least part of this effect is due to higher solubility of the nanoscale HUP precipitate relative to macroscopic HUP. This study documents several effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the nature and extent of metal phosphate precipitation. Each of these effects likely contributes to higher metal mobilities in geologic media, but the effects are not universal, and occur only with some elements and only under a subset of the conditions studied.

Dunham-Cheatham, S; Rui, X; Bunker, B; Hellmann, R; Menguy, N; J B, and Fein

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Soil carbon sequestration and changes in fungal and bacterial biomass following incorporation of forest residues.  

SciTech Connect

Sequestering carbon (C) in forest soils can benefit site fertility and help offset greenhouse gas emissions. However, identifying soil conditions and forest management practices which best promote C accumulation remains a challenging task. We tested whether soil incorporation of masticated woody residues alters short-term C storage at forested sites in western and southeastern USA. Our hypothesis was that woody residues would preferentially stimulate soil fungal biomass, resulting in improved C use efficiency and greater soil C storage. Harvest slash at loblolly pine sites in South Carolina was masticated (chipped) and either (1) retained on the soil surface, (2) tilled to a soil depth of 40 cm, or (3) tilled using at least twice the mass of organics. At comparative sites in California, live woody fuels in ponderosa pine stands were (1) masticated and surface applied, (2) masticated and tilled, or (3) left untreated. Sites with clayey and sandy soils were compared in each region, with residue additions ranging from 20 to 207 Mg ha_1. Total and active fungal biomass were not strongly affected by residue incorporation despite the high input of organics. Limited response was also found for total and active bacterial biomass. As a consequence, fungal:bacterial (F:B) biomass ratios were similar among treatments at each site. Total soil C was elevated at one California site following residue incorporation, yet was significantly lower compared to surface-applied residues at both loblolly pine sites, presumably due to the oxidative effects of tilling on soil organic matter. The findings demonstrated an inconsequential effect of residue incorporation on fungal and bacterial biomass and suggest a limited potential of such practices to enhance long-term soil C storage in these forests.

Busse, Matt, D.; Sanchez, Felipe G.; Ratcliff, Alice W.; Butnor, John R.; Carter, Emily A.; Powers, Robert F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-selective channels in planar 43. Ogunjimi AA, Chandler JM, Gbenle GO, Olukoya DK, Akinrimisi EO: Heterologous expression of cry2 gene from a local strain of Bacillus thuringiensis isolated in Nigeria. Biotechnol Appl Bio- chem 2002, 36:241-246. 44. Sreekrishna K... ral ssBioMed CentMicrobial Cell Factories Open AcceReview Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris Cemal Gurkan*1,2 and David J Ellar1 Address: 1Department of Biochemistry...

Gurkan, Cemal; Ellar, David J

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Coupling between switching regulation and torque generation in bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bacterial flagellar motor plays a crucial role in both bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis. Recent experiments reveal that the switching dynamics of the motor depends on the motor rotation speed, and thus the motor torque, non-monotonically. Here we present a unified mathematical model which models motor torque generation based on experimental torque-speed curves and torque-dependent switching based on the conformational spread model. The model successfully reproduces the observed switching rate as a function of the rotation speed, and provides a generic physical explanation independent of most details. A stator affects the switching dynamics through two mechanisms: accelerating the conformation flipping rates of individual rotor switching units, which favours slower motor speed and thus increasing torque; and affecting more switching units within unit time, which favours faster speed. Consequently, the switching rate shows a maximum at intermediate speed. Our model predicts that a motor switches more often with more stators. The load-switching relation may serve as a mechanism for sensing the physical environment, similar to the chemotaxis system for sensing the chemical environment. It may also coordinate the switch dynamics of motors within a cell.

Fan Bai; Tohru Minamino; Zhanghan Wu; Keiichi Namba; Jianhua Xing

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

RADIATION PRESSURE ON BACTERIAL CLUMPS IN THE SOLAR VICINITY AND THEIR SURVIVAL BETWEEN INTERSTELLAR TRANSITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Radiation pressure cross-sections for clumps of hollow bacterial grains with thin coatings of graphite are calculated using rigorous Guttler formulae. The carbonized skins are expected to form through exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, but a limiting thickness of about 0.03 m is determined by opacity effects. The ratios of radiation pressure to gravity P/G are calculated for varying sizes of the clumps and for varying thickness of the graphite coatings. Bacterial clumps and individual desiccated bacteria without coatings of radii in the range 0.38 m have P/G ratios less than unity, whereas particles with coatings of 0.02m thickness have ratios in excess of unity. Such coatings also provide protection from damaging ultraviolet radiation. Putative cometary bacteria, such as have been recently collected in the stratosphere, are thus not gravitationally bound in the solar system provided they possess carbonised exterior coatings. They are rapidly expelled from the solar system reaching nearby protosolar nebulae in timescales of a few million years. Even with the most pessimistic assumptions galactic cosmic rays are unable to diminish viability to an extent that vitiates the continuity of panspermia. 1.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

Thermophilic bacteria are a potential source of enzymes for the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the complement of proteins used to deconstruct biomass and the specific roles of different microbial groups in thermophilic biomass deconstruction are not well-explored. Here we report on the metagenomic and proteogenomic analyses of a compost-derived bacterial consortium adapted to switchgrass at elevated temperature with high levels of glycoside hydrolase activities. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for the most abundant populations, which included composite genomes for populations closely related to sequenced strains of Thermus thermophilus and Rhodothermus marinus, and for novel populations that are related to thermophilic Paenibacilli and an uncultivated subdivision of the littlestudied Gemmatimonadetes phylum. Partial genomes were also reconstructed for a number of lower abundance thermophilic Chloroflexi populations. Identification of genes for lignocellulose processing and metabolic reconstructions suggested Rhodothermus, Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes as key groups for deconstructing biomass, and Thermus as a group that may primarily metabolize low molecular weight compounds. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of the consortium was used to identify .3000 proteins in fractionated samples from the cultures, and confirmed the importance of Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes to biomass deconstruction. These studies also indicate that there are unexplored proteins with important roles in bacterial lignocellulose deconstruction.

D'haeseleer, Patrik; Gladden, John M.; Allgaier, Martin; Chain, Patrick; Tringe, Susannah G.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into bacterial communities in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herbivores gain access to nutrients stored in plant biomass largely by harnessing the metabolic activities of microbes. Leaf-cutter ants of the genus Atta are a hallmark example; these dominant Neotropical herbivores cultivate symbiotic fungus gardens on massive quantities of fresh plant forage. As the external digestive system of the ants, fungus gardens facilitate the production and sustenance of millions of workers in mature Atta colonies. Here we use metagenomic, and metaproteomic techniques to characterize the bacterial diversity and overall physiological potential of fungus gardens from two species of Atta. Our analysis of over 1.2 Gbp of community metagenomic sequence and three 16S pyrotag libraries reveals that, in addition to harboring the dominant fungal crop, these ecosystems contain abundant populations of Enterobacteriaceae, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, and Escherichia. We show that these bacterial communities possess genes commonly associated with lignocellulose degradation, and likely participate in the processing of plant biomass. Additionally, we demonstrate that bacteria in these environments encode a diverse suite of biosynthetic pathways, and that they may enrich the nitrogen-poor forage of the ants with B-vitamins, amino acids, and proteins. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that fungus gardens are highly-specialized fungus-bacteria communities that efficiently convert plant material into usable energy for their ant hosts. Together with recent investigations into the microbial symbionts of vertebrates, our work underscores the importance of microbial communities to the ecology and evolution of herbivorous metazoans.

Aylward, Frank O.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Suen, Garret; Tringe, Susannah G.; Adams, Sandra M.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Currie, Cameron R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial communityThe impact of ammonium availability on microbial communityin response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate

Mouser, P.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ELISA-Based Segregation of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon for Control of Bacterial Kidney Disease, Annual Report FY 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum (RS), is a serious disease of salmonid fish worldwide. The disease has a major impact on spring chinook salmon populations in the Columbia River system. There is strong evidence that RS can be transmitted from parent to progeny, and segregation of progeny based on levels of antigen detected in adult fish may obviate this mode of transmission. Results from the second year of a four year study to investigate segregation of broodstock as a tool for controlling BKD are presented. To segregate the progeny of adult fish infected with RS we have used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) optimized in the first year of this project. Gametes from fish either injected with erythromycin or receiving no antibiotic injection were successfully segregated into groups having either high or low levels of the RS soluble antigen. Screening of eggs from infected adults has not revealed any detectable antigen present in the egg tissue. Development of a rapid, field ELISA has been accomplished this year. The field ELISA utilizes monoclonal antibodies currently employed in the monoclonal antibody-based ELISA. The sensitivity of the field ELISA approaches that of the monoclonal ELISA, and has been tested on 150 adult chinook salmon. A high correlation exists between samples assayed by the monoclonal ELISA, field ELISA, and direct FAT. An alternative system for detecting RS soluble antigen, the Western blot, has also been improved. Using a chemiluminescent substrate, the sensitivity of detection has been increase 50--100 fold. 16 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Winton, James R.; Kaattari, Stephen L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Solid State Electron Transfer via Bacterial Nanowires: Contributions Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Geophysical Response of Biostimulated Subsurface  

SciTech Connect

The degradation of organic matter by microorganisms provides a source of electrical potential or so-called 'self potential' (SP) that can be measured by using a voltmeter. During this process electrons are being produced as a waste-product and bacterial cells have to dispose of these to allow for the complete biodegradation of organic matter. Especially in anaerobic microbial communities, exo-cellular electron transfer is the most important driving force behind this process and organisms have developed different, but also similar, ways to transfer electrons to other microorganisms. Recently, it has been postulated that direct electron transfer from cell-to-cell is actually done by 'hard-wired' microorganisms. This shuttling of electrons is most likely done by certain c-type cytochromes that form the functional part of electrically conductive nanowires. In this study we investigated if nanowires can explain the geoelectrical (self potential and spectral induced polarization) signals observed at some biostimulated environments such as DOE sites. The objectives of our project are to: (1) investigate any temporal changes in the geophysical signatures (Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP)) associated with nanowires of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type and mtrc/omcA deletion mutant, (2) demonstrate that mutant strains of bacteria that produce nonconductive nanowires do not contribute to geoelectrical responses. We accomplished the following: (1) Provided training to students and a postdoctoral fellow that worked on the project, (2) Conducted several SP & IP measurements correlating the distribution of nanowires and SIP/SP signals in partial fulfillment of object No. 1 and 2. On the following we will report and discuss the results of our last experiment with some emphasis on the source mechanisms of both SP and IP associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type in sand columns.

Estella Atekwana

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone  

SciTech Connect

Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may transition between asymmetric and symmetric dimers in response to changes in either biochemical modifications (e.g. proteolytic cleavage) or other biological cues. Such transitions may contribute to the broad range of protein-protein interactions and functions attributed to class II chaperones.

Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Inner Workings of a Bacterial Black Box Caught on Time-lapse Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 22, 2013 November 22, 2013 The Inner Workings of a Bacterial Black Box Caught on Time-lapse Video Cyanobacteria, found in just about every ecosystem on Earth, are one of the few bacteria that can create their own energy through photosynthesis and "fix" carbon - from carbon dioxide molecules - and convert it into fuel inside of miniscule compartments called carboxysomes. Using a pioneering visualization method, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) made what are, in effect, movies of this complex and vital cellular machinery being assembled inside living cells. They observed that bacteria build these internal compartments in a way never seen in plant, animal and other eukaryotic cells.

150

Electron-transfer pathways in the primary event of bacterial photosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

The photochemical reaction in bacterial photosynthesis is the transfer of an electron from a bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to a bacteriopheophytin (H), possibly by way of another bacteriochlorophyll (B). The authors explore the mechanism of this reaction by calculating quantum-mechanical matrix elements for the electronic coupling of the exciton states and intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) states of the photosynthetic reaction center. The calculations are based on the crystal structure of the Rhodopseudomonas viridis reaction center and on semiempirical atomic resonance integrals. Five possible mechanisms for charge separation are considered. The matrix elements for a pathway via the intermediate CT state P/sup +/B/sup -/ are consistent with the experimentally measured kinetics of the reaction, but this pathway requires a remarkable stabilization of the CT state by the protein. An alternative pathway via B/sup +/H/sup -/ could be more favorable energetically, but has somewhat smaller coupling elements.

Warshel, A.; Creighton, S.; Parson, W.W.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

Hoelzel, Christina S., E-mail: Christina.Hoelzel@wzw.tum.de [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mueller, Christa [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany); Harms, Katrin S. [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mikolajewski, Sabine [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany); Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

2012 Bacterial Source Tracking - State of the Science Conference Conference Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2012 Bacterial Source Tracking - State of the Science Conference was held February 28-29 at the T Bar M Resort and Conference Center in New Braunfels, Texas. Academia involved in BST analysis; state, federal, and regional agency personnel; elected officials; and other interested persons were targeted through various media outlets. Prior to the conference, the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) queried state and federal agencies about what their wants and needs in regards to the state of BST science. Staff from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and others were asked to identify questions and issues that should be included in conference presentations and discussion.

Smith, C.; Wagner, K.; Warrick, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

3-Dimensional Reconstruction and Modeling of BActerial Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R 3-Dimen Substanc Project s EMSL L Alice Do Microsco Co-inves Matthew Environm Bacterial (EPS) pla cellular p cell infec mineral s EPS's ch directly i heavy me fragile, h macromo in elucida immediat process t based, hi such as e method o scale ima near-to-n without a collapse processin EMSL ac Tecnai T 2006. We temperatu capability (CryoTE material Research an nsional Reco ces (EPS) start date: S Lead Investi ohnalkova opy group, E stigators: w Marshall mental Micro l extracellula ay essential processes suc ction, and ba substrates. In hemical react influence the etals and rad highly hydrat olecules pres ation of its s te collapse d hat is a prere igh resolutio electron micr of Cryo-elect aging of the native structu artifact cause after losing ng and dehyd cquired a dev T-12 (FEI) w e built upon

155

Mitochondria, which are probably derived from distant bacterial an-cestors incorporated into our cells, have their own DNA. However, we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitochondria, which are probably derived from distant bacterial an- cestors incorporated into our of a symbiosis, which occured during the course of evolution, between their distant bacterial ancestors and cells the machinery to process RNA, were baptized `mitochondrial RNA granules'. It is now possible to explore in more

Halazonetis, Thanos

156

Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anchialine blue holes found in the interior of the Bahama Islands have distinct fresh and salt water layers, with vertical mixing, and dysoxic to anoxic conditions below the halocline. Scientific cave diving exploration and microbiological investigations of Cherokee Road Extension Blue Hole on Abaco Island have provided detailed information about the water chemistry of the vertically stratified water column. Hydrologic parameters measured suggest that circulation of seawater is occurring deep within the platform. Dense microbial assemblages which occurred as mats on the cave walls below the halocline were investigated through construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries, finding representatives across several bacterial lineages including Chlorobium and OP8. In many blue holes, microbial metabolism of organic matter in the presence of seawater sulfate leads to anoxic and sulfidic conditions at or below halocline. Sunlight penetrating this sulfidic layer allows for in situ primary production to be dominated by bacterial anoxygenic phototrophs. Although water column chemistry and molecular genetic diversity of microbial mats in Cherokee Road Extension Blue Hole were investigated in this study, the full scope of the biogeochemistry of inland blue holes throughout the Bahamas Archipelago is complex and poorly understood. However, these microbial communities are clearly influenced by several factors including solar insolation, terrestrial and marine inputs of oxygen, carbon, and nutrients, water residence times, depth to the halo/chemocline, and cave passage geometry. The biogeochemistry of inland blue holes throughout the Bahamas is so distinctive which makes Abaco Island and the rest of the archipelago valuable as natural experiments, repositories of microbial diversity, and analogs for stratified and sulfidic oceans present early in Earth's history.

Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

Leuze, Michael Rex [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Beliaev, Alexander S [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Comparative Toxicity of Nanoparticulate CuO and ZnO to Soil Bacterial Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing industrial application of metal oxide Engineered Nano-Particles (ENPs) is likely to increase their environmental release to soils. While the potential of metal oxide ENPs as environmental toxicants has been shown, lack of suitable control treatments have compromised the power of many previous assessments. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of ENP (nano) forms of Zn and Cu oxides in two different soils by measuring their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. We could show a direct acute toxicity of nano-CuO acting on soil bacteria while the macroparticulate (bulk) form of CuO was not toxic. In comparison, CuSO4 was more toxic than either oxide form. Unlike Cu, all forms of Zn were toxic to soil bacteria, and the bulk-ZnO was more toxic than the nano-ZnO. The ZnSO4 addition was not consistently more toxic than the oxide forms. Consistently, we found a tight link between the dissolved concentration of metal in solution and the inhibition of bacterial growth. The inconsistent toxicological response between soils could be explained by different resulting concentrations of metals in soil solution. Our findings suggested that the principal mechanism of toxicity was dissolution of metal oxides and sulphates into a metal ion form known to be highly toxic to bacteria, and not a direct effect of nano-sized particles acting on bacteria. We propose that integrated efforts toward directly assessing bioavailable metal concentrations are more valuable than spending resources to reassess ecotoxicology of ENPs separately from

Johannes Rousk; Kathrin Ackermann; Simon F. Curling; Davey L. Jones

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fungal, bacterial, and archaeal communities mediating C cycling and trace gas flux in peatland ecosystems subject to climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fungal, bacterial, and archaeal communities mediating C cycling and trace gas flux in peatland microbial community profiling in a network of natural peatland ecosystems spanning large-scale climate the drivers of microbial community composition via metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of samples from

160

Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporation: 20,500 for upgrades to existing accounting software and training Three Eagles Development Corporation, Picuris Pueblo: 10,800 to update computer and account...

162

Dynamics of marine pelagic bacterial communities on the Texas-Louisiana shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial community interactions within many ecosystems are still relatively unknown. Investigating links between environmental dynamics and shifting pelagic bacterial community structures on the Texas-Louisiana shelf, Eubacterial community profiles of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were generated using Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) of the 16S rDNA and 23S rDNA intergenic spacer region. This ITS region is highly variable in both length and sequence. Community diversity was assessed by the comparison of ARISA-generated community fingerprints of samples collected from four distinct regions along the Texas-Louisiana shelf in a cross-shelf pattern on 10m, 20m, and 40m isobaths. Incubations of samples with a thymidine analog, 5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), allowed for the isolation and analysis of the actively growing subset within the total bacterial population. Community composition was determined through the construction of clone libraries for sequencing and putative phyla affiliation of community 16 rRNA genes. Hydrographic data were also collected for analysis of shifts in microbial community diversity correlated with a variety of influential environmental factors. ARISA profiles of Eubacterial species richness suggest strong distinction between the two communities found within Zones A and C along the Texas-Louisiana Shelf. Further analysis of salinity gradients originating from the two main fluvial sources, the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya Rivers, identified possible sources of variation between the individual communities. Whereas composition of these communities remains discrete between regions, the active subset of the population becomes more similar across the shelf through the summer. Possibly due to undersampling of hypoxic sites, no relationship could be determined between hypoxia formation and the Eubacterial community dynamics. Several OTUs within the communities were identifiable as ? - and ? - Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides. Through validation studies of 5-Bromodeoxyuridine field sampling, this study indicates the power of BrdU incorporation and ARISA analysis to study a dynamic environmental system and explore the factors that determine the structure of the pelagic community on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf.

Anitsakis, Erin Colleen

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

For Developers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developers Developers Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) OSCARS Case Study Documentation User Manual FAQ Design Specifications Functional Specifications Notifications Publications Authorization Policy Default Attributes Message Security Clients For Developers DCN/OSCARS Implementation (Aug 2007) AAA BSS Pathfinder Topology Path realization Dojo development Interfaces Links Hardware Requirements DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net For Developers DCN/OSCARS Implementation (Aug 2007)

164

Investigations of Rhizobium biofilm formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a glass slide buried in compost soil. Fluorescent image.on a glass slide buried in compost soil. Fluorescent image.organic matter, found in the compost. Bare spots on the PVC

Fujishige, Nancy A; Kapadia, Neel N; De Hoff, Peter L; Hirsch, Ann M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

f_Binding-Motifs-in-Bacterial-Gene-Promoters-Modulate-Transcriptional2_4335.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulation and Systems Biology 2012:6 93-107 Regulation and Systems Biology 2012:6 93-107 doi: 10.4137/GRSB.S9357 This article is available from http://www.la-press.com. © the author(s), publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Ltd. This is an open access article. Unrestricted non-commercial use is permitted provided the original work is properly cited. OPEN ACCESS Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Gene Regulation and Systems Biology O R I G I N A L R E S E A R C H Gene Regulation and Systems Biology 2012:6 93 Binding Motifs in Bacterial Gene Promoters Modulate Transcriptional Effects of Global Regulators CRP and ArcA Michael R. Leuze 1, *, Tatiana V. Karpinets 2,3, *, Mustafa H. Syed 2 , Alexander S. Beliaev 4 and Edward C. Uberbacher 2 1 Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

166

The protein's role in triplet energy transfer in bacterial reaction centers.  

SciTech Connect

When photosynthetic organisms are subjected to high-light conditions in nature, electron transfer becomes blocked as the rate of conversion of light into charge-separated states in the reaction center (RC) exceeds the capacity of the soluble carriers involved in cyclic electron transfer. In that event, a well-characterized T{sub 0}-polarized triplet state {sup T}P, is formed on the primary donor, P, from the P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} state (reviewed in [1]). In an aerobic or semi-aerobic environment, the major role of the carotenoid (C), also bound by the RC, is to quench {sup T}P prior to its sensitization of the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} singlet state of oxygen--a potentially damaging biological oxidant. The carotenoid performs this function efficiently in most bacterial RCs by rapidly accepting the triplet state from P and dissipating this excited-state energy into heat through internal conversion. The lowest-lying triplet states of P and the carotenoid are sufficiently different that {sup T}P can promote oxygen to its excited singlet state whereas {sup T}C can quench the {sup T}P state (reviewed in [2]).

Laible, P. D.

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF  

SciTech Connect

Electron transporting multiheme cytochromes are essential to the metabolism of microbes that inhabit soils and carry out important biogeochemical processes. Recently the first crystal structure of a prototype bacterial deca-heme cytochrome (MtrF) has been resolved and its electrochemistry characterized. However, the molecular details of electron conductance along heme chains in the cytochrome are difficult to access via experiment due to the nearly identical chemical nature of the heme cofactors. Here we employ large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to compute the reduction potentials of the ten hemes of MtrF in aqueous solution. We find that as a whole they fall within a range of about 0.3 V in agreement with experiment. Individual reduction potentials give rise to a free energy profile for electron conduction that is approximately symmetric with respect to the center of the protein. Our calculations indicate that there is no significant potential bias along the orthogonal octa- and tetra-heme chains suggesting that under aqueous conditions MtrF is a nearly reversible two-dimensional conductor.

Breuer, Marian; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The effect of bacterial endotoxins on the water intake and body weight of mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the many effects of the injection of bacterial endotoxins into experimental animals is a profound, albeit transient loss of body weight. As previously reported, this weight loss occurs even with mice of the new NCS colony, although these animals are remarkably resistant to the lethal effects of endotoxins (1, 2). More recently we have observed that mice stop drinking for many hours after receiving endotoxins and this suggested that the weight loss caused by these materials might be due in part at least to the dehydration resulting from decreased water intake. Several related aspects of these phenomena are described in the present paper. Methods The origin of the cultures of Escherlchia coli 17, Klebsidla pncumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus (strain Giorgio), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (BCG-P) and their maintenance have been described in preceding publications (1-4). Endotoxins from cultures of Esch. coli 17 and Klebsidla paeumonlae were prepared in our laboratory by the techniques described earlier. Two other preparations of endotoxin were used. One is a commercial product prepared from

J. Dubos, Ph.D.; Alum Russell; W. Schaedler

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Changes in Bacterial And Archaeal Community Structure And Functional Diversity Along a Geochemically Variable Soil Profile  

SciTech Connect

Spatial heterogeneity in physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils allows for the proliferation of diverse microbial communities. Factors influencing the structuring of microbial communities, including availability of nutrients and water, pH, and soil texture, can vary considerably with soil depth and within soil aggregates. Here we investigated changes in the microbial and functional communities within soil aggregates obtained along a soil profile spanning the surface, vadose zone, and saturated soil environments. The composition and diversity of microbial communities and specific functional groups involved in key pathways in the geochemical cycling of nitrogen, Fe, and sulfur were characterized using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of both 16S rRNA (bacterial and archaeal) and functional genes (amoA and dsrAB) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Fe(III)-reducing organisms. Here we found that the microbial communities and putative ammonia-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing communities varied greatly along the soil profile, likely reflecting differences in carbon availability, water content, and pH. In particular, the Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences are largely unique to each horizon, sharing a distribution and diversity similar to those of the putative (amoA-based) ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. Anaerobic microenvironments within soil aggregates also appear to allow for both anaerobic- and aerobic-based metabolisms, further highlighting the complexity and spatial heterogeneity impacting microbial community structure and metabolic potential within soils.

Hansel, C.M.; Fendorf, S.; Jardine, P.M.; Francis, C.A.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Flow-Through Ultrasonic Lysis System for the Disruption of Bacterial Spores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated, flow-through spore lysis instrument that is capable of rapidly disrupting bacterial spores is described. The system utilizes a flow-through chamber that allows for direct injection of the sample without the need for a chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment step to soften the spore coat prior to lysis. Lysis of Bacillus subtilis spores, a benign simulant of Bacillus anthracis, is achieved by flowing the sample through a tube whose axis is parallel to the faces of two transducers that deliver 10 W cm-2 to the surface of the tube at 1.4 MHz frequency. Increases in amplifiable DNA were assessed by real-time PCR analysis, which showed at least a 25-fold increase in amplifiable DNA following ultrasonic treatment, and dilution-to-extinction PCR, which suggests up to a 100-1000-fold increase. The modular design of the ultrasonic system and integrated fluidics allow it to be incorporated into multi-step sample treatment and detection systems.

Warner, Cynthia L.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Grate, Jay W.; Straub, Tim M.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Owsley, Stanley L.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Long range excitonic transport in a biomimetic system inspired by the bacterial light-harvesting apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light-harvesting I-PufX core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy [S. Bahatyrova et al., Nature (London) 430, 1058 (2004)]. Here, we discuss optimal exciton transfer in a biomimetic system closely modeled on the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane using a Markovian quantum model with dissipation and trapping added phenomenologically. In a deliberate manner, we neglect the high level detail of the bacterial light-harvesting complex and its interaction with the phonon bath in order to elucidate a set of design principles that may be incorporated in artificial pigment-scaffold constructs in a supramolecular assembly. We show that our scheme reproduces many of the most salient features found in their natural counterpart and may be largely explained by simple electrostatic considerations. Most importantly, we show that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robustness with respect to spatial and spectral disorder between and within complexes. The implications of such an arrangement are discussed in the context of biomimetic photosynthetic analogs capable of transferring energy efficiently across tens to hundreds of nanometers.

Harel, Elad [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Methods Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISO committee and more information on standardization effects pertaining to AOCS. Methods Development Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemi

173

Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses  

SciTech Connect

Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng (NIBS-China); (Zhejiang)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Markov random fields reveal an N-terminal double beta-propeller motif as part of a bacterial hybrid two-component sensor system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent explosion in newly sequenced bacterial genomes is outpacing the capacity of researchers to try to assign functional annotation to all the new proteins. Hence, computational methods that can help predict structural ...

Berger, Bonnie

175

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Process Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Although melt loss had become the major cost factor in ingot production, it was the soaring cost of energy during the 1973 energy crisis that triggered the search for more-efficient remelt processes. This effort also sought to develop process that were less labor intensive and more...

177

Development Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, twenty-eighth of an annual series, describes mineral, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada in 2006: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of orebodies, new mines opened, and expansion and other activities of existing mines. Statistics of known gold and silver deposits, and directories of mines

Mark Alden; Stavros Anthony; Cedric Crear; Thalia M. Dondero; Dorothy Sewell Gallagher; Jason Geddes; Ron Knecht; James D. Leavitt; Howard Rosenberg; Jack L. Schofield; Steve Sisolak; James E. Rogers; Milton D. Glick; Jeffrey Thompson; Interim Dean; James V. Taranik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Intermolecular electronic interactions in the primary charge separation in bacterial photosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the intermolecular overlap approximation is used to calculate the relative magnitudes of the electronic transfer integrals between the excited singlet state ({sup 1}P*) of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) and the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) and between B{sup {minus}} and bacteriopheopytin (H), along the L and M subunits of the reaction center (RC) of Rps. viridis. The ratio of the electron-transfer integrals for B{sub L}{sup {minus}}H{sub L}{sup {minus}}B{sub L}H{sub L}{minus} and for B{sub M}{sup {minus}}H{sub M}{minus}B{sub M}H{sub M}{sup {minus}} was calculated to be 2.1 {plus minus} 0.5, which together with the value of 2.8 {plus minus} 0.7 for the ratio of the transfer integrals for {sup 1}P*B{sub L}-P{sup +}B{sub L}- and for {sup 1}P*B{sub M}-P{sup +}B{sub M}- results in the electronic contribution of 33 {plus minus} 16 to the ratio k{sub L}/k{sub m} of the rate constants k{sub L} and k{sub M} for the primary charge separation across the L and M branches of the RC, respectively. The asymmetry of the electronic coupling terms, which originates from the combination of the asymmetry in the charge distribution of {sup 1}P* and of structural asymmetry of the P-M and B-H arrangements across the L and M subunits, provides a major contribution to the unidirectionality of the charge separation in bacterial photosynthesis. A significant contribution to the transfer integrals between adjacent pigments originates from nearby methyl groups through hyperconjugation. The ratio 6 {plus minus} 2 of the transfer integrals for {sup 1}P*B{sub L}-P{sup +}B{sub L}- and for B{sub L}-H{sub L}-B{sub L}H{sub L}- was utilized to estimate the energetic parameters required to ensure the dominance of the superexchange mediated unistep electron transfer {sup 1}P*BH {yields} P{sup +}BH{sup {minus}} over the thermally activated {sup 1}P*B {yields} P{sup +}B{sup {minus}} process. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Plato, M.; Moebius, K.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.; Bixon, M.; Jortner, J. (Freie Universitaet Berlin (West Germany))

1988-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Siderocalin/Enterobactin Interaction: A Link between Mammalian Immunity and Bacterial Iron Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The siderophore enterobactin (Ent) is produced by enteric bacteria to mediate iron uptake. Ent scavenges iron and is taken up by the bacteria as the highly stable ferric complex [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. This complex is also a specific target of the mammalian innate immune system protein, Siderocalin (Scn), which acts as an anti-bacterial agent by specifically sequestering siderophores and their ferric complexes during infection. Recent literature suggesting that Scn may also be involved in cellular iron transport has increased the importance of understanding the mechanism of siderophore interception and clearance by Scn; Scn is observed to release iron in acidic endosomes and [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} is known to undergo a change from catecholate to salicylate coordination in acidic conditions, which is predicted to be sterically incompatible with the Scn binding pocket (also referred to as the calyx). To investigate the interactions between the ferric Ent complex and Scn at different pH values, two recombinant forms of Scn with mutations in three residues lining the calyx were prepared: Scn-W79A/R81A and Scn-Y106F. Binding studies and crystal structures of the Scn-W79A/R81A:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} and Scn-Y106F:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} complexes confirm that such mutations do not affect the overall conformation of the protein but do weaken significantly its affinity for [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. Fluorescence, UV-Vis and EXAFS spectroscopies were used to determine Scn/siderophore dissociation constants and to characterize the coordination mode of iron over a wide pH range, in the presence of both mutant proteins and synthetic salicylate analogs of Ent. While Scn binding hinders salicylate coordination transformation, strong acidification results in the release of iron and degraded siderophore. Iron release may therefore result from a combination of Ent degradation and coordination change.

Meux, Susan C.

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL ENDOTOXIN ON WATER INTAKE, FOOD INTAKE, AND BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE ALBINO RAT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1961, Dubos and Schaedler (1) reported a reduction in water intake in animals treated with bacterial endotoxin. Mice were raised in a pathogen-free environment and subsequently tested with one of several toxins. Alteration in daily water intake was found to occur at doses well below the LDs0. Because of the long-standing interest in this laboratory in drive states, their behavioral consequences, and physiological basis (2), this property of endotoxin was explored in the albino rat. Our animals were not raised in a pathogen-free environment. Using fairly large doses of toxin, we were able to confirm the findings of Dubos and Schaedler, and, in addition, demonstrate a profound toxin effect on food intake and body temperature. Using behavioral and physiological techniques, we made exploratory studies of resistance and sensitization to toxin and of its possible site of action. Materials and Methods Animals.--AU the animals were male Sprague-Dawley albino rats, 90 to 120 days old, weighing 300 gm or more. They were housed in individual wire cages in a temperature-controlled room, and were fed Purina lab chow and tap water. Water intakes were measured by making water bottles available for 30 minutes every day and weighing the bottles before and after consumption. After several "familiarization " days the rats would drink a fairly standard amount each day. Food intake was measured by weighing the food in the cages every 24 hours, the food being continuously available. Animals on food-intake measurement were given water ad lib and those on water-intake measurement were given food ad lib. Temperatures were taken with an ordinary rectal thermometer, lubricated and inserted almost its entire length. The animals showed no unusual distress and tolerated the procedure day after day. Thermometers were left in place 3 to 5 minutes and then read. Thermometem that dropped out were replaced for 3 additional minutes. A paper towel on the cage floor facilitated recovery of lost thermometers. Toxin.--A eommerdally prepared lipopolysaccharide extract of Eschericlda coli was used

E. Holmes; Neal; E. Miller, Ph.D.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Structural and functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities following woody plant encroachment in the southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the southern Great Plains (USA), encroachment of grassland ecosystems by Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite) is widespread. Mesquite encroachment alters net primary productivity, enhances stores of C and N in plants and soil, and leads to increased levels of soil microbial biomass and activity. While mesquite's impact on the biogeochemistry of the region is well established, it effects on soil microbial diversity and function are unknown. In this study, soils associated with four plant types (C{sub 3} perennial grasses, C{sub 4} midgrasses, C{sub 4} shortgrasses, and mesquite) from a mesquite-encroached mixed grass prairie were surveyed to in an attempt to characterize the structure, diversity, and functional capacity of their soil microbial communities. rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used in conjunction with the GeoChip functional gene array to evaluate these potential differences. Mesquite soil supported increased bacterial and fungal diversity and harbored a distinct fungal community relative to other plant types. Despite differences in composition and diversity, few significant differences were detected with respect to the potential functional capacity of the soil microbial communities. These results may suggest that a high level of functional redundancy exists within the bacterial portion of the soil communities; however, given the bias of the GeoChip toward bacterial functional genes, potential functional differences among soil fungi could not be addressed. The results of this study illustrate the linkages shared between above- and belowground communities and demonstrate that soil microbial communities, and in particular soil fungi, may be altered by the process of woody plant encroachment.

Hollister, Emily B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Ansley, R J [Texas A& M University; Boutton, Thomas W [Texas A& M University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Instrument Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for the ARM Central Facility: Multiple Remote Sensor Techniques Development K. Sassen Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt lake City, UT 84112 overcome the poor data-handling capabilities that handi- capped multiple-channellidar studies in the past. The true diversity of transmitted and received polarization states of our system is illustrated at the bottom of Table 1. Note that the first full POL field tests will be made at the upcoming 1991 Project First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Field Observations II campaign, where our unit will be one of severallidars and radars located at a central site serving as the hub for research aircraft operations. The increasingly complex data collected by the POL and other remote sensors using different wave-

184

FARADAYIC Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FARADAYIC FARADAYIC Development of Electrically Mediated Electrophoretic Deposition for Thermal Barrier Coatings F A R A D A Y T E C H N O L O G Y , IN C . Joseph Kell 1 , Heather McCrabb 1 , Binod Kumar 2 1 Faraday Technology, Inc., Clayton, Ohio, USA 2 University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio, USA Contact: josephkell@faradaytechnology.com; heathermccrabb@faradaytechnology.com Background There is a need for an affordable, non-line-of-sight method of coating complex-shaped turbine engine components with thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that have controllable thickness distributions and a microstructure that is sufficiently strain-tolerant and will survive in the turbine environment. Typically plasma spray (PS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) are used to deposit TBCs Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a non-line-of-sight process that is easy to control

185

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The views expressed in this paper are solely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the World Bank or its member countries and should not be attributed to This paper examines the effect of foreign ownership on value added of firms in sub-Saharan Africa, using firm-level data from the Regional Program on Enterprise Development at the World Bank. The econometric analysis shows that foreign ownership has a significant effect on value added only when it exceeds a majority share. The results for Africa are consistent with the existing literature on foreign investment which argues that majority ownership creates appropriate incentives and provides greater opportunity to raise firm-level value added. 1

Vijaya Ramach; Manju Kedia Shah

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nozzle development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Developers | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developers Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers Welcome to Developers.Data.gov This community brings together developers from...

188

The chemical-in-plug bacterial chemotaxis assay is prone to false positive responses. BMC Research Notes 2010, 3:77  

SciTech Connect

Chemical-in-plug assays are commonly used to study bacterial chemotaxis, sometimes in the absence of stringent controls. We report that non-chemotactic and non-motile mutants in two distinct bacterial species (Shewanella oneidensis and Helicobacter pylori) show apparent zones of accumulation or clearing around test plugs containing potential attractants or repellents, respectively. Our results suggest that the chemical-in-plug assay should be used with caution, that non-motile or non-chemotactic mutants should be employed as controls, and that results should be confirmed with other types of assays.

Jun Li; Alvin C Go; Mandy J Ward; Karen M Ottemann

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Anion Pathway and Potential Energy Profiles along Curvilinear Bacterial ClC Cl 2 Pores: Electrostatic Effects of Charged Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT X-ray structures permit theoretical study of Cl permeation along bacterial ClC Cl pores. We determined the lowest energy curvilinear pathway, identified anion-coordinating amino acids, and calculated the electrostatic potential energy profiles. We find that all four bacterial ClC Cl crystal structures correspond to closed states. E148 and S107 side chains form steric barriers on both sides of the crystal binding site in the StClC wild-type and EcClC wild-type crystals; both the EcClC(E148A) and EcClC(E148Q) mutants are blocked at the S107 site. We studied the effect that mutating the charge of some strongly conserved pore-lining amino acids has on the electrostatic potential energy profiles. When E148 is neutralized, it creates an electrostatic trap, binding the ion near midmembrane. This suggests a possible electrostatic mechanism for controlling anion flow: neutralize E148, displace the side chain of E148 from the pore pathway to relieve the steric barrier, then trap the anion at midmembrane, and finally either deprotonate E148 and block the pore (pore closure) or bring a second Cl into the pore to promote anion flow (pore conductance). Side-chain displacement may arise by competition for the binding site between the oxygens of E148 and the anion moving down the electrostatic energy gradient. We also find that the charge state of E111 and E113 may electrostatically control anion conductance and occupancy of the binding site within the cytoplasmic pore.

Gennady V. Miloshevsky; Peter C. Jordan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

VAP Development: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release  

SciTech Connect

This white paper provides a plan to formalize the evaluation of newly developed VAPs and a framework for the development of value-added products through four different stages: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release.

Jensen, M; Collis, Fast, J; Flynn, C; Mather, J; McFarlane, S; Monroe, J; Sivaraman, C; Xie, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tanpopo cosmic dust collector: Silica aerogel production and bacterial DNA contamination analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrophobic silica aerogels with ultra-low densities have been designed and developed as cosmic dust capture media for the Tanpopo mission which is proposed to be carried out on the International Space Station. Glass particles as a simulated cosmic dust with 30 \\mu m in diameter and 2.4 g/cm^3 in density were successfully captured by the novel aerogel at a velocity of 6 km/s. Background levels of contaminated DNA in the ultra-low density aerogel were lower than the detection limit of a polymerase chain reaction assay. These results show that the manufactured aerogel has good performance as a cosmic dust collector and sufficient quality in respect of DNA contamination. The aerogel is feasible for the biological analyses of captured cosmic dust particles in the astrobiological studies.

Tabata, Makoto; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Yano, Hajime; Yamagishi, Akihiko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Staff Development Program Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Staff Development and the Individual," in S. Caldwell (Ed.) Staff Development: A Handbook of Effective Practices. Oxford, OH: National Staff Development Council. Lieberman, A....

193

Strategies for mimicking the primary events of bacterial photosynthesis: Structure, function, and mechanism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the possible implications of the photochemistry of photosynthesis for artificial systems are presented. A major aspect of this paper involves the special conditions required to prevent the undesirable charge recombination via the excited triplet state of the primary donor. If a multi-jump model is operative in the primary events of photosynthesis, then artificial model systems are relatively easy to synthesize. Such systems prevent back reactions via a series of downhill chemical reactions. Each downhill step in energy results in an increase in charge separation distance. The annihilation reactions, even to the less energetic triplet state, involve intermediate states uphill in energy and consequently are greatly diminished. However, if superexchange is a correct explanation of photosynthesis, then model systems have not been developed that properly mimic the natural process. In particular, the triplet back reaction can occur due to the lack of any thermal activation barrier. In nature this downhill back reaction appears to be prevented by carefully balancing the energetics using four molecules in the electron transport system. If this is the case, artificial photosynthesis would also require fine tuning of the coupling and energetics with three or four molecules making duplication more difficult to achieve. 10 refs.

Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Raghavan, M. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The crystal structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae PriB reveals mechanistic differences among bacterial DNA replication restart pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivation of repaired DNA replication forks is essential for complete duplication of bacterial genomes. However, not all bacteria encode homologs of the well-studied Escherichia coli DNA replication restart primosome proteins, suggesting that there might be distinct mechanistic differences among DNA replication restart pathways in diverse bacteria. Since reactivation of repaired DNA replication forks requires coordinated DNA and protein binding by DNA replication restart primosome proteins, we determined the crystal structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae PriB at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution and investigated its ability to physically interact with DNA and PriA helicase. Comparison of the crystal structures of PriB from N. gonorrhoeae and E. coli reveals a well-conserved homodimeric structure consisting of two oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds. In spite of their overall structural similarity, there is significant species variation in the type and distribution of surface amino acid residues. This correlates with striking differences in the affinity with which each PriB homolog binds single-stranded DNA and PriA helicase. These results provide evidence that mechanisms of DNA replication restart are not identical across diverse species and that these pathways have likely become specialized to meet the needs of individual organisms.

Dong, Jinlan; George, Nicholas P.; Duckett, Katrina L.; DeBeer, Madeleine A.P.; Lopper, Matthew E. (UDRI); (UW-MED)

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Information Solutions: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development IS provides management, maintenance, and development of APS Internet and Intranet web pages. Contact Webmaster Configuring Dreamweaver: Windows | Mac Improving...

196

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of...

197

Technikon Green Energy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technikon Green Energy Development November 16, 2009 2 Technikon'sRenewable Energy Testing Center 60,000 sq. ft. Energy Application Validation and Development Laboratory Formed...

198

Regional Development Authorities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance...

199

Coal Development (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

200

Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by I. J. Pickering and G. N. George by I. J. Pickering and G. N. George Sulfur is essential for all life, but it plays a particularly central role in the metabolism of many anaerobic microorganisms. Prominent among these are the sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that oxidize sulfide (S2-) to sulfate (SO42-). Many of these organisms can store elemental sulfur (S0) in "globules" for use when food is in short supply (Fig. 1). The chemical nature of the sulfur in these globules has been an enigma since they were first described as far back as 1887 (1); all known forms (or allotropes) of elemental sulfur are solid at room temperature, but globule sulfur has been described as "liquid", and it apparently has a low density – 1.3 compared to 2.1 for the common yellow allotrope a-sulfur. Various exotic forms of sulfur have been proposed to explain these properties, including micelles (small bubble-like structures) formed from long-chain polythionates, but all of these deductions have been based upon indirect evidence (for example the density was estimated by flotation of intact cells), and many questions remained.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bacterial mobilization of polonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polonium has been observed as the sole {alpha}-emitting nuclide in groundwaters of central Florida, in the absence of its radiogenic parents, at levels of 1,000 dpm/1 or more. Because of the chemical similarity of Po to S (both occupy the same column in the periodic table), studies were begun to determine whether bacteria, particularly those species active in sulfur cycling, could account for the selective solubilization and mobilization of Po. Possible sources of Po are the U-rich phosphate rock and phosphogypsum (gypsum), a byproduct in the manufacture of phosphoric acid. This paper reports on a series of experiments involving the interaction of bacteria with this waste gypsum that resulted in the solubilization of Po. Bacteria were isolated from gypsum that were capable of mediating Po release in column experiments of Po. Bacteria were isolated from gypsum that were capable of mediating Po release in column experiments when fed a growth medium. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were particularly effective at mediating Po release provided the sulfide levels did not rise above 10 {mu}M, in which case Po was apparently coprecipitated as a metal sulfide. Conversely, the ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to effectively remove dissolved Po when sulfide levels are high suggests that these bacteria may be used as an effective bioremediation tool at reducing groundwater Po levels. 22 refs., 10 figs.

LaRock, P.; Hyun, J.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [and others] [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

Crawford, D.L.; Ramachandra, M.

1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal development opportunities in developing countries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the Seminar on geothermal development opportunities in developing countries, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy and presented by the National Geothermal Association. The overall objectives of the seminar are: (1) Provide sufficient information to the attendees to encourage their interest in undertaking more geothermal projects within selected developing countries, and (2) Demonstrate the technological leadership of US technology and the depth of US industry experience and capabilities to best perform on these projects.

Kenkeremath, D.C.

1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Technical Guidelines Development Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (TGDC). The TGDC has been chartered by the US Election Assistance ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: DATE: EXECUTIVE CORE QUALIFICATION 1: LEADING CHANGE This core qualification encompasses the ability to develop and implement an organizational vision which integrates key national and program

206

Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and potentially cover a broader range of habitats.

Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of these tools continues to grow. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides Web development capabilities to government agencies and organizations interested in converting training and education programs based on traditional means of communication into a variety of tools that suit the technology skills of today's health care providers and patients. ORISE develops Web-based training and informational products that expand the reach of targeted health messages to key audiences. Our specific capabilities include: Web applications development User experience testing

208

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Essays in development economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 looks at the empirical estimation of the welfare impacts of bargaining. Bargaining for retail goods is common in developing countries, but rare in the developed world. The welfare implications of this difference ...

Keniston, Daniel Eben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

China Business Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China Business Development Postgraduate Programme #12;Programme: China Business Development with China: Intercultural Management 3 1 Daily life and business behaviour explained from a cultural perspective Chinese strategic thinking China's political constellation and its impact on business life Human

Steels, Luc

225

Biodiesel SRM Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Industrial Quality (INMETRO) on the development of the certified reference materials (CRMs) for biofuels, specifically bioethanol and biodiesel ...

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cooperative method development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of methods tools and process improvements is best to be based on the understanding of the development practice to be supported. Qualitative research has been proposed as a method for understanding the social and cooperative aspects of ... Keywords: Cooperative method development, D.2.9 [Software]: Software Engineering --- Management, Empirical research, Human factors, Research methodology, Software engineering

Yvonne Dittrich; Kari Rnkk; Jeanette Eriksson; Christina Hansson; Olle Lindeberg

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mechanisms in Plant Development  

SciTech Connect

This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM DEVELOPER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved photographic developer is presented having very high energy development fine grain characteristics and a long shelf life. These characteristics are obtained by the use of aminoacetic acid in the developer, the other constituents of which are: sodium sulfite, hydroquinone, sodiunn borate, boric acid and potassium bromide, 1-phenyl-3-pyrazolidone.

Berry, F.G.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

John J. Kilbane II

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Bacterial and Archaea Community Present in the Pine Barrens Forest of Long Island, NY: Unusually High Percentage of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of the few preserved areas in the northeast of United States, the soil in the Pine Barrens Forests presents a harsh environment for the microorganisms to grow and survive. In the current study we report the use of clustering methods to scientifically select the sampling locations that would represent the entire forest and also report the microbial diversity present in various horizons of the soil. Sixty six sampling locations were selected across the forest and soils were collected from three horizons (sampling depths). The three horizons were 0-10 cm (Horizon O); 11-25 cm (Horizon A) and 26-40 cm (Horizon B). Based on the total microbial substrate utilization pattern and K-means clustering analysis, the soil in the Pine Barrens Forest can be classified into four distinct clusters at each of the three horizons. One soil sample from each of the four clusters were selected and archaeal and bacterial populations within the soil studied using pyrosequencing method. The results show the microbial communities present in each of these clusters are different. Within the microbial communities present, microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle occupy a major fraction of microbial community in the soil. High level of diversity was observed for nitrogen fixing bacteria. In contrast, Nitrosovibrio and Nitrosocaldus spp are the single bacterial and archaeal population respectively carrying out ammonia oxidation in the soil.

Shah, V.; Green, T.; Shah, V.; Shah, S.; Kambhampati, M.; Ambrose, J.; Smith, N.; Dowd, S.; McDonnell, K.; Panigrahi, B.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project is to develop an advanced, clean coal biogasification (MicGAS) Process. The objectives of the research during FY 1993--94 were to: (1) enhance kinetics of methane production (biogasification, biomethanation) from Texas lignite (TxL) by the Mic-1 consortium isolated and developed at ARCTECH, (2) increase coal solids loading, (3) optimize medium composition, and (4) reduce retention time. A closer analysis of the results described here indicate that biomethanation of TxL at >5% solids loading is feasible through appropriate development of nutrient medium and further adaptation of the microorganisms involved in this process. Further understanding of the inhibitory factors and some biochemical manipulations to overcome those inhibitions will hasten the process considerably. Results are discussed on the following: products of biomethanation and enhance of methane production including: bacterial adaptation; effect of nutrient amendment substitutes; effects of solids loading; effect of initial pH of the culture medium; effect of hydrogen donors and carbon balance.

Walia, D.S.; Srivastava, K.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GrantEconomic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBGEDIF) (Oklahoma) Community Development Block GrantEconomic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBGEDIF) (Oklahoma) <...

233

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Principal Investigator develops a Statement of ... a consortium to develop the technology ... DEVELOPING STANDARD REQUIREMENTS FOR FATIGUE ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Semantic Developer | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semantic Developer Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers You are here Data.gov Communities Developers As the Semantic...

235

Individual Development Plan (IDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Individual Development Plan (IDP) Individual Development Plan (IDP) SAMPLE 10/01/2012 to 09/30/2013 Training Reason Developmental Activity Description Training Cost Travel Cost Total Cost Hours Start Date/ Completion Date Short Range Goal 1: Enhance Leadership Skills Development Mentoring Receive mentoring from a higher grade employee (s) and provide mentoring to lower grade employee(s). 0 0 0 TBD 1/1/2013 Development Instructor led EM Leadership Excellence Program - Interpersonal Communication Skills 0 0 0 8 6/15/2013 Development Instructor led Federal Executive Institute (OPM): Leadership for a Democratic Society $18,300 0 0 30 day residential TBD Development Shadowing Shadow one or more SES employees for one or two day period to learn leadership techniques. 0 0 0 TBD TBD

236

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

237

Workforce Development & Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Player to see images here. Welcome to Workforce Development & Education K-12 StudentsSchools High School Students Teachers Undergraduate & Graduate StudentsFaculty Berkeley Lab...

238

Economic Development and Pollutants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the correlation of economic development and pollutants in Brazil from 1960 to 2008. This investigation is (more)

Trnros, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy Education & Workforce Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I. Introduction of the Energy Literacy and Energy 101 Initiatives -Michelle Fox & Matt Garcia II. Energy 101 Curricular Framework Development - Jim Turner III. Energy 101...

240

Alloy Development and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gerald Bourne2; Joseph Jankowski2; 1Boeing; 2Colorado School of Mines; .... development of conventional superalloys has relied on the addition of heavy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Resources for Program Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may assist those who are developing programs to enhance the knowledge and skills of mathematics, science and technology teachers and provide opportuntities for students to...

242

Technology Development Loans (Wisconsin)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Technology Development Loans help innovative companies with promising economic futures clear the hurdles associated with bringing new technologies, products, and concepts to market. Loan funds...

243

Graphite technology development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

NONE

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technical Assistance to Developers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Wind Economic Development (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NERSC Science Gateway Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Forward Design Forward Home » R & D » Science Gateway Development Science Gateway Development Science gateways are conduits for bringing HPC to the web. NERSC assists in the development and hosting of gateways that make NERSC compute and data resources more broadly useful. To ease the development of these gateways, the NERSC Web Toolkit (NEWT) makes science gateways accessible to anyone familiar with HTML and javascript. You can find more detailed information about science gateway development in the related NERSC user documentation and at the NEWT website. What are some use cases? A science gateway can be tailored to the needs within a team of researchers allowing them to share data, simulation results, and information among users who may be geographically distributed.

248

Application of bacterial leaching technology to deep solution-mining conditions for uranium extraction. Final report, September 1, 1978-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms were evaluated for use in recovery of uranium under conditions of in-situ solution mining. The cultures tested were Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the faculative-thermophilic TH3 strain, and two Sulfolobus species. Growth of the organisms occurred in the presence of 0.34 to 5.0 mM uranyl ion with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Uranium ore from the Anaconda Minerals Co. Jackpile mine was not readily leachable by microorganisms. To support bacterial activity the ore was supplemented with pyrite or ferrous iron. The ore possessed some toxic properties. T. ferrooxidans was able to assist in leaching of uranium from the ore at a hydrostatic pressure of 10.3 MPa.

Brierley, J.A.; Brierley, C.L.; Torma, A.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

250

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Utah Technology Commercialization Office Location: Salt Lake City, UT Project Title Energy Innovation Commercialization Center Proposed Action or Project Description The project proposes to create an Energy Innovation Commercialization Center at the University of Utah. The scope of work for this project is in two phases: tasks necessary to create the Center and actual commercialization and outreach to other institutions. Specific activities for Phase I for the Center startup include 1) negotiating contract, prepare correspondence, establishing website, meetings, scheduling activities, developing metrics, and designing and creating a database. Phase 2 activities for Center

251

Microsystem Product Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

Polosky, M -A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development The Environmental Energy Technologies Division performs analysis, research, and development leading to better energy technologies and reduction of adverse energy-related environmental impacts. The Division carries out research on batteries and fuel cells, electricity grid technologies, energy-efficient building technologies; energy analysis; environmental impacts of energy use, including on air quality and climate, indoor environmental quality, and sensors and materials for energy applications. Batteries and Fuel Cells Advanced energy technologies for low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries and fuel cells for automotive and stationary applications. Buildings Energy Efficiency Working with industry to develop technologies for buildings that increase energy efficiency, and improve the comfort, health and safety of building occupants.

253

Sustaining development in Detroit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of this thesis is to propose a strategy for stabilizing and increasing the disparate pieces of development that form the traces of the once great industrial city of Detroit. It focuses primarily on Fordism as a ...

Resnick, Noah Samuel, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Feature - Argonne Develops ARDAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lab's capability to analyze and evaluate the performance of prototype plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) with the development of a tool called the Argonne Real-Time Data...

255

COMMISSION REPORT DEVELOPING RENEWABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incorporate the market transformation goal described above and "develop milestones to measure progress towards plus: SILVER Bronze plus: BRONZE Stringency/EnergySavings Interim milestones for this programmatic goal

256

DC Conductor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual development of promising conductors and line configurations for HVDC overhead transmission lines. It details analytic and experimental work conducted to determine the performance of the proposed concepts and ranks the most promising concepts.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

258

Advanced Interconnect Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Community Development Fund (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available...

260

PNNL: Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

business looking for a door to the Laboratory? The Economic Development Office at PNNL is here to help you start, grow, or relocate your business. We help you tap into...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Essays on development finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays that examine investment choices in less developed countries. Chapter 1 examines how the structure of existing microfinance contracts may discourage risky but high-expected return ...

Fischer, Gregory M. (Gregory Mark)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Political elites and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays on the behavior of political elites and their effect on economic development. The first two chapters focus on political dynasties in the Philippines while the third chapter analyzes ...

Querubn Borrero, Pablo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Review: 1991 industry developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is NUEXCO`s annual summary of the previous year`s (1991) events. There are reviews of major nuclear developments in each continent, as well as international developments. Specific topics include fuels, waste management, new facilities, and decommissioning. Nuclear activities in the following countries are noted: South Africa, Yemen, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Namibia, France, Japan, Taiwan, China, Korea, India, Pakistan, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Italy, Czechoslovakia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Canada, USA, Argentina, Brazil, and Uraguay.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Customer Communications Architecture Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study outlines a process for integrating requirements for the Smart Grid from representative sources and provides a structure for categorizing requirements. The process then provides an approach to the development of a tool that can be used for evaluating current and emerging standards as well as products in the marketplace. Significantly the work draws from bodies of work that have been developed by the energy industry. The results are a set of requirements metrics that can be built upon and used ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Developmental Assignment Opportunity DATE: NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: TITLE: ASSIGNMENT NUMBER: ASSIGNMENT BEGINS: ENDS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: EMAIL ADDRESS: ASSIGNMENT LOCATION HOST ORGANIZATION: PURPOSE OF ASSIGNMENT: ASSIGNMENT POSITION: ASSIGNMENT DUTIES: EXECUTIVE COR QUALIFICATIONS TO BE ADDRESSED: OFFICE ADDRESS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: E-MAIL ADDRESS: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP)

266

from Wind Energy Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These comments are submitted on behalf of the Clean Energy State Alliance (CESA) (electronically and by mail). CESA is a non-profit, multi-state coalition of state clean energy funds and programs working together to develop and promote clean energy technologies. CESA seeks to identify and address barriers to the development and growth of viable renewable energy resources in the United States. The California Energy Commission is a member of CESA. CESA offers its assistance and resources to the Commission and staff in the guidelines development process. CESA has substantial experience and expertise on the avian protection and wind siting issues that the Commission will consider in this Docket. Most notably, CESA is working actively with the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Minerals Management Service, and several states (Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, and others) to develop reasonable and effective approaches to addressing the impacts of wind projects on avian species. Many of the issues that the Commission will consider in this Docket are also being addressed by other states and federal agencies. CESA is available to provide relevant information and approaches that these other agencies and guidance development processes are employing, developing, and/or evaluating.

Dockets Office Ms; Dear Commissioners

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

SRL online Analytical Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R&D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R&D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control & Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

Jenkins, C.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

SRL online Analytical Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

Jenkins, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Emergency Response Guideline Development  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Corrosivity of Linepipe Mild Steel in an Environment Containing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SRB consortium used in this study was cultivated from a sour oil well in Louisiana, USA. The biofilm and pit morphology that developed with time were...

271

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health illiterate"-an increasing problem among special populations that appears to contribute to health disparities. Health literacy refers to the ability to read and understand materials related to personal health, as well as navigate the health system. To assist government agencies and organizations educate populations facing

272

Geothermal materials development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Guidebook on biogas development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook covers the practical aspects of small-scale biogas development suitable for use in rural areas in developing countries, especially those of the ESCAP region. It is intended that all aspects of biogas are covered so that someone with no knowledge of the subject can, with confidence, design, build, operate and maintain a biogas plant. Information on biogas technology in China is also included. Chapters cover: the biogas process; factors effecting gas-plant design and operation; the classification and design principles of plants; design, size and site selection; the construction of digesters; gas holders and pipes; household gas appliances and their use; starting and operating a biogas digester; servicing and safety; improving gas-plant performance; commercial uses of biogas; the effluent and its uses, biogas-plant development programmes; community plants; and economics. In the annexes, designs for biogas plants of the fixed-dome, bag and floating gas-holder type are presented. 9 references.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Assignment #1: Developing Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this assignment is to give you some experience developing algorithms. According to Wikipedia, an algorithm is a finite list of well-defined instructions for accomplishing some task that, given an initial state, will terminate in a defined end-state [1]. 1. Consider the following initial state: A bag containing sliced bread A jar containing peanut butter A jar containing jelly A plastic knife Develop an algorithm for producing, as an end-state, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Be as precise as possible when developing your list of instructions. 2 Hand-In Instructions The assignment is due at the start of class on August 27 th. You are required to turn in a typed document. The document should include your name, your username, the date, the course number, and the assignment number. For example:

Andrew R. Dalton; Andy Dalton (adalton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Developing electronic textbooks  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a new approach to the development of engineering education materials. The ``Electronic Textbook`` represents the logical progression of the printed textbook in the Electronic Age. The concept behind this approach is simple; to place all of the information contained in a textbook in electronic form. Currently, paper texts exist on the market with electronic supplements, however, this Electronic Textbook would include supplements fully integrated in the whole text. The computer hardware and software needed to make this advance possible have existed for nearly ten years, and they have been readily available to engineering educators and students for over three years. Computer based ``tools`` in engineering textbooks as are prevalent today range from computer styled algorithms and code snippets, to fully developed software applications with graphical user interfaces on floppy disks attached to the back covers of books. The next logical step in publishing is to dispense with the paper book entirely, by distributing textbooks via electronic media such as CD-ROM. Electronic Textbooks use the full range of multi-media technologies in the learning and teaching process including video clips, computer animations and fully functional numerical engines as integral parts of the textbook material. This is very appealing since interactive media provide teaching tools that appeal to divergent learning styles. The advantages of Electronic Textbooks lead to several challenges. Special attention must be paid to the development of user interfaces; navigation is of particular importance when non- linear exploration is encouraged. These issues are being addressed at the Sandia National Laboratories by an electronic documentation development team. This team includes experts in engineering, in human factors, and in computer hardware and software development. Guidelines for the development of electronic textbooks based on the experiences of this team are provided.

Zadoks, R.I. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept.; Ratner, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Candidate Developmental Assignment Evaluation DATE:_______________ NAME OF SES CANDIDATE TITLE OF POSITION LOCATION ASSIGNMENT DURATION: Which Executive Core Qualification(s) was this assignment intended to meet? Leading Change Leading People Results Driven Business Acumen Building Coalitions/Communication Please provide a brief description of your assignment. Did the experience meet your expectation? Was this a good learning experience? 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.5 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Candidate Developmental Assignment Evaluation

277

Hydropower research and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of information on hydropower research and development (R and D) activities of the Federal government and hydropower industry. The report includes descriptions of on-going and planned R and D activities, 1996 funding, and anticipated future funding. Summary information on R and D projects and funding is classified into eight categories: fish passage, behavior, and response; turbine-related; monitoring tool development; hydrology; water quality; dam safety; operations and maintenance; and water resources management. Several issues in hydropower R and D are briefly discussed: duplication; priorities; coordination; technical/peer review; and technology transfer/commercialization. Project information sheets from contributors are included as an appendix.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Continuous chain bit development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continuous chain drill is a diamond drill bit in which the cutting surface can be replaced while the bit is still in the hole. The first prototype of the chain drill system was fabricated and tested in 1977. Problems were encountered with the mechanism used to cycle the bit. A second prototype bit was designed to circumvent these problems. An accelerated development and test program has provided field test results on Prototype II in less than 2 years. Field testing at Nevada Test Site has proven the feasibility of the downhole changing mechanism. The development and testing of this prototype are described.

St. Clair, J.A.; Duimstra, F.A.; Varnado, S.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Economic Development | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Development Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy Entrepreneurial Development Programs Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park Economic...

280

Technology Development | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Development Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Smart Grid Demand Response Federal Smart Grid Task Force Distributed Energy Recovery Act...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nanotechnology Development in Arab States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanotechnology Development in Arab States ... to quickly build scientific capacity and track the worldwide developments in nanotechnology.

282

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems Location: Cambridge, MA Project Title TechBridge Energy Innovation Acceleration Program

283

Purposes of Strip Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...arriving at the most economical use of material. Economy of material usage must be considered so as to obtain fully the possible reductions of manufacturing costs through use of progressive dies. The strip development should be studied with a view toward using the narrowest possible carrier strips...

284

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of the March 1992 `Recent Developments` section of Nuexco. Specific issues mentioned are: (1) closure of Yankee Rowe, (2) steam-generator tube plugging at Trojan, (3) laser enrichment in South Africa, (4) the US uranium industry, (5) planning for two nuclear units in Taiwan, and (6) the establishment of a Czech/French joint venture.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Telecommunications in developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper brings out the rationale for and the course of abolition of monopolies in telecommunications, the emergence of independent regulation, competition and markets determining prices for Telecom and Information services in developed countries and ... Keywords: access, competition, convergence, corporatisation, degovernmentalisation, demonopolisation, internet cafes, public telephones, regulation, telecommunications, universal service/

T. H. Chowdary

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Standards Development as Hybridization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While users in the rest of the World have been offered 3G mobile phones based on either the CDMA2000 or W-CDMA standards, users in China have the additional option of using phones based on the TD-SCDMA standard. As a technology largely developed by Chinese ... Keywords: Global, Hybridization, Indigenous, Innovation, Mobile Phones, National, Technology

Xiaobai Shen, Ian Graham, James Stewart, Robin Williams

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Transportation in Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Africa that produces synthetic oil from coal, starts to use natural gas as feedstock in the production, natural gas, and petroleum into liquid fuels and chemicals. Sasol is now a privately owned companysolutions+ + + + Transportation in Developing Countries Greenhouse Gas Scenarios for South Africa

Delucchi, Mark

288

Portable Linear Accelerator Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Minac-3, a miniaturized linear accelerator system. It covers the current equipment capabilities and achievable modifications, applications information for prospective users, and technical information on high-energy radiography that is useful for familiarization and planning. The design basis, development, and applications history of Minac are also summarized.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

JAGUAR developer's manual.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JAGUAR (JAva GUi for Applied Research) is a Java software tool providing an advanced text editor and graphical user interface (GUI) to manipulate DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications) input specifications. This document focuses on the technical background necessary for a developer to understand JAGUAR.

Chan, Ethan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Developing architectural lighting representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a visualization system for architectural lighting designers. It starts by motivating the problem as both complex in its physics and social organization. Three iterations of prototypes for displaying time and space ... Keywords: architectural lighting design, energy efficiency, ethnographic fieldwork, information visualization, qualitative analysis

Daniel C. Glaser; Roger Tan; John Canny; Ellen Yi-Luen Do

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Bioenergy and Sustainable Development?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of raw materials). Rather than provide subsidies (other than for the poorest households), a range reserved 1543-5938/07/1121-0131$20.00 Key Words biodiesel, bioethanol, biofuels, biomass, clean energy greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For large- scale commercial biofuels to contribute to sustainable development

Bensel, Terrence G.

292

Security auditing course development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As people increasingly depend on computers and network systems, security auditing has become one of the most effective security practices to achieve defense-in-depth in organizations. It follows an effective process to measure policies, procedures ... Keywords: IT audit, IT education, curriculum development, security

Yin Pan

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

National Fertilizer Development Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h-L h-L National Fertilizer Development Center May 15, 1980 nww Hr. William Et Mott, Director Environmental Control Technology Division Office of Environment Dcpartiaent of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Mr. Mott: This is in response to your letter of May 5 requesting ccmments on a report dated Xarct; 1930 which summarizes a preliminary radiological survey of facilities used in the early 1950's for studies of recovery of uranium from leached zone ore. I have made a few suggested changes to the report, which is being returned to you. * Thaul, you for the opportunity to review this report. Sincerely, , Enclosure Development Branch . 1 -a' . I . . . PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY MUSCLE SHOALS, ALA&A Work .performed by the Health and Safety Research Division

295

Transmission Developers Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

% ~ % ~ Transmission Developers Inc. July 7, 2011 Mr. Anthony J. Como Director, Permitting and Siting Office ofElectricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence A venue SW, Room 8G-024 Washington, D.C. 20585 Subject: Champlain Hudson Power Express Project U.S. Department of Energy Presidential Permit Application PP-362 Dear Mr. Como: On January 25, 2010, Transmission Developers, Inc. ("TDI'' or "Applicants") submitted on behalf of Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. ("CHPEI") an application to the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") for a Presidential Permit and an amendment on August 5, 2010 (collectively, the "Application") in connection with the Champlain Hudson Power Express

296

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) The Regents of the University of California, UC San Diego Location: La Jolla, CA Project Title Regional Energy Innovation and Commercialization Proposed Action or Project Description The University of California San Diego and San Diego State University are partnering to address deficiencies in the process for translation of research discoveries to the private sector in the clean energy space in the greater San Diego region and accelerate the movement of clean energy innovation from the university laboratory into the marketplace. The Phase I objective for launching the Regional Energy Innovation Challenge includes tasks such as: 1) project management and planning (organizing advisory

297

Smart Charger Technology Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charger Technology Charger Technology Development Presented by: Frank Tuffner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Smart Grid R&D Peer Review November 4, 2010 Golden, CO Project Team: Michael Kintner-Meyer, PI Krishnan Gowri Richard Pratt Nathan Tenney Frank Tuffner PNNL-SA-75999 Analysis and Development Grid Capabilities for the Electrification of Transportation Goals and Objectives Funding Summary ($K) FY09 FY10 FY11 $350 $500 $500 Technical Scope GOAL: * Assure grid can support electrification of transportation * Assure that EVs/PHEVs will not create new peaks (locally or regionally) or electricity prices will not support large adoption of EVs/PHEVs Objectives: * Assess grid benefits and impacts of electrification of transportation * Technology demonstration * Actively engage in codes and standards

298

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

PEATGAS process development status  

SciTech Connect

Since 1976, IGT has conducted over 200 peat-gasification tests in both laboratory- and process-development-unit (PDU)-scale equipment. The encouraging results demonstrate that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for the production of SNG. Based on a peat-gasification kinetic model developed from the laboratory and PDU data, cost estimates for commercial operation show that the conversion of peat to SNG by the PEATGAS process is competitive with other alternative SNG sources. If the results of a 19-month, $4 million feasibility study funded by the US Department of Energy are favorable, Minnesota Gas Co. plans to participate in the construction and operation of an 80 million SCF/day industrial plant for making SNG from peat.

Punwani, D.V.; Biljetina, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Central Florida Location: Orlando, FL Project Title MegaWatt Ventures Proposed Action or Project Description The University of Central Florida is dedicated to creating innovative programs that accelerate the

302

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Customer Communications Architecture Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report builds on previous work to develop a tree of requirements metrics (TRM) that represents a detailed dictionary of primitive requirements for applications of the Smart Grid. The initial work was focused primarily, but not exclusively, on advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) systems. This project phase extends this work with some in-depth extraction of additional primitives obtained from the study of distributed energy resources and related subjects. Customer-sited distributed energy resources...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Update on INSIGHTS Development  

SciTech Connect

INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

Not Listed; Eric Burgett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Issue Development sheet Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

306

EPRI Transformer Guidebook Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are losing many of their subject matter experts through retirement and downsizing. This is particularly true in the case of power transformers, so that there is now a critical need for a comprehensive transformer reference book geared toward utility engineers. In 2007, the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI published the technical update report Transformer Guidebook Design 1013799. That report described the results of the initial project to develop the Copper Book, a comprehensive reference...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Silicon web process development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon dendritic web is a ribbon form of silicon produced from the melt without die shaping, and capable of fabrication into solar cells with greater than 15% AM1 conversion efficiency. This quarterly report describes the work carried out during the period April to June 1980, as part of Phase III of a DOE/JPL-sponsored effort to develop silicon web process technology compatible with the national goals for low cost photovoltaic output power. We have successfully demonstrated eight hours of silicon web growth with closed loop melt level control, a key contract milestone. The result was achieved using a feedback system in which the change in output from a laser melt level sensor was used to control the rate at which silicon pellets were fed to replace the material frozen into web crystal. The melt level was controlled to about +- 0.1mm, well within the range required for stable long term web growth. This is an important step toward the development of a fully automated silicon web growth machine. A second major highlight of this quarter was the completion of an engineering design for a semi-automated web growth machine embodying all the desired features developed so far as part of this program (including e.g. melt replenishment, level sensing and control) as well as some system simplifications. The completed design will serve as a basis for complete system automation.

Duncan, C.S.; Seidensticker, R.G.; McHugh, J.P.; Skutch, M.E.; Hopkins, R.H.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

ABC Technology Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: `Provide a weapon`s grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon`s grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.` This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments.

NONE

1994-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Developer > Posts by term > Developer Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: developer Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry developer New Robust References! Jweers 1 8 Aug 2013 - 08:12 Blog entry developer Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! Sfomail 17 May 2013 - 11:14 Blog entry developer Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Jweers 16 May 2013 - 14:22 Blog entry developer New Result Formats on OpenEI Jweers 25 Mar 2013 - 12:22 Blog entry developer OpenEI maintenance March 8-9, 2013 Rmckeel 8 Mar 2013 - 14:23 Blog entry developer Semantic Mediawiki Semantic Forms update Rmckeel 22 Oct 2012 - 07:23 Blog entry developer Current and historical incentive data available as XML! Rmckeel 11 Sep 2012 - 13:41

312

Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air Asia, The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) Partner: UN Habitat Sector: Land Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Website: cleanairinitiative.org/portal/node/7870

315

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Sustainable Urban...

316

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Program Type Grant Program Loan Program Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help

317

Flexible armored blanket development  

SciTech Connect

An exploratory development contract was undertaken on December 23, 1977 which had as its purpose the development and demonstration of a flexible armored blanket design suitable for providing ballistic protection to nuclear weapons during shipment. Objectives were to design and fabricate a prototype blanket which will conform to the weapon shape, is troop-handleable in the field, and which, singly or in multiple layers, can defeat a range of kinetic energy armor piercing (AP) ammunition potentially capable of damaging the critical portion of the nuclear weapon. Following empirical testing, including the firing of threat ammunition under controlled laboratory and field test conditions, materials were selected and assembled into two blanket designs, each weighing approximately 54 kg/m{sup 2} (11 lbs/ft{sup 2}) and estimated to cost from $111 to $180 per ft{sup 2} in production. A firing demonstration to evidence blanket performance against terrorist/light infantry weapons, heavy infantry weapons, and aircraft cannon was conducted for representatives of the DOD and interested Sandia employees on April 12, 1978. The blankets performed better than anticipated defeating bullets up to 7.62 mm x 51 mm AP with one layer and projectiles up to 23 mm HEI with two layers. Based on these preliminary tests it is recommended that development work be continued with the following objectives: (1) the selection by the DOD of priority applications, (2) the specific design and fabrication of sufficient quantities of armored blankets for field testing, (3) the evaluation of the blankets by DOD operational units, with reports to Sandia Laboratories to enable final design.

Roth, E.S.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Evaluation of Formal Training DATE:_______________ CANDIDATE NAME: TITLE OF TRAINING PROGRAM: VENDOR/LOCATION: TRAINING DATES: Which Executive Core Qualification(s) was this assignment intended to meet? Leading Change Leading People Results Driven Business Acumen Building Coalitions/Communication Please check one for each of the following: Level of difficulty: Too Advanced ___ Appropriate ___ Too Elementary ___ Length of course: Too Long ___ Appropriate ___ Too Short ___ Instructor(s): Excellent ___ Satisfactory ___ Fair Poor ___ 1 until U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

319

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Supervisor's Evaluation of Candidate's Performance During Developmental Assignment DATE:________________ NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: TITLE OF POSITION: LOCATION OF ASSIGNMENT: ASSIGNMENT DURATION: PART I: EVALUATION OF ASSIGNMENT OBJECTIVES Please evaluate the candidate's level of performance in meeting the objectives of the assignment as Successful or Unacceptable. Objectives Standards Performance Evaluation PLEASE RATE YOUR OVERALL EVALUATION OF THE CANDIDATE'S PERFORMANCE BY CIRCLING A NUMBER ON THE SCALE BELOW: EXCELLENT VERY GOOD SATISFACTORY POOR UNACCEPTABLE

320

ERCOT Wind Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, Texas leads the nation in wind development. Capacity reached 8005 MW in 2008, an addition of over 5000 MW in two years. Further, the state is committed to expanding the transmission system to tap as much as 18,456 MW of wind power. Focusing on the period 2008-2012, this study examines the market response to wind capacity, particularly in the time leading up to the expansion of the Texas transmission system. The study is introductory in nature, providing a foundation for more extensive analysi...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mack LNG vehicle development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to install a production-ready, state-of-the-art engine control system on the Mack E7G natural gas engine to improve efficiency and lower exhaust emissions. In addition, the power rating was increased from 300 brake horsepower (bhp) to 325 bhp. The emissions targets were oxides of nitrogen plus nonmethane hydrocarbons of less than 2.5 g/bhp-hr and particulate matter of less than 0.05 g/bhp-hr on 99% methane. Vehicle durability and field testing were also conducted. Further development of this engine should include efficiency improvements and oxides of nitrogen reductions.

Southwest Research Institute

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s September 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific iems discussed include: (1) merger of Urangesellschaft and Interuran, (2) cessation of uranium mining in Bulgaria, (3) record operation of Limerick-2 and Tokai-2, (4) MRS in Wyoming, (5) low-level waste facilities at Perry, (6) closure of Trojan, (7) restart of Kozloduy-6, (8) agreements between Cogema and Minatom, (9) planning for a large nuclear power plant in Japan moves forward, (10) order of a new reactor at Civaux, (11) relicensing of Yankee Rowe, (12) operation of Bradwell-2, and (13) high-level waste management in Japan.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s August 2992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items discussed include: (1) non-proliferation in Argentina and Brazil, (2) a joint-venture uranium leaching project in the USA, (3) life extension for Yankee Rowe, (4) contracts for nuclear plants in the Republic of Korea, (5) cleanup of Wismut, (6) record operation of Three Mile Island-1, Oconee-1, and Cook-1, (7) closure of Kozloduy units, (8) China`s ascension to the non-proliferation treaty, and (9) a centrifuge enrichment facility in Japan.

NONE

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development  

SciTech Connect

This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Photonics Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLV??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average home??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nation??s energy consumption ?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

Bill Turner

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

SYSTRAN MT dictionary development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTRAN has demonstrated success in the MT field with its long history spanning nearly 30 years. As a general-purpose fully automatic MT system, SYSTRAN employs a transfer approach. Among its several components, large, carefully encoded, high-quality dictionaries are critical to SYSTRAN's translation capability. A total of over 2.4 million words and expressions are now encoded in the dictionaries for twelve source language systems (30 language pairs- one per year!). SYSTRAN'S dictionaries, along with its parsers, transfer modules, and generators, have been tested on huge amounts of text, and contain large terminology databases covering various domains and detailed linguistic rules. Using these resources, SYSTRAN MT systems have successfully served practical translation needs for nearly 30 years, and built a reputation in the MT world for their large, mature dictionaries. This paper describes various aspects of SYSTRAN MT dictionary development as an important part of the development and refinement of SYSTRAN MT systems. There are 4 major sections: 1) Role and Importance of Dictionaries in the SYSTRAN Paradigm describes the importance of coverage and depth in the dictionaries; 2) Dictionary Structure discusses the specifics of

Laurie Gerber; Jin Yang

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Views of software development environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an abstract model of software development and then explores its implications for software development environments (SDEs). It explores the automation of engineering, i.e., what to automate, and the engineering of automation, ...

W. Stinson

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA The goal of the Research and Development Investment Criteria initiative is to measurably improve the performance of the government's...

331

Advanced Application Development Program Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of the Tranmission Reliability program's Advanced Applications Research and Development activity area. This program develops and demonstrates tools to monitor and control the grid with...

332

Argonne TDC: Regional Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Economic Development Argonne participates in economic development activities with State of Illinois agencies and programs, business and industrial organizations, and...

333

Kansas Certified Development Companies (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kansas Certified Development Companies (CDC) assist businesses by developing loan packages that meet the financial need of a project. These packages often contain multiple sources of project...

334

Developing Human Performance Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRCs risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

New MCNPX developments  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle extended (MCNPX) radiation transport code has been upgraded significantly to Version MCNPX2.4.0. It is now based on the latest MCNP4C3 and MCNPX2.3.0 releases to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). In addition to all of the advances from earlier versions of MCNP and MCNPX, important new capabilities have been developed. The Monte Carlo method was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the Manhattan Project in the early 1940s. MCNP and MCNPX are heirs to those early efforts. Over 400 person-years have been invested in the research, development, programming, documentation, and databases for these codes. MCNP is a general-purpose neutron (0-MeV to 20-MeV), photon (1-keV to 1-GeV), and electron (1-keV to 1-GeV) transport code for calculating *MCNPX, MCNP, LAHET, and LCS are trademarks of the Regents of the University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory. the time-dependent, continuous-energy transport of these particles in three-dimensional geometries. MCNP is perhaps the most widely used and well-known physics simulation code in the world today. MCNPX extends MCNP to track nearly all particles at all energies. MCNPX combined MCNP and the LAHET Code System (LCS). LCS is based on the Oak Ridge High Energy Transport Code. LCS uses models for particles in physics regimes where there are no tabulated data, including the Bertini and ISABEL models. MCNPX has additional models to LCS, such as the CEM model. MCNPX2.3.0 was released to RSICC in December 2001 and is based on MCNP4B. The principal features of MCNPX2.3.0 are (1) Physics for 34 particle types; (2) High-energy physics above the giga-electron volt range; (3) Neutron, proton, and photonuclear 150-MeV libraries: (4) Photonuclear physics; (5) Mesh tallies; (6) Radiography tallies; (7) Secondary particle production biasing; (8) VAVILOV energy straggling for charged particles; and (9) Automatic configuration for compilation. The focus of this work is MCNPX2.4.0, which is due for imminent release. MCNPX2.4.0 merges MCNPX2.3.0 with MCNP4C3 and adds important new features.

Hendricks, J. S. (John S.); McKinney, G. W. (Gregg W.); Waters, L. S. (Laurie S.); Hughes, H. G. (Henry Grady); Snow, E. C. (Edward Clark)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles  

SciTech Connect

Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Textile Engineering Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fuel Cell Development Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and sustainable fuel cell solutions UTC Power About Us PureCell ® Model 400 Solution Process Overview Power Conditioner Converts DC power to high-quality AC power 3 Fuel Cell Stack Generates DC power from hydrogen and air 2 Fuel Processor Converts natural gas fuel to hydrogen

338

PNNL: Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Calendar Events Calendar left arrow January 2014 right arrow Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Scheduled events for January 4, 2014 Calendar contains no events. Past Events 2013 September 20, 2013 - Startup Weekend Tri-Cities January 29, 2013 - PTAC Class: Developing Your Capability Statement January 24, 2013 - Economic Outlook Summit January 23, 2013 - Women in Business Conference January 10, 2013 - Venture Investment and Partnering Forum January 07, 2013 - New Routes for U.S.-Japan Collaboration / Ambassadorial Outreach Tour 2012 November 29, 2012 - Innovation Summit October 18, 2012 - Funding for Startups from the National Cancer Institute October 11, 2012 - Career Fair October 09, 2012 - Understanding Government Contracting Solicitations

339

Microchip developed by UCSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

engineer Wentai Liu has been engineer Wentai Liu has been working on an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind for 20 years. Photo by Jim MacKenzie. June 24, 2008 By Tim Stephens (831) 459-2495; stephens@ucsc.edu Last year, Wentai Liu watched as surgeons implanted a microchip he had designed into the eye of a blind patient. For Liu, a professor of electrical engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, it was a major milestone in two decades of work on an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind. Ten patients are now enrolled in a clinical trial of the device based on Liu's microchip at four leading ophthalmic centers in the United States. Patients are also enrolled in trials in Mexico, Switzerland, France, and the United Kingdom. Developed through a large

340

Geothermal development in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kampaeng and Fang geothermal areas are considered areas of interest for exploitation of geothermal energy. The technologies of exploration and development have been studied by Thai scientists and engineers during the past four years. The first geothermal deep exploration well was drilled, in cooperation with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in the San Kampaeng geothermal area. In 1985, supplementary work is planned to define the deep structural setting in greater detail before starting to drill the next deep exploration well. In Fang geothermal area some shallow exploitation wells have been drilled to obtain fluid to feed a demonstration binary system of 120 kWe, with the technical cooperation of BRGM and GEOWATT, France.

Praserdvigai, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Liquid fuel reformer development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Argonne National Laboratory we are developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to a clean hydrogen feed for a fuel cell. The process incorporates a partial oxidation/steam reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. We have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, low-sulfur diesel fuel, and a regular diesel fuel. We achieved complete conversion of the feed to products. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 800 C. For the two diesel fuels, higher temperatures, >850 C, were required to approach similar levels of hydrogen in the product stream. At 800 C, hydrogen yield of the low sulfur diesel was 32%, while that of the regular diesel was 52%. Residual products in both cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, ethylene, and methane.

Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geothermal development in Australia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the Internet has reached enormous popularity, but at the same time its weaknesses become evident: Huge efforts have to be taken to manage all participating nodes, and the infrastructure is not suitable to integrate emerging network paradigms such as sensor networks or delay tolerant networks. Therefore several research projects try to reinvent the Internet and provide a network architecture which is better armed for future needs. This thesis is situated in the ANA project which builds an autonomic network based on a clean slate approach. The ultimate goal is to develop a novel autonomic network architecture that enables flexible, dynamic, and fully autonomic formation of networks. In an ANA node two main components can be identified: The MINMEX and the Playground. The Playground hosts the elements (functional blocks) providing networking functionality. The MINMEX ties these functional blocks together and dispatches the data amongst them.

Technische Informatik Und; Ariane Keller; Supervisor Prof; Dr. B. Plattner; Advisor Theus Hossmann; Dr. Martin May; Dr. Rainer Baumann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Developing architectural lighting representations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a visualization system for architectural lighting designers. It starts by motivating the problem as both complex in its physics and social organization. Three iterations of prototypes for displaying time and space varying phenomena are discussed. Fieldwork is presented to identify where in practice they will be most effective. A set of user studies, one of which is analyzed in fine-grained detail, show how building designers incorporate visualization on hypothetical design problems. This has positive implications for both energy efficiency and lighting quality in buildings. CR Categories: H.1.2 [Models and Principles]: User/Machine SystemsHuman factors; D.2.2 [Software Engineering]: Design

Daniel C. Glaser; Roger Tan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of mirror specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed by PNL for Sandia Laboratories under a contract titled Survey and Analysis of Mirror Silvering Technology and Heliostat Glass Evaluation is described. The primary purpose for the work was to develop specifications that will enhance the durability and lifetime of heliostat mirrors. The contract was initiated with a technical survey of the present commercial silvered glass mirror industry and an analytical investigation of the degradation phenomena experienced by the heliostat mirrors at Sandia's Livermore test facility. The main thrust was to evaluate the present methods of silver deposition and protection in order to recommend a specification for the heliostat mirror silvering process that would extend the lifetime of the Barstow mirror field. In addition, several advanced concepts for enhancing mirror lifetime were investigated. Technical and measurement support for evaluation of the Barstow heliostat glass and updating the glass specification was also provided. (WHK)

Lind, M.A.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lessons for Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Argentina was one of the first countries in the world to implement a comprehensive reform of its electricity sector in the recent period. Among developing countries only Chile has had a comparably comprehensive and successful reform. This paper traces the history of the Argentine reform, which began in 1992, and assesses its progress and its lessons. We conclude that the reform was very successful prior to the collapse of the Argentine peso in early 2002. We suggest lessons for the generation, transmission and distribution sectors, as well as the economic regulation of electricity and the general institutional environment favourable to reform. We note that the achievements of the sector are now threatened by the delays in tackling the financial consequences of the peso devaluation.

Michael G. Pollitt; Michael Pollitt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Supervisory Control Strategy Development  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 of this collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focused on the design of the hierarchical supervisory control for multiple-module units. The state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design made developing a detailed hierarchical control difficult at this time. However, other simultaneous and ongoing efforts have contributed to providing the needed information. This report summarizes the results achieved under Task 4 of this Financial Assistance Award. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 discusses the IRIS control functions. Next, it briefly reviews the current control concepts, and then reviews the maneuvering requirements for the IRIS plant. It closes by noting the benefits that automated sequences have in reducing operator workload. Section 3 examines reactor loading in the frequency domain to establish some guidelines for module operation, paying particular attention to strategies for using process steam for desalination and/or district heating. The final subsection discusses the implications for reactor control, and argues that using the envisioned percentage (up to 10%) of the NSSS thermal output for these purposes should not significantly affect the NSSS control strategies. Section 4 uses some very general economic assumptions to suggest how one should approach multi-module operation. It concludes that the well-known algorithms used for economic dispatching could be used to help manage a multi-unit IRIS site. Section 5 addresses the human performance factors of multi-module operation. Section 6 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Community-Driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community-Driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Community-Driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Community-driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Agency/Company /Organization: International Fund for Agricultural Development Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.ifad.org/english/cdd/pub/decisiontools.pdf Community-driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Screenshot References: Community-Driven Development Decision Tools[1] Overview "The CDD Decision Tools is the final outcome of a series of studies conducted from 2003-08 by IFAD on the CDD activities and approaches it sponsors in a number of countries in Western and Central Africa (WCA). The

349

Three Essays on Development Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December December MMD, FDD UNIP, UPND December Wards withand Development (FDD), United National Independence Party (

Nakagawa, Hideyuki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Standards and agile software development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the adaptability of agile methodologies to software development standards laid down by ISO. On the basis of this analysis, guidelines are proposed for developing software in such a way that the development process conforms to ... Keywords: ISO/IEC 12207:1995, agile methodologies, documentation, extreme programming, software development, standardization

W. H. Morkel Theunissen; Derrick G. Kourie; Bruce W. Watson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development framework components as commonplaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the practice of using front-end web development frameworks and associated plug-ins to develop web application interfaces and suggests returning to a rhetorical foundation for determining the propriety of code use and vetting of an ... Keywords: code libraries, commonplaces, design, development frameworks, extreme usability, front-end development, rhetoric, topoi, user interfaces

Tom Lindsley

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CNST Researchers Develop Integrated Nanomechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CNST Researchers Develop Integrated Nanomechanical Sensor for Atomic Force Microscopy. June 1, 2011. ...

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

354

Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nation has embarked on an aggressive program to develop its indigenous resources of geothermal energy. For more than a decade, geothermal energy has been heralded as one of the more promising forms of energy alternate to oil and gas for electric power generation, but during the last fifteen years, the total capacity in the U.S. has reached 502 MWe, about half the size of a single modern nuclear power plant. And yet, the United States, especially its western and Gulf coast states, is believed to possess a vast resource base of geothermal heat at depths up to 3 to 10 km. Many estimates of these potential resources suitable for the production of electric power have been published and they range over a spectrum of more than a factor of 100. This variation suggests that the potential is essentially unknown. Table 1 gives a range of published forecasts for the year 1985 and the equivalent potential in number of 1000 Mwe power plants and in oil consumption in millions of barrels per day. In view of the estimated construction of about 200 to 250 nuclear power reactors by 1985-90, the pessimistic forecasts clearly show that the contribution of geothermal energy to the Nation's energy supply may indeed be small. The optimistic forecasts represent more than 15% of the total electric power requirements estimated for the year 1985. The Task Force for Geothermal Energy, in the Federal Energy Administration Project Independence Blueprint report of November 1974, established a national goal for 1985 of 20,000 to 30,000 MWe, the latter value representing an equivalent energy supply of one million barrels of oil per day. This goal was clearly a compromise between what is worth a national effort and what might be realistically achieved. The potential for adding or replacing the equivalent of some 25 nuclear power plants or for conserving one million barrels of oil per day should be an adequate incentive for the Nation to accelerate the development of a viable geothermal industry.

Kruger, Paul

1975-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Career Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programs » Career Programs » Career Development Career Development Career Development The career development objective is to produce better employees and maximizing employee potential. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs can help provide employees with the skills and tools they need to advance in their career. There are 3 instruments that will aid employees through this process: Career Paths, Competency Development, and Skills Assessments & Gap Analysis. Career Paths The employee career path is instrumental in helping organizations and individuals plan for short and long-term development activities. These paths will define the core technical competencies that are mission critical for successful performance at DOE, and each competency description includes

356

The Effects of Stator Compliance, Backs Steps, Temperature, and Clockwise Rotation on the Torque-Speed Curve of Bacterial Flagellar Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotation of a single bacterial flagellar motor is powered by multiple stators tethered to the cell wall. In a "power-stroke" model the observed independence of the speed at low load on the number of stators is explained by a torque-dependent stepping mechanism independent of the strength of the stator tethering spring. On the other hand, in models that depend solely on the stator spring to explain the observed behavior, exceedingly small stator spring constants are required. To study the dynamics of the motor driven by external forces (such as those exerted by an optical tweezer), back-stepping is introduced when stators are driven far out of equilibrium. Our model with back-stepping reproduces the observed absence of a barrier to backward rotation, as well the behaviors in the high-speed negative-torque regime. Recently measured temperature dependence of the motor speed near zero load (Yuan & Berg 2010 Biophys J) is explained quantitatively by the thermally activated stepping rates in our model. Finally, we suggest that the general mechanical properties of all molecular motors (linear and rotary), characterized by their force(torque)-speed curve, can be determined by their power-stroke potentials and the dependence of the stepping rates on the mechanical state of the motor (force or speed). The torque-speed curve for the clockwise rotating flagellar motor has been observed for the first time recently (Yuan et al. 2010 PNAS). Its quasi-linear behavior is quantitatively reproduced by our model. In particular, we show that concave and convex shapes of the torque-speed curve can be achieved by changing the interaction potential from linear to quadratic form. We also show that reversing the stepping rate dependence on force (torque) can lead to non-monotonicity in the speed-load dependency.

Giovanni Meacci; Ganhui Lan; Yuhai Tu

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Culture-independent analysis of bacterial fuel contamination provides insight into the level of concordance with the standard industry practice of aerobis cultivation.  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by 'JW') was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas.

White, J.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hill, G.; Hill, E.; Huse, S. M.; Weightman, A. J.; Mahenthiralingam, E. (CLS-CI); (Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University); (ECHA Microbiology Ltd.); (Josephine Bay Paul Centre for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

CIBS Solar Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focused on efforts to prepare and characterize the first copper-indium-boron-diselenide (CIBS) photovoltaic materials. Attempts to fabricate CIBS in thin-film form followed a three-step process: 1) RF sputtering of copper, indium, and boron to form a copper-indium-boron (CIB) alloy; 2) ex-situ selenization of CIB via physical vapor deposition; 3) annealing the final product. No CIBS materials were produced with this method due to the formation of an unstable boron diselenide species that formed in step 2. Detailed investigations of the CIB alloy formation revealed that boron does not adequately mix with the copper and indium in step 1. In the last year, a nanoscience-based method has shown greater promise for successful CIBS preparation. In this two-step method, sources of copper, indium, boron, and selenium are combined and heated in a high-boiling amine solvent. The isolated product is then annealed at temperatures between 400-500 deg. C. Currently, purified CIBS has not been isolated and characterized but further study and development of this nanoscience-based method is in progress through the support of two grants from the DOE Office of Energy Renewability and Efficiency and the State of Nebraskas Nebraska Research Initiative program. The research described in this report resulted in four scientific publications and 12 presentations at regional, national and international scientific and engineering conferences.

Exstrom, Christopher L.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Power Systems Development Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

None

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

DEVELOPMENT Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEVELOPMENT Solutions DEVELOPMENT Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name DEVELOPMENT Solutions Place Reading, England, United Kingdom Zip RG4 8UJ Sector Efficiency Product DEVELOPMENT Solutions (DS) supports investors to realise projects with sustainable applications, including in the areas of environment, energy efficiency, water resource management and other applications for sustainable development. References DEVELOPMENT Solutions[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. DEVELOPMENT Solutions is a company located in Reading, England, United Kingdom . References ↑ "DEVELOPMENT Solutions" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DEVELOPMENT_Solutions&oldid=344207

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Stage 3c: Developing and Assessing Low Emissions Development Scenarios |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stage 3c: Developing and Assessing Low Emissions Development Scenarios Stage 3c: Developing and Assessing Low Emissions Development Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

362

Community Development as a Strategy to Rural Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ,Iliteracy, ill health, regional disparity, unequal power or the other. Rural development aims to improve the standard of living of rural people. Thus community development can b_ e ~iew~d as a straregy to rural development. fhis paper is organ Ized Into 3... they play organizational and informational roles. This approach is appealing because of its apparent compatibility with democratic ideology. The distinctive feature of community development is the participation by the people themselves in efforts to impro...

Pyakuryal, Kailash N

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Developing product platforms:analysis of the development process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several authors have highlighted the importance of companies enhancing their new product development process through a multiproduct

Roveda, Marco

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

364

WEC Model Development at Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2C 2C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Wave Energy Converter Model Development at Sandia Outline  Overview of SNL's WEC Modeling Activities * Wave Energy Development Roadmap * MHK Reference Models - Diana Bull * WEC Model Tool Development - Kelley Ruehl Reference Models and SNL Array Modeling presented in next session Wave Energy Development Roadmap Overall Goal and Motivation  Goal: Develop a suggested path for WEC development from design to commercialization.  Motivation: Guide industry towards successful design optimizations, prototype deployments, and utility scale commercialization by providing a roadmap incorporating numerical modeling and experimentation.

365

Leadership Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Development Leadership Development Leadership Development DOE's Leadership & Development Programs are designed to strengthen the participant's capacity to lead by deepening their understanding of the DOE's core values and key leadership characteristics and behaviors, which is the foundation of our model for success. These programs will help individuals improve performance through the implementation of a personalized development plan that uses competency assessments as the foundation. Participants are introduced to concepts, characteristics, and behaviors needed to enhance leadership skills and/or prepare them for assignment to leadership positions at DOE and beyond. The programs consist of developmental experiences, formal and informal training, active learning

366

College of Health, Education, and Human Development DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and the Outdoor Laboratory. Collaboration within the col- lege between academics and community outreach services98 College of Health, Education, and Human Development 98 COLLEGE OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The College of Health, Education, and Human Development provides students the means by which

Stuart, Steven J.

367

Development and application of the spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool (select) to determine potential E. coli loads in watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the USEPA National Section 303(d) List Fact Sheet, bacterial pathogens are the leading cause of water quality impairments in Texas. The automated Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) uses spatially variable factors such as land use, soil condition, and distance to streams to characterize pathogen sources across a watershed. The results support development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) where bacterial contamination is of concern. SELECT calculates potential E. coli loads by distributing the contributing source populations across suitable habitats, applying a fecal production rate, and then aggregating the potential load to the subwatersheds. SELECT provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI), developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) within ArcGIS 9.X, where project parameters can be adjusted for various pollutant loading scenarios. A new approach for characterizing E. coli loads resulting from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) was incorporated into the SELECT methodology. The pollutant connectivity factor (PCF) module was created to identify areas potentially contributing E. coli loads to waterbodies during runoff events by weighting the influence of potential loading, runoff potential, and travel distance. Simulation results indicate livestock and wildlife are potentially contributing large amounts of E. coli in the Lake Granbury Watershed in areas where these contributing sources are not currently monitored for E. coli. The bacterial water quality violations near Lake Granbury are most likely the result of malfunctioning OWTSs and pet waste in the runoff. The automated SELECT was verified by characterizing the potential E. coli loading in the Plum Creek Watershed and comparing to results from a prior study (Teague, 2007). The E. coli potential load for the watershed was lower than the previous study due to major differences in assumptions. Comparing the average ranked PCF estimated by physical properties of the watershed with the statistical clustering of watershed characteristics provided similar groupings. SELECT supports the need to evaluate each contributing source separately to effectively allocate site specific best management practices (BMPs). This approach can be used as a screening step for determining areas where detailed investigation is merited. SELECT in conjunction with PCF and clustering analysis can assist decision makers develop Watershed Protection Plans (WPPs) and determine TMDLs.

Riebschleager, Kendra Jean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mathematical Modeling of Bacterial Motility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that a steep energy well constrains the thermal fluctuationsaware that energy inputs may color the thermal noise. Inenergy wells. Thus for some purposes we can ignore the internal thermal

Chen, Jing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Mathematical Modeling of Bacterial Motility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the overall foot release rate increases acutely withweakly-facilitated rate increases sharply with increasingthe unbinding rates probably increase with the order of

Chen, Jing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mathematical Modeling of Bacterial Motility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

account for the free energy consumption in the biochemicalis proportional to the energy consumption rate of the? 13 pN. The total energy consumption rate is then i E ? C

Chen, Jing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Field Research in Bacterial Transport  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the final phase of this project is to incorporate new understanding and practical insights derived from interdisciplinary field studies by DOE and other agencies into a broader research framework to address DOE remediation problems. This effort will lend unique strength to Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD) strategic planning and offer real linkages to remediation problems faced in the field at DOE sites nationwide.

Wildung, Raymond E.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Available Technologies: Production of Bacterial ...  

IB-2013-014. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Fig. 1: Illustration of a BMC with protein (green and yellow) sequestered within. Biotechnology ; Carbon capture and ...

373

Bacterial Fermentation Improves Metallic, Semiconducting ...  

Quantum dots are semiconducting nanoparticles structured for use in computing, tagging, electronics, LED displays, and photovoltaics. They currently ...

374

Recent Developments in SHERPA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some recent QCD-related developments in the SHERPA event generator are presented. In the past decades, event generators such as PYTHIA [1, 2] and HERWIG [3, 4] have been central for nearly all physics analyses at particle physics experiments at the high-energy frontier. This will also hold true at the LHC, where a large number of interesting signals for new particles or new phenomena (the Higgs boson or any other manifestation of the mechanism behind electro-weak symmetry breaking, supersymmetry, extra dimensions etc.) is hampered by a plethora of severe, sometimes overwhelming backgrounds. Nearly all of them are largely influenced by QCD. Therefore it seems fair to say that the success of the LHC in finding new physics may very well depend on a deep and detailed understanding of old physics, like QCD. Examples for this include, among others, the central-jet veto for the vector boson fusion channel for Higgs production or topologies, where gauge bosons emerge in association with many jets, a background for many search channels. In a reflection on increased needs by the experimental community, aiming at higher precision, incorporation of new physics models and so on, the work horses of old have undergone serious renovation efforts, resulting in new, improved versions of the respective codes, namely PYTHIA8 [5] and HERWIG++ [6]. In addition a completely new code, SHERPA [7], has been constructed and is in the process of maturing. The status of this code is the topic of this contribution. SHERPA's hallmark property is the inclusion of higher-order tree-level QCD contributions, leading to an improved modelling of jet production. They are introduced through a full-fledged matrix element generator, AMEGIC++ [8], which is capable of generating matrix elements and corresponding phase space mappings for processes with multi-particle final states in various models, including the Standard Model, anomalous gauge triple and quadruple couplings according to [9, 10], the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with Feynman rules from [11], the ADD-model of extra dimensions [12, 13], and a model with an extra U(1) singlet coupling to the Higgs boson only [14]. The code has been thoroughly tested and validated [15]. This code, however, is limited, especially in the treatment of many ({ge} 6) external QCD particles. Therefore, in the near future, SHERPA will incorporate another, new matrix element generator, COMIX, which is based on Berends-Giele recursion relations [16] and color-dressing [17] rather than color-ordering. In Tabs. 1 and 2 some example cross sections for gg {yields} ng at fixed energies and pp {yields} b{bar b} + n jets obtained with this program are exhibited and compared to those from other programs. In addition, concerning the calculation of higher-order matrix elements and cross sections, there have been first steps towards an automation of such calculations at truly next-to leading order accuracy. They manifest themselves in the implementation of a procedure [19] to fully automatically construct and evaluate Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction terms [20] for the real part of such NLO calculations. The results from the matrix element calculations are merged with the subsequent parton shower through the formalism of [21, 22]. The results of its implementation in SHERPA [23] has recently been compared with other algorithms [24]. Although there remains some dispute about the theoretical equivalence of the different approaches, the overall results show satisfying agreement with each other, such that they can be used with confidence for data analysis.

Archibald, Jennifer; /Durham U., IPPP; Gleisberg, Tanju; /SLAC; Hoeche, Stefan; /Durham U., IPPP; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Schonherr, Marek; /Dresden, Tech. U.; Schumann, Steffen; /Edinburgh U.; Siegert, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Winter, Jan; /Fermilab

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, H{sub 2}/converted carbon ratio, gasification rates, carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Test run GCT3 was started on December 1, 2000, with the startup of the thermal oxidizer fan, and was completed on February 1, 2001. This test was conducted in two parts; the loop seal was commissioned during the first part of this test run from December 1 through 15, which consisted of hot inert solids circulation testing. These initial tests provided preliminary data necessary to understand different parameters associated with the operation and performance of the loop seal. The loop seal was tested with coal feed during the second part of the test run and additional data was gathered to analyze reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance. In the second part of GCT3, the gasification portion of the test, from January 20 to February 1, 2001, the mixing zone and riser temperatures were varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures ranging from 200 to 240 psig. There were 306 hours of solid circulation and 184 hours of coal feed attained in GCT3.

Unknown

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development Practice in HVAC Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Practice in HVAC Controls Development Practice in HVAC Controls Speaker(s): John Zhou Date: April 11, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The presentation will introduce development tools and design considerations used in HVAC controls development. Controls development use simulation, lab testing and field trial at different phases of the project cycle to improve control performance and to achieve rapid development. Development starts with simulation to originate and define algorithm concept. The concept is then implemented in a prototype controller, and tested in lab environment. The concept is refined and verified by analyzing lab results. In the final phase of development, controllers with refined and verified algorithms are installed in field trial sites to ensure system integration and to confirm

377

Design of product development systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of successful new products in less time and using fewer resources is key to the financial success of most consumer product companies. In this thesis we have studied the development of new products and how ...

Aguirre Granados, Adrian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: OUR CHOICE FOR THE FUTURE Proceedings from PROCEEDINGS North Dakota's Transportation Network: Our Choice for the Future Program Biographical Sketches PROCEEDINGS Transportation and Economic Development: Our Choice for the Future Program Biographical Sketches

Levinson, David M.

379

Mechanisms of brain ventricle development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The brain ventricles are a conserved system of fluid-filled cavities within the brain that form during the earliest stages of brain development. Abnormal brain ventricle development has been correlated with neurodevelopmental ...

Lowery, Laura Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cities - Developers | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developers Cities Data Apps Challenges Policies Cities You are here Data.gov Communities Cities Developers Got an idea for an app? We've got data Find examples and open...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dataflow computer development in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the research activity on dataflow computing in Japan focusing on dataflow computer development at the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL). First, the history of dataflow computer development in Japan is outlined. Some distinguished ...

Toshitsugu Yuba; Toshio Shimada; Yoshinori Yamaguchi; Kei Hiraki; Shuichi Sakai

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Refund for Economic Development (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Refund for Economic Development under the Tax Code for state tax refunds for economic development. Some Texas property owners may be eligible to receive refunds of state sales and use taxes and...

383

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate and prioritize policies across an economy and clearly explain the process

384

Lean Software Development: A Tutorial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lean Software Development has become a popular term over the last few years. This tutorial describes where it comes from, what it means, how it relates to well-known agile development practices, and how it will evolve in the future. Keywords: Programming,Software development,Product development,Agile manufacturing,Tutorials,Assembly,Design methodology,Product life cycle management,Toyota,lean,agile,scrum,Kanban,XP,lean startup,continuous delivery,design thinking

Mary Poppendieck; Michael A. Cusumano

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy. Sponsorship, MS&T...

386

Argonne TDC: Regional Economic Development  

... industrial site characterization and cleanup, conservation and energy efficiency, waste recycling and materials reuse, and business development and training. ...

387

Physical Metallurgy and Alloy Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FORUMS > PHYSICAL METALLURGY AND ALLOY DEVELOPMENT ... A TMS Knowledge Packet on the Physical Metallurgy of Solders and Solder Interfaces

388

PML Develops Graphene Fabrication Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PML Develops Graphene Fabrication Capability. October 3, 2011. ... That further limits the growth of the graphene, we think. ...

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

Integrated Biosystems for Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated biosystems for sustainable development Proceedings of the InFoRM 2000 National Workshop on Integrated

Kev Warburton; Usha Pillai-mcgarry; Deborah Ramage; No Ms; Dr. Kev Warburton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.  

SciTech Connect

The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Development The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports and participates in the model building energy code development processes administered by the ASHRAE and the International Code Council (ICC). DOE activities include developing and submitting code change proposals, conducting analysis of building energy efficiency and cost savings, and formulating underlying evaluation methodologies. Through participation in model energy code development for both commercial and residential buildings, DOE strives to make cost-effective, energy efficient upgrades to current model codes. DOE also establishes energy efficiency standards for federal buildings and manufactured housing. Further information on this process is defined under

392

Engineering for Developing Communities: The Developing World as the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering for Developing Communities: The Developing World as the Engineering for Developing Communities: The Developing World as the Classroom of the 21st Century Speaker(s): Bernard Amadei Date: December 16, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Engineering curricula in modern universities are mostly designed toward solving the problems of the one billion rich and not the needs of the five billion poor. This is unfortunate as the demand of the developing world for engineering solutions is likely to increase in the forthcoming years due to population growth. There is a need for training a new generation of engineers who could better meet the challenges and needs of the developing world. The challenge is the education of engineers: (i) who have the skills and tools appropriate to address the issues that our planet is facing today

393

Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance: Advanced Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

was created to give tribal leaders and professionals background information in renewable energy development to: Present foundational information on strategic energy...

394

Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Program Info State...

395

Argonne TDC: Collaborative Research and Development Agreements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Facilities SBIRSTTR and Other Government Funds Regional Economic Development Cooperative Research and Development Agreements Cooperative research and development agreements...

396

Research and Development Investment Criteria | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Investment Criteria Research and Development Investment Criteria Criteria for research and development. The goal of the Research and Development Investment...

397

Career Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Career Development Career Development Career Development The Department of Energy (DOE) offers a variety of learning and development programs to address employee needs throughout the continuum of knowledge and experience from entry-level employees to senior executives. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development can help you find the program that serves your needs. These programs represent a major commitment by the DOE in an employee's career development. Most DOE organizational elements have a coordinator for these programs to ensure that applicants are given a fair opportunity to participate based on merit principles. The participants need to work with the program coordinators to complete the programs in a satisfactory manner, and that resources are available, especially where programs span more than

398

Developer Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Developer Resources Developer Resources Developer Resources Apps for Energy The Energy Department is challenging developers to use the Green Button data access program to bring residential and commercial utility data to life with fun and creative apps. Read more Learn about Green Button Apps for Energy submissions must use Green Button data. To learn more, start here. Read more NREL Resources NREL offers a number resources for Green Button app developers. Find out more! Read more Vehicle Data Resources Sample Vehicle Data (Apps for Vehicles) OpenXC Translation Output Format Vehicle Data API OpenEI Developer FAQ OpenXC Platform Guide OpenEI Hackathon Resources EPA OBD Page Society of Automotive Engineers OBD Page Other Agencies Energy.Data.gov Geo.Data.Gov Census Data Census: TIGER Geographic Data

399

MPAS-Ocean Development Update  

SciTech Connect

The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

Jacobsen, Douglas W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jones, Philip W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program Mod I Stirling engine development  

SciTech Connect

The Automotive Stirling Engine (ASE) Development Program was established to enable research and development of alternate propulsion systems. The program was awarded to Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the purpose of developing an automotive Stirling engine, and transferring Stirling-engine technology to the United States. MTI has fabricated and tested four Mod I engines that have accumulated over 1900 test hours to date. The engines evaluated in the test cell have achieved an average of 34.5% efficiency at their maximum efficiency point (2000 rpm), and have developed an average maximum output power (power available to the drive train) level of 54.4 kW (73.2 bhp). All engines are still operating, and are being used to develop components and control strategy for the Upgraded Mod I engine design (predicted to increase maximum power output and efficiency while reducing total engine system weight).

Simetkosky, M.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORISE: Instructional Design and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructional Design and Development Instructional Design and Development The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works with government agencies and organizations to create customized training and instructional design programs, from traditional classroom teaching to online education. ORISE uses a multi-step process to define the instructional design and development needs. Our process includes: Defining the target audience and objectives Designing and developing the program and materials Piloting, delivering and managing the training Evaluating the final product Whether a small- or large-scale effort, ORISE helps determine the most effective approach based on needs and resources, which may include: Collaborative experiences Interactive simulations Self-paced tutorials Guided instructions

402

Strip Development for Progressive Dies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 2 Strip development for a ring-shaped part (two at a time). Note idle stage for die strength, layout of strip for material economy....

403

Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NOTE: The Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund has issued its [http://publicservicedept.vermont.gov/sites/psd/files/Topics/Renewable_En... Five Year Strategic Plan]. See the [http:/...

404

Recent Developments in Powder Metallurgy  

SciTech Connect

Brief notes from a meeting between NAA and S. B. Roboff, Sylvania Electric Products, regarding the important developments in powder metallurgy fuels and reactor materials.

Hayward, B.R.

1953-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

METHODOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT OF DESIGN ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was also proposed for developing design criteria based on ... loss of power due to wind induced damage to transmission tower or power line ...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

Belo Monte - A Development Project?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis has as its aim the examination of the processes of development for the Amazon region in Brazil. It looks at the current Brazilian (more)

Vestergaard-Hansen, Hanna Karina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Updated guidebook on biogas development  

SciTech Connect

On the practical aspects of small-scale biogas development suitable for use in rural areas of developing countries reviews biogas development throughout the ESCAP region and examines each of the steps involved in developing and operating a biogas plant. It details both the process and the microbiology of biogas fermentation and analyses the factors affecting gas plant design and operation. Also covered are the classification and design principles of plants, design, site, and site selection; starting and operating a gas plant; servicing and safety; and efficient plant performance. Also considered are the commercial uses of biogas and possible use of effluent.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cooperative Research & Development Agreements | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

universities, non-profits, etc.) to collaborate with federal laboratories, such as ORNL, on research and development projects. CRADAs are specifically technology transfer...

409

Alternate Energy Development Fund (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulations Title 115 chapter 2 establishes the alternative energy development fund under the authority of the Kentucky Energy Cabinet. The goal for the use of the...

410

Carbon Capture Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Research Institute of Innovative Energy Carbon Capture Research and Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power...

411

Office of Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of this mission, NETL's Office of Research and Development (ORD) provides the DOE Fossil Energy R&D Program an onsite "corporate laboratory," where fundamental and applied fossil...

412

g. tms business development guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines on Business Development within TMS ... are in compliance with existing TMS articles of incorporation, bylaws, policies, practices, and procedures . 2.

413

Understanding Joint Technology Development Arrangements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For example, a maker of printing inks may partner with a company that owns glass-decorating equipment and process technology in order to develop a better ...

414

Postdoctoral Appointees - Training and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both at the Laboratory and offsite. Below you will find information on the various training programs and opportunities for development that the Postdoctoral Office recommends....

415

NREL: Technology Deployment - Tool Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

renewable energy projects. NREL develops geographic tools, interactive calculators, market and metrics databases, and mobile applications to help inform sustainable energy...

416

Development of Alternative Engine Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ature strength(31,32), and reinforced rings are envisioned in various IHPTET engine tests. The development of r-based materials with a balance of properties.

417

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Standards Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Engineering group supports the development of national and international standards for PV engineering. Current standards lack specifics on how to...

418

Heavy Ion Fusion development plan  

SciTech Connect

Some general cnsiderations in the fusion development program are given. The various factors are considered that must be determined before heavy ion fusion can be assessed. (MOW)

Maschke, A.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Chemical Additives for Reducing CO 2 Capture Costs Yang Li Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presented at 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab at a Glance 13 - Nobel Laureates; 55 - Nobel Laureates trained here; 13 - National Medal of Science members; 900 - University students trained each year; 4,200 - Employees; 202 - Site acreage Bringing Science Solutions to the World Research areas Climate Change and Environmental Sciences Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Energy Biological Sciences for Energy Research and Health Computational Science and Networking Matter and Force in the Universe Soft X-Ray Science for Discovery Project Status * Funding: DOE $ 1,250 K * Project period: 6/1/08 - 5/31/13 * Participants: Ted Chang - PI Participants: Y. Li - Chemist Project Scientist/Engr Participants: C. Y. Liao -

420

Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directed release of the 2002 New York State Energy Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement (Energy Plan). Since the Energy Plan was

William M. Flynn; Joseph H. Boardman; Erin M. Crotty

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Additives for Reducing CO 2 Capture Costs Yang Li Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presented at 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Lawrence...

422

Developing security protocols by refinement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a development method for security protocols based on stepwise refinement. Our refinement strategy guides the transformation of abstract security goals into protocols that are secure when operating over an insecure channel controlled by a Dolev-Yao-style ... Keywords: entity authentication, formal development, key establishment, security protocols, stepwise refinement

Christoph Sprenger; David Basin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Office of Research and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Sciences Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P Excellence in Technology Transfer Award to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology

424

Strategies for communication skills development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the scope of computer science continues to expand and move further into inter-disciplinary research, we see communication skills development (CSD) gain prominence in tertiary courses. Employer groups, professional bodies and universities increasingly ... Keywords: communication across the curriculum, communication skills development, curriculum change

Paul Gruba; Reem Al-Mahmood

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

MCFC component development at ANL.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathode and electrolyte components for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Working in support of the MCFC developers, the goal of this effort is to extend the life of the MCFC cell and to improve its performance.

Bloom, I.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

The molecular evolution of development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The molecular evolution of development Michael D. Purugganan Summary Morphological differences in understanding the genetic basis behind the evolution of developmental systems. Molecular evolutionary genetics-day attempts to study the evolution of development are centered at the molecular level and exploit

Purugganan, Michael D.

427

Energy and Development Gordon Mackenzie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Development Gordon Mackenzie Energy Programme Coordinator UNEP Risø Centre #12;Energy · Nordic Arctic energy network #12;African Rural Energy Enterprise Development - AREED ENDA MFC KITE TaTEDO CEEEZ E+Co Africa E+Co NJ UNEP Paris URC UN Foundation Sida Others Demonstrating that needed energy

428

Tool-based language development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows how to tackle the problem of ever larger languages and the problem of combining multiple languages. The central idea is to build a foundation for language definitions that uses a metamodel-driven approach with support of language engineering ... Keywords: Common language concepts, Language development, Model driven architecture, Model driven development, Model repositories, Modelling and metamodelling, Modelling language semantics

Joachim Fischer; Eckhardt Holz; Andreas Prinz; Markus Scheidgen

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developer developer Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 11:14 Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! API developer OpenEI update utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here! I encourage you to check out the V2 Utility Rates API

430

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Developer > Posts by term > Developer Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: API Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry API The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Rmckeel 6 Sep 2013 - 14:00 Blog entry API Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI Sfomail 31 May 2013 - 12:04 Blog entry API Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! Sfomail 17 May 2013 - 11:14 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Timo,My apologies for the ... Browse by region (RaphaelSVGMap) The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Probably the best reference on... New Robust References! more Group members (18) Managers: Rmckeel Recent members:

431

EMSL: Capabilities: Instrument Development Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrument Development Laboratory Instrument Development Laboratory The mission of the Instrument Development Laboratory (IDL) is to design, develop, and deploy advanced state-of-the-art instrument systems and custom application software in support of the ongoing experimental research efforts within EMSL. IDL staff design and develop much of the custom hardware and software used at EMSL, and provide the critical support necessary to rapidly modify or adapt a user's system to help the user achieve the world-class results they expect at EMSL. Additional Information IDL Home Meet the IDL Experts IDL Innovations IDL Brochure IDL staff provide electrical engineering expertise in high-voltage, radiofrequency, and high-speed analog and digital systems; digital signaling processing and FPGA technology; and rapid prototyping. In

432

Technology Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Development Technology Development Technology Development Hydroelectric power is the largest source of renewable electricity in the United States, producing about 7% of the nation's total electricity throughout the last decade. Even after a century of proven experience with this reliable renewable resource, significant opportunities still exist to expand the nation's hydropower resources through non-powered dams, water conveyance systems, pumped storage hydropower, and new site development. The Water Power Program supports the hydropower industry and complements existing investments through the development and deployment of new technologies and key components, and by identifying key opportunity areas through which hydropower generation can be enhanced. The Water Power Program aims to provide 15% of the nation's electricity

433

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Developer > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds American Clean Skies Foundation (1) API (3) APIs (1) Apps (1) ask queries (1) Big Data (1) bug (2) challenge (1) citation (1) citing (1) clean energy (1) cleanweb (2) compound queries (1) data (1) developer (10) DOE (1) EIA (2) Energy data (1) energy efficiency (1) Energy Visions Prize (1) EZFeed (1) FOA (1) formatting (1) funding (1) Gapminder (1) 1 2 3 next › last » Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Timo,My apologies for the ... Browse by region (RaphaelSVGMap) The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Probably the best reference on... New Robust References! more Group members (18) Managers: Rmckeel Recent members: Sangduen

434

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Developer > Posts by term > Developer Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Energy Visions Prize Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Energy Visions Prize Nominations open for $250,000 Multimedia Clean Energy prizes Graham7781 2 Oct 2012 - 13:01 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Thank you Jon, I know about th... Hi Yury-Thank you for your i... source code for OpenEI extensions Timo,My apologies for the ... Browse by region (RaphaelSVGMap) more Group members (19) Managers: Rmckeel Recent members: Yury Katkov Sangduen Timo.Kouwenhoven Jwkropf KingJahfy Graham7781 Ianjkalin Autumn1 Mvdv Sprzesmi Satish Cdonnelly Wzeng Twong Jayhuggins Jorn.aabakken Jweers

435

Develop BAU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BAU BAU Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

436

Human Resources in Geothermal Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some 80 countries are potentially interested in geothermal energy development, and about 50 have quantifiable geothermal utilization at present. Electricity is produced from geothermal in 21 countries (total 38 TWh/a) and direct application is recorded in 35 countries (34 TWh/a). Geothermal electricity production is equally common in industrialized and developing countries, but plays a more important role in the developing countries. Apart from China, direct use is mainly in the industrialized countries and Central and East Europe. There is a surplus of trained geothermal manpower in many industrialized countries. Most of the developing countries as well as Central and East Europe countries still lack trained manpower. The Philippines (PNOC) have demonstrated how a nation can build up a strong geothermal workforce in an exemplary way. Data from Iceland shows how the geothermal manpower needs of a country gradually change from the exploration and field development to monitoring and operations.

Fridleifsson, I.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of an Automated Microfluidic System for DNA Collection, Amplification, and Detection of Pathogens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was focused on developing and testing automated routines for a microfluidic Pathogen Detection System. The basic pathogen detection routine has three primary components; cell concentration, DNA amplification, and detection. In cell concentration, magnetic beads are held in a flow cell by an electromagnet. Sample liquid is passed through the flow cell and bacterial cells attach to the beads. These beads are then released into a small volume of fluid and delivered to the peltier device for cell lysis and DNA amplification. The cells are lysed during initial heating in the peltier device, and the released DNA is amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or strand displacement amplification (SDA). Once amplified, the DNA is then delivered to a laser induced fluorescence detection unit in which the sample is detected. These three components create a flexible platform that can be used for pathogen detection in liquid and sediment samples. Future developments of the system will include on-line DNA detection during DNA amplification and improved capture and release methods for the magnetic beads during cell concentration.

Hagan, Bethany S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Wind Project Development Process  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Project Wind Project Development Process Developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory by Dale Osborn Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. September 1998 The Wind Project Development Process Site Selection Land Agreements Wind Assessment Environmental Review Economic Modeling Interconnection Studies Financing Permitting Sales Agreements Turbine Procurement Construction Contracting Operations & Maintenance Site Selection Evidence of Significant Wind Preferably Privately Owned Remote Land Proximity to Transmission Lines Reasonable Road Access Few Environmental Concerns Receptive Community Land Agreements Term: Expected Life of the Turbine Assignable Indemnification Rights Compensation: Percentage of Revenues Reclamation Provision Wind Rights, Ingress/Egress Rights, Transmission Rights

439

Overview of Geothermal Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Energy Geothermal Energy Development Kermit Witherbee Geothermal Geologist/Analyst DOE Office of Indian Energy Webcast: Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Geothermal Geology and Resources Environmental Impacts Geothermal Technology - Energy Conversion Geothermal Leasing and Development 2 PRESENTATION OUTLINE GEOTHERMAL GEOLOGY AND RESOURCES 3 Geology - Plate Tectonics 4 Plate Tectonic Processes Schematic Cross-Section "Extensional" Systems- "Rifting" Basin and Range Rio Grand Rift Imperial Valley East Africa Rift Valley "Magmatic" Systems Cascade Range 6 Geothermal Resources(USGS Fact Sheet 2008-3062) 7 State Systems

440

Development Administration By Alice Buck  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Research and Development Administration By Alice Buck March 1982 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Office of the Executive Secretariat Office of History and Heritage Resources 1 Introduction Congress created the Energy Research and Development Administration on October 11, 1974, in response to the Nation's growing need for additional sources of energy. The new agency would coordinate energy programs formerly scattered among many federal agencies, and serve as the focal point for a major effort by the Federal Government to expand energy research and development efforts. New ways to conserve existing supplies as well as the commercial

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441

Development Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Development Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(9) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

442

Development of a geothermal thesaurus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An attempt was made to develop a thesaurus of terminology associated with geothermal energy for use in the information storage and retrieval system of LBL's Geothermal Information Group. The development of the thesaurus is discussed, beginning with an outline of its subject scope, sources, and methods used in compiling the list of terms. The tendency was to include, rather than exclude, terms of unknown usefulness, and to provide paths through the thesaurus to make these terms accessible. The thesaurus structure and links to other vocabularies are described. The thesaurus processing software developed at LBL is briefly mentioned.

Herr, J.J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

Minkel, Darin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Progress on reactor programs and in general engineering research and development programs is summarized. Research and development are reported on water-cooled reactors including EBWR and Borax-V, sodium-cooled reactors including ZPR-III, IV, and IX, Juggernaut, and EBR-I and II. Other work included a review of fast reactor technology, and studies on nuclear superheat, thermal and fast reactor safety, and reactor physics. Effort was also devoted to reactor materials and fuels development, heat engineering, separation processes and advanced reactor concepts. (J.R.D.)

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Advanced photovoltaic-trough development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of the work on photvoltaic troughs includes analytical studies, hardware development, and component testing. Various aspects of the system have been optimized and improvements have been realized, particularly in the receiver and reflecting surface designs. An empirical system performance model has been developed that closely agrees with measured system performance. This in-depth study of single-axis reflecting linear focus photovoltaic concentrators will be very beneficial in the development of improved models for similar systems as well as other phtovoltaic concentrator designs.

Spencer, R.; Yasuda, K.; Merson, B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Business Development Executive (BDE) Program  

SciTech Connect

The IPST BDE (Institute of Paper Science and Technology Business Development Executive) program was initiated in 1997 to make the paper industry better aware of the new manufacturing technologies being developed at IPST for the U.S. pulp and paper industry's use. In April 2000, the BDE program management and the 20 BDEs, all retired senior level industry manufacturing and research executives, were asked by Ms. Denise Swink of OIT at DOE to take the added responsibility of bringing DOE developed energy conservation technology to the paper industry. This project was funded by a DOE grant of $950,000.

Rice, E.J. "Woody"; Frederick, W. James

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Groups > Groups > Developer Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Looking Back At 2013's Cleantech Investing Predictions - Energy Collective Google Cleanweb News - 5 hours 30 min ago Energy Collective Looking Back At 2013's Cleantech Investing Predictions Energy Collective As I explained, everyone already saw Cleanweb as an exciting new area, but meanwhile I was hearing a lot about agriculture from VCs but not seeing it talked about much by cleantech journalists and others. Well, agriculture-related venture investments ... Chicago co-working space aims to make cleantech cooler - Midwest Energy News Google Cleanweb News - 9 January, 2014 - 05:13 Midwest Energy News Chicago co-working space aims to make cleantech cooler

448

Economic Development | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Success Stories Success Stories Commercialization and Licensing Economic Development Industrial Partnerships Sponsored Research Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Success Stories | Economic Development Success Stories Economic Development 1-3 of 3 Results ORNL and Enterprise Center Help Revitalize Chattanooga September 02, 2011 - The Enterprise Center, through its technology-based economic development initiatives, is focused on economic transformation in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, and the Tennessee Valley Corridor region. Seven Companies Selected for ORNL Mentor Protégé Program November 28, 2012 - Seven companies have been selected to participate in the mentor protégé program sponsored by ORNL. The program is a DOE initiative designed to assist energy-related companies in an effort to

449

Developing energy efficient filtering systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azzopardi,L. Vanderbauwhede,W. Moadeli,M. Proceedings of the 32nd international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval (SIGIR09) pp 664-665 ACM

450

Essays on development and finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a collection of three empirical essays on economic development and finance. Chapter 1 examines how politicians influence the lending decisions of government owned- banks, particularly whether government ...

Cole, Shawn (Shawn Allen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Lunar exploration rover program developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) design concept began at Sandia National Laboratories in late 1991 with a series of small, proof-of-principle, working scale models. The models proved the viability of the concept for high mobility through mechanical simplicity, and eventually received internal funding at Sandia National Laboratories for full scale, proof-of-concept prototype development. Whereas the proof-of-principle models demonstrated the mechanical design`s capabilities for mobility, the full scale proof-of-concept design currently under development is intended to support field operations for experiments in telerobotics, autonomous robotic operations, telerobotic field geology, and advanced man-machine interface concepts. The development program`s current status is described, including an outline of the program`s work over the past year, recent accomplishments, and plans for follow-on development work.

Klarer, P.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Reflections on HCI for development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This forum looks at how the fields of interaction design and HCI can extend to cover "developing" communities around the world, ones that are gaining access to digital technology for the first time. Gary Marsden, Editor

Kentaro Toyama

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Individual differences and system development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an order of magnitude more subjects, this replication of a study by Dos Santos and Hawk confirms its finding that system development professionals' attitudes can be classified as user-oriented, technically-oriented, or socio-politically-oriented. ...

James J. Jiang; Gary Stephen Klein; Roger Alan Pick

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Rural Development Advantage Program (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rural Development Advantage Program provides qualified businesses with refundable tax incentives for projects that create two new jobs and invest $125,000 in counties with less than 15,000...

455

Development of Wind Profiling Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study group has developed a new wind profiling sodar with a phased array antenna. This system is superior to usual ones with parabolic reflectors in its portability. Preliminary experiments have shown the expected acoustic performance ...

Yoshiki Ito; Yasuhiro Kobori; Mitsuaki Horiguchi; Masato Takehisa; Yasushi Mitsuta

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.' :h I : ' ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20545 October 24, 1975 :.. ,. Memo to Piles' CARNEGIE-MELLON SC&RCCYCLOTRON On October 23, 1975, W....

457

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Timo.Kouwenhoven Thank you Jon, I know about th... Posted by: Timo.Kouwenhoven 19 Nov 2013 - 10:26 NickL Hi Yury-Thank you for your i... Posted by: NickL 18 Nov 2013 - 09:03 Hi Yury- Yury Katkov source code for OpenEI extensions Posted by: Yury Katkov 13 Nov 2013 - 06:42 Is the source code of OpenEI extensions awailable as open source? I'm especially interested in your faceted search, looks great! Jweers Timo,My apologies for the ... Posted by: Jweers 22 Oct 2013 - 17:13 Timo, My apologies for the delayed response. The Semantic Result Format we used was a custom Raphael SVG mapping format we developed. While we're not

458

Wineagle Developers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wineagle Developers Wineagle Developers Jump to: navigation, search Name Wineagle Developers Place Sacramento, California Zip 95814 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal developer in California. Coordinates 38.579065°, -121.491014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.579065,"lon":-121.491014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

NGNP Research and Development Status  

SciTech Connect

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, experts from the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, gas reactor vendors, and universities collaborated to establish technology research and development (R&D) roadmaps. These roadmaps outlined the testing and computational development activities needed to qualify the materials and validate the modeling and simulation tools to be used in the design and safe operation of the NGNP, a helium-cooled, high temperature gas reactor (HTGR).

David A. Petti

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

International developments in oil shale  

SciTech Connect

An overview of oil shale research and development outside the US provides a status report on technology approaches under active consideration in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, West Germany, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Soviet Union, Thailand, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. The status report covers the development plans and project costs of industrial projects. The technologies under consideration include the Fushun, Galoter, Kiviter, Lurgi, and Petrosix processes. 10 references.

Uthus, D.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z