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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

2

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

3

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

4

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

5

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

6

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

7

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

8

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

9

A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a Manjunath Hegde of biofilm community formation. Here, we describe the development of a PDMS-based two-layer microfluidic flow

Wood, Thomas K.

10

Successional Development of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Populations and Their Activities in a Wastewater Biofilm Growing under Microaerophilic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in wastewater treatment systems, the...genus level in wastewater biofilms in relation...the biofilm. Mass balance of sulfide and...anoxic zones in wastewater treatment biofilms (36...wastewater treatment plant in Sapporo...

Tsukasa Ito; Satoshi Okabe; Hisashi Satoh; Yoshimasa Watanabe

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hacking into bacterial biofilms: a new therapeutic challenge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbiologists have extensively worked during the past decade on a particular phase of the bacterial cell cycle known as biofilm, in which single-celled individuals gather together to form a sedentary but dyn...

Christophe Bordi; Sophie de Bentzmann

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bacterial Adhesion: Seen Any Good Biofilms Lately?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...preferentially attach to surfaces is a fundamental survival feature that evolved...J. Friedman (ed.), Handbook of bacterial adhesion: principles...J. Friedman (ed.), Handbook of bacterial adhesion: principles...J. Friedman (ed.), Handbook of bacterial adhesion: principles...

W. Michael Dunne Jr.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Succession of Internal Sulfur Cycles and Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cycle that occurs in wastewater biofilms. One of...activity in developing wastewater biofilms was analyzed...In addition, the mass balance for SO4 2, S0, and...effluent from a domestic wastewater treatment plant (Sapporo, Japan...

Satoshi Okabe; Tsukasa Ito; Kenichi Sugita; Hisashi Satoh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2. , Sabine U The accumulation of the widely-used antibacterial and antifungal compound triclosan (TCS) in freshwaters raises) and exposed to a range of triclosan concentrations (control, 2 ­ 100 mg L21 ) was monitored over time

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

15

Zinc sorption to biogenic hexagonal-birnessite particles within a hydrated bacterial biofilm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc sorption to biogenic hexagonal-birnessite particles within a hydrated bacterial biofilm Brandy oxides found in streams, wetlands, soils, and aquifers. We investigated the mecha- nisms of Zn sorption experiments were conducted at pH 6.9 to characterize Zn sorption to this biogenic Mn oxide, and to determine

16

Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm  

SciTech Connect

Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur...

18

Stratification of Activity and Bacterial Community Structure in Biofilms Grown on Membranes Transferring Oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...441 Uncultured sludge bacterium S43...G. Faup. 1988. Bubble-free aeration using...Modeling biofilms on gas-permeable supports...biofilms growing on gas permeable membranes...Modeling biofilms on gas-permeable supports...applicable to high-strength nitrogenous wastewater...

Alina C. Cole; Michael J. Semmens; Timothy M. LaPara

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Bacterial biofilm shows persistent resistance to liquid wetting and gas penetration  

SciTech Connect

Most of the world's bacteria exist in robust, sessile communities known as biofilms, ubiquitously adherent to environmental surfaces from ocean floors to human teeth and notoriously resistant to antimicrobial agents. We report the surprising observation that Bacillus subtilis biofilm colonies and pellicles are extremely nonwetting, greatly surpassing the repellency of Teflon toward water and lower surface tension liquids. The biofilm surface remains nonwetting against up to 80% ethanol as well as other organic solvents and commercial biocides across a large and clinically important concentration range. We show that this property limits the penetration of antimicrobial liquids into the biofilm, severely compromising their efficacy. To highlight the mechanisms of this phenomenon, we performed experiments with mutant biofilms lacking ECM components and with functionalized polymeric replicas of biofilm microstructure. We show that the nonwetting properties are a synergistic result of ECM composition, multiscale roughness, reentrant topography, and possibly yet other factors related to the dynamic nature of the biofilm surface. Finally, we report the impenetrability of the biofilm surface by gases, implying defense capability against vapor-phase antimicrobials as well. These remarkable properties of B. subtilis biofilm, which may have evolved as a protection mechanism against native environmental threats, provide a new direction in both antimicrobial research and bioinspired liquid-repellent surface paradigms.

Epstein, Alexander K.; Pokroy, Boaz; Seminara, Agnese; Aizenberg, Joanna (Harvard)

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Signals, Regulatory Networks, and Materials That Build and Break Bacterial Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conditions, which reduce cell density effects...suggesting that it can reduce vpsT transcription...of molecules that make up the matrix of the...hydrated, up to 97 water by some estimates...biofilms devoid of water channels and mushroom-like...rhamnolipids can reduce biofilm formation...

Ece Karatan; Paula Watnick

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Combinatorial Materials Research Applied to the Development of New Surface Coatings I:? A Multiwell Plate Screening Method for the High-Throughput Assessment of Bacterial Biofilm Retention on Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The screening process involves (1) multiwell plate modifications for coating deposition, (2) deposition of combinatorial coating libraries via an automated liquid dispensing robot, (3) coating thickness measurements of cured coatings, (4) preconditioning of coatings via immersion in deionized water, (5) bacterial incubation, (6) plate processing, and (7) data analysis for identification of promising candidates. ... This clearly perceptible increase recorded since 1982, may be attributable to the growing use of copper paints subsequent to the antifouling paint regulations adopted in 1982. ... that can be applied with both lethal and sublethal effect criteria for the detn. of toxic stress from leaches of painted surfaces. ...

Shane J. Stafslien; James A. Bahr; Jason M. Feser; Jonathan C. Weisz; Bret J. Chisholm; Thomas E. Ready; Philip Boudjouk

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Microfluidic Systems for Investigating Bacterial Chemotaxis and Colonization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall goal of this work was to develop and utilize microfluidic models for investigating bacterial chemotaxis and biofilm formation - phenotypes that play key roles in bacterial infections. Classical methods for investigating chemotaxis...

Englert, Derek Lynn

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filter biofilm Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Bacterial biofilm shows persistent resistance to liquid wetting and gas penetration Summary: to selectively target particular biofilms. B. subtilis biofilms grow...

24

Linked Redox Precipitation of Sulfur and Selenium under Anaerobic Conditions by Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Influence of growth rate on susceptibility to antimicrobial...handbook of chemistry and physics, 83rd ed. CRC Press...Measurement of in situ rates of selenate removal by...Aquatic chemistry: chemical rates and equilibria in natural...was therefore shown to pass through the biofilm matrix...

Simon L. Hockin; Geoffrey M. Gadd

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Microanatomy at Cellular Resolution and Spatial Order of Physiological Differentiation in a Bacterial Biofilm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the biofilm, we examined a flagellar motor-deficient deltamotA mutant. In contrast...our study will be a basis for numerous future studies. These will address the specific...The specimens were examined with an FEI Quanta 200 scanning electron microscope (FEI...

Diego O. Serra; Anja M. Richter; Gisela Klauck; Franziska Mika; Regine Hengge

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require...

27

Metagenome Survey of a Multispecies and Alga-Associated Biofilm Revealed Key Elements of Bacterial-Algal Interactions in Photobioreactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metagenomes of hydrothermal vent chimneys, biofilms on concrete...microalgal cultures using solar tracked photobioreactors...metagenome of a hydrothermal chimney biofilm. ISME J. 3...Photobioreactors mounted on a solar tracker and flow chart...

Ines Krohn-Molt; Bernd Wemheuer; Malik Alawi; Anja Poehlein; Simon Güllert; Christel Schmeisser; Andreas Pommerening-Röser; Adam Grundhoff; Rolf Daniel; Dieter Hanelt; Wolfgang R. Streit

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

Temporal and Stochastic Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the existing model for tower development in S.-aureus...suggest the presence of a Sae-controlled nuclease-mediated...for the development of tower structures. Furthermore...cells that occurs after tower development, we found...event is dependent on the Sae regulatory system and...

Derek E. Moormeier; Jeffrey L. Bose; Alexander R. Horswill; Kenneth W. Bayles

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Permeabilizing biofilms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

Soukos, Nikolaos S. (Revere, MA); Lee, Shun (Arlington, VA); Doukas,; Apostolos G. (Belmont, MA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

A simple and low-cost biofilm quantification method using LED and CMOS image sensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel biofilm detection platform, which consists of a cost-effective red, green, and blue light-emitting diode (RGB LED) as a light source and a lens-free CMOS image sensor as a detector, is designed. This system can measure the diffraction patterns of cells from their shadow images, and gather light absorbance information according to the concentration of biofilms through a simple image processing procedure. Compared to a bulky and expensive commercial spectrophotometer, this platform can provide accurate and reproducible biofilm concentration detection and is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Biofilms originating from various bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), were tested to demonstrate the efficacy of this new biofilm detection approach. The results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. To utilize a cost-effective light source (i.e., an LED) for biofilm detection, the illumination conditions were optimized. For accurate and reproducible biofilm detection, a simple, custom-coded image processing algorithm was developed and applied to a five-megapixel CMOS image sensor, which is a cost-effective detector. The concentration of biofilms formed by P. aeruginosa was detected and quantified by varying the indole concentration, and the results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. The correlation value of the results from those two systems was 0.981 (N = 9, P  < 0.01) and the coefficients of variation (CVs) were approximately threefold lower at the CMOS image-sensor platform.

Yeon Hwa Kwak; Junhee Lee; Junghoon Lee; Soo Hwan Kwak; Sangwoo Oh; Se-Hwan Paek; Un-Hwan Ha; Sungkyu Seo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...changes in bacteria resulting in resistance occuring within the biofilm environment, (ii...of a biofilm bacterial community to UV radiation. . M. J. Elder F. Stapleton E. Evans...of clone libraries for PCR amplified, naturally occurring 16S rDNA on the primer pair...

Mary Ellen Davey; George A. O'toole

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Influence of Rugosity on Biofilm Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cellular automata model is used to assess the effect of surface rugosity on the development of biofilms at increasing Reynolds numbers. The model includes basic cellular mechanisms (division displacement) and an elementary description of the interaction with the surrounding flow. Numerical simulations show that rugosity enhances the resistance of biofilms to erosion by the flow and helps biofilms to colonize new regions. Rugosity makes it easier to build uniform biofilms at high Reynolds numbers.

D. Rodriguez; B. Einarsson; A. Carpio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Support Analytical Infrastructure and Further Development of a Statewide Bacterial Source Tracking Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project titled Support Analytical Infrastructure and Further Development of a Statewide Bacterial Source Tracking Library funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board was established to provide needed resources to expand...

DiGiovanni, G.; Casarez, E.; Gentry, T.; Martin, E.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Eradication of marine biofilms by atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: A potential approach to control biofouling?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although the antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas, including its capacity to eradicate microbial biofilms, has been gaining an ever increasing interest for different medical applications, its potential utilisation in the control of biofouling and biodeterioration has, to date, received no attention. In this study, the ability of atmospheric pressure plasma to eradicate biofilms of four biofouling bacterial species, frequently encountered in marine environments, was investigated. Biofilms were grown on both polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces before being exposed to the plasma source. Viability and biomass of biofilms were evaluated using colony count method and differential Live/Dead fluorescence staining followed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Rapid and complete eradication of all biofilms under study was achieved after plasma exposures ranging from 60 to 120 s. Confocal microscopy examination showed that plasma treatment has mediated not only cell killing but also varying degrees of physical removal of biofilms. Further investigation and tailored development of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma sources for this particular application could provide an additional powerful and effective weapon in the current anti-biofouling armamentarium.

Mahmoud Y. Alkawareek; Sean P. Gorman; William G. Graham; Brendan F. Gilmore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Combinatorial discovery of polymers resistant to bacterial attachment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation pose key challenges to the optimal performance of medical devices. In this study, we determined the attachment of selected bacterial species to hundreds of polymeric ...

Hook, Andrew L

36

Electroactive Biofilms: Current Status and Future Research Needs  

SciTech Connect

Electroactive biofilms generated by electrochemically active microorganisms have many potential applications in bioenergy and chemicals production. This review assesses the effects of microbiological and process parameters on enrichment of such biofilms as well as critically evaluates the current knowledge of the mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer in BES systems. First we discuss the role of biofilm forming microorganisms vs. planktonic microorganisms. Physical, chemical and electrochemical parameters which dictate the enrichment and subsequent performance of the biofilms are discussed. Potential dependent biological parameters including biofilm growth rate, specific electron transfer rate and others and their relationship to BES system performance is assessed. A review of the mechanisms of electron transfer in BES systems is included followed by a discussion of biofilm and its exopolymeric components and their electrical conductivity. A discussion of the electroactive biofilms in biocathodes is also included. Finally, we identify the research needs for further development of the electroactive biofilms to enable commercial applications.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Reguera, Gemma [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ringeisen, Bradley [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Wang, Zhiwu [ORNL; Feng, Yujie [Harbin Institute of Technology; Kim, Byung Hong [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid bacterial inclusion Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monomers and amyloids. Such transi- tions govern... processes as diverse as human protein-folding diseases, bacterial biofilm assembly, and the inheritance... that Q and N...

38

Eradication of Bacteria in Suspension and Biofilms Using Methylene Blue-Loaded Dynamic Nanoplatforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens makes the remediation of environmental media and clinically relevant infections...public attention and concern is on the rise (17). Novel and innovative approaches are needed for the treatment of biofilm-related...

Jianfeng Wu; Hao Xu; Wei Tang; Raoul Kopelman; Martin A. Philbert; Chuanwu Xi

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

Bacterial evolution.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...valid one ructure (75), is vital to the future development of microbiology. als a resem...macro- evolution, megaevolution, or quantum evolution (192). Ini- tially, global...Implications for Bacterial Taxonomy If future findings support the above conclusions...

C R Woese

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: Potential therapeutic targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell–cell and cell–surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review.

Garima Sharma; Saloni Rao; Ankiti Bansal; Shweta Dang; Sanjay Gupta; Reema Gabrani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The impacts of the AOC concentration on biofilm formation under higher shear force condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The logistic growth model was applied in the study to evaluate the impacts of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentration on the growth characteristics of biofilm and bulk bacteria under high flow velocity condition. The experimental results showed that there existed a growth and decline relation between biofilm and bulk bacteria at the low (0.05 mg/L) and medium (0.5 mg/L) AOC levels. Increasing the AOC concentration up to 1.0 mg/L, it resulted in high amounts of biofilm and bulk bacteria simultaneously. Although the carrying capacity of biofilm bacteria at the medium condition of AOC level was substantially reduced, the specific growth rate (GR) of biofilm bacteria was largest at this condition. It showed that the reduction of biofilm bacteria quantity did not represent the suppression of bacterial growth. The quantity of bulk water bacteria was obviously dependent with the quantity of biofilm bacteria and the increase of free bacteria with time in networks was mainly due to the growth and detachment of biofilm bacteria, not due to the growth of free bacteria themselves. The maximum growth rate of biofilm bacteria was increased upon increasing the AOC level. It indicated that the AOC level was an important factor affecting the growth of biofilm bacteria.

Y.P Tsai; T.Y Pai; J.M Qiu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biofilm-Related Infections: Bridging the Gap between Clinical Management and Fundamental Aspects of Recalcitrance toward Antibiotics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surfaces show different biofilm compositions under in vivo conditions...2000. Surface finishes on stainless steel reduce bacterial attachment...glycol) methacrylate)-stainless steel hybrids and their antifouling...Antimicrob. Agents 37 :316-323. doi: 10.1016...

David Lebeaux; Jean-Marc Ghigo; Christophe Beloin

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Artificial teeth : dental biofilm analysis on a chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, an "artificial teeth" microfluidic device is developed that provides unprecedented control over the conditions required to simulate the growth of complex dental biofilm. Dental plaque formation is not only ...

Lam, Raymond Hiu-wai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A comparison of the action of various biocides on corrosive biofilms  

SciTech Connect

Results of several years laboratory experience with biocides in the presence of bacterial biofilms on metal surfaces are reported. Planktonic growth and biofilms of Pseudomonas sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens, were used to assess the biocidal efficacy of glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, ammonium didecyldimethyl chloride, an isothiazolinones mixture, ozone and sodium hypochlorite. All the biocides showed to be effective to kill planktonic cells within the concentration ranges assayed in this paper. This effectivity was restricted for sessile bacterial population, when the biocidal efficacy was assessed on bacterial biofilms under the same experimental conditions and for the same contact times. An interpretation of the decrease of the biocidal efficacy on sessile bacteria is envisaged under the light of new conceptions on biofilm structure. The electrochemical behavior of two different steels (carbon steel and AISI type 304 stainless steel) was also tested in the presence of each of the biocides used in this work by means of open circuit potential vs. time evaluation, potentiodynamic polarization assays and Tafel polarization. The passive behavior of both steels was not significantly altered in any of the biocide solutions assayed. However, the passive or active behavior of the metallic substratum can influence either the biocide penetration into the biofilm or the bacterial detachment after exposure to the biocide solution.

Videla, H.A.; Guiamet, P.S.; Viera, M.R.; Gomez de Saravia, S.G. [Univ. of La Plata (Argentina). Dept. of Chemistry; Gaylarde, C.C. [UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Expression of the psl Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Biofilms: PslA Performs an Essential Function in Biofilm Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which could be restored to wild-type biofilm development by using a cosmid with a 22-kb insert comprising the genes pslA to pslF. In this study, we identified the designated pslA gene as a functional gene essential for biofilm development in nonmucoid...

Jörg Overhage; Mirle Schemionek; Jeremy S. Webb; Bernd H. A. Rehm

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Anti-biofilm activity of Marula – A study with the standardized bark extract  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractEthnopharmacological relevance Marula (Sclerocarya birrea; family – Anacardiaceae) is an African plant, which enjoys wide socio-economic importance particularly in southern part of Africa. The fruits are consumed as food and also as alcoholic beverage (cream liquor). In different parts of Africa, the decoction of the bark is traditionally used for the treatment of dysentery, diarrhoea, and various other infectious conditions. The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-biofilm properties of the methanol extract of Marula bark (stem bark of Sclerocarya birrea), with a view towards combating the emergence of antimicrobial resistance often associated with bacterial biofilms. Materials and methods The standardized methanol extract was initially tested for its antimicrobial property. The crystal violet assay was used for evaluating anti-biofilm (biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeuginosa) activity. Further in order to study the mechanism of anti-biofilm activity, the same was evaluated for understanding its role on various quorums sensing mediated phenomenon (swarming motility assay, protease and pyoverdin assay) that are known to be associated with the formation of biofilms and pathogenicity. Results The methanol extract showed no inhibition of bacterial growth up to a concentration of 200 µg/ml. Interestingly, the sample produced anti-biofilm activity (around 75% decrease; 100 µg/ml) at sub-lethal concentration. Further it also significantly reduced the QS mediated swarming motility. The release of various virulent factors (protease and pyoverdin) was found to be lowered when pre-treated with the extract. Conclusion The present study illustrates the anti-biofilm property Sclerocarya birrea. The standardized extract significantly disrupted the quorum sensing mediated production of biofilm formation and also inhibited swarming ability of the cells. The extract displayed a regulatory role on the secretion of protease and pyoverdin, two QS dependent pathogenic factors found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study also validates the ethnobotanical use of Marula.

Ratul Sarkar; Sushil K. Chaudhary; Amrita Sharma; Kirendra K. Yadav; Neelesh K. Nema; Mamello Sekhoacha; Sanmoy Karmakar; Fernão C. Braga; Motlalepula Gilbert Matsabisa; Pulok K. Mukherjee; Tuhinadri Sen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently

Mei, Chuansheng [IALR; Nowak, Jerzy [VPISU; Seiler, John [VPISU

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Biocide treatment of biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biofilms are ubiquitous in nature and microorganisms often exist as members of complex consortia, rather than as pure cultures. Their localised metabolic activity can create diffusion gradients of nutrients, fermentation byproducts and possible associated corrosion products within the biofilms; together with cell lysis, these cause a mosaic of microenvironments which may be totally different to the bathing phase. Such habitats pose a major, and often ignored, constraint on the interpretation of results obtained from laboratory disinfection models which can be physically, environmentally and physiologically inappropriate. For example, the most commonly used model for inactivation of microorganisms by biocides utilises the so-called ‘Chick- Watson law’: this implies that biocide concentration and contact time, the (C × T) factor, are the two key variables determining biocide efficacy. However, applications of the ‘law’ have assumed complete and uniform mixing of microorganisms and biocide, ignoring that diffusion might be rate limiting and that biocide concentration might decrease with time. Recent results suggest that many of the viable bacteria in chlorinated potable water are attached to surfaces and under these circumstances coliforms have withstood at least 12 ppm free residual chlorine. The use and efficacy of alternative biocides such as monochloramine against aquatic biofilms is discussed.

C.W. Keevil; C.W. Mackerness; Jennifer S. Colbourne

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsursface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation  

SciTech Connect

Our work is towards mechanistically understanding interactions of unsaturated bacterial biofilms and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with actinide metals and metal surrogates under vadose zone conditions. Because metal contaminants in the vadose zone co-occur with organic pollutants, some of our work has included experiments with organic pollutants.

Holden, Patricia; Neu, Mary P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsursface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation  

SciTech Connect

Our work is towards mechanistically understanding interactions of unsaturated bacterial biofilms and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with actinide metals and metal surrogates under vadose zone conditions. Because metal contaminants in the vadose zone co-occur with organic pollutants, some of our work has included experiments with organic pollutants.

Holden, Patricia

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bioenergy Derived from Electrochemically Active Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microorganisms (bacteria) naturally form biofilms on solid surfaces. Biofilms can be found in a variety of natural sites, such as sea water sediments, soils, and a range of wastewaters, such as municipal, dye, ag...

Mohammad Mansoob Khan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

53

Coaggregation by the Freshwater Bacterium Sphingomonas natatoria Alters Dual-Species Biofilm Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...180 min were the occasional larger glass-attached clusters observed...continued to develop to form large stacks of biofilm cells that...diversity in kerosene-based drilling fluid from the deep ice borehole at Vostok, East Antarctica...

K. R. Min; A. H. Rickard

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Biofilm Roughness Determines Cryptosporidium parvum Retention in Environmental Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cryptosporidium parvum and model sand surfaces in aqueous...32 :53-85. 16. Flood, JA and NJ Ashbolt...composition, and surface polymers to the survival and transport...2001. Two-dimensional model of biofilm detachment...planktonic samples in a model system, p 209-213...

E. A. Wolyniak DiCesare; B. R. Hargreaves; K. L. Jellison

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Watermelon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial fruit blotch is a disease occurring sporadically in almost all areas of Texas where watermelons are grown. This publication discusses symptoms, diagnosis and disease development and management....

Isakeit, Thomas

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Laser-Generated Shockwaves for the Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization by modified Laser Spallation Technique (The Basic Laser Spallation Technique (Modified Laser Spallation Technique: “Top-Down”

Navarro, Artemio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Analysis of the Multidimensional Effects in Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. W. Wimpenny, "Effect of EPS on biofilm structure andIndividual Cells and Continuum EPS Matrix," Biotechnologypolymeric substance (EPS). Free floating, planktonic

Hauser, Michael Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on implant infection will be very useful in understanding the chemistry of the biomaterial surfaces, which can deter the formation of biofilms. It is observed that the adsorption of BSA on the biomaterial surfaces increases with time and concentration, irrespective of their type and the nature of the EPS matrix of the bacterial biofilm is dependent on the amount of protein adsorbed on the biomaterial surface. The adsorption of protein (BSA) on the biomaterials, polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) has been stu...

Sinha, S Dutta; Maity, P K; Tarafdar, S; Moulik, S P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mercury Methylation by Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mercury Methylation by Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ... The similarity of the relationships in the presence and absence of a biofilm indicates that the existence of the biofilm does not appear to change the relative availability of the dominant mercuric sulfide species to SRB, which is consistent with our previous work with E. coli (18). ...

Chu-Ching Lin; Jennifer A. Jay

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Energy-Dependent Stability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expression requirements for biofilm stability primarily in S. oneidensis...suggest that maintenance of the stability of young biofilms requires...medium was exchanged in the bubble trap and the upstream tubing...for maintenance of biofilm stability. We previously showed that...

Renee M. Saville; Shauna Rakshe; Janus A. J. Haagensen; Soni Shukla; Alfred M. Spormann

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Functional Analysis of the Protein Veg, Which Stimulates Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sporulation development at the tips of aerial structures in mature biofilms (10...epsH deletion mutation to suppress the aerial structure that interferes with color comparison...J. Bacteriol. 147 :443-451. 26. Fukushima T , S Ishikawa, H Yamamoto, N Ogasawara...

Ying Lei; Taku Oshima; Naotake Ogasawara; Shu Ishikawa

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Estimate of Biofilm Properties using an Acoustic Microscope  

SciTech Connect

Noninvasive measurements over a biofilm, a three-dimensional community of microorganisms immobilized at a substratum, were made using an acoustic microscope operating at frequencies up to 70 MHz. Spatial variation of surface heterogeneity, thickness, interior structure, and biomass of a living biofilm was estimated over a 2.5-mm by 2.5-mm region. Ultrasound based estimates of thickness were corroborated using optical microscopy and the nominal biofilm thickness was 100 microns. Experimental data showed that the acoustic microscope combined with signal processing was capable of imaging and making quantitative estimates of the spatial distribution of biomass within the biofilm. The revealed surface topology and interior structure of the biofilm provide data for use in advanced biofilm mass transport models. The experimental acoustic and optical systems, methods to estimate of biofilm properties and potential applications for the resulting data are discussed.

Good, Morris S.; Wend, Christopher F.; Bond, Leonard J.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Crawford, Susan L.; Daly, Don S.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on implant infection will be very useful in understanding the chemistry of the biomaterial surfaces, which can deter the formation of biofilms. It is observed that the adsorption of BSA on the biomaterial surfaces increases with time and concentration, irrespective of their type and the nature of the EPS matrix of the bacterial biofilm is dependent on the amount of protein adsorbed on the biomaterial surface. The adsorption of protein (BSA) on the biomaterials, polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) has been studied and the formation of the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on them has been examined.

S Dutta Sinha; Susmita Chatterjee; P. K. Maity; S. Tarafdar; S. P. Moulik

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bacillus subtilis biofilm induction by plant polysaccharides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...different structures. Xylan is a polymer of xylose...we propose that, for surface colonization of A. thaliana...51), in which case xylan would more likely be...the AGPs, pectins and xylan serving to induce biofilm...53). However, such treatment would leave the pectin...

Pascale B. Beauregard; Yunrong Chai; Hera Vlamakis; Richard Losick; Roberto Kolter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Analyses of Spatial Distributions of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activity in Aerobic Wastewater Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aerobic wastewater treatment systems...their activity in wastewater biofilms is of...biofilms. Since mass balance of sulfide or...sulfur cycle in wastewater biofilm systems...municipal wastewater treatment plant in Sapporo...

Satoshi Okabe; Tsukasa Itoh; Hisashi Satoh; Yoshimasa Watanabe

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - aureus biofilm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

multiple important functions including virulence and biofilm formation1... -sensing inhibitor RNAIII-inhibiting peptide to prevent biofilm formation in vivo by drug-resistant...

69

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

71

Use of SWATH mass spectrometry for quantitative proteomic investigation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms grown on graphite cloth electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Quantitative proteomics from low biomass, biofilm samples is not well documented. In this study we show successful use of SWATH-MS for quantitative proteomic analysis of a microbial electrochemically active biofilm. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown on carbon cloth electrodes under continuous anodic electrochemical polarizations in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). Using lactate as the electron donor, anodes serving as terminal microbial electron acceptors were operated at three different electrode potentials (+0.71 V, +0.21 V & ?0.19 V vs. SHE) and the development of catalytic activity was monitored by measuring the current traces over time. Once maximum current was reached (usually within 21–29 hours) the electrochemical systems were shut off and biofilm proteins were extracted from the electrodes for proteomic assessment. SWATH-MS analysis identified 704 proteins, and quantitative comparison was made of those associated with tricarboxcylic acid (TCA) cycle. Metabolic differences detected between the biofilms suggested a branching of the S. oneidensis TCA cycle when grown at the different electrode potentials. In addition, the higher abundance of enzymes involved in the TCA cycle at higher potential indicates an increase in metabolic activity, which is expected given the assumed higher energy gains. This study demonstrates high numbers of identifications on BES biofilm samples can be achieved in comparison to what is currently reported. This is most likely due to the minimal preparation steps required for SWATH-MS.

Christy Grobbler; Bernardino Virdis; Amanda Nouwens; Falk Harnisch; Korneel Rabaey; Philip L. Bond

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Various chemicals that inhibit the growth and/or the metabolism of corrosion-associated microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and methanogenic bacteria were evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit corrosion in experiments utilizing pure and mixed bacterial cultures, and planktonic cultures as well as mature biofilms. Planktonic cultures are easier to inhibit than mature biofilms but several compounds were shown to be effective in decreasing the amount of metal corrosion. Of the compounds tested hexane extracts of Capsicum pepper plants and molybdate were the most effective inhibitors of sulfate reducing bacteria, bismuth nitrate was the most effective inhibitor of nitrate reducing bacteria, and 4-((pyridine-2-yl)methylamino)benzoic acid (PMBA) was the most effective inhibitor of methanogenic bacteria. All of these compounds were demonstrated to minimize corrosion due to MIC, at least in some circumstances. The results obtained in this project are consistent with the hypothesis that any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion. This approach of controlling MIC by controlling the metabolism of biofilms is more environmentally benign than the current approach involving the use of potent biocides, and warrants further investigation.

Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; Gemma Husmillo; Kristine Lowe; J. Robert Paterek; John J. Kilbane II

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Spatial Distributions of Copper in Microbial Biofilms by Scanning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a biofilm may confer resistance to transient spikes in the bulk solution concentration of toxic metal), and toxins (e.g., anti- microbial agents (15) and heavy metals (10, 16)). Trace metals are also ubiquitous species by retarding metal diffusion and reducing the metal exposure of cells within the biofilm

Houston, Paul L.

75

Liquid transport facilitated by channels in Bacillus subtilis biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

| multicellularity | wrinkles Biofilms are dense multicellular communities of bacteria em- bedded in a self-produced remediation (10), plant protection (11), and microbial fuel cells (12). Biofilm growth and physiology rely on the transport of nutrients, waste, and sig- naling molecules, all of which are dissolved in water. For example

76

Modelling mechanical characteristics of microbial biofilms by network theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and applications (ed. BHA Rehm). Microbiology Monographs, vol. 13, pp. 95-115...biofilms (eds HM Lappin-Scott, P Gilbert, M Wilson, and D Allison), pp...strength of Candida albicans biofilms. Microbiology 155, 1997-2003. 10.1099/mic...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Impact of rpoS Deletion on the Proteome of Escherichia coli Grown Planktonically and as Biofilm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were performed on planktonic cells (in exponential or stationary growth phase) and biofilms developed on glass wool. ... Trypsin digestion was performed using an automatic digester (MultiPROBE II, PerkinElmer Sciex) by using a protocol previously described. ... SDS-PAGE anal. of trypsin digested ?133-157 AKe revealed accumulation of several well defined fragments which were not obsd. ...

Anthony Collet; Pascal Cosette; Christophe Beloin; Jean-Marc Ghigo; Christophe Rihouey; Patrice Lerouge; Guy-Alain Junter; Thierry Jouenne

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energetics of Bacterial Photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energetics of Bacterial Photosynthesis ... We report the results of extensive numerical simulations and theoretical calculations of electronic transitions in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic bacterium. ...

David N. LeBard; Dmitry V. Matyushov

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

Transcriptional response of selected genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilm cells during inactivation by superheated steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Superheated steam (SHS), produced by the addition of heat to saturated steam (SS) at the same pressure, has great advantages over conventional heat sterilization due to its high temperature and accelerated drying rate. We previously demonstrated that treatment with SHS at 200°C for 10 sec inactivated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes biofilm cells on the surface of stainless steel to below the detection limit. However, bacteria withstanding heat stress become more resistant to other stress conditions, and may be more virulent when consumed by a host. Herein, we studied the transcriptional regulation of genes important for stress resistance and virulence in Salmonella biofilms after SHS treatments. Genes encoding heat shock proteins and general stress resistance proteins showed transcriptional surges after 1 sec of SHS treatment at 200°C, with parallel induction of stress-related regulator genes including rpoE, rpoS, and rpoH. Interestingly, Salmonella biofilm cells exposed to SHS showed decreased transcription of flagella and Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) genes required for motility and invasion of host cells, respectively, whereas increased transcription of SPI-2 genes, important for bacterial survival and replication inside host cells, was detected. When the transcriptional response was compared between cells treated with SHS (200°C) and SS (100°C), SHS caused immediate changes in gene expression by shorter treatments. Understanding the status of Salmonella virulence and stress resistance induced by SHS treatments is important for wider application of SHS in controlling Salmonella biofilm formation during food production.

Ga-Hee Ban; Dong-Hyun Kang; Hyunjin Yoon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community  

SciTech Connect

In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

Jiao, Yongqin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); D'Haeseleer, Patrik M [ORNL; Dill, Brian [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy-Dependent Stability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Physiology and Metabolism Energy-Dependent Stability of Shewanella oneidensis...maintenance of biofilm stability is an energy-dependent process and whether transcription...found to be ineffective in preventing energy starvation-induced detachment, suggesting...

Renee M. Saville; Shauna Rakshe; Janus A. J. Haagensen; Soni Shukla; Alfred M. Spormann

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

82

Measurements of the distribution of adenylate concentrations and adenylate energy charge across Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...function of biofilms. Wiley Interscience, New York. 29. Wimpenny, J. W. T., A. Peters...function of biofilms. Wiley Interscience, New York. 30. Witzel, K. P. 1979. The adenylate energy charge as a measure of microbial activities...

S L Kinniment; J W Wimpenny

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effect of Heterogenous Structure in Mechanically Unstressed Biofilms on Overall Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A biofilm is a hydrated collection of micro­organisms concentrated together in a self­secreted matrix and industrial systems, dental plaque, algal mats, and waste­water treatment systems. Biofilm presence has

Klapper, Isaac

84

Role of AI-2 in oral biofilm formation using microfluidic devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofilm formation. Microfluidic devices provide biomimetic environments and offer a simple method for executing multiple stimuli experiments simultaneously, thus, can be an extremely powerful tool in the study of QS in biofilms. In this study, we report...

Kim, Sun Ho

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Extracellular Matrix Component Psl Provides Fast-Acting Antibiotic Defense in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacteria within biofilms secrete and surround themselves with an extracellular matrix, which serves as a first line of defense against antibiotic attack. Polysaccharides constitute major elements of the biofilm matrix and ...

Ramirez Millan, Maria

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters dual-species biofilm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: alters dual-species biofilm Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

87

Composition and Metabolic Activities of Bacterial Biofilms Colonizing Food Residues in the Human Gut  

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...SEM (Fig. 1A). Washing with buffer removed...1B); however, surfactant treatment with CTAB...Fig. 1). While washing with buffer removed...treatment with the surfactant CTAB was required...the surface before washing. (B) Bacteria...bacteria following surfactant treatment with 0...

Sandra Macfarlane; George T. Macfarlane

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Inter- and Intra-kingdom Signaling in Bacterial Chemotaxis, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the actions of NE are mediated primarily through the LasR, and not the RhlR QS system. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the chemo-sensing of the intra-kingdom signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2) by pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella...

Hegde, Manjunath

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Biofilm Bacterial Community Structure in Streams Affected by Acid Mine Drainage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that any restoration activities...36), aquatic invertebrates...on aquatic ecosystems, the effects...extent of ecosystem degradation...ecological restoration in streams...successful restoration of any degraded ecosystem requires...

Gavin Lear; Dev Niyogi; Jon Harding; Yimin Dong; Gillian Lewis

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

New Methods for Analysis of Spatial Distribution and Coaggregation of Microbial Populations in Complex Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biofilms from different reactors. For this purpose...enables detailed analyses of biofilms grown...the digital image analysis software daime...the statistical reliability of the results...Vertical-distribution analysis. The biofilms in...reasons such as reactor design, shear forces...

Robert Almstrand; Holger Daims; Frank Persson; Fred Sörensson; Malte Hermansson

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure  

SciTech Connect

Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5? biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ? 30 ?m before acidification to ? 60 ?m after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5? biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5? biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Physics of Bacterial Morphogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...FtsZ conformation may be a bent conformation. The mechanical...S-benzylisothiourea compound that induces spherical cells in Escherichia coli probably...and J. Lowe. 2004. The crystal structure of ZapA and its modulation...and L. A. Amos. 1998. Crystal structure of the bacterial...

Sean X. Sun; Hongyuan Jiang

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Moscow, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Bacterial Bleeding Canker of Horse Chestnut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a tree in phloem and cambium Horse chestnut bleeding canker ph ph + ca #12;Summary of Infection Pae;· Bacterial diseases represent an increasing threat to Britain's forest, woodland and amenity trees · The Pae epidemic provides an ideal opportunity to develop a system for tackling newly emerging tree diseases · We

95

Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

96

Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. Furthermore, we propose several experiments to elucidate the torque-speed relationship in motors where the number of stators may not be constant. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental features of the flagellar motor, including: torque-speed and speed-ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the puzzle of swarming experiments.

Kranthi K. Mandadapu; Jasmine A. Nirody; Richard M. Berry; George Oster

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

97

Biofilm Cohesiveness Measurement Using a Novel Atomic Force Microscopy Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...functions by characterizing friction and/or wear under repeated scanning with variable loads...our knowledge, concomitant friction and wear processes on biofilms, important for understanding...Bacteriol. 186: 8096-8104. 40 Towler, B. W., C. J. Rupp, A. B. Cunningham...

Francois Ahimou; Michael J. Semmens; Paige J. Novak; Greg Haugstad

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pb(II) distributions at biofilm–metal oxide interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between Burkholderia cepacia biofilms and hematite ({alpha}-Fe2O3) or corundum ({alpha}-Al2O3) surfaces has been probed...submicromolar concentrations, following the trend {alpha}-Fe2O3 (0001) > {alpha}-Al2O3 (11?02) > {alpha}-Al2O3...

Alexis S. Templeton; Thomas P. Trainor; Samuel J. Traina; Alfred M. Spormann; Gordon E. Brown; Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ALSNews Vol. 312  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Lab, and UC Berkeley have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms, coupling infrared (IR) rays from...

100

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by Bacterial Cells Displaying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by Bacterial Cells Displaying Synthetic Phytochelatins for enhanced bioaccumulation of toxic metals. Synthetic genes encoding for several metal strategy for develop- ing high-affinity bioadsorbents suitable for heavy metal removal. © 2000 John Wiley

Chen, Wilfred

102

Evaluation of bacterial detachment rates in porous media  

SciTech Connect

The ability of published biomass detachment rate expressions to describe experimental data obtained from porous media reactors using Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown aerobically on glucose was evaluated. A first-order rate expression on attached biomass concentration best reflected effluent substrate concentration for combined data sets. Detachment rate coefficient k{sub d1} was dependent on initial substrate concentration. Simulation of porous media reactor experiments indicated that responses using higher influent substrate concentrations possessed greater sensitivity to variations in k{sub d1}. Simulations of field bioremediation systems suggest the use of accurate biofilm development kinetics is important in the prediction of well bore biofouling.

Peyton, B.M.; Hooker, B.S.; Skeen, R.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cunningham, A.B.; Lundman, R.W. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Efeito do triclosan sobre a formação inicial dos biofilmes supragengival e subgengival.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A maioria das pessoas não consegue desenvolver em forma adequada, a remoção total do biofilme por médios mecânicos. Em decorrência a complementação com coadjuvantes químicos… (more)

Ernesto Andrade

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Biofilm responses to multiple stressors associated to global change in river ecosystems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the effects of consequences of global change on fluvial biofilms. To achieve this objective a multi-marker… (more)

Proia, Lorenzo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinomyces israelii biofilm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 38 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamar blue biofilm Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Technology Collection: Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 7 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - anammox biofilm reactors Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georgia Institute of Technology Collection: Chemistry 23 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidophilic microbial biofilms Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Restoration Technologies ; Biology and Medicine 38 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - autotrophic nitrogen-removing biofilm Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 80 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - aporated anammox biofilm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 34 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic packed-bed biofilm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 12 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - albicans biofilm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Summary: avium biofilm formation Henriette Geier, MSU-CBE PhD Candidate, Microbiology SESSION 6: Environmental... 9:00-9:50 Resistance, persistence and consistence...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated biofilm reactor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 43 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sewer biofilms Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crosse Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilms exposed Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Chemistry 18 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic wastewater biofilms Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane... biofilm reactor Introduction One of the major challenges in wastewater treatment is achieving effective... et al. 2004). Nitrifying bacteria grow in the deep,...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects downstream biofilm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOTIC AGGREGATES AND BIOFILMS ERIC A. STRAUSS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences... water) ecosystems and is important for nutri- ent cycling, organic matter decomposition,...

118

Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

Tinberg, Christine Elaine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement of cells : chemotaxis, biofilms, algae, etc... Magali Ribot;Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Hyperbolic

Ribot, Magali

120

Biofilm streamers cause catastrophic disruption of flow with consequences for environmental and medical systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...incomplete flagellum (21), {delta}pilC has no type IV pili, and {delta}lasR...similar to the wild type. (E) {delta}pilC forms no streamers, but does form thick biofilms...Cells lacking type IV pili ({delta}pilC) can form biofilms in the presence of...

Knut Drescher; Yi Shen; Bonnie L. Bassler; Howard A. Stone

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Promotion of Endodontic Lesions in Rats by a Novel Extraradicular Biofilm Model Using Obturation Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology Promotion of Endodontic Lesions in Rats by a Novel Extraradicular Biofilm Model...in vivo extraradicular biofilm model in rats and to identify and quantify extraradicular...mandibular first molars of male Wistar rats to their oral environment. Four weeks...

Katsutaka Kuremoto; Yuichiro Noiri; Takuya Ishimoto; Naomichi Yoneda; Reiko Yamamoto; Hazuki Maezono; Takayoshi Nakano; Mikako Hayashi; Shigeyuki Ebisu

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Increased Biofilm Formation by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates from Patients with Invasive Disease or Otitis Media versus Strains Recovered from Cases of Respiratory Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to a solid surface by the BioFilm ring test and quantified biofilm formation by crystal...absorbance from at least three independent tests and comparing it with the absorbance of...adhesion was evaluated by the BioFilm ring test (Biofilm Control, St Beauzire, France...

Carmen Puig; Arnau Domenech; Junkal Garmendia; Jeroen D. Langereis; Pascal Mayer; Laura Calatayud; Josefina Liñares; Carmen Ardanuy; Sara Marti

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: Microalgal biofilm based technologies are of keen interest due to their high biomass concentrations and ability to utilize renewable resources, such as light and CO2. While photoautotrophic biofilms have long been used for wastewater remediation applications, biofuel production represents a relatively new and under-represented focus area. However, the direct measurement and characterization of fundamental parameters required for physiological analyses are challenging due to biofilm heterogeneity. This study evaluated oxygenic photosynthesis and biofuel precursor molecule production using a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) operated at field- and laboratory-scales for wastewater remediation and biofuel production, respectively. Clear differences in oxygenic-photosynthesis, respiration and biofuel-precursor capacities were observed between the two systems and different conditions based on light and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen depletion was not found to have the same effect on lipid accumulation compared to prior planktonic studies. Physiological characterizations of these microalgal biofilms identify potential areas for future process optimization.

Bernstein, Hans C.; Kesaano, Maureen; Moll, Karen; Smith, Terence; Gerlach, Robin; Carlson, Ross; Miller, Charles D.; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith; Gardner, Robert D.; Sims, Ronald C.

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

Smith, Hal

125

Cover image: Research within Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Chemical Imaging Initiative is characterizing chemical and physical interactions of biofilms produced by microbes. This information is used to provide insight on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth biofilm fermenter. #12;Douglas Ray, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director Fundamental, energy materials and processes, and atmospheric aerosol research. Our technical leadership of another DOE fundamental research and technology development of natural and engineered biological systems in the laboratory

126

Microscale geochemical gradients in Hanford 300 Area sediment biofilms and influence of uranium  

SciTech Connect

The presence and importance of microenvironments in the subsurface at contaminated sites were suggested by previous geochemical studies. However, no direct quantitative characterization of the geochemical microenvironments had been reported. We quantitatively characterized microscale geochemical gradients (dissolved oxygen (DO), H(2), pH, and redox potential) in Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms. Our results revealed significant differences in geochemical parameters across the sediment biofilm/water interface in the presence and absence of U(VI) under oxic and anoxic conditions. While the pH was relatively constant within the sediment biofilm, the redox potential and the DO and H(2) concentrations were heterogeneous at the microscale (<500-1000 ?m). We found microenvironments with high DO levels (DO hotspots) when the sediment biofilm was exposed to U(VI). On the other hand, we found hotspots (high concentrations) of H(2) under anoxic conditions both in the presence and in the absence of U(VI). The presence of anoxic microenvironments inside the sediment biofilms suggests that U(VI) reduction proceeds under bulk oxic conditions. To test this, we operated our biofilm reactor under air-saturated conditions in the presence of U(VI) and characterized U speciation in the sediment biofilm. U L(III)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed that 80-85% of the U was in the U(IV) valence state.

Nguyen, Hung D.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Proteomics  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of EPS with redox-active metals and radionuclides. Both bound and loosely associated EPS were extracted from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms prepared using a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, membrane lipids, and fatty acids in both bound and loosely associated EPS. Using a global proteomic approach, a total of 58 extracellular and outer membrane proteins were identified in the EPS. These included homologues of multiple S. oneidensis MR-1 proteins that potentially contribute to key physiological biofilm processes, such as biofilm-promoting protein BpfA, surface-associated serine protease, nucleotidases (CpdB and UshA), an extracellular lipase, and oligopeptidases (PtrB and a M13 family oligopeptidase lipoprotein). In addition, 20 redox proteins were found in extracted EPS. Among the detected redox proteins were the homologues of two S. oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA, which have been implicated in extracellular electron transfer. Given their detection in the EPS of Shewanella sp. HRCR 1 biofilms, c-type cytochromes may contribute to the possible redox activity of the biofilm matrix and play important roles in extracellular electron transfer reactions.

Cao, Bin; Shi, Liang; Brown, Roslyn N.; Xiong, Yijia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a Model for Understanding Bacterial Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial Mercury Methylation Contact: Cynthia Gilmour (gilmourc@si.edu, 443-482-2498) DOE/Office of Science/Biological & Environmental Research ·The ORNL Mercury Science Focus Area is developing the Hg-methylating bacterium as a model for understanding bacterial mercury methylation. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 77:3938-3951 (doi:10

129

PREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes Samuel Hiard, The Netherlands Received 27 March 2007 Available online 12 April 2007 Abstract In the post-genomic area Elements Detector), a tool developed for predicting regulons of DNA-binding proteins in bacterial genomes

Wehenkel, Louis

130

X-ray Microtomography Developed high Z element staining to enhance the visualization of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

influence larger, pore-scale environmental processes Develop fundamental correlative capabilities of subsurface biofilms from DOE- BER Early Career Research Award (5 years, $2.5M) Apply approaches to pursue

131

Effect of Chemical Speciation on Toxicity of Mercury to Escherichia coli Biofilms and Planktonic Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Chemical Speciation on Toxicity of Mercury to Escherichia coli Biofilms and Planktonic Cells ... charged forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl3-/HgCl42-) induced less light prodn. ...

Isaac Najera; Chu-Ching Lin; Golenaz Adeli Kohbodi; Jennifer A. Jay

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

Augmented survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae within biofilms: exposure to atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bacteria embedded within biofilms present a challenge to surface decontamination by conventional means. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma processes have emerged as a promising approach to overcoming this pr...

L. Xu; Y. Tu; Y. Yu; M. Tan; J. Li; H. Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Inactivation of Microorganisms in Model Biofilms by an Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Non-thermal Plasma  

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Non-thermal plasma jet formed by self-running pulsed-periodical ... current spark generator (PPSG) was used for atmospheric pressure inactivation of microorganisms including biofilms. A ... the PPSG is a formatio...

Yuri Akishev; N. Trushkin; M. Grushin…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Wastewater Treatment Bruce E. Rittmann, Robert Nerenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Wastewater Treatment Bruce E. Rittmann, RobertCarty 2001). If soluble organic nitrogen can be held to a few tenths of a mg/L, the total N can

Nerenberg, Robert

135

Capture and Retention of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms  

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...R. Sterling. 1987. Isolation of Cryptosporidium parvum...in biofilms formed in a pilot-scale water distribution...Cryptosporidium parvum isolation & purification pathogenicity...physiology Humans Oocysts isolation & purification pathogenicity...

Kristin E. Searcy; Aaron I. Packman; Edward R. Atwill; Thomas Harter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Coaggregation by the Freshwater Bacterium Sphingomonas natatoria Alters Dual-Species Biofilm Formation  

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...has been isolated from swimming pools, deep-ice boreholes...source of carbon and energy. Another study that...occurs with enhanced efficiency in biofilms and induces...bacteria isolated from a swimming pool. J. Appl. Bacteriol...

K. R. Min; A. H. Rickard

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm bacteria Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of bacteria that are held... and secretion of EPSs, but although some bacteria switch on EPS production at high cell densities in biofilms... , other bacteria switch it off. Nadell...

138

Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A new technique for the performance evaluation of clean-in-place disinfection of biofilms  

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A concentric cylinder reactor (CCR) is described that enables the steady-state kinetics of microbial biofilms to be evaluated under conditions of constant nutrient flow and variable shear-stress. The reactor h...

L Willcock; P Gilbert; J Holah; G Wirtanen…

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The dynamics of surface detachment and quorum sensing in spatially controlled biofilm colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofilms represent a highly successful life strategy of bacteria in a very broad range of environments and often have negative implications for industrial and clinical applications, as their removal from surfaces and the ...

Jang, Hongchul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biofilm reactors Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A&M University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

142

Multidimensional Modeling of the Hydrogen-Based, Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Denitrification of Potable and Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Potable and Wastewater Kelly Martin, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Notre Dame Monday, February 24, 2013 4 oxidized contaminants from drinking water and wastewater. A promising option, the membrane biofilm reactor

Kamat, Vineet R.

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chair... of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by quorum sensing inhibition Caol Huff, CBE PhD Candidate, Chemistry 10... :30-10:50 Break 10:50-11:10 Dormant cells in Pseudomonas ......

144

Metabolic Differentiation in Biofilms as Indicated by Carbon Dioxide Production Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metabolic activity. The effect of air bubbles on biofilm stability has mostly been studied in a dental...namely, collision efficiency, bubble-bacteria attachment efficiency, and the stability of the bubble-bacteria aggregate. For a bubble...

Elanna Bester; Otini Kroukamp; Gideon M. Wolfaardt; Leandro Boonzaaier; Steven N. Liss

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

MECHANICAL GERMINATION OF BACTERIAL SPORES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacterial spores in water,5 (e) an apparent...variety of different treatments with- out an apparent...procedure employing electrodialysis.8 The present paper...sterile deion- ized water, and stored in water...now killed by the heat treatment where none was killed...

L. J. Rode; J. W. Foster

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Oxygen Limitation within a Bacterial Aggregate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...standard deviation of the average of cells exposed to 2...and Doring G. 2002. Effects of reduced mucus oxygen...Lewandowski Z. 1994. Effects of biofilm structures...Dietrich LE , Okegbe C, Price-Whelan A, Sakhtah...capability. Energy Fuels 20 :1565-1571. doi...

Aimee K. Wessel; Talha A. Arshad; Mignon Fitzpatrick; Jodi L. Connell; Roger T. Bonnecaze; Jason B. Shear; Marvin Whiteley

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Metagenome Survey of a Multispecies and Alga-Associated Biofilm Revealed Key Elements of Bacterial-Algal Interactions in Photobioreactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microalgae as biodiesel and biomass feedstocks...cultivation of algae. Bioresour. Technol...studies towards biodiesel production. J...and haptophyte algae. Am. J. Bot...Smith. 2010. Biodiesel from algae: challenges and...

Ines Krohn-Molt; Bernd Wemheuer; Malik Alawi; Anja Poehlein; Simon Güllert; Christel Schmeisser; Andreas Pommerening-Röser; Adam Grundhoff; Rolf Daniel; Dieter Hanelt; Wolfgang R. Streit

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Metagenome Survey of a Multispecies and Alga-Associated Biofilm Revealed Key Elements of Bacterial-Algal Interactions in Photobioreactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...downstream processing of biofuels and/or other valuable...and released by the algae. Published ahead...C1-Chemistry in Resource and Energy Management (C1-REM...mass cultivation of algae. Bioresour. Technol...a raw material for biofuels production. J. Ind...

Ines Krohn-Molt; Bernd Wemheuer; Malik Alawi; Anja Poehlein; Simon Güllert; Christel Schmeisser; Andreas Pommerening-Röser; Adam Grundhoff; Rolf Daniel; Dieter Hanelt; Wolfgang R. Streit

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community  

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...min (ultrasonic cleaner, model 2210; Branson Ultrasonics...ANOVA) using JMP statistical software (version 10; SAS Institute...analysis (62). R statistical software (version 2.15.1 for Windows...boreal streams during a spring flood. Limnol. Oceanogr. 45...

Suchismita Ghosh; Laura G. Leff

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...High DON bioavailability in boreal streams during a spring flood. Limnol. Oceanogr. 45 :1298-1307. 32. Mulholland...organic nitrogen in minimally disturbed montane streams of Colorado, U. S. A. Biogeochemistry 74 :303-321. 44. Chrost...

Suchismita Ghosh; Laura G. Leff

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of best management practices are critical to implementing these efforts. Through more than 130Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along with low dissolved and participation vital to developing and implementing watershed-protection plans. Economic and Environmental

152

Long-Term Succession of Structure and Diversity of a Biofilm Formed in a Model Drinking Water Distribution System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Jorgensen, T. M; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Triclosan causes toxic effects to algae in marine biofilms, but does not inhibit the metabolic activity of marine biofilm bacteria  

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Abstract Effects of the antimicrobial agent triclosan to natural periphyton communities (biofilms, comprising primarily microalgae and bacteria) were assessed in two independent experiments during spring and summer. For that purpose a semi-static test system was used in which periphyton was exposed to a concentration range of 5–9054 nmol/L triclosan. Effects on algae were analyzed as content and composition of photosynthetic pigments. The corresponding EC50 values were 39.25 and 302.45 nmol/L for the spring and summer experiment, respectively. Effects on periphytic bacteria were assessed as effects on carbon utilization patterns, using Biolog Ecoplates. No inhibition of either total carbon utilization or functional diversity was observed, indicating a pronounced triclosan tolerance of the marine bacteria. In contrast, a small stimulation of the total carbon utilization was observed at triclosan concentrations exceeding 100 nmol/L.

C. Henrik Johansson; Lisa Janmar; Thomas Backhaus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Why sequence denitrifying bacterial isolates?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

denitrifying bacterial isolates? denitrifying bacterial isolates? Nitrates are contaminants at nuclear waste sites and can also seep into the groundwater from sources such as agricultural runoff, wastewater treatment plants and septic tanks. As the increasing global population boosts demand for drinking water, it is important to maintain and protect these resources. Photo: courtesy of Stefan Green The project calls for sequencing six anaerobic bacteria samples known to be capable of breaking down nitrate contaminants that have been isolated from the Oak Ridge-Integrated Field Research Center, one of the sites established by the U.S. Department of Energy to study the roles various microbes play in breaking down environmental contaminants over time. From a bioremediative perspective, the genomic information could be used to

155

Electromagnetic Signals from Bacterial DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical reactions can be induced at a distance due to the propagation of electromagnetic signals during intermediate chemical stages. Although is is well known at optical frequencies, e.g. photosynthetic reactions, electromagnetic signals hold true for muck lower frequencies. In E. coli bacteria such electromagnetic signals can be generated by electric transitions between energy levels describing electrons moving around DNA loops. The electromagnetic signals between different bacteria within a community is a "wireless" version of intercellular communication found in bacterial communities connected by "nanowires". The wireless broadcasts can in principle be of both the AM and FM variety due to the magnetic flux periodicity in electron energy spectra in bacterial DNA orbital motions.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava; S. Sivasubramanian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

156

PA2663 (PpyR) increases biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 through the psl operon and stimulates virulence and quorum-sensing phenotypes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To explore the mechanism by which PA2663 induces biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa, differential gene expression in biofilms was performed. The most striking changes in gene expression were found in the genes re...

Can Attila; Akihiro Ueda; Thomas K. Wood

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry evaluations, a more complete understanding of the balance between system additions (nutrients, groundwater) and biology can be achieved, thus increasing long-term predictions of performance. These analyses uniquely provide information that can be used in optimizing the overall performance, efficiency, and stability of the system both in real time as well as over the long-term, as the system design is altered or improved and/or new streams are added.

Lee, Michelle H.; Saurey, Sabrina D.; Lee, Brady D.; Parker, Kent E.; Eisenhauer, Emalee ER; Cordova, Elsa A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

SEED: ATP metabolism and its impact on biofilms Principal Investigators: Mark P. Brynildsen and A. James Link  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEED: ATP metabolism and its impact on biofilms Principal Investigators: Mark P. Brynildsen and A was to define the role of ATP metabolism in the formation, physiology, and material properties of biofilms. Using computational and experimental approaches we found that efficient ATP production and consumption

Petta, Jason

159

HYDROGEN-BASED, HOLLOW-FIBER MEMBRANE BIOFILM REACTOR FOR REDUCTION OF PERCHLORATE AND OTHER OXIDIZED CONTAMINANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROGEN-BASED, HOLLOW-FIBER MEMBRANE BIOFILM REACTOR FOR REDUCTION OF PERCHLORATE AND OTHER be added. Hydrogen is an ideal electron donor, as it is non-toxic, inexpensive, and sparsely soluble. We tested a hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for reduction of perchlorate

Nerenberg, Robert

160

Bacterial Alpha Amylase Paper Disc Tests on Starch Agar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles Bacterial Alpha Amylase Paper Disc Tests on Starch Agar Egon Stark Ralph...Mass. Bacterial Alpha Amylase Paper Disc Tests on Starch Agar EGON STARK...hydrolysis of soluble starch by a bacterial alpha-amylase preparation, so...

Egon Stark; Ralph Wellerson Jr.; Philip A. Tetrault; Carl F. Kossack

1953-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation  

SciTech Connect

Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

Picardal, F.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Fatty Acid Messenger Is Responsible for Inducing Dispersion in Microbial Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Biofilms Published ahead of print on 12 December 2008. David...maintained in equilibrium with atmospheric pressure by a 0.2-mum-pore-size...Analyzes was performed in a 300 MHz Proton NMR-Bruker AC 300...Pseudomonas aeruginosa degrade plasma proteins and extracellular...

David G. Davies; Cláudia N. H. Marques

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms on Aluminum 2024 and Brass in Different Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms on Aluminum 2024 and Brass in Different Media F. Mansfeld,a, *,z H. Hsu,a D. O¨ rnek,b T. K. Wood,b and B. C. Syrettc a Corrosion and Environmental Effects Institute, Palo Alto, California 94303, USA The corrosion behavior of Al 2024-T3 and C26000 brass exposed

Wood, Thomas K.

164

Corrosion control using regenerative biofilms (CCURB) on brass in different media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion control using regenerative biofilms (CCURB) on brass in different media D. OOrnek a , T of Chemical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion and Environmental The corrosion behavior of cartridge brass (UNS C26000) exposed to artificial seawater (AS) and Luria Bertani (LB

Wood, Thomas K.

165

Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms for continuous power generation in microbial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms on granular activated carbon (GAC) particles. Particles were fluidized in the anode chamber for electricity was sustained by inter- mittent contact of charged particles with the anode. Higher power was obtained by flu

166

Catalytic biofilm formation by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and anode characterization by expanded uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, high-density planktonic cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are grown aerobically to early stationary phase. After washing the cells and removing from original medium, the culture is exposed to an anaerobic environment in an electrochemical cell. An applied potential of ?0.30 V vs Ag/AgCl is applied to the working electrode and the corresponding current is measured via chronoamperometry. Current begins to increase within 2–3 h stabilizing at 5 h. Cyclic voltammetry was measured at 5 h indicating the initial stages a kinetically limited biofilm and again at 24 h with an apparently more stable catalytic biofilm. At this point, the biofilm appears to suffer mass transport limitation as the catalytic wave dominates the shape of the voltammogram, similar to voltammograms reported for Geobacter spp. Polarization curves are also reported herein, further demonstrating a large increase of current near the oxidation potential of what is believed to be the terminal protein complex (MtrC/OmcA) of the trans-membrane cytochrome cascade, the Mtr pathway. Additional characterization and comparison between replicates of the biofilm is made using the idea of expanded uncertainty. This novel approach in reporting measured results for microbial fuel cells elucidates specific electrochemical parameters for appropriate comparison between systems and laboratories.

Jared N. Roy; Sofia Babanova; Kristen E. Garcia; Jose Cornejo; Linnea K. Ista; Plamen Atanassov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Localized cell death focuses mechanical forces during 3D patterning in a biofilm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...result of treatment with an...biological systems, including...self-organization through control over localized...sequencing and integrated into the chromosome...Mechanical control of tissue and organ...organogenesis in the plant shoot apical meristem...2008 ) Control of cell fate...Toxin-antitoxin systems influence biofilm...capacity, k, waste products, w...

Munehiro Asally; Mark Kittisopikul; Pau Rué; Yingjie Du; Zhenxing Hu; Tolga Ça?atay; Andra B. Robinson; Hongbing Lu; Jordi Garcia-Ojalvo; Gürol M. Süel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

When to clean and how to clean biofilms in heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and gas penetration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2011, 108, 995-1000. [19] Marchand, S., De Block, J., De Jonghe, V., Coorevits, A., Heyndrickx, M., Herman, L. Biofilm formation in milk production...

Pogiatzis, T.A.; Vassiliadis, V.S.; Mergulhão, F.J.; Wilson, D.I.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optically Transparent Porous Medium for Nondestructive Studies of Microbial Biofilm Architecture and Transport Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1998. Handbook of polymers. Wiley-Interscience...Busscher. 1999. Models for studying initial...Ever see a water flood? Oil Gas J. 59...A new colloidal model system to study long-range...colloids within a model porous medium. Biofilms...0 Culture Media 0 Polymers 9002-84-0 Polytetrafluoroethylene...

Andrew P. Leis; Sven Schlicher; Hilmar Franke; Martin Strathmann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Architecture of a Nascent Sphingomonas sp. Biofilm under Varied Hydrodynamic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...LSM 410 confocal system with a Zeiss Axiovert...Flow cells are ideal tools for the generation...presented a method for assessment of experimental reproducibility...extremely heterogeneous systems (65) and, therefore...interactions in biofilm systems: an overview. Water...microscopy as experimental tools. Spatial and temporal...

V. P. Venugopalan; M. Kuehn; M. Hausner; D. Springael; P. A. Wilderer; S. Wuertz

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biofilm (ED). (A) Borehole 130; (B) ventilation...similar to those found in borehole 130 were also seen...originally been used for drilling and construction activities...floor, so when the borehole was excavated it provided...B-polyhydroxybutyrate (identified by large size and by C and 0...

D. Ann Brown; D. Choudari Kamineni; Jerzy A. Sawicki; Terry J. Beveridge

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...studied by measuring concentration...simple one-dimensional diffusion...oxic-anoxic interface, although...technique for measuring sulfate reduction...20 C) in standard pH buffers...checked for by measuring several microprofiles...biofilm-water interface and through...law of one-dimensional diffusion...

Michael Kühl; Bo Barker Jørgensen

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor for reduction of perchlorate and other oxidized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor for reduction of perchlorate and other. For drinking water treatment, an electron donor must be added. Hydrogen is an ideal electron donor, as it is non-toxic, inexpensive, and sparsely soluble. We tested a hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane

Nerenberg, Robert

174

Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial wastewater Jennifer L. Shore a,b , William S. M'Coy b , Claudia K. Gunsch a , Marc A. Deshusses a 2012 Available online 17 February 2012 Keywords: Moving bed biofilm reactor Industrial wastewater and industrial wastewater. No biotreatment was observed at 45 °C, although effective nitrification was rapidly

175

Measurements of the distribution of adenylate concentrations and adenylate energy charge across Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increase in adenylate energy charge of about 0.2...the biofilm. However, energy charge values were generally...indicator of the energetic status of living cells is the...sensitivity would allow us to measure adenylates...intermediate carriers of chemical energy linking catabo- lism...

S L Kinniment; J W Wimpenny

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching  

SciTech Connect

The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH  

SciTech Connect

Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

Hobbs, D.

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Interaction Between Toxic Metals and Complex Biofilm/Mineral/Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights highlights title by Alexis S. Templeton, Thomas P. Trainor, and Gordon E. Brown, Jr., Stanford University Sorption reactions on particle surfaces can dramatically affect the speciation, cycling and bioavailability of essential micronutrients (i.e. PO43-, Cu, Zn etc.) and toxic metals and metalloids (i.e. Pb, Hg, Se, As) in soils and aquatic environments. Considerable attention has been focused on understanding metal sorption reactions at a molecular/mechanistic level and the effects of metal concentration, pH, ionic strength, and complexing ligands on the ways in which metal ions bind to the surfaces of common mineral phases such as Fe-, Mn- and Al-(hydr)oxides and clays. However, a significant fraction of mineral surfaces in natural environments are extensively colonized by microbial organisms, which can also be potent sorbents for metals due to the large number of reactive functional groups that decorate the cell walls and outer membranes of bacterial surfaces.

179

Bacterial reduction of selenite to elemental selenium  

SciTech Connect

Toxic species of selenium are pollutants found in agricultural as well as oil refinery waste streams. Selenium contamination is particularly problematic in areas which have seleniferous subsurface geology, such as the central valley of California. We are developing a bacterial treatment system to address the selenium problem using Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, as model Gram (+) and (-) soil bacteria. We have found that, during growth, both organisms reduce selenite, a major soluble toxic species, to red elemental selenium--an insoluble product generally regarded as nontoxic. In both cases, reduction depended on the growth substrate and was effected by an inducible system that effectively removed selenite at concentrations typical of polluted sites--i.e. 50 to 300 ppb. The bacteria studied differed in one respect: when grown in media supplemented with nitrate or sulfate, the ability of P. fluorescens to remediate selenite was enhanced, whereas that of B. subtilis was unchanged. Current efforts are being directed toward understanding the biochemical mechanism(s) of detoxification, and determining whether bacteria occurring in polluted environments such as soils and sludge systems are capable of selenite remediation.

Leighton, T.; Buchanan, B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Heavy Metals  

SciTech Connect

Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a Gramnegative sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB), and the physiology of SRBs can impact many anaerobic environments including radionuclide waste sites, oil reservoirs and metal pipelines. In an attempt to understand D. vulgaris as a population that can adhere to surfaces, D. vulgaris cultures were grown in a defined medium and analysed for carbohydrate production, motility and biofilm formation. Desulfovibrio vulgaris wild-type cells had increasing amounts of carbohydrate into stationary phase and approximately half of the carbohydrate remained internal. In comparison, a mutant that lacked the 200 kb megaplasmid, strain DMP, produced less carbohydrate and the majority of carbohydrate remained internal of the cell proper. To assess the possibility of carbohydrate re-allocation, biofilm formation was investigated. Wild-type cells produced approximately threefold more biofilm on glass slides compared with DMP; however, wild-type biofilm did not contain significant levels of exopolysaccharide. In addition, stains specific for extracellular carbohydrate did not reveal polysaccharide material within the biofilm. Desulfovibrio vulgaris wild-type biofilms contained long filaments as observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the biofilm-deficient DMP strain was also deficient in motility. Biofilms grown directly on silica oxide transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids did not contain significant levels of an exopolysaccharide matrix when viewed with TEM and SEM, and samples stained with ammonium molybdate also showed long filaments that resembled flagella. Biofilms subjected to protease treatments were degraded, and different proteases that were added at the time of inoculation inhibited biofilm formation. The data indicated that D. vulgaris did not produce an extensive exopolysaccharide matrix, used protein filaments to form biofilm between cells and silica oxide surfaces, and the filaments appeared to be flagella. It is likely that D. vulgaris used flagella for more than a means of locomotion to a surface, but also used flagella, or modified flagella, to establish and/or maintain biofilm structure.

Fields, Matthew W [Montana State University

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Phylogeny of bacterial methylotrophy genes reveals robustness in Methylobacterium mxaF sequences and mxa operon construction  

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mxaF, the structural gene for the methanol dehydrogenase (MDH enzyme), encodes for alpha subunit of the MDH enzyme. This member of the mxa family is required for production of a functional MDH enzyme. Methylobacterium species, pink-pigmented facultatively methylotrophic bacteria (PPFMs), are plant colonizing, methylotrophic bacteria that utilize methanol as a carbon and energy source during phyllosphere and rhizosphere growth. In a previous study that examined the phylogeny of soil and blueberry skin biofilm isolates, mxaF sequence was found to be a more useful indicator of species distinction within the Methylobacterium genus than 16S rRNA gene sequence and that it was not influenced by several environmental properties, including pH. Here, the phylogeny of methylotrophy genes including mxaF is examined to assess the potential for use of mxaF sequence as a biomarker for the Methylobacterium genus. A phylogenetic comparison of 311 archived PPFM and non-PPFM GenBank bacterial sequences of mxaF, xoxF, and generically annotated PQQ-dependent dehydrogenase genes in the methanol/ethanol family was conducted, including 270 mxaF, mxaF? and mxaF-like sequences. In addition, construction of operons within the mxa gene family was compared using GenBank completed genome sequences to investigate potential horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events within the mxa methylotrophy system. mxaF sequence and mxa gene family operon construction was found to be highly conserved within the genus Methylobacterium as compared to other bacterial genera. The data reveal evidence of HGT events between Methylobacterium species and other bacterial genera as well as the potential for mxaF sequence to be used as a taxonomic indicator for environmental Methylobacterium strains.

Jennifer Kist; Robert L. Tate III

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Bioreduction of Trichloroethene Using a Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor  

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We measured the sulfate concentration using a capillary ion analyzer (CIA, Millipore Corp., Milford, MA) and the dissolved sulfide concentration in the aqueous phase using a colorimetric method based on methylene blue (58). ... We extracted DNA from the biofilm sample using the Ultra Clean soil DNA kit (MoBio Laboratories Inc., Solana Beach, CA), which includes bead beating and a spin-column purification step (61). ...

Jinwook Chung; Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown; Bruce; E. Rittmann

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Microalgal biofilms on common yew needles in relation to anthropogenic air pollution in urban Prague, Czech Republic  

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Abstract Excessive occurrence of microalgae on needles of gymnosperms was reported for the first time in the 1980s from the Scandinavian countries. Since then, it has been repeatedly encountered on needles from various European forest habitats. The abundance of these biofilms has been related to the climatic conditions, such as temperature and precipitation, as well as to the air pollution by nitrogen and sulfur oxides. Urban areas typically have relatively homogenous climates and profound variation in levels of air pollution. Therefore, variation in the occurrence of biofilms in localities within an urban area may be related to local anthropogenic air pollution. We investigated the abundance of biofilms occurring on needles of the common yew (Taxus baccata) in the city of Prague, Czech Republic. The biofilms were composed of algae, fungi and particulate matter. The cover area of the biofilms was marginally explained by a positive influence of short-term maximum atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The amounts of the microalgae were also positively influenced by short-term maximum NO2 levels. In addition, high atmospheric levels of particulate matter (PM10) were related to low abundance of algae. The microbial biofilms growing on widely cultivated conifers, such as the common yew, form one of the few commonly occurring natural communities in highly urbanized central areas of temperate European cities. Consequently, we propose that microscopic analysis of biofilms may be used as a rapid and cheap method to collect ecological data. Such data may be used in biomonitoring schemes illustrating the effects of anthropogenic air pollution on natural microcommunities in urban areas.

Radka Nováková; Ji?í Neustupa

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Bacterial Resistance to Antisense Peptide Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomers  

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...phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) are synthetic DNA mimics that bind cRNA and inhibit bacterial gene expression...phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) are synthetic DNA mimics that bind cRNA and inhibit bacterial gene expression...

Susan E. Puckett; Kaleb A. Reese; Georgi M. Mitev; Valerie Mullen; Rudd C. Johnson; Kyle R. Pomraning; Brett L. Mellbye; Lucas D. Tilley; Patrick L. Iversen; Michael Freitag; Bruce L. Geller

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Selective Value of Bacterial Shape  

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...bacteria pursue free-swimming algae by detecting tiny...is essential in open waters where bacteria have only...times their own volume of water every hour (246). At this rate, the entire water column may be filtered...flagellates reduces bacterial recovery between 60 and 97...

Kevin D. Young

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print Wednesday, 31 January 2007 00:00 For the first time, scientists have determined the structure of the initiator of bacterial DNA replication. It is already known that such replication is controlled by a protein known as DnaA, a member of the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. What has now been discovered is that the core of the initiator is not the closed-ring structure expected for this system. Instead, DnaA forms an open right-handed helix. In addition, the architecture indicates that this AAA+ superhelix will wrap coils of the DNA around its exterior, causing the DNA double helix to deform as a first step in the separation and unwinding of its strands. Eukaryotic and archaeal initiators also have the structural elements that promote open-helix formation, indicating that a spiral, open-ring AAA+ assembly is a conserved element from a common evolutionary ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.

188

Influence of genetic background, races of the pathogen and plant parts on evaluation of resistance to bacterial blight of cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system for evaluating resistance as given by Bird and Hadley (3). 50 20. 21. 22. Grading system developed for evaluating stem and boll resistance to bacterial blight, . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . 51 Frequency distributions of disease grades.... The 84 gene was additive in its effects with 82 and 83. The immunity of Multani cotton (G. arboreum) to bacterial blight was shown to depend on the B4 gene, accompanied by a strong complex of minor genes designated 85m (24). The BBm complex...

Pool, William Larry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Binding of Harvested Bacterial Exopolymers to the Surface of Calcite  

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In this study, natural alkaliphilic microbial isolates were collected from biofilms on historic limestone. ... The microbial samples were collected from the dark interior of Tomb 25, Athienou Archaeological Project, Mal loura, Cyprus. ... Glycosyl composition and linkage analysis were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (38) of partially methylated alditol acetates (39). ...

Thomas D. Perry; IV; Vanja Klepac-Ceraj; Xiang V. Zhang; Christopher J. McNamara; Martin F. Polz; Scot T. Martin; Neal Berke; Ralph Mitchell

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

190

Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

Judy D. Wall

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF BACTERIAL MOLECULAR NETWORKS  

SciTech Connect

The project examined a number of aspects of complex bacterial networks, their architecture, topology, dynamics and design principles.

Andrey Rzhetsky; Dimitris Anastassiou

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bacterial cooperation controlled by mobile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bacterial cooperation controlled by mobile elements: kin selection online 27 July 2011 Genes involved in bacterial cooperation and virulence are overrepresented on mobile elements (Nogueira et al., 2009). This highlights the importance of gene mobility in bacterial social

Rankin, Daniel

193

2012 Land Grant and Sea Grant National Water Conference Bacterial Detection and Tracking Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Land Grant and Sea Grant National Water Conference Bacterial Detection and Tracking Symposium-based interdisciplinary major. She recently was awarded a $4.4 million grant from the USDA, part of a $40 million regional grant, to develop Bioenergy education at OSU and regionally. She received a BA in Biology from Yale

194

Rapid Screening Method for Analyzing the Conjugated Linoleic Acid Production Capabilities of Bacterial Cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...highlighted. FIG. 1. Standard curves for the absorbance...calculated from the standard curve for bacterial...National Development Plan 2000-2006 and by...Stanton. 2004. Mining the microbiota of...dairy products-a review. Int. Dairy J...compares well with the standard gas-liquid chromatography...

E. Barrett; R. P. Ross; G. F. Fitzgerald; C. Stanton

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these sources is needed to target best management practices and develop bacterial total maximum daily loads significant environmental challenges of the new millen- nium. According to the 2010 Texas Water Quality and current practices, scientific advances and improvements in application. Collaborators · Texas Agri

196

Salmonella Biofilm Development Depends on the Phosphorylation Status of RcsB  

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...DNA from E. coli was purified with a Quantum Prep plasmid kit (Bio-Rad). Plasmids...than just a two-component pathway. Future Microbiol. 5 :1173-1184. 4. Clarke...binding protein YcgR controls flagellar motor direction and speed to affect chemotaxis...

Cristina Latasa; Begoña García; Maite Echeverz; Alejandro Toledo-Arana; Jaione Valle; Susana Campoy; Francisco García-del Portillo; Cristina Solano; Iñigo Lasa

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development and Characterization of an In Vivo Central Venous Catheter Candida albicans Biofilm Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...network of extracellular polymers produced by the involved...been limited to in vitro models. An immense amount of...surface conditioning into models, it would be extremely...voriconazole in an in vitro model of Candida catheter-related...Livak, K. J., S. J. Flood, J. Marmaro, W. Giusti...

D. Andes; J. Nett; P. Oschel; R. Albrecht; K. Marchillo; A. Pitula

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method development for enhanced antifouling testing using novel natural products against marine biofilms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Marine biofouling is the accumulation of organisms on underwater surfaces, causing increased ship hydrodynamic drag, which results in higher fuel consumption and decreased speed and… (more)

Salta, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Role of protein acetylation, formation and dispersal of biofilms, and their impact on insects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. coli K-12 strains. Adhesins Locus Assays for detection curli csgBA Congo red assay (Zhang et al., 2007) flagella flh, flg, fli, and mot operons swimming and swarming motility (Wood et al., 2006; Inoue et al., 2007) type 1 fimbriae fimA yeast... assay using Congo red, calcofluor, and cellulose method (Ma and Wood, 2009) colanic acid wcaK colanic acid assay-using 6-deoxyhexose (Zhang et al., 2008) PGA pgaABCD FPLC (Wang et al., 2005) 10 2.2.2 Biofilm formation and toxin/antitoxin systems...

Ma, Qun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print For the first time, scientists have determined the structure of the initiator of bacterial DNA replication. It is already known that such replication is controlled by a protein known as DnaA, a member of the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. What has now been discovered is that the core of the initiator is not the closed-ring structure expected for this system. Instead, DnaA forms an open right-handed helix. In addition, the architecture indicates that this AAA+ superhelix will wrap coils of the DNA around its exterior, causing the DNA double helix to deform as a first step in the separation and unwinding of its strands. Eukaryotic and archaeal initiators also have the structural elements that promote open-helix formation, indicating that a spiral, open-ring AAA+ assembly is a conserved element from a common evolutionary ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication Print For the first time, scientists have determined the structure of the initiator of bacterial DNA replication. It is already known that such replication is controlled by a protein known as DnaA, a member of the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. What has now been discovered is that the core of the initiator is not the closed-ring structure expected for this system. Instead, DnaA forms an open right-handed helix. In addition, the architecture indicates that this AAA+ superhelix will wrap coils of the DNA around its exterior, causing the DNA double helix to deform as a first step in the separation and unwinding of its strands. Eukaryotic and archaeal initiators also have the structural elements that promote open-helix formation, indicating that a spiral, open-ring AAA+ assembly is a conserved element from a common evolutionary ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.

202

Influence of sulfate reducing bacterial biofilm on corrosion behavior of low-alloy, high-strength steel (API-5L X80)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-strength steel (API-5L X80) Faisal M. AlAbbas a,*, Charles Williamson b , Shaily M. Bhola a , John R. Spear b in revised form 25 October 2012 Accepted 25 October 2012 Available online Keywords: Carbon steel API 5L X80. This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of API 5L X80 linepipe steel by sulfate

203

Effects of biofilms, sunlight, and salinity on corrosion potential and corrosion initiation of stainless alloys  

SciTech Connect

This phenomenon of corrosion potential ennoblement on stainless alloys is well known for full strength seawater. This report presents data on the extent to which that process occurs as a function of salinity and sunlight level for: stainless steels S30400 and S31600; stainless alloys S44735 (29-4C), S44660 (Seacure), NO8367 (6XN) and N10276 (C-276); and R50250 (Ti-Gr2). The results showed that natural population biofilms formed from all salinity waters under low light level conditions were capable of ennobling the corrosion potentials of all test alloys, although R50250 was consistently ennobled the least. Both the amount of ennoblement and the highest steady potential reached were maximized in fresh water and decreased for all alloys with increasing salinity. The critical pitting potentials for all test alloys were measured in coastal seawater. In addition, the critical pitting potentials for alloys S30400 and S31600 were measured (or estimated from the literature) as a function of salinity. The effect of ennoblement on the initiation and propagation of crevice corrosion are currently under investigation. The effect of sunlight on corrosion potential ennoblement was examined for the super alloy N10276 (C-276). Mechanisms by which ennoblement may be affected by sunlight were discussed, and it was hypothesized that the phenomenon may be at least partially understood in terms of pH fluctuations within the biofilm under the influence of periodic changes in the rates of photosynthesis and respiration.

Dexter, S.C.; Zhang, H.-J. (Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (USA). Coll. of Marine Studies)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Development Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

205

Candidate phylum TM6 genome recovered from a hospital sink biofilm provides genomic insights into this uncultivated phylum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and biofilms . J Water Health 7 ( 3 ): 469 – 477...PCR . Int J Hyg Environ Health 213 ( 3 ): 176 – 182 . 17 Feazel...Prochlorococcus clades from iron-depleted oceanic regions . Proc...levels of nitric acid-uranium waste. FEMS Microbiol...National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant 3P41RR024851-02S1...

Jeffrey S. McLean; Mary-Jane Lombardo; Jonathan H. Badger; Anna Edlund; Mark Novotny; Joyclyn Yee-Greenbaum; Nikolay Vyahhi; Adam P. Hall; Youngik Yang; Christopher L. Dupont; Michael G. Ziegler; Hamidreza Chitsaz; Andrew E. Allen; Shibu Yooseph; Glenn Tesler; Pavel A. Pevzner; Robert M. Friedman; Kenneth H. Nealson; J. Craig Venter; Roger S. Lasken

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effect of Green Tea on Streptococcus mutans Metabolic Activity, Planktonic Growth, and Biofilm Activity in the Presence of Nicotine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Green Tea on Streptococcus mutans Metabolic Activity, Planktonic Growth, and Biofilm from dental plaque entering the bloodstream. Green Tea is a commonly consumed beverage, which has been known to reduce the number of dental cavities. Previous research has concluded that green tea contains

Zhou, Yaoqi

207

Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen Toxins Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen Toxins The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Structure-Based Receptor MIMICS Targeted Against Bacterial Superantigen Toxins The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes

208

Growth rate of the major phylogenetic bacterial groups in the ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The phylogenetic composition of bacterial communities varies along the salinity gradient of estuaries, one notable pattern being the prevalence of ...

209

Distribution, size, and bacterial colonization of pico-and nano ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distribution, size, and bacterial colonization of pico- and nano-detrital organic particles (DOP) in two lakes of different trophic status. Carrias, Jean-François ...

210

Reconstruction of a Bacterial Genome from DNA Cassettes  

SciTech Connect

This basic research program comprised two major areas: (1) acquisition and analysis of marine microbial metagenomic data and development of genomic analysis tools for broad, external community use; (2) development of a minimal bacterial genome. Our Marine Metagenomic Diversity effort generated and analyzed shotgun sequencing data from microbial communities sampled from over 250 sites around the world. About 40% of the 26 Gbp of sequence data has been made publicly available to date with a complete release anticipated in six months. Our results and those mining the deposited data have revealed a vast diversity of genes coding for critical metabolic processes whose phylogenetic and geographic distributions will enable a deeper understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling, microbial ecology, and rapid rate evolutionary processes such as horizontal gene transfer by viruses and plasmids. A global assembly of the generated dataset resulted in a massive set (5Gbp) of genome fragments that provide context to the majority of the generated data that originated from uncultivated organisms. Our Synthetic Biology team has made significant progress towards the goal of synthesizing a minimal mycoplasma genome that will have all of the machinery for independent life. This project, once completed, will provide fundamentally new knowledge about requirements for microbial life and help to lay a basic research foundation for developing microbiological approaches to bioenergy.

Christopher Dupont; John Glass; Laura Sheahan; Shibu Yooseph; Lisa Zeigler Allen; Mathangi Thiagarajan; Andrew Allen; Robert Friedman; J. Craig Venter

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Structure and Dynamics of Anaerobic Bacterial Aggregates in a Gas-Lift Reactor  

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...Consequently, the mechanical strength of aggregates is affected...Such mechanical effects by gas bubbles arising within biofilms...shearing forces, cell lysis, gas production, etc.) may...W. F. Kossen. 1980. Gas production by immobilized...

H. H. Beeftink; P. Staugaard

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

Fertin, Guillaume

213

Bacterial phytopathogens and genome science Joa~ o C Setubal1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial phytopathogens and genome science Joa~ o C Setubal1 , Leandro M Moreira2 and Ana CR da Silva3 There are now fourteen completed genomes of bacterial phytopathogens, all of which have been generated in the past six years. These genomes come from a phylogenetically diverse set of organisms

Setubal, João Carlos

214

Apis mellifera semen: bacterial contamination and susceptibility to antibiotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apis mellifera semen: bacterial contamination and susceptibility to antibiotics Cecilia Irene ­ The aims of this study were to identify the bacterial genera and species present in semen of Apis mellifera in sperm samples diluted in buffer with antibiotic was similar to that of pure semen. Apis mellifera

215

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Use of Chemical Oxygen Demand Values of Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification  

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...Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification A. F. Gaudy Jr. M. N...Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification A. F. GAUDY, JR., M...bacterial cells in waste-water purification. Appl. Microbiol. 12:254-260...

A. F. Gaudy Jr.; M. N. Bhatla; E. T. Gaudy

1964-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Trial of a Bacterial Screening System for Rapid Detection of Mutagens and Carcinogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of a Bacterial Screening System for Rapid Detection of Mutagens and Carcinogens...Missouri 63103 A bacterial test system for detection of mutagens and carcinogens...SUMMARY A bacterial test system for detection of mutagens and carcinogens...

Daniel S. Longnecker; Thomas J. Curphey; Susan T. James; Douglas S. Daniel; and Nicholas J. Jacobs

1974-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

biofilms | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S Pin D Mei GK Schenter N Govind DM Camaioni JZ Hu JA Lercher Capabilities: NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Microscopy Molecular...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing bacterial phenotypes Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

online 20 August 2003 A bacterial symbiont... killing; Aphelinidae; Hymenoptera; CFB group 1. INTRODUCTION Vertically transmitted bacterial symbionts... to be responsible...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial rhinosinusitis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reponse to this persistent intraluminal bacterial infection leads... clearance of secretions from the lung and antibiotics to treat the chronic bacterial infection. Recent...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting bacterial community Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: of soil bacteria and documenting how soil bacterial communities are affected by specific environmental... The diversity and biogeography of soil bacterial...

223

Iron-oxidising microbial biofilms as possible causes of increased friction coefficient in intermediate and lower guide vane bearing bushings at a hydroelectric powerplant in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased coefficient of friction led to malfunction of many and destruction of some maintenance-free bushings of intermediate and lower guide vane bearings at a hydroelectric power plant in Brazil. Analysis of surfaces of failed bushings revealed the presence of three types of deposits. The contact zones between bushings and the guide vane axis were covered with a thin black graphite film. The remaining bushing surface was covered by a mix of yellow-red coloured deposits, which contained a large proportion of iron-oxide-rich microbial biofilms, and green-coloured deposits, which consisted largely of copper oxides. Biofilms sampled from both the inside and the outside of the bearings contained 75% iron oxides by weight. The iron oxide deposits produced by these biofilms were identified as the primary cause of increased friction resistance between the bushing surface and the guide vane axis. Iron deposition within biofilms was made possible by the action of iron-reducing bacteria in the anaerobic zone of the reservoir immediately in front of the turbine intakes. These bacteria enriched the anoxic reservoir water with Fe(II) and the relatively small oxygen concentrations in turbine feedwater prevented the complete oxidation of Fe(II) in the penstock. Water-proofing of the bearing seals would prevent water penetration into the bearings and biofilm formation on the bushing surfaces and thus avoid the type of failure observed at this plant.

René Peter Schneider; Lucimara R. da Silva; Helder Brandão; Liutas Martinaitis Ferreira

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nitrogen mineralization by bacterial-feeding nematodes: verification and measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bacterial feeding nematodes excrete N assimilated in excess of that required for growth. Because metabolic and developmental rates differ among nematode species, we hypothesized that their contribution to N mi...

H. Ferris; R.C. Venette; H.R. van der Meulen; S.S. Lau

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Impact of detergent systems on bacterial survival on laundered fabrics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...14) indicated that soil removal and bacterial...factors of water hardness, soil load, wash water temperature...25) and eight control washings without detergent. In...hardness, temperature, and soil load. Both de- tergents...brightener, nonionic surfactant, antiredeposition agent...

J M Jaska; D L Fredell

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modification by surface association of antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the majority of natural situations in which bacteria are found, they are associated with and attached to surfaces. In the presence of moisture and nutrients, they grow to form extensive bacterial films whic...

D G Allison; Dr P Gilbert

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Production of orally immunogenic bacterial protein in transgenic plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRODUCTION OF AN ORALLY IMMUNOGENIC BACTERIAL PROTEIN IN TRANSGENIC PLANTS A Thesis TARIQ ANSARUL HAQ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1996 Major Subject: Biochemistry PRODUCTION OF AN ORALLY IMMUNOGENIC BACTERIAL PROTEIN IN TRANSGENIC PLANTS A Thesis by TARIQ ANSARUL HAQ Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Haq, Tariq Ansarul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

229

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

230

In Situ Hydrocarbon Degradation by Indigenous Nearshore Bacterial Populations  

SciTech Connect

Potential episodic hydrocarbon inputs associated with oil mining and transportation together with chronic introduction of hydrocarbons via urban runoff into the relatively pristine coastal Florida waters poses a significant threat to Florida's fragile marine environment. It is therefore important to understand the extent to which indigenous bacterial populations are able to degrade hydrocarbon compounds and also determine factors that could potentially control and promote the rate at which these compounds are broken down in situ. Previous controlled laboratory experiments carried out by our research group demonstrated that separately both photo-oxidation and cometabolism stimulate bacterial hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected from a chronically petroleum contaminated site in Bayboro Bay, Florida. Additionally, we also demonstrated that stable carbon and radiocarbon abundances of respired CO{sub 2} could be used to trace in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations at this same site. This current proposal had two main objectives: (a) to evaluate the cumulative impact of cometabolism and photo-oxidation on hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected the same site in Bayboro Bay, Florida and (b) to determine if in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations this site could be traced using natural radiocarbon and stable carbon abundances of assimilated bacterial carbon. Funds were used for 2 years of full support for one ESI Ph.D. student, April Croxton. To address our first objective a series of closed system bacterial incubations were carried out using photo-oxidized petroleum and pinfish (i.e. cometabolite). Bacterial production of CO{sub 2} was used as the indicator of hydrocarbon degradation and {delta}{sup 13}C analysis of the resultant CO{sub 2} was used to evaluate the source of the respired CO{sub 2} (i.e. petroleum hydrocarbons or the pinfish cometabolite). Results from these time series experiments demonstrated that short-term exposure of petroleum to UV light enhanced hydrocarbon degradation by 48% over that observed for non-photo-oxidized petroleum. Despite the greater bio-availability of the photo-oxidized over the non-photo-oxidized petroleum, an initial lag in CO{sub 2} production was observed indicating potential phototoxicity of the photo- by-products. {delta}{sup 13}C analysis and mass balance calculations reveal that co-metabolism with pinfish resulted in increased hydrocarbon degradation for both photo-oxidized and non-photo-oxidized petroleum each by over 100%. These results demonstrate the cumulative effect of photo-oxidation and co-metabolism on petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial populations indigenous to systems chronically impacted by hydrocarbon input. To address the second objective of this proposal bacterial concentrates were collected from Bayboro Harbor in April 2001 for nucleic acid extraction and subsequent natural radiocarbon abundance analyses. Unfortunately, however, all of these samples were lost due to a faulty compressor in our -70 freezer. The freezer was subsequently repaired and samples were again collected from Bayboro Harbor in June 2002 and again December 2002. Several attempts were made to extract the nucleic acid samples--however, the student was not able to successfully extract and an adequate amount of uncontaminated nucleic acid samples for subsequent natural radiocarbon abundance measurements of the bacterial carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry (i.e. require at least 50 {micro}g carbon for AMS measurement). Consequently, we were not able to address the second objective of this proposed work.

Cherrier, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Biofilm-Related Infections: Bridging the Gap between Clinical Management and Fundamental Aspects of Recalcitrance toward Antibiotics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...preventive strategies based on fundamental knowledge of mechanisms involved...Antibiofilm strategies arising from fundamental research. Approaches to...that ultimately leads to electronic structure-dependent bacterial...strategies originating from fundamental research Mode of action Comments...

David Lebeaux; Jean-Marc Ghigo; Christophe Beloin

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

WO3 nanorods-modified carbon electrode for sustained electron uptake from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with suppressed biofilm formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon materials are widely used as electrodes for bioelectrochemical systems (BES). However, a thick biofilm tends to grow on the electrode surface during continuous operation, resulting in constrained transport of electrons and nutrients at the cell-electrode interface. In this work, we tackled this problem by adopting a WO3-nanorods modified carbon electrode (C–WO3 nanorods), which completely suppressed the biofilm growth of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1. Moreover, the C–WO3 nanorods exhibited high electric conductivity and strong response to riboflavin. These two factors together make it possible for the C–WO3 nanorods to maintain a sustained, efficient process of electron transfer from the MR-1 planktonic cells. As a consequence, the microbial fuel cells with C–WO3 nanorods anode showed more stable performance than the pure carbon paper and WO3-nanoparticles systems in prolonged operation. This work suggests that WO3 nanorods have the potential to be used as a robust and biofouling-resistant electrode material for practical bioelectrochemical applications.

Feng Zhang; Shi-Jie Yuan; Wen-Wei Li; Jie-Jie Chen; Chi-Chiu Ko; Han-Qing Yu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Different Roles of EIIABMan and EIIGlc in Regulation of Energy Metabolism, Biofilm Development, and Competence in Streptococcus mutans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...catabolism in response to nutrient source...in controlling energy metabolism and...intracellular storage polymers (IPS...of essential energy sources and with...Transformation frequency of S. mutans...by sensing the energy levels of the...availability and, in response, regulating...

Jacqueline Abranches; Melissa M. Candella; Zezhang T. Wen; Henry V. Baker; Robert A. Burne

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Rates of Species Accumulation and Taxonomic Diversification during Phototrophic Biofilm Development Are Controlled by both Nutrient Supply and Current Velocity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2002. Taxonomic richness of stream benthic algae: effects of flood disturbance and nutrients. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47 :1175-1186...171-178. 40. Sousa, W . 1979. Disturbance in marine intertidal boulder fields: the nonequilibrium maintenance of species diversity...

Chad A. Larson; Sophia I. Passy

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

235

Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...detection of secondary antibody with GOD Biotinyl antibody 3 101-3...saturated calomel electrode; GOD, glucose oxidase; EMF, electron...antibody-conjugated magnetic particles were suspended on top of a gold...engineering and developments in particle research are moving this field...

Asif Ahmed; Jo V. Rushworth; Natalie A. Hirst; Paul A. Millner

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

personnel to conduct this study. With the help and cooperation of the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Vernon, a work plan was developed to collect water samples and conduct water quality monitoring every other week at 13 different sites along...

237

Enrichment and Molecular Characterization of a Bacterial Culture That Degrades Methoxy-Methyl Urea Herbicides and Their Aniline Derivatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to identify the bacterial composition of a coculture capable of...changes in bacterial species composition in enrichment cultures prepared...Changes in bacterial species composition in enrichment cultures with...and remediation for retail agrochemical dealers R. Pasquini G...

Said El-Fantroussi

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE-Funded Research on Bacterial Enzyme Could Lead to Cheaper...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE-Funded Research on Bacterial Enzyme Could Lead to Cheaper Biofuel DOE-Funded Research on Bacterial Enzyme Could Lead to Cheaper Biofuel May 28, 2014 - 12:24pm Addthis A...

239

Evidence of a bacterial carbonate coating on plaster samples subjected to the Calcite Bioconcept biomineralization technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence of a bacterial carbonate coating on plaster samples subjected to the Calcite Bioconcept plaster samples. This substrate was chosen in order to unambiguously detect the bacterial carbonate production. Keywords: Coating; bioremediation; carbonate production; plaster; grazing incidence; X

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

Quorum-sensing blockade as a strategy for enhancing host defences against bacterial pathogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacterial conversations: talking, listening and eavesdropping compiled by Ian...and with every foreign medical device inserted into a patient there is...Bacterial conversations: talking, listening and eavesdropping. Figure 1 The...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Degradation of Metal?EDTA Complexes by Resting Cells of the Bacterial Strain DSM 9103  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Degradation of Metal?EDTA Complexes by Resting Cells of the Bacterial Strain DSM 9103 ... Therefore, the influence of EDTA speciation on its utilization by the EDTA-degrading bacterial strain DSM 9103 was investigated. ...

Aidar D. Satroutdinov; Emiliya G. Dedyukhina; Tat‘yana I. Chistyakova; Margarete Witschel; Igor G. Minkevich; Valery K. Eroshin; Thomas Egli

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Abstract: Electron transporting multiheme...

243

Probing Prokaryotic Social Behaviors with Bacterial “Lobster Traps”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...while limiting the exit rate. Fabrication of the bacterial...cover glass of a single-pass flow cell, allowing bacteria...modulate solution flow rates around the cavity, limitations...Tsunami; Spectra-Physics) operating at 740-nm...VWR) within a single-pass flow cell system (42...

Jodi L. Connell; Aimee K. Wessel; Matthew R. Parsek; Andrew D. Ellington; Marvin Whiteley; Jason B. Shear

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Effect of a Fullerene Water Suspension on Bacterial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of a Fullerene Water Suspension on Bacterial Phospholipids and Membrane Phase Behavior J I , A N D P E D R O J . J . A L V A R E Z Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State, Minnesota 55455 Several fullerene-based nanomaterials generate reactive oxygen species that can damage cells

Alvarez, Pedro J.

245

Modeling Bacterial Population Growth from Stochastic Single-Cell Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the Matlab optimization...problem (equation 7), leading...and 32C. Simulation of bacterial...division. The process is then repeated...2004. Simulation of distributed...systems using a Matlab-based method...numerical simulation of stochastic differential equations. SIAM Rev...Appendix. PDF, 45K Supplemental...

Antonio A. Alonso; Ignacio Molina; Constantinos Theodoropoulos

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Changes in assembly processes in soil bacterial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Changes in assembly processes in soil bacterial communities following a wildfire and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA; 2 Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA; 3 Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA

Williams, Mark W.

247

Non-tuberculous mycobacteria, amoebae and bacterial indicators in swimming pool and spa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are microorganisms commonly living in the environment. Nevertheless, most of them are opportunistic pathogens. To verify their concentrations in swimming pool and spa, analyses were performed on water and biofilm samples and the data were correlated to the global microbiological quality of water. The 93% of samples were found positive for the investigated bacteria. All water samples were positive for mycobacteria with higher densities in the whirlpool (105 cfu/L). Swimming pool samples showed variable counts ranging from 29 to 7 × 104 cfu/L while similar levels of mycobacteria (around to 102 cfu/L) characterized water samples from the spa. The 80% of the biofilm samples were positive and one of them was characterized by very high densities (3.7 × 103 cfu/cm2). The most frequently isolated species was Mycobacterium mucogenicum followed by Mycobacterium immunogenum. Free-living amoebae were never detected in swimming pools and in the whirlpool, while they were found in 75% of spa samples and in 67% of biofilm samples. The mean values of heterotrophic bacteria in swimming pool water were similar to those observed in spa water at both temperatures. Higher values were detected in the whirlpool. Microbial indicators of fecal contamination, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were never detected both in water and in biofilm samples. No correlation exists between the monitoring controls carried out by law and the occurrence of mycobacteria that may represent a potential risk in facilities such as those investigated.

Rossella Briancesco; Pierluigi Meloni; Maurizio Semproni; Lucia Bonadonna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Light Conditions Affect the Measurement of Oceanic Bacterial Production via Leucine Uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacterial heterotrophic production (BHP) in aquatic...effect of primary production on bacterial activity...question of how solar radiation influences...through dissolved organic matter (DOM) photochemical...estimate of bacterial production is obtained with...a (mg m3) BN (cells ml1) Syne (cells...

Xosé Anxelu G. Morán; Ramon Massana; Josep M. Gasol

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An adaptive bacterial foraging algorithm for fuzzy entropy based image segmentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper an Adaptive Bacterial Foraging is proposed for fuzzy entropy optimization when it is applied to the segmentation of gray images. The proposed algorithm represents the improved version of classical bacterial foraging algorithm which is a ... Keywords: Bacterial foraging algorithm, Bi level thresholding, Chemotaxis, Fuzzy entropy, Image segmentation

Nandita Sanyal; Amitava Chatterjee; Sugata Munshi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sequential resuspension of biofilm components (viruses, prokaryotes and protists) as measured by erodimetry experiments in the Brouage mudflat (French Atlantic coast)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Resuspension thresholds in terms of friction velocity were experimentally quantified for the prokaryotes, protists and for the first time, viruses of intertidal mudflat biofilms. Differences in resuspension thresholds could be related to the type, behaviour and size of microorganisms and their association with particles. Free microorganisms (viruses, bacteria and some nanoflagellates) were resuspended by weak flow at friction velocities lower than 2 cm s? 1. Chlorophyll a, some nanoflagellates and attached bacteria were resuspended together with the bed's muddy sediment, which required friction velocities larger than 3 cm s? 1. Diatoms smaller than 60 ?m were resuspended at velocities between 3 and 5 cm s? 1, while those larger than 60 ?m were resuspended at higher friction velocities (5.5 to 6.5 cm s? 1). The thresholds of resuspension also depended on the micro-scale position of microorganisms in the sediment (horizontal and vertical distributions). In the field, the vertical distribution of chlorophyll a (a proxy of microphytobenthos) was skewed, with a maximum in the first 2 mm of sediment. Along the neap–spring tidal cycle, chlorophyll a revealed an increase in MPB biomass in the first 2 mm of the sediment, in relation to light increases with exposure durations. The horizontal distribution of chlorophyll a could be inferred from erosion experiments. During the initial phase of biofilm growth, the distribution of chlorophyll a seemed horizontally homogeneous, and was uniformly eroded at the beginning of the increase in chlorophyll a. From these results, we can make a hypothesis: in the subsequent phase of biofilm growth until the maximum of emersion duration, the eroded quantity of chlorophyll a was larger than expected based from chlorophyll a vertical distribution, suggesting that biofilm horizontal distribution became patchy and enriched chlorophyll a was preferentially eroded. When emersion duration and biofilm growth decreased, the trend was reversed, and eroded quantity of chlorophyll a was lower than expected from chlorophyll a vertical distribution, suggesting that areas with low chlorophyll a were preferentially eroded. Such erosion patterns when biofilm growth decreased probably resulted from the bulldozing activity of a surficial sediment bioturbator, the gastropod Peringia ulvae. Our study did not directly prove this horizontal distribution but it should be further discussed. This distribution needs to be studied to acquire real evidence of patchy distributions.

Christine Dupuy; Clarisse Mallet; Katell Guizien; Hélène Montanié; Martine Bréret; Françoise Mornet; Camille Fontaine; Caroline Nérot; Francis Orvain

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Enhancing mass transfer and ethanol production in syngas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 through a monolithic biofilm reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Syngas fermentation is a promising process for producing fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Currently syngas fermentation faces several engineering challenges, with gas-to-liquid mass transfer limitation representing the major bottleneck. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of a monolithic biofilm reactor (MBR) as a novel reactor configuration for syngas fermentation. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) of the MBR was evaluated in abiotic conditions within a wide range of gas flow rates (i.e., gas velocity in monolithic channels) and liquid flow rates (i.e., liquid velocity in the channels). The kLa values of the MBR were higher than those of a controlled bubble column reactor (BCR) in certain conditions, due to the slug flow pattern in the monolithic channels. A continuous syngas fermentation using Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 was conducted in the MBR system under varying operational conditions, with the variables including syngas flow rate, liquid recirculation between the monolithic column and reservoir, and dilution rate. It was found that the syngas fermentation performance – measured by such parameters as syngas utilization efficiency, ethanol concentration and productivity, and ratio of ethanol to acetic acid – depended not only on the mass transfer efficiency but also on the biofouling or abrading of the biofilm attached on the monolithic channel wall. At a condition of 300 mL/min of syngas flow rate, 500 mL/min of liquid flow rate, and 0.48 day?1 of dilution rate, the MBR produced much higher syngas (CO/H2) utilization efficiency and much greater metabolite (ethanol/acetic acid) productivity than what was obtained using a traditional bubble column reactor. The study demonstrates the great potential of MBR as a promising reactor configuration for syngas fermentation with high mass transfer efficiency, low energy consumption, and high metabolite productivity.

Yanwen Shen; Robert Brown; Zhiyou Wen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Why sequence metagenome function of the Earthworm egg capsule bacterial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metagenome function of metagenome function of the Earthworm egg capsule bacterial community? Earthworms are common soil organisms that influence the fertility of soils by altering the nutrient availability to plants. These nutrients include forms of nitrogen, phosphorous and carbon. The microbial community within earthworms releases nitrous oxide, degrades cellulose, and stimulates the growth of fungi that can break down cellulose. The earthworm egg capsule microbial community represents the seed population for the juvenile, and then adult, organism. Acquiring the complete set of genetic data from the earthworm metagenome will provide a resource for future studies in a variety of areas. Understanding the bacterial component of earthworm eggs is relevant to understanding the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the soil, which in turn influence the levels

253

Assessment Of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco And Belton Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time for sample delivery to the laboratory and initiation of analysis was maintained. Following incubation and enumeration using USEPA Method 1603, the Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco & Belton Lake Executive Summary J:\\742... of Contents J:\\742\\742880_TX_Farm_Bureau\\Reports\\Final_Report_2-2006\\TXFB_ReportFinal_020806.doc i February 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................ ES-1 SECTION 1...

Giovanni, G.

254

Triclosan-Loaded Tooth-Binding Micelles for Prevention and Treatment of Dental Biofilm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To develop tooth-binding micelle formulations of triclosan for the prevention and treatment of dental...

Fu Chen; Kelly C. Rice; Xin-Ming Liu; Richard A. Reinhardt…

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - adapted culturable bacterial Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July, 2009 Summary: Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer Jordan Baumgardner, Karen Acker, Oyinade... Engineering 2009, 3:11 (24 July 2009) Results...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - attached bacterial populations Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July, 2009 Summary: Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer Jordan Baumgardner, Karen Acker, Oyinade... Engineering 2009, 3:11 (24 July 2009) Results...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters bacterial attachment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July, 2009 Summary: Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer Jordan Baumgardner, Karen Acker, Oyinade... Engineering 2009, 3:11 (24 July 2009) Results...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters bacterial gene Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July, 2009 Summary: Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer Jordan Baumgardner, Karen Acker, Oyinade... Engineering 2009, 3:11 (24 July 2009) Results...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - antagonistic bacterial interactions Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Aims: Isolation of bacterial antagonist for use in the biological control of phy... the antifungal molecule produced by the ... Source: Balaram , P. - Molecular...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge bacterial Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: activated sludge bacterial Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Summary: is a traditional build plant base don...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaliphilic sulfo-oxidizing bacterial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bacterial Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering) Summary:...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical bacterial respiratory Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tract by a bacterial molecule... coughing illness known as pertussis or whooping cough, persisting for weeks within the ... Source: Andrews, Anne M. - Huck Institutes of the...

263

Impact of commonly used agrochemicals on bacterial diversity in cultivated soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of three selected agrochemicals on bacterial diversity in cultivated soil have been studied. The selected agrochemicals are Cerox (an insecticide), Ceresate and ... heterotrophic bacteria presence and...

J. A. Ampofo; W. Tetteh; M. Bello

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Summary: AA...

265

Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF  

SciTech Connect

The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effect of Humic Substance Photodegradation on Bacterial Growth and Respiration in Lake Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...different dissolved organic matter sources...artificial solar UV radiation...bacterial carbon production (BCP) and...of dissolved organic matter (DOM...production on a per cell basis. In...marine dissolved organic matter. Academic...Consequences of solar radiation on...bacterial secondary production and growth...

Alexandre M. Anesio; Wilhelm Granéli; George R. Aiken; David J. Kieber; Kenneth Mopper

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Bacterial carbon production in Lake Erie is influenced by viruses and solar radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial carbon production in Lake Erie is influenced by viruses and solar radiation Steven W basin, solar radiation was also dem- onstrated to regulate bacterial productivity. Ultraviolet radiation and >30% of the population of Canada. The lakes themselves constitute the largest system of fresh, surface

Wilhelm, Steven W.

269

Biofouling of reverse-osmosis membranes under different shear rates during tertiary wastewater desalination: Microbial community composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigated the influence of feed-water shear rate during reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination on biofouling with respect to microbial community composition developed on the membrane surface. The RO membrane biofilm's microbial community profile was elucidated during desalination of tertiary wastewater effluent in a flat-sheet lab-scale system operated under high (555.6 s?1), medium (370.4 s?1), or low (185.2 s?1) shear rates, corresponding to average velocities of 27.8, 18.5, and 9.3 cm s?1, respectively. Bacterial diversity was highest when medium shear was applied (Shannon–Weaver diversity index H' = 4.30 ± 0.04) compared to RO-membrane biofilm developed under lower and higher shear rates (H? = 3.80 ± 0.26 and H? = 3.42 ± 0.38, respectively). At the medium shear rate, RO-membrane biofilms were dominated by Betaproteobacteria, whereas under lower and higher shear rates, the biofilms were dominated by Alpha- and Gamma- Proteobacteria, and the latter biofilms also contained Deltaproteobacteria. Bacterial abundance on the RO membrane was higher at low and medium shear rates compared to the high shear rate: 8.97 × 108 ± 1.03 × 103, 4.70 × 108 ± 1.70 × 103 and 5.72 × 106 ± 2.09 × 103 copy number per cm2, respectively. Interestingly, at the high shear rate, the RO-membrane biofilm's bacterial community consisted mainly of populations known to excrete high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. Our results suggest that the RO-membrane biofilm's community composition, structure and abundance differ in accordance with applied shear rate. These results shed new light on the biofouling phenomenon and are important for further development of antibiofouling strategies for RO membranes.

Ashraf Al Ashhab; Osnat Gillor; Moshe Herzberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase  

SciTech Connect

Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A. (Harvard-Med); (HHMI)

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N , C Rohde, C Munk, M Nolan, S Lucas, TG Del Rio, H Tice, S Deshpande, JF Cheng, R Tapia, C Han, L Goodwin, S Pitluck, K Liolios, K Mavromatis, N Mikhailova, A Pati, A Chen, K Palaniappan, M Land, L Hauser, YJ Chang, CD Jeffries...

Stephanie A. Eichorst; Chijioke Joshua; Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh; Seema Singh; Blake A. Simmons; Steven W. Singer

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bacterial Population Development and Chemical Characteristics of Refuse Decomposition in a Simulated Sanitary Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...population of 440 cells per g (dry weight...Fig. 5) and hydrogen (data not shown...Thus, in a hydrogen-limited environment...production of car- boxylic acids suggests that hydrogen is not limiting...Pacey. 1981. Fuel gas enhancement...

M. A. Barlaz; D. M. Schaefer; R. K. Ham

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermophilic conditions using green waste compost as the inoculum...were purchased from a municipal green waste compositing facility...52N, 12117.35W). The green waste consisted of yard trimmings...sole supplemented carbon and energy source in 50 ml of M9 medium...

Stephanie A. Eichorst; Chijioke Joshua; Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh; Seema Singh; Blake A. Simmons; Steven W. Singer

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

Kingsley, Mark T.

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

Predictions of flexible C-terminal tethers of bacterial proteins with the FLEXTAIL bioinformatics pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proteins use conserved binding motifs associated with relatively unconserved flexible amino acid sequences as mobile tethers for interacting molecules, as exemplified by C-terminal sequences of bacterial chemotaxis receptors. The FLEXTAIL bioinformatics pipeline predicts flexible tethers and their binding motifs based on the properties of flexibility and sequence conservation. In four groups of bacterial genomes, the algorithm identified >100 putative binding domains, including verifying the known bacterial chemotaxis receptor – NWETF binding motif. Some potential C-terminal flexible regions that have not previously been recognised to function as protein tethers were found and should be investigated further for binding targets and flexibility.

Yi Lu; Jeffrey L. Ram

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

How does the resuspension of the biofilm alter the functioning of the benthos–pelagos coupled food web of a bare mudflat in Marennes-Oléron Bay (NE Atlantic)?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intertidal mudflats are ecosystems submitted to natural hydrodynamical forcings during each tide. When the offshore water flows at high tide, a proportion of the biofilm produced at low tide can be resuspended in the water column and interact with the pelagic food web. As a consequence, the resuspension creates a link between the benthos and the pelagos, modifying their properties and the stability of the meta-ecosystem they form together. The aim of this study is to describe the consequences of the microbial biofilm resuspension on the pelagic food web, and to investigate the question of the stability of the benthos–pelagos coupling resulting from the biofilm resuspension. Two food webs were considered, corresponding to different hydrodynamical conditions in summer condition: one allowing the biofilm massive resuspension, and one without resuspension, but with particle sedimentation. The Monte-Carlo Markov Chain Linear Modelling was used to estimate the unknown flows of the food web. The comparison of the Ecological Network Analysis indices for the two food webs allowed defining their respective differences of structure and functioning. The results showed that the massive resuspension of the microbial biofilm stimulates pelagic primary production and microbial food web via a higher bacterivory. The higher activity of the whole system coupled with both a drop in the specialisation of the trophic pathways and a low cycling activity demonstrated that when massive resuspension occurs, the system is disturbed. In contrast, when sedimentation occurs, the food webs show functioning features pointing out to a higher stability of the whole system.

Blanche Saint-Béat; Christine Dupuy; Hélène Agogué; Alexandre Carpentier; Julien Chalumeau; Serena Como; Valérie David; Margot De Crignis; Jean-Claude Duchêne; Camille Fontaine; Eric Feunteun; Katell Guizien; Hans Hartmann; Johann Lavaud; Sébastien Lefebvre; Christel Lefrançois; Clarisse Mallet; Hélène Montanié; Jean-Luc Mouget; Francis Orvain; Pascaline Ory; Pierre-Yves Pascal; Gilles Radenac; Pierre Richard; Alain F. Vézina; Nathalie Niquil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

FapR, a Bacterial Transcription Factor Involved in Global Regulation of Membrane Lipid Biosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial cells exert exquisite control over the biosynthesis of their membrane lipids, but the mechanisms are obscure. We describe the identification and purification from Bacillus subtilis of a transcription factor, FapR, ...

Schujman, Gustavo E

278

Siderophore production by heterotrophic bacterial isolates from the Costa Rica upwelling dome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont) An increased understanding of heterotrophic bacterial strategies for acquiring nutrients and trace elements is critical for elucidating their impact on biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. It is estimated that iron ...

Krey, Whitney B. (Whitney Blair)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Selection and characterization of alpha-amylase-overproducing recombinant Escherichia coli containing the bacterial hemoglobin gene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We previously reported that the presence of the bacterial (Vitreoscilla) hemoglobin gene enhances alpha-amylase production in recombinant Escherichia coli...strain MK79. Using the growth of MK79 on starch as a se...

Shie-Chau Liu; Besim Ogretmen; Yao-Yu Chuang…

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...III secretion systems. To facilitate future communication, I suggest renaming the...systems will be identified in the near future. The resulting increase in sequence information...bacterium facilitated an evolutionary quantum leap (E. A. Groisman) in bacterial...

Christoph J. Hueck

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Steroid transformation by Rhodococcus strains and bacterial cytochrome P450 enzymes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis describes activities of four bacterial steroid-induced cytochrome P450 enzymes in terms of their potential biotechnological use for steroid transformations by engineered Rhodococcus strains… (more)

Du Plessis-Rosloniec, Kamila Zofia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Normal Operating Range of Bacterial Communities in Soil Used for Potato Cropping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quantitative PCR, clone library, and PCR-denaturing...3 years, 12 clone libraries consisting of bacterial...rRNA gene sequence libraries from environmental...introducing myRDP space and quality controlled public data. Nucleic Acids...

Özgül ?nceo?lu; Leo Simon van Overbeek; Joana Falcão Salles; Jan Dirk van Elsas

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Structural investigations of hydroxylase proteins and complexes in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial multicomponent monooxgenases (BMMs) such as toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), phenol hydroxylase (PH), and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation reactions at a carboxylatebridged ...

McCormick, Michael S. (Michael Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Correlation between leukotoxin production of Pasteurella haemolytica and bacterial culture conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the in vitro growth characteristics of Pasteurella haemolytica was undertaken to determine the effect of media composition and available oxygen on bacterial growth. The rate and total growth, and the production of the exotoxin, leukotoxin...

Fann, Hsing Fu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heavy oil exposure increases viral production in natural marine bacterial populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined whether heavy oil (HO) increases viral production and how that change may affect the marine bacterial community. The addition of a relatively low concentration (10 ?g/mL) of HO to seawater ...

Mitsuhiro Yoshida; Satoru Suzuki

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Antimicrobial Stewardship Lessons: Do Pseudomonas-Sparing Agents, Such as Ertapenem, Effectively Improve Bacterial Resistance?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Improve Bacterial Resistance? Rodrigo Pires dos Santos Phone: 55 51 33598644, Fax...R. Kuchenbecker, R. P. dos Santos, L. Magedanz, P. Guzzato...Pennsylvania We are glad that Santos et al. agree that segmented regression...

Rodrigo Pires dos Santos; Thalita Jacoby; Luciano Zubaran Goldani

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparison and Verification of Bacterial Water Quality Indicator Measurement Methods Using Ambient Coastal Water Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 30 laboratories routinely monitor water along southern California's beaches for bacterial indicators of fecal contamination. Data from these efforts frequently are combined and compared even though t...

John F. Griffith; Larissa A. Aumand…

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Discovery of Novel Materials with Broad Resistance to Bacterial Attachment Using Combinatorial Polymer Microarrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new class of bacteria-attachment-resistant materials is discovered using a multi-generation polymer microarray methodology that reduces bacterial attachment by up to 99.3% compared with a leading commercially available ...

Hook, Andrew L.

289

Stable nitrogen isotope measurements of marine bacterial proteins and nucleic acids: tracers of microbial activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable nitrogen isotopes ([]15N) can trace elemental cycling in aquatic ecosystems if the enzyme mediated fractionations associated with nutrient uptake and assimilation are negligible or consistently predictable. In this study, bacterial proteins...

Kovacs, Jeffrey Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Exploring the optimality of various bacterial motility strategies : a stochastic hybrid systems approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While many species of bacteria are motile, they use various random strategies to determine where to swim. This chemotaxis allow bacterial populations to distribute themselves in accordance to distributions of nutrients ...

Norris, Noele Rosalie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Clinical Microbiology of Bacterial and Fungal Sepsis in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology ARTICLE REVIEWS Clinical Microbiology of Bacterial and Fungal Sepsis in Very-Low-Birth-Weight...Chesney, P. J., A. Taher, E. M. Gilbert, and N. T. Shahidi. 1978. Intranuclear...Streptococcal infections: clinical aspects, microbiology, and molecular pathogenesis. Oxford...

David Kaufman; Karen D. Fairchild

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

M13 Virus based detection of bacterial infections in living hosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a first method for using M13 bacteriophage as a multifunctional scaffold for optically imaging bacterial infections in vivo. We demonstrate that M13 virus conjugated with hundreds of dye molecules (M13-Dye) can ...

Ghosh, Debadyuti

293

Design, construction and characterization of a set of insulated bacterial promoters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have generated a series of variable-strength, constitutive, bacterial promoters that act predictably in different sequence contexts, span two orders of magnitude in strength and contain convenient sites for cloning and ...

Davis, Joseph H.

294

Functional characterization of bacterial sRNAs using a network biology approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small RNAs (sRNAs) are important components of posttranscriptional regulation. These molecules are prevalent in bacterial and eukaryotic organisms, and involved in a variety of responses to environmental stresses. The ...

Walker, Graham C.

295

The heat resistance of bacterial spores due to their partial dehydration by reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of bacterial spores to withstand heat is known to be associated with a lowering of their water content. This partial dehydration is considered to be produced by reverse osmosis, with the pressure bein...

John E. Algie

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Bacterial Contamination and Antibiotic Resistance in Fecal Coliforms from Glacial Water Runoff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although, resistance against common antibiotics among the bacterial population in glacial and glacio-fluvial regions with low anthropogenic activities is very unusual, most of the E. coli...isolates from pre-Gang...

S. P. Pathak; K. Gopal

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Oil bioremediation in salt marsh mesocosms as influenced by nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial seeding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glasshouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of N and P fertilization and bacterial seeding on crude oil degradation in salt marsh mesocosms containing marsh soil and Spartina alterniflora. Fertilization with urea, NH4, and N03...

Wright, Alan Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Enrichment and optimization of anaerobic bacterial mixed culture for conversion of syngas to ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main aim of the present study was to enrich anaerobic mixed bacterial culture capable of producing ethanol from synthesis gas fermentation. Screening of thirteen anaerobic strains together with enrichment protocol helped to develop an efficient mixed culture capable of utilizing syngas for ethanol production. Physiological and operational parameters were optimized for enhanced ethanol production. The optimized value of operational parameters i.e. initial media pH, incubation temperature, initial syngas pressure, and agitation speed were 6.0 ± 0.1, 37 °C, 2 kg cm?2 and 100 rpm respectively. Under these conditions ethanol and acetic acid production by the selected mixed culture were 1.54 g L?1 and 0.8 g L?1 respectively. Furthermore, up-scaling studies in semi-continuous fermentation mode further enhanced ethanol and acetic acid production up to 2.2 g L?1 and 0.9 g L?1 respectively. Mixed culture TERI SA1 was efficient for ethanol production by syngas fermentation.

Ashish Singla; Dipti Verma; Banwari Lal; Priyangshu M. Sarma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Compensation for L212GLU in bacterial reaction centers  

SciTech Connect

In wild-type bacterial reaction centers (RC), residue L212Glu, which is located about 5 {Angstrom} away from Q{sub B}, is involved in the delivery of the second proton to Q{sub B{sup 2}{minus}} [1-4]. We previously constructed the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala double mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus, and it is incapable of photosynthetic growth (PS{sup {minus}}) due to interruption of the proton transfer pathway to Q{sub B}[3,4]. We have isolated several photocompetent (PS{sup +}) phenotypic revertants of this L212-L213AA double mutant [3-7]. The compensatory mutations that restore function in these strains are diverse and show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is absolutely required for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer. Genotypic revertant and second-site mutations, located within the Q{sub B} binding picket or at more distant sites, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213 to restore photocompetence. One of the phenotypic revertants of the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant carries a genotypic reversion of L213Ala to Asp; the Ala substitution at L212 remains. We were intrigued that this L212Glu {yields} Ala mutant R. capsulatus is photocompetent, while the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant of R. sphaeroides is not, particularly since the sequence identity in the Q{sub B} site of these two strains is 90{percent} [8]. To this end, we constructed the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant in R. capsulatus, and it is also PS{sup {minus}}. To determine the function that is lost in the L212Gln mutant but restored by Ala at that site, we selected four PS{sup +} revertants from the L212Gln strain.

Hanson, D.K.; Deng, Y.L.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sebban, P. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif/Yvette (France). CNRS

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Identification and characterization of a bacterial hydrosulphide ion channel  

SciTech Connect

The hydrosulphide ion (HS{sup -}) and its undissociated form, hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), which are believed to have been critical to the origin of life on Earth, remain important in physiology and cellular signalling. As a major metabolite in anaerobic bacterial growth, hydrogen sulphide is a product of both assimilatory and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. These pathways can reduce various oxidized sulphur compounds including sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate. The dissimilatory sulphate reduction pathway uses this molecule as the terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, in which process it produces excess amounts of H{sub 2}S. The reduction of sulphite is a key intermediate step in all sulphate reduction pathways. In Clostridium and Salmonella, an inducible sulphite reductase is directly linked to the regeneration of NAD{sup +}, which has been suggested to have a role in energy production and growth, as well as in the detoxification of sulphite. Above a certain concentration threshold, both H{sub 2}S and HS{sup -} inhibit cell growth by binding the metal centres of enzymes and cytochrome oxidase, necessitating a release mechanism for the export of this toxic metabolite from the cell. Here we report the identification of a hydrosulphide ion channel in the pathogen Clostridium difficile through a combination of genetic, biochemical and functional approaches. The HS{sup -} channel is a member of the formate/nitrite transport family, in which about 50 hydrosulphide ion channels form a third subfamily alongside those for formate (FocA) and for nitrite (NirC). The hydrosulphide ion channel is permeable to formate and nitrite as well as to HS{sup -} ions. Such polyspecificity can be explained by the conserved ion selectivity filter observed in the channel's crystal structure. The channel has a low open probability and is tightly regulated, to avoid decoupling of the membrane proton gradient.

Czyzewski, Bryan K.; Wang, Da-Neng (NYUSM)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Tier 1 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Lab Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies Initiative (TMTI). The high-level goal of TMTI is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve those goals, TMTI has a near term need to obtain more sequence information across a large range of pathogens, near neighbors, and across a broad geographical and host range. Our role in this project is to research available sequence data for the organisms of interest and identify critical microbial sequence and knowledge gaps that need to be filled to meet TMTI objectives. This effort includes: (1) assessing current genomic sequence for each agent including phylogenetic and geographical diversity, host range, date of isolation range, virulence, sequence availability of key near neighbors, and other characteristics; (2) identifying Subject Matter Experts (SME's) and potential holders of isolate collections, contacting appropriate SME's with known expertise and isolate collections to obtain information on isolate availability and specific recommendations; (3) identifying sequence as well as knowledge gaps (eg virulence, host range, and antibiotic resistance determinants); (4) providing specific recommendations as to the most valuable strains to be placed on the DTRA sequencing queue. We acknowledge that criteria for prioritization of isolates for sequencing falls into two categories aligning with priority queues 1 and 2 as described in the summary. (Priority queue 0 relates to DTRA operational isolates whose availability is not predictable in advance.) 1. Selection of isolates that appear to have likelihood to provide information on virulence and antibiotic resistance. This will include sequence of known virulent strains. Particularly valuable would be virulent strains that have genetically similar yet avirulent, or non human transmissible, counterparts that can be used for comparison to help identify key virulence or host range genes. This approach will provide information that can be used by structural biologists to help develop therapeutics and vaccines. We have pointed out such high priority strains of which we are aware, and note that if any such isolates should be discovered, they will rise to the top priority. We anticipate difficulty locating samples with unusual resistance phenotypes, in particular. Sequencing strategies for isolates in queue 1 should aim for as complete finishing status as possible, since high-quality initial annotation (gene-calling) will be necessary for the follow-on protein structure analyses contributing to countermeasure development. Queue 2 for sequencing determination will be more dynamic than queue 1, and samples will be added to it as they become available to the TMTI program. 2. Selection of isolates that will provide broader information about diversity and phylogenetics and aid in specific detection as well as forensics. This approach focuses on sequencing of isolates that will provide better resolution of variants that are (or were) circulating in nature. The finishing strategy for queue 2 does not require complete closing with annotation. This queue is more static, as there is considerable phylogenetic data, and in this report we have sought to reveal gaps and make suggestions to fill them given existing sequence data and strain information. In this report we identify current sequencing gaps in both priority queue categories. Note that this is most applicable to the bacterial pathogens, as most viruses are by default in queue 1. The Phase I focus of this project is on viral hemorrhagic fever viruses and Category A bacterial agents as defined to us by TMTI. We have carried out individual analyses on each species of interest, and these are included as chapters in this report. Viruses and bacteria are biologically very distinct from each other and require different methods of analysis and criteria for sequencing prioritization. Therefore, we will describe our methods, analyses and conclusions separately for each category.

Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Novel and unexpected bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich ecosystem revealed by culture-dependent approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discovery of novel bacterial lineages and evidences of a more robust community functioning revealed by culture-dependent approaches, compared with previous metagenomic strategies.

François Delavat; Marie-Claire Lett; Didier Lièvremont

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Functional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the emerging water contaminants: 1,4-dioxane and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstration with propane to remediate trichloroethene andTrichloroethylene degradation by propane-oxidizing bacteria.Bacterial oxidation of propane. FEMS Micro- biology Letters,

Sales, Christopher Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Next Science Wound Gel Technology, a Novel Agent That Inhibits Biofilm Development by Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Wound Pathogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microbiology and associated approaches to wound management. Clin. Microbiol...persistent infections. Science 284 :1318-1322. doi: 10.1126/science.284.5418.1318...current therapeutic approaches in burns. Shock 5...

Kyle G. Miller; Phat L. Tran; Cecily L. Haley; Cassandra Kruzek; Jane A. Colmer-Hamood; Matt Myntti; Abdul N. Hamood

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

Community-Level Assessment of the Effects of the Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Chlorhexidine on the Outcome of River Microbial Biofilm Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Subsampling for other analyses (protozoan counts...and carbon utilization analyses) was also carried out...coupons in each replicate reactor. Analysis of variance was used...degree of realism and reliability in assessing the potential...

J. R. Lawrence; B. Zhu; G. D. W. Swerhone; E. Topp; J. Roy; L. I. Wassenaar; T. Rema; D. R. Korber

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Transcriptional Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Transcriptional Efficiency Qin Ma, Ying Xu PII: S1672-0229(13)00008-9 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gpb.2013.01.004 Reference: GPB 52 To appear in: Please cite this article as: Q. Ma, Y. Xu, Global Genomic Arrangement of Bacterial Genes Is Closely Tied with the Total Transcriptional Efficiency, (2013), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gpb.2013.01.004 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process

307

Primary Photosynthetic Energy Conversion in Bacterial Reaction Centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of human societies is strongly influenced by the available energetic resources. In a period where the limitations of conventional fossil energy carriers become as evident as the often uncontrollab...

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Zinth; J. Wachtveitl

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The biodegradation of organic acids by a heterogeneous bacterial culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tion of fatty acids results in multiple cleavage of the molecules to form shorter chain acids. It has been found (1I) that ethanoic and butanoic are the principle volatile acids present during digestion of sewage sludge while propanoic and pentanoic... was developed from a heterogeneous culture found in a sewage plant effluent. The culture was developed in a bench scale continuous flow activated. sludge reactor, and individual studies were made in a bench scale aerated batch reactor. The acids used were...

Tyer, Bobby Ray

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequen...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in Bacterial Biofilms Lanni, Eric J.; Masyuko, Rachel N.; Driscoll, Callan M.; Aerts, Jordan T.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V. None USDOE Office of...

312

Generating super-shedders: co-infection increases bacterial load and egg production of a gastrointestinal helminth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...course of infection in our data, allowing nonlinear...spline to the bacterial load, over time, of the...log-transformed the data and then carried out...Lass 2008, unpublished data), as such, a high bacterial load may translate into higher...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Abstract--An integrated bacterial detection chip is implemented in 0.18m CMOS technology. The chip has been  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and an appropriate set of bacteriophages [3] were used to detect the presence (or absence) of E.coli in less than 10 sensitive to the pyocin in less than 10 minutes. The effect of bacterial cell concentration is also. aeruginosa) is an increasingly prevalent opportunistic human and plant bacterial pathogen [1]. It is one

Gulak, P. Glenn

314

Intermediate Products in the Bacterial Decomposition of Hexadecanol and Octadecanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deterioration of water quality. In the arid Southwestern region of the Uni ted States, the lack of a large natural supply of water and only moderate annual rainfall have retarded the development of the area for both industrial and agricultural purposes. Clearly...

Langley, W. D.

315

Improved Yield and Diverse Finished Bacterial Genomes using Pacific Biosciences RS II SMRT Sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved Yield and Diverse Finished Bacterial Genomes using Pacific Biosciences RS II SMRT-Cruz, Alvaro Godinez, Luke J. Tallon Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, effective, and highly accurate platform for generation of complete microbial genome sequences. As early

Weber, David J.

316

Triclosan Exposure Increases Triclosan Resistance and Influences Taxonomic Composition of Benthic Bacterial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan Exposure Increases Triclosan Resistance and Influences Taxonomic Composition of Benthic Bacterial Communities ... Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound that is incorporated into numerous consumer products. ... Transformation Products and Human Metabolites of Triclocarban and Triclosan in Sewage Sludge Across the United States ...

Bradley Drury; John Scott; Emma J. Rosi-Marshall; John J. Kelly

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

317

Triclosan as a Systemic Antibacterial Agent in a Mouse Model of Acute Bacterial Challenge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology ARTICLE EXPERIMENTAL THERAPEUTICS Triclosan as a Systemic Antibacterial Agent in...and/or use of effective antibiotics. Triclosan, though used in cosmetic and dermatological...Here we report the striking efficacy of triclosan in a mouse model of acute systemic bacterial...

Shilpi Sharma; T. N. C. Ramya; Avadhesha Surolia; Namita Surolia

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mercury and Other Heavy Metals Influence Bacterial Community Structure in Contaminated Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury and Other Heavy Metals Influence Bacterial Community Structure in Contaminated Streams Research The influences of uranium (U), mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) on the microbial community. #12;High concentrations of uranium, inorganic mercury, Hg(II) and methymercury (MeHg) have been

319

Viscosity of Bacterial Suspensions: Hydrodynamic Interactions and Self-Induced Noise Shawn D. Ryan,1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viscosity of Bacterial Suspensions: Hydrodynamic Interactions and Self-Induced Noise Shawn D. Ryan, 2011) The viscosity of a suspension of swimming bacteria is investigated analytically and numerically fluid, result in a dramatic reduction of the effective viscosity. In agreement with experiments

Berlyand, Leonid

320

Differential Genome Evolution Between Companion Symbionts in an Insect-Bacterial Symbiosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...btm009 . 76. Finn RD , Clements J and Eddy SR. 2011. HMMER web server: interactive sequence similarity searching. Nucleic...gkr367 . 77. Gao F and Zhang CT. 2008. Ori-finder: a web-based system for finding oriCs in unannotated bacterial genomes...

Gordon M. Bennett; John P. McCutcheon; Bradon R. MacDonald; Dwight Romanovicz; Nancy A. Moran

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Predictive Model of Bacterial Foraging by Means of Freely Released Extracellular Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Predictive Model of Bacterial Foraging by Means of Freely Released Extracellular Enzymes Y T Extracellular enzymes are important agents for microbial foraging and material cycling in diverse natural immobile microbe, of freely releasing extracellular enzymes into a fluid- bathed, stable matrix of both

Jumars, Pete

322

Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Bioreactors Treating Pharmaceutical Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a full-scale industrial wastewater treatment facility consisting...AND METHODS Study site. The wastewater treatment facility consists...exceeding 45C without cell recycling, due to poor bacterial flocculation...oxygen demand of the untreated wastewater has historically varied between...

Timothy M. LaPara; Cindy H. Nakatsu; Lisa Pantea; James E. Alleman

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Huanglongbing, a Systemic Disease, Restructures the Bacterial Community Associated with Citrus Roots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the infected clone library using LIBSHUFF statistics...competition for nutrients and space, production of metabolites...analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries. Bacterial community...introducing myRDP space and quality controlled public data. Nucleic Acids...

Pankaj Trivedi; Yongping Duan; Nian Wang

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Bacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with an increase in ammonia showing there had to be an additional P removal process at the same timeBacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream sludge Phosphorus removal Denitrification Apatite formation Sulfur cycling a b s t r a c t Simultaneous

Benning, Liane G.

325

Bacterial community structures are unique and resilient in full-scale bioenergy systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial community structures are unique and resilient in full-scale bioenergy systems Jeffrey J digestion is the most successful bioenergy technology worldwide with, at its core, undefined microbialFrac | community function | digester | sludge The production of bioenergy from wastes is an essential com- ponent

Hammerton, James

326

Structural Studies of a Bacterial Condensin Complex Reveal ATP-Dependent Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Studies of a Bacterial Condensin Complex Reveal ATP-Dependent Disruption of Intersubunit-like structures. Surprisingly, one of the two bound C-WHDs is forced to detach upon ATP-medi- ated engagement on the linker restrict cell growth. Thus ATP-dependent transient disruption of the MukB-MukF interaction, which

Lee, Jooyoung

327

An Isoniazid Analogue Promotes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Nanoparticle Interactions and Enhances Bacterial Killing by Macrophages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacterial Killing by Macrophages Tatiany J. de Faria a Mariane Roman a Nicole M. de Souza a Rodrigo De Vecchi a Joao Vitor de Assis b Ana Lucia Gomes dos Santos c Ivan H. Bechtold d Nathalie Winter e Maurilio Jose Soares f Luciano Paulino Silva g...

Tatiany J. de Faria; Mariane Roman; Nicole M. de Souza; Rodrigo De Vecchi; João Vitor de Assis; Ana Lúcia Gomes dos Santos; Ivan H. Bechtold; Nathalie Winter; Maurilio José Soares; Luciano Paulino Silva; Mauro V. De Almeida; André Báfica

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Soil bacterial strains able to grow on the surface of oxidized polyethylene film containing prooxidant additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil bacterial strains able to grow on the surface of oxidized polyethylene film containing low-density polyethylene film containing prooxidant additives were isolated from three forest soils of adhering to the surface of oxidized polyethylene, growing there and possibly biodegrading its oxidation

Boyer, Edmond

329

Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seagrass Bed Sediments by Double-Gradient Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial Ecology Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seagrass Bed Sediments by Double, including the presence or absence of vegetation, depth into sediment, and season. Double- gradient of these similarity coefficients were used to group banding patterns by depth into sediment, presence or absence

Sherman, Tim

330

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum reinhardtii was found to secrete substances that mimic the activity of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL's own AHL signals, providing evidence that the algal mimic affected quorum sensing-regulated functions

Meier, Iris

331

Survey of Motile Microaerophilic Bacterial Morphotypes in the Oxygen Gradient above a Marine Sulfidic Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...days the ferrous iron pool was removed by oxidation...strategy: straight swimming paths are interrupted...Mitchell. 1999. Bacterial swimming strategies and turbulence...E. M. 1997. The efficiency of propulsion by a rotating...Swan. 1994. The swimming of unipolar cells of...

Roland Thar; Tom Fenchel

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Data reduction in headspace analysis of blood and urine samples for robust bacterial identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the application of chemical headspace analysis to the problem of classifying the presence of bacteria in biomedical samples by using computational tools. Blood and urine samples of disparate forms were analysed using a Cyrano ... Keywords: Bacterial identification, Black box models, Electronic nose, Headspace analysis, Intrinsic dimension, Model reduction

J.W. T. Yates; M. J. Chappell; J. W. Gardner; C. S. Dow; C. Dowson; A. Hamood; F. Bolt; L. Beeby

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Evolutionary theory of bacterial quorum sensing: when is a signal not a signal?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...future is experimental studies that determine the costs...ijmm.2004.06.022 . Foster, K.R , Wenseleers...S, Egland, P.G, Foster, J.S, Palmer, R...bacterial luminescent system. J. Bacteriol. 104...2003 . Telford, G , Wheeler, D, Williams, P...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1; ¶Water Environment and Remediation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791, Korea; §Department

335

Home Life: Factors Structuring the Bacterial Diversity Found within and between Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Life: Factors Structuring the Bacterial Diversity Found within and between Homes Robert R and in the air of our homes. Despite their ubiquity and abundance, we have a limited understanding of the microbial diversity found within homes and how the composition and diversity of microbial communities change

Fierer, Noah

336

Clinical Features of Bacterial Vaginosis in a Murine Model of Vaginal Infection with Gardnerella vaginalis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vaginalis Nicole M. Gilbert1 , Warren G. Lewis2 , Amanda L. Lewis1,3 * 1 Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America, 2: Gilbert NM, Lewis WG, Lewis AL (2013) Clinical Features of Bacterial Vaginosis in a Murine Model

Lewis, Amanda L.

337

Lethal protein produced in response to competition between sibling bacterial colonies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of subtilisin (a protease) and a 12 kDa protein, termed sibling lethal factor (Slf). Purified subtilisin promotes the growth and expan- sion of P. dendritiformis colonies, whereas Slf is lethal and lyses P. dendritiformis cells in culture. Slf is encoded by a gene belonging to a large family of bacterial genes

Ariel, Gil

338

ORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce a 54 kDa ice-binding protein (GenBank EU694412) that is similar to ice-binding proteins previously- vival at sub-zero temperatures by producing proteins that bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystalsORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core James A. Raymond Ã? Brent C

Christner, Brent C.

339

Modulation of Substrate Efflux in Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Mutations at the Dimer Interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...WT structure by measuring the intermonomer...the propagated standard errors of the means...was determined by measuring bacterial cell...TM4 dimerization interface have different...2003. Three-dimensional structure of the...mutations at the dimer interface. | Bacteria evade...

Bradley E. Poulsen; Fiona Cunningham; Kate K. Y. Lee; Charles M. Deber

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

The N Terminus of Bacterial Elongation Factor Tu Elicits Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characteristic for true fungi, such as the wall components chitin, chitosan, and glucan, the membrane component ergosterol, and the...bacterial extracts from R. solanacearum and A. tumefaciens. ). Inhibitor activity of elf12 was rather weak and, as expected for a...

Gernot Kunze; Cyril Zipfel; Silke Robatzek; Karsten Niehaus; Thomas Boller; Georg Felix

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Integr. Biol. Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Integr. Biol. Microfluidics for bacterial 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00049c Microfluidics is revolutionizing the way we study the motile behavior system to understand how cells and organisms sense and respond to gradients. Using microfluidics to study

Shimizu, Tom

342

GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum tolerance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum that were more aluminum-tolerant than the non-transgenic control, confirming that citrate synthase overexpression can be a useful tool to help achieve aluminum tolerance. Keywords Acid soils Á Aluminum toxicity Á

Parrott, Wayne

343

Bacterial cellulose based hydrogel (BC-g-AA) and preliminary result of swelling behavior  

SciTech Connect

In this study, hydrogel based on Bacterial cellulose (BC) or local known as Nata de Coco, which grafted with monomer: Acrylic acid (AA) is synthesis by using gamma radiation technique. These hydrogel (BC-g-AA) has unique characteristic whereby responsive to pH buffer solution.

Hakam, Adil; Lazim, Azwan Mat [UKM-MIMOS Laboratory, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM) (Malaysia); Abdul Rahman, I. Irman [Laboratory of Gamma Radiation Instrument, Science Nuclear Program, School of Applied Physics, National University of Malaysia (UKM) (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa BY T. A of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria, South Africa. E-mail: Teresa. Coutinho@FABI.up.ac.za; 3 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry, University of the Orange Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa; 4 Agricultural

345

Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division Ganhui Lana , Brian R. Danielsb-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low- density state to a high-density state and generates the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that Fts

Sun, Sean

346

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1 , Christian L. Lauberb are personalized, we hypothesized that we could use the residual skin bacteria left on objects for forensic approach, this series ofstudies introducesa forensics approach that could eventually be used

Fierer, Noah

347

A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements  

SciTech Connect

We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

Jaing, C

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this exploratory study is to provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the impact of bacterial sulfhydryl groups on the bacterial uptake, speciation, methylation and bioavailability of Hg and redox changes of uranium. The relative concentration and reactivity of different functional groups present on bacterial surfaces will be determined, enabling quantitative predictions of the role of biosorption of Hg under the physicochemical conditions found at contaminated DOE sites.The hypotheses we propose to test in this investigation are as follows- 1) Sulfhydryl groups on bacterial cell surfaces modify Hg speciation and solubility, and play an important role, specifically in the sub-micromolar concentration ranges of metals in the natural and contaminated systems. 2) Sulfhydryl binding of Hg on bacterial surfaces significantly influences Hg transport into the cell and the methylation rates by the bacteria. 3) Sulfhydryls on cell membranes can interact with hexavalent uranium and convert to insoluble tetravalent species. 4) Bacterial sulfhydryl surface groups are inducible by the presence of metals during cell growth. Our studies focused on the first hypothesis, and we examined the nature of sulfhydryl sites on three representative bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive aerobic soil species; Shewanella oneidensis, a facultative gram-negative surface water species; and Geobacter sulfurreducens, an anaerobic iron-reducing gram-negative species that is capable of Hg methylation; and at a range of Hg concentration (and Hg:bacterial concentration ratio) in which these sites become important. A summary of our findings is as follows- ? Hg adsorbs more extensively to bacteria than other metals. Hg adsorption also varies strongly with pH and chloride concentration, with maximum adsorption occurring under circumneutral pH conditions for both Cl-bearing and Cl-free systems. Under these conditions, all bacterial species tested exhibit almost complete removal of Hg from the experimental solutions at relatively low bacterial concentrations. ? Synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopic studies of these samples indicate that the structure and the coordination environment of Hg surface complexes on bacterial cell walls change dramatically- with sulfhydryls as the dominant Hg-binding groups in the micromolar and submicromolar range, and carboxyls and phosphoryls dominating at high micromolar concentrations. ? Hg interactions change from a trigonal or T-shaped HgS{sub 3} complex to HgS or HgS{sub 2} type complexes as the Hg concentration increases in the submicromolar range. Although all bacterial species studied exhibited the same types of coordination environments for Hg, the relative concentrations of the complexes change as a function of Hg concentration.

Myneni, Satish C.; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Fein, Jeremy

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Correcting imbalanced reads coverage in bacterial transcriptome sequencing with extreme deep coverage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High throughput bacterial RNA-Seq experiments can generate extremely high and imbalanced sequencing coverage. Over- or under-estimation of gene expression levels will hinder accurate gene differential expression analysis. Here we evaluated strategies to identify expression differences of genes with high coverage in bacterial transcriptome data using either raw sequence reads or unique reads with duplicate fragments removed. In addition, we proposed a generalised linear model (GLM) based approach to identify imbalance in read coverage based on sequence compositions. Our results show that analysis using raw reads identifies more differentially expressed genes with more accurate fold change than using unique reads. We also demonstrate the presence of sequence composition related biases that are independent of gene expression levels and experimental conditions. Finally, genes that still show strong coverage imbalance after correction were tagged using statistical approach.

Xinjun Zhang; Dharanesh Gangaiah; Jr."> Robert S. Munson Jr.; Stanley M. Spinola; Yunlong Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Extinction of a bacterial colony under forced convection in pie geometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extinction of a bacterial colony, as it is forced to migrate into a hostile environment, is analyzed in pie geometry. Under convection, separation of the radial and the azimuthal degrees of freedom is not possible, so the linearized evolution operator is diagonalized numerically. Some characteristic scales are compared with the results of recent experiments, and the “integrable” limit of the theory in the narrow growth region is studied.

Nadav M. Shnerb

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Elucidation of the pathways responsible for the biosynthesis of UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine in bacterial pathogens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The highly-modified, bacterial sugar N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) has been implicated in the pathogenicity of certain microbes through its incorporation onto various protein virulence factors. In particular, ...

Morrison, Michael James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Modeling Bacterial Evolution with Comparative-Genome-Based Marker Systems: Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Evolution and Pathogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BIOLOGY OF PATHOGENS Modeling Bacterial Evolution...perform extensive computer simulations of CGM-based phylogenies...22). Phylogenetic simulations and tree construction...beacons: implications for rapid susceptibility testing...and C. Locht. 2001. Automated high-throughput genotyping...

David Alland; Thomas S. Whittam; Megan B. Murray; M. Donald Cave; Manzour H. Hazbon; Kim Dix; Mark Kokoris; Andreas Duesterhoeft; Jonathan A. Eisen; Claire M. Fraser; Robert D. Fleischmann

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Comparison of the effectiveness of different methods of screening for bacterial soft rot resistance of potato tubers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tubers from eight potato cultivars (cvs) grown at two different locations in Wisconsin were tested for bacterial soft rot resistance using different inoculation techniques. The procedures included 1) point ino...

Ewa ?ojkowska; Arthur Kelman

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Seasonal change in the proportion of bacterial and phytoplankton production along a salinity gradient in a shallow estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We intended to evaluate the relative contribution of primary production versus allochthonous carbon in the production of bacterial biomass in a mesotrophic estuary. Different spatial and temporal ranges were obse...

M.A. Almeida; M.A. Cunha; F. Alcântara

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Charge Resonance Effects on Electronic Absorption Line Shapes: Application to the Heterodimer Absorption of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the formalism of Fano's treatment for atomic absorption line shapes associated with autoionization (Fano, UCharge Resonance Effects on Electronic Absorption Line Shapes: Application to the Heterodimer Absorption of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers Huilin Zhou and Steven G. Boxer* Department

Boxer, Steven G.

356

Two Cooperating Helices Constitute the Lipid-binding Domain of the Bacterial SRP Receptor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Protein targeting by the bacterial signal recognition particle requires the specific interaction of the signal recognition particle (SRP)–ribosome–nascent chain complex with FtsY, the bacterial SRP receptor. Although FtsY in Escherichia coli lacks a transmembrane domain, the membrane-bound FtsY displays many features of an integral membrane protein. Our data reveal that it is the cooperative action of two lipid-binding helices that allows this unusually strong membrane contact. Helix I comprises the first 14 amino acids of FtsY and the second is located at the interface between the A- and the N-domain of FtsY. We show by site-directed cross-linking and binding assays that both helices bind to negatively charged phospholipids, with a preference for phosphatidyl glycerol. Despite the strong lipid binding, helix I does not seem to be completely inserted into the lipid phase, but appears to be oriented parallel with the membrane surface. The two helices together with the connecting linker constitute an independently folded domain, which maintains its lipid binding even in the absence of the conserved NG-core of FtsY. In summary, our data reveal that the two consecutive lipid-binding helices of FtsY can provide a membrane contact that does not differ significantly in stability from that provided by a transmembrane domain. This explains why the bacterial SRP receptor does not require an integral ?-subunit for membrane binding.

David Braig; Constance Bär; Jörg-Oliver Thumfart; Hans-Georg Koch

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Molecular analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in Cipangopaludina chinensis used in aquatic ecological restorations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High pollutant concentrations have led to the breakout of planktonic bloom and the breakdown of the ecosystem in several bodies of water in China. Some restoration projects using constructed wetlands have been enacted to increase the water clarity and rebuild the aquatic ecosystem in these bodies of water. Cipangopaludina chinensis were usually placed to manage the particles and microbes adhering to the surface of the aquatic plants in the wetlands. In the current study, the intestinal bacteria in C. chinensis collected from three restoration projects in Shanghai, China were investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses. The species affiliated to Firmicutes were proven the dominant species in the intestinal bacterial population in C. chinensis. The most dominant phylotypes are closely related to Pseudobutyrivibrio ruminis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Furthermore, significant differences between the intestinal bacterial community constructs and different structures were found in C. chinensis collected from different restoration projects. This information on the intestinal bacteria of C. chinensis is helpful in further understanding the function of these mollusks and in screening for useful bacterial strains.

Kejun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Isolation and Characterization of Chlorothalonil-Degrading Bacterial Strain H4 and Its Potential for Remediation of Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A chlorothalonil (CTN)-degrading bacterial strain H4 was isolated in this study from a contaminated soil by continuous enrichment culture to identify its characteristics and to investigate its potential for remediation of CTN in contaminated soil. Based on the morphological, physiological and biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the strain was identified as Stenotrophomonas sp. After liquid culture for 7 d, 82.2% of CTN was removed by strain H4. The isolate could degrade CTN over a broad range of temperatures and pH values, and the optimum conditions for H4 degradation were pH 7.0 and 30 °C. Reintroduction of the bacteria into artificially contaminated soil resulted in substantial removal of CTN (> 50%) after incubation for 14 d. Soil samples treated by H4 showed significant increases (P < 0.05) in soil dehydrogenase activity, soil polyphenol oxidase activity, average well-color development obtained by the Biolog Eco plateTM assay and Shannon-Weaver index, compared with the control. Strain H4 might be a promising candidate for application in the bioremediation of CTN-contaminated soils.

Man-Yun ZHANG; Ying TENG; Ye ZHU; Jun WANG; Yong-Ming LUO; P. CHRISTIE; Zhen-Gao LI; T.K. UDEIGWE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Impact of Biochar Application to Soil on the Root-Associated Bacterial Community Structure of Fully Developed Greenhouse Pepper Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rhizosphere is well documented in the literature and is attributed to carbon-rich root...stimulation or induced plant resistance in the literature included Hydrogenophaga and Dechloromonas...soils in the tropics with charcoal-a review. Biol. Fertil. Soils 35 :219-230...

Max Kolton; Yael Meller Harel; Zohar Pasternak; Ellen R. Graber; Yigal Elad; Eddie Cytryn

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

Impact of Biochar Application to Soil on the Root-Associated Bacterial Community Structure of Fully Developed Greenhouse Pepper Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strains in plant root environments, which in some cases...plant resistance in the literature included Hydrogenophaga...are found in soil environments, where they can oxidize...tropics with charcoal-a review. Biol. Fertil. Soils...gene diversity in any environment. Methods Mol. Biol...

Max Kolton; Yael Meller Harel; Zohar Pasternak; Ellen R. Graber; Yigal Elad; Eddie Cytryn

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bacterial total maximum daily load (TMDL): development and evaluation of a new classification scheme for impaired waterbodies of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

functions corresponding to NCDC and NEXRAD rainfall datasets ............................... 224 6.4 FOA results corresponding to NCDC ............................................................. 226 6.5 FOA results corresponding to NEXRAD... ................................................... 238 6.12 Means and standard deviations of FOA and MCS..........................................239 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION According to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 131, all States, Territories, and authorized Tribes...

Paul, Sabu

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report on SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2 0 1 1 ­ 2 0 1 2 ISCN-GULF Charter Report #12;3 1. FACILITIES with projects of our University's Cell for Sustainable Development; it also presents evidence for steady alike. THIS REPORT This is the second report on sustainable development at the University of Luxembourg

van der Torre, Leon

363

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ... Say the words "sustainable development" in most chemical industry offices and you are likely to observe a response of glazed eyes, furrowed brows, and inattentive expressions. ... "You are not going to find an extensive understanding and a thorough discourse about sustainable development taking place in a lot of companies." ...

PAIGE MARIE MORSE

1998-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

Bacterial respiration.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variety of redox car- riers, depending...to nongrowing cells, or 149, 332...cally) formate-hydrogen lyase activities...oxygen), the hydrogen-carrying limb...present in the hydrogen- and electron-carrying...demands on the cell vary. Third...oxidoreductase), through car- riers of similar...

B A Haddock; C W Jones

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

BACTERIAL CYTOCHROMES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria, yeast and heart muscle particles K4 TXOZ rsmBTMTZ Ki 4...6 3 186 186 65 Heart muscle particles succinate 4.0 80-100 80...mu A OD main Soret peak Kn GOD Soret peak Ki (b) - 0s uptake...Chance (51) for heart muscle particles. They were calculated from...

Lucile Smith

1954-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bacterial metabolite indole modulates incretin secretion from intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used as a control measurement. The dish was mounted in a perfusion chamber on an Olympus IX71 microscope with x40 oil-immersion objective, and imaged using an Orca-ER CCD camera. A 75W Xenon arc lamp and a monochromator (Cairn Research) controlled... ) expressed on the plasma membrane of L-cells, enhancing L-cell number and secretion (Cani et al., 2013; Petersen et al., 2014; Plaisancie et al., 1995; Psichas et al., 2014; Tarini and Wolever, 2010; Tolhurst et al., 2012). Many other bacterial metabolites...

Chimerel, Catalin; Emery, Edward; Summers, David K.; Keyser, Ulrich; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Bacterial Growth in Distribution Systems:? Effect of Assimilable Organic Carbon and Biodegradable Dissolved Organic Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the distribution systems fed by ozonated water, HPCs were correlated (R2 = 0.96) using an exponential model with the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at each sampling site. ... Also, it was observed that ozonation caused a significant increase in the AOC concentration of the distribution system (over 100% increase) as well as a significant increase in the bacterial counts of the distribution system (average increase over 100%). ... The HPCs from the distribution systems fed by nanofiltration in parallel with lime-softening water also displayed an exponential correlation (R2 = 0.73) with an exponential model based on AOC. ...

Isabel C. Escobar; Andrew A. Randall; James S. Taylor

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Program Development  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

Atencio, Julian J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to fulfill federal contracting requirements and begin 8A certification process Sunbeam Indian Art: 3,400 to develop website capabilities to increase online sales Than Povi:...

370

The Study of Two Stages Anaerobic Digestion Application and Suitable Bio-Film as an Effort to Improve Bio-Gas Productivity from Jatropha Curcas Linn Capsule Husk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The conversion program from kerosene to LPG in Indonesia has positive impact on saving budget of fuel subsidized. However, the program does not only depend on LPG supply from overseas but also inadvisable related to the LPG availability in the world. Bio-gas is renewable energy which categorized as modern cooking oil. This gaseous bio- fuel is feasible in Indonesia due to plenty of bio-gas resources such as bio-mass and waste, simple technology, supporting tropical climate on bio-gas process, no food competition on material supply, minimizing global warming, reducing water pollution and producing organic fertilizer. Some series of study are conducted on dried Jatropha curcas Linn. capsule husk (JCL-CH) as bio-gas feedstock. The objective of the study is to create technology for managing JCL integrally according to bio-refinery principle. This paper will present two studies, JCL-CH performance in single stage digester compared with two stages digester in laboratory and palm fiber compared with glass wool as bio-film/bio-carrier in methanogenesis reactor. The studies were conducted in Research Laboratory PT. Bumimas Ekapersada, Bekasi, West Java from March until May 2012. A liter of glass bottle as digester, arranged in Randomized Complete Design, three replications per treatment placed in 32 °C water bath. The bio-gas feedstock was put continuously with Organic Loading Rate – OLR or concentration 1: 12 in single stage compared with 1: 12 and 1: 8 in two stages. The observed parameters were pH, temperature, bio-gas volume, methane concentration, volatile solid and acetic acid concentration. Bio-gas volume was measured by water displacement method and methane concentration was measured by gas chromatography. T-test was used for statistical analysis. The studies showed that two stages digester more efficient since it can increase methane concentration and bio-gas volume/gram VS. The bio-gas volume increase 63.83% in OLR 1: 8. Glass wool was more effective as bio-film carrier compared with palm fiber.

Praptiningsih G. Adinurani; Tony Liwang; Salafudin; Leopold O. Nelwan; Yosephianus Sakri; Satriyo K. Wahono; Roy Hendroko

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

For Developers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developers Developers Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) OSCARS Case Study Documentation User Manual FAQ Design Specifications Functional Specifications Notifications Publications Authorization Policy Default Attributes Message Security Clients For Developers DCN/OSCARS Implementation (Aug 2007) AAA BSS Pathfinder Topology Path realization Dojo development Interfaces Links Hardware Requirements DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net For Developers DCN/OSCARS Implementation (Aug 2007)

372

Macromolecular crowding can account for RNase-sensitive constraint of bacterial nucleoid structure  

SciTech Connect

The shape and compaction of the bacterial nucleoid may affect the accessibility of genetic material to the transcriptional machinery in natural and synthetic systems. To investigate this phenomenon, the nature and contribution of RNA and protein to the compaction of nucleoids that had been gently released from Escherichia coli cells were investigated using fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy. We propose that the removal of RNA from the bacterial nucleoid affects nucleoid compaction by altering the branching density and molecular weight of the nucleoid. We show that a common detergent in nucleoid preparations, Brij 58, plays a previously unrecognized role as a macromolecular crowding agent. RNA-free nucleoids adopt a compact structure similar in size to exponential-phase nucleoids when the concentration of Brij 58 is increased, consistent with our hypothesis. We present evidence that control and protein-free nucleoids behave similarly in solutions containing a macromolecular crowding agent. These results show that the contribution to DNA compaction by nucleoid-associated proteins is small when compared to macromolecular crowding effects.

Foley, Patricia L. [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5201 (United States)] [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5201 (United States); Wilson, David B. [Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5201 (United States)] [Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5201 (United States); Shuler, Michael L., E-mail: mls50@cornell.edu [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5201 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5201 (United States)

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance  

SciTech Connect

Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against {beta}-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against {beta}-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

Hoelzel, Christina S., E-mail: Christina.Hoelzel@wzw.tum.de [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mueller, Christa [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany); Harms, Katrin S. [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mikolajewski, Sabine [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany); Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)] [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Coupling between Switching Regulation and Torque Generation in Bacterial Flagellar Motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bacterial flagellar motor plays a crucial role in both bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis. Recent experiments reveal that the switching dynamics of the motor depend on the rotation speed of the motor, and thus the motor torque, nonmonotonically. Here we present a unified mathematical model which treats motor torque generation based on experimental torque-speed curves and the torque-dependent switching based on the conformational spread model. The model successfully reproduces the observed switching rate as a function of the rotation speed, and provides a generic physical explanation independent of most details. A stator affects the switching dynamics through two mechanisms: accelerating the conformational flipping rate of individual rotor-switching units, which contributes most when the stator works at a high torque and thus a low speed; and influencing a larger number of rotor-switching units within unit time, whose contribution is the greatest when the motor rotates at a high speed. Consequently, the switching rate shows a maximum at intermediate speed, where the above two mechanisms find an optimal output. The load-switching relation may serve as a mechanism for sensing the physical environment, similar to the chemotaxis mechanism for sensing the chemical environment. It may also coordinate the switch dynamics of motors within the same cell.

Fan Bai; Tohru Minamino; Zhanghan Wu; Keiichi Namba; Jianhua Xing

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat  

SciTech Connect

In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting.

Grant, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Zhong, R.; Wang, P.Z.; Chen, H.F.; Garcia, B.; Behme, R.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J. (University of Western Ontario (Canada))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens  

SciTech Connect

Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% ?-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

377

Composition of bacterial and archaeal communities in freshwater sediments with different contamination levels (Lake Geneva, Switzerland)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to compare the composition of bacterial and archaeal communities in contaminated sediments (Vidy Bay) with uncontaminated sediments (Ouchy area) of Lake Geneva using 16S rRNA clone libraries. Sediments of both sites were analysed for physicochemical characteristics including porewater composition, organic carbon, and heavy metals. Results show high concentrations of contaminants in sediments from Vidy. Particularly, high contents of fresh organic matter and nutrients led to intense mineralisation, which was dominated by sulphate-reduction and methanogenesis. The bacterial diversity in Vidy sediments was significantly different from the communities in the uncontaminated sediments. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a large proportion of Betaproteobacteria clones in Vidy sediments related to Dechloromonas sp., a group of dechlorinating and contaminant degrading bacteria. Deltaproteobacteria, including clones related to sulphate-reducing bacteria and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Geobacter sp.) were also more abundant in the contaminated sediments. The archaeal communities consisted essentially of methanogenic Euryarchaeota, mainly found in the contaminated sediments rich in organic matter. Multiple factor analysis revealed that the microbial community composition and the environmental variables were correlated at the two sites, which suggests that in addition to environmental parameters, pollution may be one of the factors affecting microbial community structure.

Laurence Haller; Mauro Tonolla; Jakob Zopfi; Raffaele Peduzzi; Walter Wildi; John Poté

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Technology Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In presenting this chapter on technology development, it must be stated that attempts to make an up-to-date technology survey are restricted, unfortunately, by the proprietary nature of recent advances, detail...

B. E. Conway

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

3-Dimensional Reconstruction and Modeling of BActerial Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R 3-Dimen Substanc Project s EMSL L Alice Do Microsco Co-inves Matthew Environm Bacterial (EPS) pla cellular p cell infec mineral s EPS's ch directly i heavy me fragile, h macromo in elucida immediat process t based, hi such as e method o scale ima near-to-n without a collapse processin EMSL ac Tecnai T 2006. We temperatu capability (CryoTE material Research an nsional Reco ces (EPS) start date: S Lead Investi ohnalkova opy group, E stigators: w Marshall mental Micro l extracellula ay essential processes suc ction, and ba substrates. In hemical react influence the etals and rad highly hydrat olecules pres ation of its s te collapse d hat is a prere igh resolutio electron micr of Cryo-elect aging of the native structu artifact cause after losing ng and dehyd cquired a dev T-12 (FEI) w e built upon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Inner Workings of a Bacterial Black Box Caught on Time-lapse Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 22, 2013 November 22, 2013 The Inner Workings of a Bacterial Black Box Caught on Time-lapse Video Cyanobacteria, found in just about every ecosystem on Earth, are one of the few bacteria that can create their own energy through photosynthesis and "fix" carbon - from carbon dioxide molecules - and convert it into fuel inside of miniscule compartments called carboxysomes. Using a pioneering visualization method, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) made what are, in effect, movies of this complex and vital cellular machinery being assembled inside living cells. They observed that bacteria build these internal compartments in a way never seen in plant, animal and other eukaryotic cells.

382

Classification of bacterial isolates of the Jordanian oil refinery petroleum sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to characterise the bacterial isolates of Jordanian oil refinery sludge for the purpose of using microorganisms in treating industrial wastewater effluents that contains hydrocarbons. Morphological, physiological, biochemical, antimicrobial susceptibility tests and 16S-23S rRNA spacer region polymorphism were used to characterise the isolated thermotolerant Bacillus, with specific reference to Bacillus strains. Data were coded and analysed by numerical techniques using the Gower coefficients and by average linkage (UPGMA) analysis. The study resulted in allocation of strains into two areas at 50.0% similarity levels and ten major phenons at 78.0% similarity level. Amplification of 16S-32S rRNA genes divided all strains into two areas at 48.0% similarity level; however, at 78.0% similarity level five taxonomically distinct phenons were evident.

Mohammed N. Battikhi; Bassam Mrayyan; Manar Atoum

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Structural, Functional, and Genetic Analysis of Sorangicin Inhibition of Bacterial RNA Polymerase  

SciTech Connect

A combined structural, functional, and genetic approach was used to investigate inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by sorangicin (Sor), a macrolide polyether antibiotic. Sor lacks chemical and structural similarity to the ansamycin rifampicin (Rif), an RNAP inhibitor widely used to treat tuberculosis. Nevertheless, structural analysis revealed Sor binds in the same RNAP {beta} subunit pocket as Rif, with almost complete overlap of RNAP binding determinants, and functional analysis revealed that both antibiotics inhibit transcription by directly blocking the path of the elongating transcript at a length of 2-3 nucleotides. Genetic analysis indicates that Rif binding is extremely sensitive to mutations expected to change the shape of the antibiotic binding pocket, while Sor is not. We suggest that conformational flexibility of Sor, in contrast to the rigid conformation of Rif, allows Sor to adapt to changes in the binding pocket. This has important implications for drug design against rapidly mutating targets.

Campbell,E.; Pavlova, O.; Zenkin, N.; Leon, F.; Irschik, H.; Jansen, R.; Severinov, K.; Darst, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration  

SciTech Connect

Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Software Developers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

386

Detection of a Reproducible, Single-Member Shift in Soil Bacterial Communities Exposed to Low Levels of Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the soils, the only difference from the control microcosms was the H2 addition. The H2...data logger (no. 12) and saved onto a computer (no. 13). FIG. 2. Kinetics of H2...Hunter. 2002. Determination of bacterial load by real-time PCR using a broad-range...

Catherine A. Osborne; Mark B. Peoples; Peter H. Janssen

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

387

Adaptation to herbivory by the Tammar wallaby includes bacterial and glycoside hydrolase profiles different from other herbivores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...binding domain chitin binding domain 0 0 CBM34 Alpha-amylase_N PF02903.6 Alpha amylase, N-terminal ig-like domain starch binding...Bacterial pullanase-associated domain-glucans amylose, amylopectin, pullulan, and oligosaccharide binding...

P. B. Pope; S. E. Denman; M. Jones; S. G. Tringe; K. Barry; S. A. Malfatti; A. C. McHardy; J.-F. Cheng; P. Hugenholtz; C. S. McSweeney; M. Morrison

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

604 Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 604629 This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw Tanvir Ahmed,a Thomas S. Shimizub and Roman Stocker*a Received 1st June 2010, Accepted 11th August 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00049c Microfluidics is revolutionizing the way we to gradients. Using microfluidics to study chemotaxis of free-swimming bacteria presents experimental

Entekhabi, Dara

389

Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar January 21, 2015...

390

Instrument Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for the ARM Central Facility: Multiple Remote Sensor Techniques Development K. Sassen Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt lake City, UT 84112 overcome the poor data-handling capabilities that handi- capped multiple-channellidar studies in the past. The true diversity of transmitted and received polarization states of our system is illustrated at the bottom of Table 1. Note that the first full POL field tests will be made at the upcoming 1991 Project First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Field Observations II campaign, where our unit will be one of severallidars and radars located at a central site serving as the hub for research aircraft operations. The increasingly complex data collected by the POL and other remote sensors using different wave-

391

FARADAYIC Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FARADAYIC FARADAYIC Development of Electrically Mediated Electrophoretic Deposition for Thermal Barrier Coatings F A R A D A Y T E C H N O L O G Y , IN C . Joseph Kell 1 , Heather McCrabb 1 , Binod Kumar 2 1 Faraday Technology, Inc., Clayton, Ohio, USA 2 University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio, USA Contact: josephkell@faradaytechnology.com; heathermccrabb@faradaytechnology.com Background There is a need for an affordable, non-line-of-sight method of coating complex-shaped turbine engine components with thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that have controllable thickness distributions and a microstructure that is sufficiently strain-tolerant and will survive in the turbine environment. Typically plasma spray (PS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) are used to deposit TBCs Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a non-line-of-sight process that is easy to control

392

Nozzle development  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

f_Binding-Motifs-in-Bacterial-Gene-Promoters-Modulate-Transcriptional2_4335.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulation and Systems Biology 2012:6 93-107 Regulation and Systems Biology 2012:6 93-107 doi: 10.4137/GRSB.S9357 This article is available from http://www.la-press.com. © the author(s), publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Ltd. This is an open access article. Unrestricted non-commercial use is permitted provided the original work is properly cited. OPEN ACCESS Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Gene Regulation and Systems Biology O R I G I N A L R E S E A R C H Gene Regulation and Systems Biology 2012:6 93 Binding Motifs in Bacterial Gene Promoters Modulate Transcriptional Effects of Global Regulators CRP and ArcA Michael R. Leuze 1, *, Tatiana V. Karpinets 2,3, *, Mustafa H. Syed 2 , Alexander S. Beliaev 4 and Edward C. Uberbacher 2 1 Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

394

Investigation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and bacterial regrowth in drinking water distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigated the variation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentrations in water from several typical water treatment plants and distribution systems in a northern city of China. It is concluded from this study that: (1) The AOC in most of the product water of the studied water treatment plants and the water from the associated distribution systems could not meet the biostability criteria of 50–100 ?g/L. (2) Only 4% of the measured AOC concentrations were less than 100 ?g/L. However, about half of the measured AOC values were less than 200 ?g/L. (3) Better source water quality resulted in lower AOC concentrations. (4) The variation of AOC concentrations in distribution systems was affected by chlorine oxidation and bacterial activity: the former resulted in an increase of AOC value while the latter led to a reduction in AOC. (5) The variation of AOC concentration followed different patterns in different distribution systems or different seasons due to their respective operational characteristics. (6) Less than 30% of AOC could be removed by a conventional treatment process, whereas 30–60% with a maximum of 50–60% could be removed by granular activated carbon (GAC). (7) The observation via scanning electron microscope (SEM) on distribution pipe tubercle samples demonstrated that the pipe inner wall was not smooth and bacteria multiplied in the crevice as well as in the interior wall of distribution pipes.

W Liu; H Wu; Z Wang; S.L Ong; J.Y Hu; W.J Ng

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A turbine oil-degrading bacterial consortium from soils of oil fields and its characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microbial consortium capable of degrading turbine oil (TuO), which consisted mainly of recalcitrant cycloalkanes and isoalkanes, was obtained from a soil sample collected from oil fields using repeated enrichment. When this consortium, named Atsuta A, was cultured in minimal salts medium containing 0.5% (w/v) TuO, it degraded 90% of TuO at 30 °C and pH 7 over 5 days. Although nine bacterial strains were isolated from the Atsuta A consortium, TuO degradation by the individual isolates and by a mixture of them was negligible. The community structure of the consortium, which was investigated by PCR–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes, changed significantly during the degradation of TuO. Four major bands (F, K, N and T) out of at least 23 DGGE bands significantly increased in intensity over time during incubation. The DGGE bands F, K and N corresponded to those of previously isolated species. However, DGGE band T did not correspond to any isolated strain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence collected from band T was 98% homologous to that of an unculturable strain belonging to the ?-Proteobacteria. The degradation of TuO in the consortium may occur by cooperation between the unculturable species corresponding to band T and other strains in the consortium, including species corresponding to bands F, K and N.

Hitoshi Ito; Reia Hosokawa; Masaaki Morikawa; Hidetoshi Okuyama

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

'In-Crystallo' Capture of a Michaelis Complex And Product Binding Modes of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism by which the binuclear metallophosphotriesterases (PTEs, E.C. 3.1.8.1) catalyse substrate hydrolysis has been extensively studied. The {mu}-hydroxo bridge between the metal ions has been proposed to be the initiating nucleophile in the hydrolytic reaction. In contrast, analysis of some biomimetic systems has indicated that {mu}-hydroxo bridges are often not themselves nucleophiles, but act as general bases for freely exchangeable nucleophilic water molecules. Herein, we present crystallographic analyses of a bacterial PTE from Agrobacterium radiobacter, OpdA, capturing the enzyme-substrate complex during hydrolysis. This model of the Michaelis complex suggests the alignment of the substrate will favor attack from a solvent molecule terminally coordinated to the {alpha}-metal ion. The bridging of both metal ions by the product, without disruption of the {mu}-hydroxo bridge, is also consistent with nucleophilic attack occurring from the terminal position. When phosphodiesters are soaked into crystals of OpdA, they coordinate bidentately to the {beta}-metal ion, displacing the {mu}-hydroxo bridge. Thus, alternative product-binding modes exist for the PTEs, and it is the bridging mode that appears to result from phosphotriester hydrolysis. Kinetic analysis of the PTE and promiscuous phosphodiesterase activities confirms that the presence of a {mu}-hydroxo bridge during phosphotriester hydrolysis is correlated with a lower pK{sub a} for the nucleophile, consistent with a general base function during catalysis.

Jackson, C.J.; Foo, J.-L.; Kim, H.-K.; Carr, P.D.; Liu, J.-W.; Salem, G.; Ollis, D.L.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Smart bacterial foraging algorithm based controller for speed control of switched reluctance motor drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a innovative methodology for Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) drive control using Smart Bacterial Foraging Algorithm (SBFA) is presented. This method mimics the chemotactic behavior of the E. Coli bacteria for optimization. The proposed algorithm uses individual and social intelligences, so that it can search responses among local optimums of the problem adaptively. This method is used to tune the coefficients of a conventional Proportion–Integration (PI) speed controller for SRM drives with consideration of torque ripple reduction. This matter is done by applying the proposed algorithm to a multi-objective function including both speed error and torque ripple. This drive is implemented using a DSP-based (TMS320F2812) for an 8/6, 4-kW SRM. The simulation and experimental results confirm the improved performance of adjusted PI controller using SBFA in comparison with adjusted PI controller using standard BFA. Excellent dynamic performance, reduced torque ripple and current oscillation can be achieved when the coefficients of PI controller are optimized by using SBFA.

Ehsan Daryabeigi; Behzad Mirzaeian Dehkordi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Long range excitonic transport in a biomimetic system inspired by the bacterial light-harvesting apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light-harvesting I-PufX core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy [S. Bahatyrova et al., Nature (London) 430, 1058 (2004)]. Here, we discuss optimal exciton transfer in a biomimetic system closely modeled on the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane using a Markovian quantum model with dissipation and trapping added phenomenologically. In a deliberate manner, we neglect the high level detail of the bacterial light-harvesting complex and its interaction with the phonon bath in order to elucidate a set of design principles that may be incorporated in artificial pigment-scaffold constructs in a supramolecular assembly. We show that our scheme reproduces many of the most salient features found in their natural counterpart and may be largely explained by simple electrostatic considerations. Most importantly, we show that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robustness with respect to spatial and spectral disorder between and within complexes. The implications of such an arrangement are discussed in the context of biomimetic photosynthetic analogs capable of transferring energy efficiently across tens to hundreds of nanometers.

Harel, Elad [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacterial Flora of Integrated Fish Farming Environments of Pakistan and Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacterial Flora of Integrated Fish Farming Environments of Pakistan and Tanzania ... Percentages of single and multiple antimicrobial resistances among the Pakistani and Tanzanian isolates (S, susceptible; A, antimicrobial/s; PK, Pakistan; TNZ, Tanzania). ... Screening of the 14 dfr positive isolates from Pakistan and 12 from Tanzania for the occurrence of the int2 gene yielded int2 among eight Pakistani isolates and two Tanzanian isolates. ...

Syed Q. A. Shah; Duncan J. Colquhoun; Hamisi L. Nikuli; Henning Sørum

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Dynamic characteristics of bacterial community in a sulphate-reducing bioreactor fed with acetate and intermittent ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acetotrophic Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria (ASRB) were enriched in a sulphidogenic Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) fed with acetate/ethanol and diagnosed by Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The CSTR was run for 65 days with synthetic wastewater containing sulphate and acetate with intermittent ethanol at hydraulic retention time of 10 h. The Sulphate-Removal Rate (SRR) reached to 3.8 g/(Lâ?¢day) after 35 days of start-up. The SSCP profiles of bacterial community changed rapidly at the beginning of start-up before Desulphococcus sp., Desulphomicrobium sp., Aminomonas and Anaerolinea formed a stable community. Bacterial diversity decreased when the ethanol in the influent was replaced by acetate of equal Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). Desulphomicrobium sp. was enriched and found to have a significant role in acetate utilisation. When ethanol was re-added instead of acetate of equal COD strength, microbial diversity increased and the Desulphomicrobium band of SSCP profiles became weak. At the later start-up stage, the 16S rRNA gene clone library indicated the presence of bacteria belonging to six different known phyla and sequences with similarities to those of sulphate-reducing bacteria accounted for 22%. The SSCP band sequences revealed that the characteristics of bacterial community populations resembled those of clone library sequences. The present study showed the addition of ethanol to influent would enhance bacterial diversity and SRR, ASRB could be enriched and Desulphomicrobium sp. was the primary source of acetate oxidation.

Yangguo Zhao; Nanqi Ren; Aijie Wang; Yiwei Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Synthesis of chalcogenide ternary and quaternary nanotubes through directed compositional alterations of bacterial As--S nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis of chalcogenide ternary and quaternary nanotubes through directed compositional alterations of bacterial As--S nanotubes Shenghua Jiang,a Fang Liu,b Min-Gyu Kim,c Jae-Hong Lim,b Kun-Jae Lee--S--Se and As--Cd--S) and quaternary (i.e. As--Cd--S--Se) composite nanotubes were synthesized using biotic As

Chen, Wilfred

402

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process); 14th Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

Reported here is the progress on the Development of Biological Coal Gasification for DOE contract No. DE-AC21-90MC27226 MOD A006. Task 1, NEPA Compliance and Updated Test Plan has been completed. Progress toward Task 2, Enhanced Methane Production, is reported in the areas of bacterial strain improvement, addition of co-substrates, and low cost nutrient amendment. Conclusions reached as a result of this work are presented. Plans for future work are briefly outlined.

NONE

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

Analysis of Substrate Access to Active Sites in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenase Hydroxylases: X-Ray Crystal Structure of Xenon-Pressurized Phenol Hydroxylase from Pseudomonas Sp Ox1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In all structurally characterized bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase proteins, a series of hydrophobic cavities in the ?-subunit trace a conserved path from the protein exterior to the carboxylate-bridged ...

McCormick, Michael S.

404

Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish, detected by nested reverse transcription-PCR of 16S rRNA sequences.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chinook salmon for control of bacterial kidney disease, annual report FY. U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife, Oreg. 17. Kawasaki, E. S. 1990. Amplification of RNA, p. 21-27...

H B Magnússon; O H Fridjónsson; O S Andrésson; E Benediktsdóttir; S Gudmundsdóttir; V Andrésdóttir

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Growth condition and bacterial community for maximum hydrolysis of suspended organic materials in anaerobic digestion of food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the effects of changing pH (5–7) and temperature (T..., 40–60 °C) on the efficiencies of bacterial hydrolysis of suspended organic matter (SOM) in wastewater from food waste recycling (FWR) and...

Man Deok Kim; Minkyung Song; Minho Jo…

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility  

SciTech Connect

Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (UNC)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

A comprehensive insight into bacterial virulence in drinking water using 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to comprehensively investigate bacterial virulence in drinking water, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential pathogenic bacteria and virulence factors (VFs) in a full-scale drinking water treatment and distribution system. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed high bacterial diversity in the drinking water (441–586 operational taxonomic units). Bacterial diversity decreased after chlorine disinfection, but increased after pipeline distribution. ?-Proteobacteria was the most dominant taxonomic class. Alignment against the established pathogen database showed that several types of putative pathogens were present in the drinking water and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had the highest abundance (over 11‰ of total sequencing reads). Many pathogens disappeared after chlorine disinfection, but P. aeruginosa and Leptospira interrogans were still detected in the tap water. High-throughput sequencing revealed prevalence of various pathogenicity islands and virulence proteins in the drinking water, and translocases, transposons, Clp proteases and flagellar motor switch proteins were the predominant VFs. Both diversity and abundance of the detectable \\{VFs\\} increased after the chlorination, and decreased after the pipeline distribution. This study indicates that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing can comprehensively characterize environmental pathogenesis, and several types of putative pathogens and various \\{VFs\\} are prevalent in drinking water.

Kailong Huang; Xu-Xiang Zhang; Peng Shi; Bing Wu; Hongqiang Ren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a {open_quote}receiver domain{close_quote} in the family of {open_quote}two-component{close_quote} regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

Volkman, B.F.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Molecular mechanism of bundle formation by the bacterial actin ParM  

SciTech Connect

The actin homolog ParM plays a microtubule-like role in segregating DNA prior to bacterial cell division. Fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy have shown that ParM forms filament bundles between separating DNA plasmids in vivo. Given the lack of ParM bundling proteins it remains unknown how ParM bundles form at the molecular level. Here we show using time-lapse TIRF microscopy, under in vitro molecular crowding conditions, that ParM-bundle formation consists of two distinct phases. At the onset of polymerization bundle thickness and shape are determined in the form of nuclei of short helically disordered filaments arranged in a liquid-like lattice. These nuclei then undergo an elongation phase whereby they rapidly increase in length. At steady state, ParM bundles fuse into one single large aggregate. This behavior had been predicted by theory but has not been observed for any other cytomotive biopolymer, including F-actin. We employed electron micrographs of ParM rafts, which are 2-D analogs of 3-D bundles, to identify the main molecular interfilament contacts within these suprastructures. The interface between filaments is similar for both parallel and anti-parallel orientations and the distribution of filament polarity is random within a bundle. We suggest that the interfilament interactions are not due to the interactions of specific residues but rather to long-range, counter ion mediated, electrostatic attractive forces. A randomly oriented bundle ensures that the assembly is rigid and that DNA may be captured with equal efficiency at both ends of the bundle via the ParR binding protein.

Popp, David, E-mail: dpopp@imcb.a-star.edu.sg [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos, 138673 Singapore (Singapore); Narita, Akihiro [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nagoya University Graduate School of Science, Structural Biology Research Center and Division of Biological Sciences, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Iwasa, Mitsusada [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Maeda, Yuichiro [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [ERATO 'Actin Filament Dynamics' Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nagoya University Graduate School of Science, Structural Biology Research Center and Division of Biological Sciences, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Robinson, Robert C. [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos, 138673 Singapore (Singapore)] [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos, 138673 Singapore (Singapore)

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

"Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bacterial Biofilms","Lanni, Eric J.; Masyuko, Rachel N.; Driscoll, Callan M.; Aerts, Jordan T.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.","2014-08-26T04:00:00Z",11...

411

TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in Bacterial Biofilms Lanni Eric J Masyuko Rachel N Driscoll Callan M Aerts Jordan T Shrout Joshua D Bohn Paul W Sweedler Jonathan V None USDOE Office of Science SC...

412

Psychology of Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,Psychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck andPsychology of Sustainable Development. Norwell, MA: Kluwer

Milfont, Taciano Lemos

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase, a Regulatory Enzyme for Bacterial Glycogen Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and J. Preiss. 1998. Starch: basic science to biotechnology...wheat endosperm increases seed yield. Proc. Natl...pyrophosphorylase in regulating starch levels in plant tissues...genes in relation to starch biosynthesis during seed development in Vicia...

Miguel A. Ballicora; Alberto A. Iglesias; Jack Preiss

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

upper (hydroelectric) development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

upper (hydroelectric) development, upper (hydroelectric) station, upstream (hydroelectric) development, upstream (hydroelectric) station ? Oberstufe f, oberes Wasserkraftwerk n, Oberliegerkraftwerk

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Microbiological and Physicochemical Characterization of Small-Scale Cocoa Fermentations and Screening of Yeast and Bacterial Strains To Develop a Defined Starter Culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsequently centrifuged at 100 g and 4C for 10 min to remove large particles. The supernatant was further centrifuged at 8,000 g and...MH Zwietering. 2011. Theobroma cacao L., the food of the gods: quality determinants of commercial cocoa beans, with particular...

Gilberto Vinícius de Melo Pereira; Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo Miguel; Cíntia Lacerda Ramos; Rosane Freitas Schwan

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watershed MGD Million Gallons per Day n Number of Samples (or E. coli isolates) NA-MUG Nutrient Agar with 4-methylumbelliferyl- ?-D-glucuronide (MUG) mTEC Membrane Thermotolerant E. coli OSSF Onsite Sewage Facility QAPP Quality Assurance... Protection Agency (EPA) method 1603 modified mTEC (USEPA 2006), and 5) collecting at least 50 known source fecal samples for the isolation of E. coli and augmentation of the Texas E. coli BST Library. Building on previous work conducted in the LRW (TSSWCB...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................... 14 Laboratory Procedures ........................................................................................ 14 Results ................................................................................................................. 15 Known... forming units (CFU) per 100 mL .................................................................................... 15 Table 6 Known source fecal samples collected in the Lampasas River Watershed . 17 Table 7 City, volume, and discharge location...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

Quantitative divergence of the bacterial root microbiota in Arabidopsis thaliana relatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...imported into R (R Development Core Team, http://www.R-project.org) to plot Fig.174 S7. We randomly chose the data file...Lake784 Michigan College, LMC; Michigan Extension, ME; North Liberty, NL and Route Marker,785 RM). (B) Taxonomic assignments...

Klaus Schlaeppi; Nina Dombrowski; Ruben Garrido Oter; Emiel Ver Loren van Themaat; Paul Schulze-Lefert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Biosynthesis of bacterial glycogen: purification and structural and immunological properties of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides ADPglucose synthetase.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was applied to a thin-layer cellulose sheet (20 by 20 cm; Eastman Kodak no. 6064...Rfof 0.22 on thin-layer cellulose sheets developed in 2-propanol-2-butanone-1...cross-reactivity upon sequence resem- blance among lysozymes. I. Comparison ofprecipitin...

S G Yung; J Preiss

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Bioconversion to Bacterial Single Cell Protein for Animal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OF EUTROPHIC NUTRIENTS FROM WASTEWATER AND THEIR BIOCONVERSION TO BACTERIAL SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FOR ANIMAL FEED ......................................................................................................10 3. Nutritive quality of A. eutrophus biomass grown in wastewater (digester elutriate) as a protein

District of Columbia, University of the

423

Individual Development and Excutive Development Plan Resources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

link. CDR Menu image linked to Leadership Development Resource Center (LDRC) Career Interest Career Planning Federal Resume IDPEDP Interviewing Skills Is Management for Me...

424

COMING SOON DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMING SOON DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING THE JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. · Rigorous analysis of existing development "solutions" through an engineering or economic lens. FOR MORE, interdisciplinary journal applying engineering and economic research to the problems of poverty. Published studies

Jacobs, Lucia

425

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen 1 of 5 This office coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional and state classified personnel. Customized training and orga- nizational development consulting services

426

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Locations

Stephens, Graeme L.

427

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location

Stephens, Graeme L.

428

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State University training and organiza- tional development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson

429

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State University training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson

Stephens, Graeme L.

430

Developer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Below are access to resources, guides, and tutorials for OpenEI Developers. Contents 1 Content Developer 2 Linked Data 2.1 Background 2.2 Outside Resources 3 Links to developer...

431

Published: February 17, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 2435 dx.doi.org/10.1021/es103115a |Environ. Sci. Technol. 2011, 45, 24352441  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information ABSTRACT: The variable biocatalyst density in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode biofilm and the development of anode biofilm architecture under different external loadings, with duplicate acetate-fed single these steady-state reactors generally showed comparable profiles despite the fact that anode biofilm

Mench, Matthew M.

432

NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20, 1976 LBL-5293 NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banksof California. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banks andof practical heat engines based on this phenomenon is

Banks, Ridgway

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

434

Coal Development (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

435

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations...

436

SSL Market Development Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SSL Market Development Workshop – Nov 12-13The 2014 DOE SSL Market Development Workshop gathers perspectives from government, industry, cities, utilities, designers, specifiers, retailers,...

437

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of...

438

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: DATE: EXECUTIVE CORE QUALIFICATION 1: LEADING CHANGE This core qualification encompasses the ability to develop and implement an organizational vision which integrates key national and program

439

Structuring product development processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes operational frameworks for structuring product development processes. The primary objective of this research is to develop procedures to minimize iterations during the development process which adversely affect development time and costs. Several procedures are introduced to restructure the development process. The computation of the corresponding product development times is facilitated by two Markov models addressing different types of learning. The methodologies are employed to identify a set of managerial concerns in restructuring the product development processes. The developed framework has become an integral part of a re-engineering project for the development of rocket engines at Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International. Throughout the paper, the methodologies are illustrated with the help of this process.

Reza Ahmadi; Thomas A. Roemer; Robert H. Wang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of these tools continues to grow. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides Web development capabilities to government agencies and organizations interested in converting training and education programs based on traditional means of communication into a variety of tools that suit the technology skills of today's health care providers and patients. ORISE develops Web-based training and informational products that expand the reach of targeted health messages to key audiences. Our specific capabilities include: Web applications development User experience testing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

China Business Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China Business Development Postgraduate Programme #12;Programme: China Business Development with China: Intercultural Management 3 1 Daily life and business behaviour explained from a cultural perspective Chinese strategic thinking China's political constellation and its impact on business life Human

Einmahl, Uwe

442

Global New Product Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the age of ubiquitous internet bandwidth, the development of a global market, coupled with rapid development of what once were underdeveloped countries and regions has led to many companies thinking and act...

Russell Watt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Developing a Marketing Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development of Operation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are gradually developing a total hospital information system known as GUNMAS (Gunma University Network for Medical-Hospital- Information Archiving System). an operation system is also being developed as part o...

Seiji Kato M.D.; Yasuharu Kitani M.D.…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

X-ray Crystal Structure of the Bacterial Conjugation Factor PsiB, a Negative Regulator of RecA  

SciTech Connect

During bacterial conjugation, genetic material from one cell is transferred to another as single-stranded DNA. The introduction of single-stranded DNA into the recipient cell would ordinarily trigger a potentially deleterious transcriptional response called SOS, which is initiated by RecA protein filaments formed on the DNA. During F plasmid conjugation, however, the SOS response is suppressed by PsiB, an F-plasmid-encoded protein that binds and sequesters free RecA to prevent filament formation. Among the many characterized RecA modulator proteins, PsiB is unique in using sequestration as an inhibitory mechanism. We describe the crystal structure of PsiB from the Escherichia coli F plasmid. The stucture of PsiB is surprisingly similar to CapZ, a eukaryotic actin filament capping protein. Structure-directed neutralization of electronegative surfaces on PsiB abrogates RecA inhibition whereas neutralization of an electropositive surface element enhances PsiB inhibition of RecA. Together, these studies provide a first molecular view of PsiB and highlight its use as a reagent in studies of RecA activity.

Petrova, Vessela; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; George, Nicholas P.; McCaslin, Darrell; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L. (UW)

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gammasphere software development  

SciTech Connect

Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

Piercey, R.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

United Nations Development Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Development Policy Energy and Atmosphere Programme Development Programme with support from the Government of Norway #12;The views expressed in this volume. #12;5 Acknowledgements 6 Notes on Authors 7 Foreword 9 Executive Summary 27 Introduction: Energy

451

Understanding the degradation of Congo red and bacterial diversity in an air–cathode microbial fuel cell being evaluated for simultaneous azo dye removal from wastewater and bioelectricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the mechanism of Congo red degradation and bacterial diversity in a single-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) incorporating a microfiltration membrane and ... a mixture of Congo red and glucose a...

Jian Sun; Youming Li; Yongyou Hu; Bin Hou…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The potential of glycerol in freezing preservation of turbine oil-degrading bacterial consortium and the ability of the revised consortium to degrade petroleum wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The turbine oil (TuO)-degrading bacterial consortium Tank-2 (original Tank-2) was preserved as a glycerol stock at ?80 °C from 2009 to 2012. Storage methods have been unavailable so far for any TuO-degrading bacterial consortia or isolates. To evaluate the usefulness of glycerol stock, the original Tank-2 consortium frozen in glycerol at ?80 °C was thawed and then revived by repeated culture in mineral salts medium (MSM) containing 0.5% (w/w) TuO (revived Tank-2). The revived Tank-2 consortium exhibited a high activity to degrade TuO, which was equivalent to that of original Tank-2. It also degraded car engine oil, used car engine oil, Arabian light and Vityaz crude oils and TuO in wastewater. These results indicated that a glycerol stock at ?80 °C was useful for storing Tank-2. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) that targeted the V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the DGGE band profiles of principal bacteria were significantly different between the original and revived Tank-2 consortia and between the revived Tank-2 culture grown in MSM containing TuO and that grown in MSM containing other types of petroleum products. This suggested that bacterial strains inherently residing in Tank-2 could adjust their compositions based on the storage and culture conditions.

Kumiko Kurachi; Reia Hosokawa; Marina Takahashi; Hidetoshi Okuyama

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process)  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the project is to develop an advanced, clean coal biogasification (MicGAS) Process. The objectives of the research during FY 1993--94 were to: (1) enhance kinetics of methane production (biogasification, biomethanation) from Texas lignite (TxL) by the Mic-1 consortium isolated and developed at ARCTECH, (2) increase coal solids loading, (3) optimize medium composition, and (4) reduce retention time. A closer analysis of the results described here indicate that biomethanation of TxL at >5% solids loading is feasible through appropriate development of nutrient medium and further adaptation of the microorganisms involved in this process. Further understanding of the inhibitory factors and some biochemical manipulations to overcome those inhibitions will hasten the process considerably. Results are discussed on the following: products of biomethanation and enhance of methane production including: bacterial adaptation; effect of nutrient amendment substitutes; effects of solids loading; effect of initial pH of the culture medium; effect of hydrogen donors and carbon balance.

Walia, D.S.; Srivastava, K.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

John J. Kilbane II

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Examination and characterization of distribution system biofilms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analyzer. As- similable organic carbon (AOC) was determined by the methods of Van der Kooij et al. (41, 42). AOC determina- tions were based on growth...C). Nutritional parameters (TOC and AOC) were infrequently monitored and, although...

M W LeChevallier; T M Babcock; R G Lee

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Boundaries for Biofilm Formation: Humidity and Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Yucca Mountain is located at the Nevada Test Site, 100 miles northwest of Las...oxygenated volcanic tuff at the Nevada Test Site (1, 10, 11). When native...exist in the rock and soil of the Nevada Test Site (5, 16, 21). Studies by...

Terry Ann Else; Curtis R. Pantle; Penny S. Amy

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Examination and characterization of distribution system biofilms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...18 May 1987/Accepted 21 August 1987 Investigations concerning the role of distribution...not occurring at the treatment plant. Remedial actions to control the coliform episode...forms in a water distribution system: a remedial approach. J. Am. Water Works Assoc...

M W LeChevallier; T M Babcock; R G Lee

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Individual Development Plan (IDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Individual Development Plan (IDP) Individual Development Plan (IDP) SAMPLE 10/01/2012 to 09/30/2013 Training Reason Developmental Activity Description Training Cost Travel Cost Total Cost Hours Start Date/ Completion Date Short Range Goal 1: Enhance Leadership Skills Development Mentoring Receive mentoring from a higher grade employee (s) and provide mentoring to lower grade employee(s). 0 0 0 TBD 1/1/2013 Development Instructor led EM Leadership Excellence Program - Interpersonal Communication Skills 0 0 0 8 6/15/2013 Development Instructor led Federal Executive Institute (OPM): Leadership for a Democratic Society $18,300 0 0 30 day residential TBD Development Shadowing Shadow one or more SES employees for one or two day period to learn leadership techniques. 0 0 0 TBD TBD

459

Geothermal energy development  

SciTech Connect

This book studies the impact of geothermal energy development in Imperial County, California. An integrated assessment model for public policy is presented. Geothermal energy resources in Imperial County are identified. Population and employment studies project the impact of geothermal on demography and population movement in the county. A public opinion, and a leadership opinion survey indicate support for well-regulated geothermal development. Actual development events are updated. Finally, research conclusions and policy recommendations are presented.

Butler, E.W.; Pick, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Common components of industrial metal-working fluids as sources of carbon for bacterial growth. [Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas  

SciTech Connect

Water-based metal-working fluids in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). Pure strains of predominating bacteria were isolated from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which were tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 x 10/sup 3/) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 10/sup 8/ CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified.

Foxall-vanAken, S.; Brown, J.A. Jr.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S. Jr.; Olsen, R.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

462

Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Gary Spanner Economic Development Office Manager 509372-4296 ROB1210 Robin Conger Program Manager 509372-4328 ROB1221 Bernard Hansen Entrepreneurial Programs Manager...

463

USER MANUAL Developers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foundation, US Department of Energy Primary developers: Darius Abramavicius: 2003 -- 2010 (initiator) Wei.......................................................................7 3 Basic usage and functionality.....................................................................................13 A. System Made of Known Energy Levels...........................................................14

Mukamel, Shaul

464

Bioenergy for Sustainable Development  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sustainable Bioenergy High-Impact Opportunity Sustainable Energy For All BIOENERGY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Overview * Energy poverty is widespread and prevents economic...

465

SRNL LDRD - Developed Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developed Technologies Porous Wall Hollow Glass Microspheres Porous Wall Hollow Glass Microspheres Tiny Glass Spheres for Energy Storage, Medical Applications and Other Uses...

466

Development Michael Short  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plant for buses PEM fuel cell, 120 kW, hydrogen Automotive fuel cell systems for primary power PEM and technology development PEM fuel cell, 5 kW, hydrogen Fuel cell system for the Space Shuttle Orbiter Alkaline fuel cell development Continued commercialization Reduce product cost Reduce size and weight Increase

467

Growth & Development / Parental Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

participate; if one parents is lost, fledging rates usually drop #12;Winkler reduced clutch size from 5 to 3Growth & Development / Parental Care #12;Embryonic Development Although the sequence of 42 stages the egg The hatching muscle helps the chick break out of the egg Parents typically dispose of the egg

Butler, Christopher J.

468

The Development Commission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... report of the Development Commissioners, covering the year ended March 31, 1936, reviews the expenditure from the Development Fund on agricultural and rural economy, fisheries, the construction and improvement ... the Agricultural Research Council, in addition to £43,000 to the latter Council for capital ...

1937-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

469

Sun Academic Developer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sun Academic Developer Program Kim Jones Vice President Government, Education & Health Care Sun Microsystems, Inc. FY08 Campus Ambassador Programme Your Name Here Sun Microsystems, Inc. #12;2 FY08 Campus Ambassador Programme #12;3 Sun Academic Developer Initiative On-Campus Events and Contests Open Source

McCusker, Guy

470

Internet Polling Development Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the development of a polling engine to launch the above procedures and pass the data on to the database server. This final report describes the automated polling procedures that have been developed for Synergistic, Highland and ABB loggers. This report also...

Klima, P.; Lockhart, D.; Haberl, J. S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

NERSC Science Gateway Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Forward Design Forward Home » R & D » Science Gateway Development Science Gateway Development Science gateways are conduits for bringing HPC to the web. NERSC assists in the development and hosting of gateways that make NERSC compute and data resources more broadly useful. To ease the development of these gateways, the NERSC Web Toolkit (NEWT) makes science gateways accessible to anyone familiar with HTML and javascript. You can find more detailed information about science gateway development in the related NERSC user documentation and at the NEWT website. What are some use cases? A science gateway can be tailored to the needs within a team of researchers allowing them to share data, simulation results, and information among users who may be geographically distributed.

472

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

473

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Utah Technology Commercialization Office Location: Salt Lake City, UT Project Title Energy Innovation Commercialization Center Proposed Action or Project Description The project proposes to create an Energy Innovation Commercialization Center at the University of Utah. The scope of work for this project is in two phases: tasks necessary to create the Center and actual commercialization and outreach to other institutions. Specific activities for Phase I for the Center startup include 1) negotiating contract, prepare correspondence, establishing website, meetings, scheduling activities, developing metrics, and designing and creating a database. Phase 2 activities for Center

474

Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by I. J. Pickering and G. N. George by I. J. Pickering and G. N. George Sulfur is essential for all life, but it plays a particularly central role in the metabolism of many anaerobic microorganisms. Prominent among these are the sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that oxidize sulfide (S2-) to sulfate (SO42-). Many of these organisms can store elemental sulfur (S0) in "globules" for use when food is in short supply (Fig. 1). The chemical nature of the sulfur in these globules has been an enigma since they were first described as far back as 1887 (1); all known forms (or allotropes) of elemental sulfur are solid at room temperature, but globule sulfur has been described as "liquid", and it apparently has a low density – 1.3 compared to 2.1 for the common yellow allotrope a-sulfur. Various exotic forms of sulfur have been proposed to explain these properties, including micelles (small bubble-like structures) formed from long-chain polythionates, but all of these deductions have been based upon indirect evidence (for example the density was estimated by flotation of intact cells), and many questions remained.

475

Mesosomes: membranous bacterial organelles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cusses in considerable detail the mechanisms of energy conservation and transformation in bac- teria and...the fundamental in- terrelationships of metabolic energy conserva- tion and energy utilization are the same in bacteria and in mitochondria...

J W Greenawalt; T L Whiteside

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Wilmington, DE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

Crawford, D.L.; Ramachandra, M.

1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

Bacterial Fermentative Hydrogen Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Melanie Mormile, Missouri University of Science and Technology, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

479

Calibrating bacterial evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analysis: Aeromonas hydrophila, exeCDE (X66504), oriC (X89469), pilC (U20255) tapABCD (U20255); Aeromonas salmonicida, exeCDE (X80505), oriC (U65741), pilC (U95640), tapAB (AF059248), tapC (AF059249), tapD (AF059250...

Howard Ochman; Susannah Elwyn; Nancy A. Moran

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development The Environmental Energy Technologies Division performs analysis, research, and development leading to better energy technologies and reduction of adverse energy-related environmental impacts. The Division carries out research on batteries and fuel cells, electricity grid technologies, energy-efficient building technologies; energy analysis; environmental impacts of energy use, including on air quality and climate, indoor environmental quality, and sensors and materials for energy applications. Batteries and Fuel Cells Advanced energy technologies for low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries and fuel cells for automotive and stationary applications. Buildings Energy Efficiency Working with industry to develop technologies for buildings that increase energy efficiency, and improve the comfort, health and safety of building occupants.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Essays on development finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays that examine investment choices in less developed countries. Chapter 1 examines how the structure of existing microfinance contracts may discourage risky but high-expected return ...

Fischer, Gregory M. (Gregory Mark)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Validated SCR Concept Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Validated SCR Concept Development 2007 DEER Conference, Detroit, MI Dr. Michael Traver, IAV Inc James Ireton, IAV Inc Dr. Lutz Krmer, IAV GmbH Jrgen Manns, IAV GmbH Poster...

483

Remote Sensing in Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...social development in Tanzania. Mainland Tanzania is ad-ministratively divided into 20...encounters methods of manip-ulating solar reflectance values to bring out spectral...these planets were formed. In the outer solar system, evidence indicates that large...

Charles K. Paul; Adolfo C. Mascarenhas

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

484

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

485

Training and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training and Development Administration Assistant Vice Chancellor Lori Castro VC Business Senior Manager Conflict Resolution Nancy Heischman Training Coordinator Vacant Principal Technical Training Consultant Frank Widman Health Care Facilitator / Interim Benefits Manager Frank Trueba Disability

California at Santa Cruz, University of

486

Education and Workforce Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

OPERATION BioenergizeME is BETO’s educational base camp for students, educators, and others seeking better understanding of the promises and challenges in developing a thriving bioeconomy.

487

Scott Koenig Development Officer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scott Koenig Development Officer Teri Lucie Thompson Senior Vice President & CMO UA FOUNDAT I/TV Station Mgr Frank Fregoso Chief Engineer Cheech Calenti IT Manager Ed Kesterson Radio Program Dir. AHSC

Utzinger, Urs

488

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview NIST's Role in Implementing Executive Order 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" #12;Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity - February 12, 2013 "The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow

Bentz, Dale P.

489

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview NIST's Role in Implementing Executive Order 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" #12;Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2013 · "The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow

490

Technology Diffusion and Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the technology diffusion and development that play a key role in climate change mitigation. Most of the authors are engineers with long business experience in this field. In Sect. 9.1, t...

Teruo Okazaki; Mitsutsune Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Watanabe…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

UESC Development Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers an update on the utility energy service contract (UESC) development and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

492

Senior Director Student Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Senior Director Student Development & Services Janet Teasdale Assistant to the Vice President, Conferences & Food Operations (dual campus) Andrew Parr Chaplains Roberta Fraser Inter-Fraternity & Panhellenic Community Service Learning Margot Fryer Alma Mater Society UBCV Graduate Student Society UBCV

Michelson, David G.

493

Community Development Fund (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available...

494

Geological Development of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Panama that geologists see today is a young ... /early Tertiary time. The geological development of Panama is a consequence of the relative motions ... igneous rocks that comprise much of present-day Panama f...

Russell S.Harmon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Essays on development economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is a collection of three independent papers in empirical development economics. The first chapter studies the effect of a family planning program in Bangladesh, which successfully reduced fertility, on ...

Ruthbah, Ummul Hasanath

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Advanced Interconnect Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

497

NOx Sensor Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

needed to meet emission targets and enable widespread use of diesel vehicles with better fuel economies: We are developing a novel sensor with the potential to meet OEM cost and...

498

Microbioreactors for bioprocess development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microbioreactor integrated with automated sensors and actuators as a step towards high-throughput bioprocess development. In particular, this thesis ...

Zhang, Zhiyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

USABC Battery Separator Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Separator Development P.I. - Ron Smith Presenter - Kristoffer Stokes, Ph.D. Celgard, LLC Project ID ES007 May 10, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

500

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z