Sample records for bacterial biofilm development

  1. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy measurements. Future applications of the SR-FTIR-based microfluidics approach may help explain why some bacteria maintain biofilms in given...

  2. A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a Manjunath Hegde of biofilm community formation. Here, we describe the development of a PDMS-based two-layer microfluidic flow

  3. Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style composition ­ isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK) ­ on non-cohesive glass beads (,63 mm determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development

  4. Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

  5. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasper, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 ? 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics andextracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

  6. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur...

  7. Inter- and Intra-kingdom Signaling in Bacterial Chemotaxis, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegde, Manjunath

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-o-C12HSL) and implemented it in an upgraded ?BF device. We showed that a QS system may be utilized with biofilm dispersal proteins to control consortial biofilm formation by removing an existing biofilm...

  8. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw biofilms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuzvinsky, Tom

    . Bis- phosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is characterized by necrotic jaw bone of BRONJ have been reported without mucosal breach, although in most cases patients who develop BRONJ haveElectrically conductive bacterial nanowires in bisphosphonate- related osteonecrosis of the jaw

  9. APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMATERIALS: NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOFILMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.; Berry, T.; Narayan, R.

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Biotechnology is the application of biological techniques to develop new tools and products for medicine and industry. Due to various properties including chemical stability, biocompatibility, and specific activity, e.g. antimicrobial properties, many new and novel materials are being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. Many of these materials are less than 100 nanometers in size. Nanotechnology is the engineering discipline encompassing designing, producing, testing, and using structures and devices less than 100 nanometers. One of the challenges associated with biomaterials is microbial contamination that can lead to infections. In recent work we have examined the functionalization of nanoporous biomaterials and antimicrobial activities of nanocrystalline diamond materials. In vitro testing has revealed little antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria and associated biofilm formation that enhances recalcitrance to antimicrobial agents including disinfectants and antibiotics. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies further demonstrated properties and characteristics of the material with regard to biofilm formation.

  10. Inter- and Intra-kingdom Signaling in Bacterial Chemotaxis, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegde, Manjunath

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and then removing the biofilm that displaced the first one. These types of synthetic QS circuits may be used to pattern biofilms by facilitating the re-use of platforms and to create sophisticated reactor systems that will be used to form bio-refineries....

  11. Microfluidic Systems for Investigating Bacterial Chemotaxis and Colonization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englert, Derek Lynn

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this work was to develop and utilize microfluidic models for investigating bacterial chemotaxis and biofilm formation - phenotypes that play key roles in bacterial infections. Classical methods for investigating chemotaxis...

  12. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase,Reaction-Driven Restructuring

  13. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase,Reaction-Driven

  17. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising fundsReal Property

  18. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising fundsReal PropertyReal-Time Chemical

  19. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. biofilms | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel...

  2. Role of AI-2 in oral biofilm formation using microfluidic devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sun Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofilms are highly organized bacterial structures that are attached to a surface. They are ubiquitous in nature and may be detrimental, causing numerous types of illnesses in living organisms. Biofilms in the human oral cavity are the main cause...

  3. EMSL - biofilms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofilms en New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  4. Biochemical composition and changes of extracellular polysaccharides1 (ECPS) produced during microphytobenthic biofilm development2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in a European15 intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) during winter. Microphytobenthic biomass16 characterization, biofilm, benthic33 ecology, intertidal mudflat34 35 Introduction36 Tidal flats are an essential. The high primary and secondary productivity of mudflats38 is linked to physical and biological processes

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid bacterial inclusion Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monomers and amyloids. Such transi- tions govern... processes as diverse as human protein-folding diseases, bacterial biofilm assembly, and the inheritance... that Q and N...

  6. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  7. Engineering Escherichia coli to Control Biofilm Formation, Dispersal, and Persister Cell Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Seok Hoon

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    was obtained that causes nearly complete biofilm dispersal by increasing cell death by the activation of proteases. Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) systems are important components of a wide variety of engineered biological devices, since autoinducers are useful...

  8. Role of protein acetylation, formation and dispersal of biofilms, and their impact on insects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Qun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacterial biofilms form on liquid/air and liquid/solid surfaces and consist of cells combined with an extracellular matrix such as exopolysaccharides, extracellular DNA, and glycoproteins. Bacteria have up to a 1000-fold increase of antibiotic...

  9. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  10. Effect of Nutrition on In Vitro Biofilm Formation of Gastrointestinal Associated Microbes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokazono, Asuka

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in response to nutrients that pass through the GI system, a high throughput system to assess biofilm formation was developed. Gastrointestinal-associated microbes, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, were assayed for biofilm formation...

  11. Stages common to all biofilms (medical and environmental) Stages unique to aquatic biofouling BiofilmThickness(m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of biofilms and support rational development of better antifouling materials. ST2, Project 1.11; March 2013 chemistry and features impact biofilm formation to enable rational development of new antifouling materials to mechanistic study of antifouling materials Begin ASTM method certification process Write proposals

  12. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  13. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Chuansheng [IALR; Nowak, Jerzy [VPISU; Seiler, John [VPISU

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently

  14. Artificial teeth : dental biofilm analysis on a chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Raymond Hiu-wai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an "artificial teeth" microfluidic device is developed that provides unprecedented control over the conditions required to simulate the growth of complex dental biofilm. Dental plaque formation is not only ...

  15. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via...

  16. Metabolic spatial variability in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Majors, Paul D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain bacteria are capable of transferring electrons derived from respiratory metabolism to solid extracellular electron-accepting materials1-4. This ability allows the organisms to use conductive substrata as their sole electron sink, generating electricity that is available for practical applications5-7. Geobacter is a biofilm-forming genus capable of this extracellular electron transfer8-11. Evidence in the literature suggests that Geobacter cells produce a conductive matrix to gain access to electron-accepting surfaces12,13. It has been hypothesized that cells that are more than tens of microns from the electron-accepting surface cannot respire because of electrical resistance in the matrix and thus remain metabolically inactive14-16. To test this hypothesis, we sought to determine whether the entire biofilm remains metabolically active and able to respire on an electron-accepting surface as the biofilm thickness increases. We developed and used a novel electrochemical-nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) microimaging system capable of sustaining an electrochemically active biofilm on a polarized electrode inside a superconducting magnet, allowing for simultaneous NMR and electrochemical investigation of a biofilm for the first time. Here, we show that Geobacter biofilms can grow to several hundred microns thick while respiring on an electrode and that the top of the biofilm remains metabolically active. This is only possible if the cells near the top are able to transfer electrons through the initial biofilm matrix to the electrode. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to verify electron transfer to uranium ions by metabolically active cells near the top of the biofilm. Our results reveal that extracellular electron transfer is not prevented by electrical resistance, even when the biofilm is hundreds of microns thick. Furthermore, the electron donor may be the limiting factor for respiration and the base of the biofilm may be less active despite being in close proximity to the electrode. Long-range electron transfer across metabolically inactive regions within Geobacter biofilms adds a novel facet to our comprehension of electrochemically active biology.

  17. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  18. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  19. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  20. Microfluidic Systems for Investigating Bacterial Chemotaxis and Colonization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englert, Derek Lynn

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    microfluidic model systems for chemotaxis and biofilm formation developed in this study addresses these drawbacks. Chemotaxis model system development was done in three stages. We first developed two static chemotaxis model systems - the two fluorophore...

  1. Simulating biofilm deformation and detachment with the immersed boundary method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarsan, Rangarajan; Stockie, John M; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the immersed boundary (or IB) method to simulate deformation and detachment of a periodic array of wall-bounded biofilm colonies in response to a linear shear flow. The biofilm material is represented as a network of Hookean springs that are placed along the edges of a triangulation of the biofilm region. The interfacial shear stress, lift and drag forces acting on the biofilm colony are computed by using fluid stress jump method developed by Williams, Fauci and Gaver [Disc. Contin. Dyn. Sys. B 11(2):519-540, 2009], with a modified version of their exclusion filter. Our detachment criterion is based on the novel concept of an averaged equivalent continuum stress tensor defined at each IB point in the biofilm which is then used to determine a corresponding von Mises yield stress; wherever this yield stress exceeds a given critical threshold the connections to that node are severed, thereby signalling the onset of a detachment event. In order to capture the deformation and detachment behaviour of a bio...

  2. From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

  3. Three-Dimensional Imaging and Quantification of Biomass and Biofilms in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorthe Wildenschild

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method to resolve biofilms in three dimensions in porous media using high-resolution synchrotron-based x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) has been developed. Imaging biofilms in porous media without disturbing the natural spatial arrangement of the porous media and associated biofilm has been a challenging task, primarily because porous media generally precludes conventional imaging via optical microscopy; x-ray tomography offers a potential alternative. One challenge for using this method is that most conventional x-ray contrast agents are water-soluble and easily diffuse into biofilms. To overcome this problem, silver-coated microspheres were added to the fluid phase to create an x-ray contrast that does not diffuse into the biofilm mass. Using this approach, biofilm imaging in porous media was accomplished with sufficient contrast to differentiate between the biomass- and fluid-filled pore spaces. The method was validated by using a two-dimensional micro-model flow cell where both light microscopy and CMT imaging were used to im age the biofilm. The results of this work has been published in Water Resources Research (Iltis et al., 2010). Additional work needs to be done to optimize this imaging approach, specifically, we find that the quality of the images are highly dependent on the coverage of the biofilm with Ag particles, - which means that we may have issues in dead-end pore space and for very low density (fluffy) biofilms. What we can image for certain with this technique is the biofilm surface that is well-connected to flow paths and thus well-supplied with nutrients etc.

  4. Laser-Generated Shockwaves for the Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Artemio

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization by modified Laser Spallation Technique (The Basic Laser Spallation Technique (Modified Laser Spallation Technique: “Top-Down”

  5. Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

  6. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  7. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam...

  8. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities,...

  9. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  10. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The “Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed” project was developed in response to the creek’s listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

  11. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boppart, Stephen

    groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces Dao Janjaroen a , Fangqiong Ling a , Guillermo Monroy b , Nicolas Pathogens a b s t r a c t Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E

  12. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; Gemma Husmillo; Kristine Lowe; J. Robert Paterek; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Various chemicals that inhibit the growth and/or the metabolism of corrosion-associated microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and methanogenic bacteria were evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit corrosion in experiments utilizing pure and mixed bacterial cultures, and planktonic cultures as well as mature biofilms. Planktonic cultures are easier to inhibit than mature biofilms but several compounds were shown to be effective in decreasing the amount of metal corrosion. Of the compounds tested hexane extracts of Capsicum pepper plants and molybdate were the most effective inhibitors of sulfate reducing bacteria, bismuth nitrate was the most effective inhibitor of nitrate reducing bacteria, and 4-((pyridine-2-yl)methylamino)benzoic acid (PMBA) was the most effective inhibitor of methanogenic bacteria. All of these compounds were demonstrated to minimize corrosion due to MIC, at least in some circumstances. The results obtained in this project are consistent with the hypothesis that any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion. This approach of controlling MIC by controlling the metabolism of biofilms is more environmentally benign than the current approach involving the use of potent biocides, and warrants further investigation.

  14. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing...

  15. Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

  16. actinomyces israelii biofilm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode biofilm several operational strategies for system optimization. ' INTRODUCTION Microbial fuel cells (MFCs |Environ. Sci. Technol. 2011, 45,...

  17. Bacterial adhesion in structured environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlander, Ronn S. (Ronn Samuel)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofilms-surface-bound communities of microbes-are a major medical concern, as they can be sources of infection that are difficult to eradicate. Their formation starts with the attachment of bacteria to available surfaces-often ...

  18. Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Tanvir, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacterial chemotaxis, a remarkable behavioral trait which allows bacteria to sense and respond to chemical gradients in the environment, has implications in a broad range of fields including but not limited to disease ...

  19. A fluid dynamics multidimensional model of biofilm growth: stability, influence of environment and sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio Clarelli; Cristiana Di Russo; Roberto Natalini; Magali Ribot

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we study in details the fluid dynamics system proposed in Clarelli et al (2013) to model the formation of cyanobacteria biofilms. After analyzing the linear stability of the unique non trivial equilibrium of the system, we introduce in the model the influence of light and temperature, which are two important factors for the development of cyanobacteria biofilm. Since the values of the coefficients we use for our simulations are estimated through information found in the literature, some sensitivity and robustness analyses on these parameters are performed. All these elements enable us to control and to validate the model we have already derived and to present some numerical simulations in the 2D and the 3D cases.

  20. Annual progress Report on research related to our research project “Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsurface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation” funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Mary

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this research project is to investigate and optimize the mechanisms for in situ immobilization of Pu species by naturally-occurring bacteria. Specific research objectives are: (a) investigate the mechanism of bacterial accumulation and immobilization of plutonium species by biofilm formation under aerobic conditions and (b) to demonstrate the direct and indirect stabilization of Pu via dissimilatory reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

  1. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Moscow, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  2. Bacterial Bleeding Canker of Horse Chestnut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacterial Bleeding Canker of Horse Chestnut -unraveling its secrets through genomics Sarah Green bleeding canker 3. Sequenced the genome of Pae to gain insights into its evolution and biology 1. Developed) #12;Genome sequencing Pae What does genomics mean? `Genomics' is the study of the genomes of organisms

  3. Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

  4. A bacterial ratchet motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Di Leonardo; L. Angelani; G. Ruocco; V. Iebba; M. P. Conte; S. Schippa; F. De Angelis; F. Mecarini; E. Di Fabrizio

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-propelling bacteria are a dream of nano-technology. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines could be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for micro-devices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric micro-gears can spontaneously rotate when immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the saw-toothed boundaries of a nano-fabricated rotor. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter's ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids.

  5. Role of AI-2 in oral biofilm formation using microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sun Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    biofilm formation. Microfluidic devices provide biomimetic environments and offer a simple method for executing multiple stimuli experiments simultaneously, thus, can be an extremely powerful tool in the study of QS in biofilms. In this study, we report...

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli to Control Biofilm Formation, Dispersal, and Persister Cell Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Seok Hoon

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    as input signals because they are small, diffuse freely in aqueous media, and are easily taken up by cells. To demonstrate that biofilms may be controlled for biotechnological applications such as biorefineries, we constructed a synthetic biofilm...

  7. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranthi K. Mandadapu; Jasmine A. Nirody; Richard M. Berry; George Oster

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. Furthermore, we propose several experiments to elucidate the torque-speed relationship in motors where the number of stators may not be constant. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental features of the flagellar motor, including: torque-speed and speed-ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the puzzle of swarming experiments.

  8. Effect of methanotrophic biofilm growth on the hydraulic conductivity of porous media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the biofilm surface in some cases increased eddy diffusion and external mass transfer rates into heterotrophic biofilms. Boawer et al. [1988] was able to draw the following conclusions from his experiments which addressed biofilm accumulation processes... and their effect on 11 hydraulic resistance in porous media: 1. Biofilm accumulation in the pore space increases the hydraulic resistance in small laminar capillary and porous media flow systems. 2. The tortuous flow paths in porous media increase the rate...

  9. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5? biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ? 30 ?m before acidification to ? 60 ?m after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5? biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5? biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  10. Optical reflectance assay for the detection of biofilm Shira L. Broschat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broschat, Shira Lynn

    Introduction A biofilm consists of a population of microbial organisms that are encased within a matrix of organic materials generated by the microbes themselves.1,2 Biofilms appear to be widespread and financial cost.5 Biofilms are integral to both water-borne and food-borne diseases. It has long been known

  11. Kinetics of Microbial Bromate Reduction in a Hydrogen-Oxidizing, Denitrifying Biofilm Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    Reactor Leon S. Downing, Robert Nerenberg Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences a hydrogen-based, deni- trifying membrane-biofilm reactor (MBfR) for bromate reduction, and report the first; denitrification; biofilm; hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor Introduction Bromate (BrOÀ 3 ) is an oxidized

  12. Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.N. (2008) Bacterial endophytes: recent developments andapplications for bacterial endophytes, including productionthat diazotrophic endophyte Herbaspirillum seropedicae could

  13. LATERAL GENE TRANSFER AND THE HISTORY OF BACTERIAL GENOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Ochman

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of this research were to elucidate the role and extent of lateral transfer in the differentiation of bacterial strains and species, and to assess the impact of gene transfer on the evolution of bacterial genomes. The ultimate goal of the project is to examine the dynamics of a core set of protein-coding genes (i.e., those that are distributed universally among Bacteria) by developing conserved primers that would allow their amplification and sequencing in any bacterial taxa. In addition, we adopted a bioinformatic approach to elucidate the extent of lateral gene transfer in sequenced genome.

  14. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  15. Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

  16. The importance of live biofilms in corrosion protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Letter The importance of live biofilms in corrosion protection Rongjun Zuo a , Esra Kus b , Florian, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, U-3222, Storrs, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion occurred within a few hours as indicated by characteristic changes in the impedance spectra. The corrosion

  17. In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

  18. Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

  19. aeruginosa biofilm development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that P. aeruginosa is prone to revise the interaction with its host during persistent lifestyle. Finally, sequence analysis of Pos-STM genes in longitudinally P. aeruginosa...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Convergent development of anodic bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treatment plant sample known to produce consistent power densities, a second wastewater treatment plant Joint Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant)) produced substantially less power. Denaturing gradient gel). The aerobic effluent (1.16 mW mÀ 2 ) and river water (1.14 mW mÀ 2 ) inocula produced a higher maximum power

  1. Role of protein acetylation, formation and dispersal of biofilms, and their impact on insects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Qun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 34 3.3.6 Cellulose inhibits biofilm formation on polystyrene plates ........................................................................... 35 3.3.7 OmpA influences cellulose production and biofilm formation through CpxR... .................................................... 58 4.3.3 BdcA binds c-di-GMP to control phenotypes............. 60 4.3.4 BdcR (YjgJ) regulates bdcA ....................................... 61 4.3.5 Protein engineering of BdcA for biofilm dispersal..... 65 4.4...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - autotrophic nitrogen-removing biofilm Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Notre Dame Collection: Biotechnology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 18 The influence of land use on stream biofilm nutrient...

  3. aerobic packed-bed biofilm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation Dietrich, Lars 98 Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater Environmental Management and...

  4. Cryo-electron tomography of bacterial viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C. [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)] [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Wright, Elizabeth R., E-mail: erwrigh@emory.edu [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteriophage particles contain both simple and complex macromolecular assemblages and machines that enable them to regulate the infection process under diverse environmental conditions with a broad range of bacterial hosts. Recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) make it possible to observe the interactions of bacteriophages with their host cells under native-state conditions at unprecedented resolution and in three-dimensions. This review describes the application of cryo-ET to studies of bacteriophage attachment, genome ejection, assembly and egress. Current topics of investigation and future directions in the field are also discussed.

  5. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  6. Role of Rhizobium endoglucanase CelC2 in cellulose biosynthesis and biofilm formation on plant roots and abiotic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for these bacteria. PVC tabs were used to examine the three-for biofilm-forming ability on PVC tabs. Wild type ANU843A-C) and biofilm formation on PVC (D-F) tabs of the studied

  7. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IX International Conference on Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST IX) was held from 14 to 19 January 2007 in Laughlin, NV, a town in the Mojave Desert on the Nevada-Arizona border near old Route 66 and along the banks of the Colorado River. This area is a home to rattlesnakes, sagebrush, abandoned gold mines, and compulsive gamblers. What better venue could scientists possibly dream of for a professional meeting? So there they were, about 190 scientists gathered in the Aquarius Casino Resort, the largest hotel and casino in Laughlin, discussing the latest advances in the field. Aside from a brief excursion to an abandoned gold mine and a dinner cruise on the Colorado River, the scientists focused on nothing but their data and hypotheses, in spirited arguments and rebuttals, and outlined their visions and future plans in a friendly and open environment. The BLAST IX program was dense, with nearly 50 talks and over 90 posters. For that reason, this meeting report will not attempt to be comprehensive; instead it will first provide general background information on the central topics of the meeting and then highlight only a few talks that were of special interest to us and hopefully to the wider scientific community. We will also attempt to articulate some of the future directions or perspectives to the best of our abilities. The best known and understood bacterial motility mechanism is swimming powered by flagella. The rotation of bacterial flagella drives this form of bacterial movement in an aqueous environment. A bacterial flagellum consists of a helical filament attached to the cell body through a complex structure known as the hook-basal body, which drives flagellar rotation. The essential components of the basal body are the MotA-MotB motor-stator proteins bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. These stator proteins interact with proteins that comprise the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings, which are components of the motor imbedded in the cytoplasmic membrane. The interaction causes the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings to rotate along with the flagellar filaments. The energy for flagellar rotation comes from proton motive force or other ions, especially sodium in marine bacteria, which generate an electrochemical gradient across the cell membrane. Three proteins, FliM, FliN, and FliG, located at the base of the motor act as switches that control the direction of flagellar rotation. As exemplified by the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, changes in the direction of flagellar rotation affect the swimming behavior of the bacterial cell. Counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of the flagella causes the flagellar filaments to form a bundle that pushes the cell forward in a 'run.' In contrast, clockwise (CW) rotation causes the flagellar bundle to fly apart, and the cell tumbles to reorient to a new direction for the ensuing run upon the return of CCW rotation. The interchanging pattern of CCW and CW rotations produces a random walk, composed of relatively long runs with occasional direction changes or turns. By modulating the lengths of the runs or the frequency of tumbling, bacteria can regulate their motile behavior to move in a desirable direction. Many bacteria can also move on surfaces. Except for flagellum-driven swarming motility, all the other forms of known bacterial surface movement involve no flagella. The flagellum-independent surface motility, known as gliding, is observed in cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma species, Cytophaga-Flexibacterium species, and Myxococcus species. Without a doubt, the most thoroughly studied model gliding bacterium is Myxococcus xanthus, which also serves as a prokaryotic model for developmental biology due to its ability to develop multicellular fruiting bodies. M. xanthus cells use gliding motility both to hunt for food during vegetative growth and to aggregate during fruiting body formation. When nutrients are present, groups of cells or swarms propagate and move outward like hunting wolf packs in search of additional macromole

  8. Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribot, Magali

    Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement of cells : chemotaxis, biofilms, algae, etc... Magali Ribot;Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Hyperbolic

  9. Page 1 of 8 2012 MSU Center for Biofilm Engineering Testing Surface Disinfectants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Center for Biofilm Engineering As an example of the recognition that concurrent controls are importantPage 1 of 8 © 2012 MSU Center for Biofilm Engineering Testing Surface Disinfectants This series The importance of concurrent control carriers in laboratory tests of surface disinfectants [Key Words: efficacy

  10. Mcanismes de prcipitation de carbonate de calcium dans les biofilms photosynthtiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mécanismes de précipitation de carbonate de calcium dans les biofilms photosynthétiques Pascale carbonate de calcium dans les systèmes benthiques est souvent associée aux biofilms photosynthétiques, et, les stromatolithes et les microbialithes. Cette biocalcification modifie les flux de CO2, de calcium

  11. Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Kesaano, Maureen; Moll, Karen; Smith, Terence; Gerlach, Robin; Carlson, Ross; Miller, Charles D.; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith; Gardner, Robert D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Microalgal biofilm based technologies are of keen interest due to their high biomass concentrations and ability to utilize renewable resources, such as light and CO2. While photoautotrophic biofilms have long been used for wastewater remediation applications, biofuel production represents a relatively new and under-represented focus area. However, the direct measurement and characterization of fundamental parameters required for physiological analyses are challenging due to biofilm heterogeneity. This study evaluated oxygenic photosynthesis and biofuel precursor molecule production using a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) operated at field- and laboratory-scales for wastewater remediation and biofuel production, respectively. Clear differences in oxygenic-photosynthesis, respiration and biofuel-precursor capacities were observed between the two systems and different conditions based on light and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen depletion was not found to have the same effect on lipid accumulation compared to prior planktonic studies. Physiological characterizations of these microalgal biofilms identify potential areas for future process optimization.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  13. Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Brian P.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Fleck, Laura E.; LaFleur, Michael D.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Coleman, K.; Leonard, Steve N.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lewis, Kim

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The current antibiotic crisis stems from two distinct phenomena-drug resistance, and drug tolerance. Resistance mechanisms such as drug efflux or modification prevent antibiotics from binding to their targets 1, allowing pathogens to grow. Antibiotic tolerance is the property of persister cells, phenotypic variants of regular bacteria 2. Antibiotics kill by corrupting targets, but these are inactive in dormant persisters, leading to tolerance. Persisters were first identified by Joseph Bigger in 1944, when he discovered a surviving sub-population of Staphylococcus following treatment with penicillin3. Persisters are largely responsible for recalcitrance of chronic diseases such as tuberculosis, and various infections associated with biofilms - endocarditis, osteomyelitis, infections of catheters and indwelling devices, and deep-seated infections of soft tissues 4. There are a number of redundant pathways involved in persister formation5,6 precluding development of drugs inhibiting their formation. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP 4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease resulting in death of growing cells 7. Here we show that ADEP4 activated ClpP becomes a fairly non-specific protease and kills persister cells by degradation of over 400 intracellular targets. clpP mutants are resistant to ADEP4 7, but we find that they display increased susceptibility to killing by a range of conventional antibiotics. Combining ADEP4 with rifampicin leads to eradication of persisters, stationary and biofilm populations of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in a deep-seated murine infection. Target corruption/activation provides an approach to killing persisters and eradicating chronic infections.

  14. Biosynthesis and structural characterization of silver nanoparticles from bacterial isolates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaki, Sahar, E-mail: saharzaki@yahoo.com [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)] [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt); El Kady, M.F. [Fabrication Technology Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute (ATNMRI), Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria (Egypt)] [Fabrication Technology Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute (ATNMRI), Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria (Egypt); Abd-El-Haleem, Desouky [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)] [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: In this study five bacterial isolates belong to different genera were found to be able to biosynthesize silver nanoparticles. Biosynthesis and spectral characterization are reported here. Highlights: {yields} About 300 bacterial isolates were screened for their ability to produce nanosilvers {yields} Five of them were potential candidates for synthesis of silver nanoparticles {yields} Production of silver nanoparticles was examined using UV-Vis, XRD, SEM and EDS. {yields} The presence of nanoparticles with all five bacterial isolates was confirmed. -- Abstract: This study aimed to develop a green process for biosynthesis of silver nanomaterials by some Egyptian bacterial isolates. This target was achieved by screening an in-house culture collection consists of 300 bacterial isolates for silver nanoparticle formation. Through screening process, it was observed that strains belonging to Escherichia coli (S30, S78), Bacillus megaterium (S52), Acinetobacter sp. (S7) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S54) were potential candidates for synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The extracellular production of silver nanoparticles by positive isolates was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results demonstrated that UV-visible spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver ion showed a peak at 420 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph showed formation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 15-50 nm. XRD-spectrum of the silver nanoparticles exhibited 2{theta} values corresponding to the silver nanocrystal that produce in hexagonal and cubic crystal configurations with different plane of orientation. In addition, the signals of the silver atoms were observed by EDS-spectrum analysis that confirms the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in all positive bacterial isolates.

  15. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations augmented by phylogenetic representations of relatedness will not and enzootic outbreaks noted through international outbreak surveillance systems, and 'representative' genetic sequences from each outbreak. (5) Interpretation of genetic comparisons between an attack strain and reference strains requires a model for the network structure of maintenance foci, enzootic outbreaks, and human outbreaks of that disease, coupled with estimates of mutational rate constants. Validation of the model requires a set of sequences from exemplary outbreaks and laboratory data on mutation rates during animal passage. The necessary number of isolates in each validation set is determined by disease transmission network theory, and is based on the 'network diameter' of the outbreak. (6) The 8 bacteria in this study can be classified into 4 categories based on the complexity of the transmission network structure of their natural maintenance foci and their outbreaks, both enzootic and zoonotic. (7) For B. anthracis, Y. pestis, E. coli O157, and Brucella melitensis, and their primary natural animal hosts, most of the fundamental parameters needed for modeling genetic change within natural host or human transmission networks have been determined or can be estimated from existing field and laboratory studies. (8) For Burkholderia mallei, plausible approaches to transmission network models exist, but much of the fundamental parameterization does not. In addition, a validated high-resolution typing system for characterizing genetic change within outbreaks or foci has not yet been demonstrated, although a candidate system exists. (9) For Francisella tularensis, the increased complexity of the transmission network and unresolved questions about maintenance and transmission suggest that it will be more complex and difficult to develop useful models based on currently available data. (10) For Burkholderia pseudomallei and Clostridium botulinum, the transmission and maintenance networks involve complex soil communities and metapopulations about which very little is known. It is not clear that these pathogens can be brought into the in

  16. 3D Imaging of Microbial Biofilms: Integration of Synchrotron Imaging and an Interactive Visualization Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Mathew; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the interactions of structured communities known as “biofilms” and other complex matrixes is possible through the X-ray micro tomography imaging of the biofilms. Feature detection and image processing for this type of data focuses on efficiently identifying and segmenting biofilms and bacteria in the datasets. The datasets are very large and often require manual interventions due to low contrast between objects and high noise levels. Thus new software is required for the effectual interpretation and analysis of the data. This work specifies the evolution and application of the ability to analyze and visualize high resolution X-ray micro tomography datasets.

  17. Mep72, a Metzincin Protease That Is Preferentially Secreted by Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passmore, Ian J.; Nishikawa, Kahoko; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Bowden, Steven D.; Chung, Jade C. S.; Welch, Martin

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and increased mortality (18, 19). A pair of two-component sensor systems have been identified that reciprocally regulate T3SS expression and biofilm formation (20, 21). As a result, biofilm cells often are thought of as being less virulent than planktonic cells... cultureswere grown inflasks with vigorous shaking and harvested after 3 h (late exponential phase; optical density at 600 nm [OD600], #4;1) or 9 h (stationary phase; OD600, #4;9). Continuous-flow biofilms were grown in AGSY medium as previ- ously described...

  18. Comparing Vacuum and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation for Postionization of Laser Desorbed Neutrals from Bacterial Biofilms and Organic Fullerene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaspera, Gerald L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, USA Comparing Vacuum and Extreme Ultravioletradiation, extreme ultraviolet, vacuum ultravioletAbstract Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation from 8 -

  19. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not well-explored. Here we report on the metagenomic and proteogenomic analyses of a compost-derived bacterial consortium adapted to switchgrass at elevated temperature with high...

  20. In situ chemical imaging at the sub-biofilm-scale | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Liu, Z Zhu, AE Tucker, WB Chrisler, EA Hill, S Thevuthasan, Y Lin, S Liu, and MJ Marshall. 2014. "In Situ Molecular Imaging of Hydrated Biofilm in a Microfluidic Reactor by...

  1. Nickel and cadmium ions inhibit quorum sensing and biofilm formation without affecting viability in Burkholderia multivorans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Nickel and cadmium ions inhibit quorum sensing and biofilm formation without affecting viability transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assays, we show that sub-millimolar concentrations of nickel (Ni

  2. Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

  3. The dynamics of surface detachment and quorum sensing in spatially controlled biofilm colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Hongchul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofilms represent a highly successful life strategy of bacteria in a very broad range of environments and often have negative implications for industrial and clinical applications, as their removal from surfaces and the ...

  4. The effect of adjacent layers like biofilms on mass transport through nanofiltration membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothe, Dieter

    , which is always present on the membrane surface in crossflow filtration processes, as well as a feed to high tangential flow velocities in crossflow filtrations, the size of this biofilm is limited to values

  5. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Usup, Gires [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  6. Effect of methanotrophic biofilm growth on the hydraulic conductivity of porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the physical properties of porous media. The key element influencing flow is the growth of a biofilm which coats the particles and clogs the pores. This thesis presents results of an investigation of the effect of microbial growth on the hydraulic... Afass in u Column Section (mg cells) = TOC?+ 2. 125 (7) Mathematical Model A mathematical model was used to describe biofilm induced changes in the flow parameters of porous media under biostimulated conditions. Because of the fragile nature...

  7. Leading Edge Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekalanos, John

    Leading Edge Review Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution David M. Raskin,1 Rekha Seshadri,2 Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA 2 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive.02.002 The availability of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences has altered the study of bacte- rial pathogenesis

  8. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals....

  9. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals....

  10. Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial Multiheme Cytochromes. Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial Multiheme...

  11. Sulfur Isotopes as Indicators of Amended Bacterial Sulfate Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Amended Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Processes Influencing Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation. Sulfur Isotopes as Indicators of Amended Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Processes...

  12. air bacterial contamination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partial Bacterial Proteome Extraction Kit Cat. No. 539780 1. Introduction Proteome analysis implies Lebendiker, Mario 44 Understanding and Overcoming Bacterial Biology and...

  13. Aquatic microenvironments in bacterial ecology and diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Dana E., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular surveys have revealed tremendous bacterial diversity in the world's oceans; yet how do these diverse bacteria with the same essential nutrient requirements co-exist in the same environment? This study examines ...

  14. Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological Wastewater Treatment of the microbial communities within biological wastewater treatment reactors is incomplete due to limitations microbial community composition in five biological wastewater treatment reactors in China and the United

  15. Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Michelle H.; Saurey, Sabrina D.; Lee, Brady D.; Parker, Kent E.; Eisenhauer, Emalee ER; Cordova, Elsa A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry evaluations, a more complete understanding of the balance between system additions (nutrients, groundwater) and biology can be achieved, thus increasing long-term predictions of performance. These analyses uniquely provide information that can be used in optimizing the overall performance, efficiency, and stability of the system both in real time as well as over the long-term, as the system design is altered or improved and/or new streams are added.

  16. HYDROGEN-BASED, HOLLOW-FIBER MEMBRANE BIOFILM REACTOR FOR REDUCTION OF PERCHLORATE AND OTHER OXIDIZED CONTAMINANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    HYDROGEN-BASED, HOLLOW-FIBER MEMBRANE BIOFILM REACTOR FOR REDUCTION OF PERCHLORATE AND OTHER be added. Hydrogen is an ideal electron donor, as it is non-toxic, inexpensive, and sparsely soluble. We tested a hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for reduction of perchlorate

  17. Feeding ecology of Liza spp. in a tidal flat: Evidence of the importance of primary production (biofilm) and associated meiofauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    mullets are unique among temperate-region fish species in their ability to feed on mudflat biofilm into the mudflat but exported mud, biofilm, and associated meiofauna. The results of mullet stomach content flat ecosystems are discussed. Keywords: Grey mullets; Feeding ecology; Mudflat; Microphytobenthos

  18. Final Report - Ferrographic Tracking of Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William P. Johnson

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed during the past three years has been extremely productive. Ferrographic capture was utilized in analysis of several thousand field samples collected from arrays of multilevel samplers during three intensive field campaigns conducted at two shallow sandy aquifer sites in Oyster, VA. This work has shown resulted in three important conclusions: (1) Ferrographic capture provides unparalleled low quantitation limits for bacterial cell enumeration (Johnson et al., 2000). (2) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of increased bacterial removal rates (from groundwater) that corresponded to increased populations of protozoa in the groundwater (Zhang et al., 2001). This novel data allowed determination of bacterial predation rates by protists in the field, a consideration that will be important for successful bioaugmentation strategies. (3) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of detachment of indigenous cells in response to breakthrough of injected cells in groundwater (Johnson et al., 2001). The implication of this unique observation is that bacterial transport, specifically bacterial attachment and detachment, may be much more dynamic than has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies. Dynamic attachment and detachment of bacteria in groundwater may lead to greatly increased transport distances over long terms relative to what has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies.

  19. Hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor for reduction of perchlorate and other oxidized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    Hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor for reduction of perchlorate and other. For drinking water treatment, an electron donor must be added. Hydrogen is an ideal electron donor, as it is non-toxic, inexpensive, and sparsely soluble. We tested a hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane

  20. Impact of Initial Biofilm Growth on the Anode Impedance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    . Ramasamy,1 Zhiyong Ren,2 Matthew M. Mench,1 John M. Regan2 1 Fuel Cell Dynamics and Diagnostics LaboratoryARTICLE Impact of Initial Biofilm Growth on the Anode Impedance of Microbial Fuel Cells Ramaraja P: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the behavior of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) during

  1. Corrosion control using regenerative biofilms (CCURB) on brass in different media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Corrosion control using regenerative biofilms (CCURB) on brass in different media D. OOrnek a , T of Chemical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion and Environmental The corrosion behavior of cartridge brass (UNS C26000) exposed to artificial seawater (AS) and Luria Bertani (LB

  2. Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms on Aluminum 2024 and Brass in Different Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms on Aluminum 2024 and Brass in Different Media F. Mansfeld,a, *,z H. Hsu,a D. O¨ rnek,b T. K. Wood,b and B. C. Syrettc a Corrosion and Environmental Effects Institute, Palo Alto, California 94303, USA The corrosion behavior of Al 2024-T3 and C26000 brass exposed

  3. Clinical Research Training Fellowships in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clinical Research Training Fellowships in Bacterial Pathogenesis Two fellowships available in 2013 Training Programme is aimed at clinically qualified professionals (usually at speciality Registrar level on providing future clinical academics with the knowledge and analytical skills that will enable them to pursue

  4. Attoyac Bayou Bacterial Source Tracking Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, E.; Gentry, T.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iv List Of Tables Table 1. Texas E. coli BST Library (ver. 5-13, cross-library validation) composition and rates of correct classification (RCCs) by Jackknife analysis of ERIC-RP composite data sets using an 80% similarity cutoff and three... v List of Acronyms ARCC Average Rate of Correct Classification BST Bacterial Source Tracking DNA Deoxyribonucleic Acid E. coli Escherichia coli ERIC Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence mTEC Modified...

  5. Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

  6. An in-vivo study of electrical charge distribution on the bacterial cell wall by Atomic Force Microscopy in vibrating force mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Marliere; Samia Dhahri

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-vivo electromechanical Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of charge distribution on the cell wall of Gram plus Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria, naturally adherent to a glass substrate, in physiological conditions. The method presented in this paper relies on a detailed study of AFM approach-retract curves giving the variation of the interaction force versus distance between tip and sample. In addition to classical height and mechanical (as stiffness) data, mapping of local electrical properties, as bacterial surface charge, was proved to be feasible at a spatial resolution better than few tens of nanometers. This innovative method relies on the measurement of the cantilever's surface stress through its deflection far from (higher than 10nm) the repulsive contact zone. The variations of surface stress come from modification of electrical surface charge of the cantilever (as in classical electrocapillary measurements) likely stemming from its charging during contact of both tip and sample electrical double layers. This method offers an important improvement in local electrical and electrochemical measurements at the solid-liquid interface particularly in high-molarity electrolytes when compared to technics focused on the direct use of electrostatic force. It thus opens a new way to directly investigate in-situ biological electrical surface processes involved in numerous practical and fundamental problems as bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, microbial fuel cell, etc.

  7. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  8. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  9. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  10. Bacterial infections of the equine uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffery, Arlene Celeste

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    additional mares conceived during the first estrus post-treatment. Eight mares did not become pregnant. Of these eight mares, one is sub-fertile and two aborted fifty-five and fifty-nine day fetuses before diagnosis of a bacterial uterine infection... handling. The internship was performed at American Farms in Scottsdale, Arizona, from February 4 to May 7, 1985. American Farms is a fourteen- acre Arabian horse farm averaging 250-280 head of horses. A total of eight stallions stand at stud, with three...

  11. The Carboxysome and Other Bacterial Microcompartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Greenleaf, William B.; Kinney, James N.

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    - Carboxysomes are part of the carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria and chemoautotrophs. - Carboxysomes are a subclass of bacterial microcompartments (BMCs); BMCs can encapsulate a range of metabolic processes. - Like some viral particles, the carboxysome can be modeled as an icosahedron-in its case, having 4,000-5,000 hexameric shell subunits and 12 surface pentamers to generate curvature. - The threefold axis of symmetry of the CsoS1D protein in carboxysomes forms a pore that can open and close, allowing for selective diffusion. - Genetic modules encoding BMC shell proteins and the enzymes that they encapsulate are horizontally transferable, suggesting they enable bacteria to adapt to diverse environments.

  12. alcohol intestinal bacterial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) Larvae Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: turkey bedding and corn silage. Aerobic culturing yielded 25 bacterial species, including 11...

  13. Bacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwill, Rob; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tate. Reducing microbial contamination in storm runoff fromManagement of microbial contamination in storm runoff fromBacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine

  14. acetic acid bacterial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and...

  15. antibodies bacterial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and...

  16. acute bacterial meningitis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and...

  17. activated sludge bacterial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wastes in Georgia are discussed. The main groups of microbiological community of the peat suspension used in the experiments of bacterial leaching are investigated and the...

  18. Lessons learned from bacterial transport research at the South Oyster Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, T.; Hubbard, S.S.; Onstott, T.C.; DeFlaun, M.F.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi-investigator, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The experiments were conducted during the time period 1999-2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: (1) quantification of bacterial transport in physically, chemically and biologically heterogeneous aquifers, (2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, (3) scale effects in bacterial transport, (4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, (5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and (6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort. Lessons learned are summarized in each of these areas. The body of literature resulting from South Oyster Site research has been widely cited and continues to influence research into the controls exerted by aquifer heterogeneity on reactive transport (including microbial transport). It also served as a model (and provided valuable experience) for subsequent and ongoing highly-instrumented field research efforts conducted by DOE-sponsored investigators.

  19. High Performance Bioanode Development for Fermentable Substrates via Controlled Electroactive Biofilm Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihashi, Osamu [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioanode was optimized to generate current densities reaching 38.4 4.9 A m-2, which brings bioelectrochemical systems closer to commercial consideration. Glucose and lactate were fed together in a continuous or fed-batch mode. The current density increased from 2.3 A m-2 to 38.4 A m-2 over a 33 day period and remained stable thereafter. The coulombic efficiency ranged from 50% to 80%. A change in substrate concentration from 200 mg L-1 to 5 mg L-1 decreased maximum current density from 38.4 A m-2 to 12.3 A m-2. The anode consortia included Firmicutes (55.0%), Proteobacteria (41.8%) and Bacteroidetes (2.1%) constituting two potential electrogenic genera: Geobacter (6.8%) and Aeromonas (31.9%). The current production was found to be limited by kinetics during the growth period (33 days), and mass transfer, thereafter. The results indicate the necessity of removing spent biomass for efficient long term operation and treatment of wastewater streams.

  20. Influence of sulfate reducing bacterial biofilm on corrosion behavior of low-alloy, high-strength steel (API-5L X80)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (EIS), polarization resistance (Rp) and open circuit potential (OCP) were used to analyze the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the phys- icoelectric interactions

  1. Reconstruction of a Bacterial Genome from DNA Cassettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Dupont; John Glass; Laura Sheahan; Shibu Yooseph; Lisa Zeigler Allen; Mathangi Thiagarajan; Andrew Allen; Robert Friedman; J. Craig Venter

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This basic research program comprised two major areas: (1) acquisition and analysis of marine microbial metagenomic data and development of genomic analysis tools for broad, external community use; (2) development of a minimal bacterial genome. Our Marine Metagenomic Diversity effort generated and analyzed shotgun sequencing data from microbial communities sampled from over 250 sites around the world. About 40% of the 26 Gbp of sequence data has been made publicly available to date with a complete release anticipated in six months. Our results and those mining the deposited data have revealed a vast diversity of genes coding for critical metabolic processes whose phylogenetic and geographic distributions will enable a deeper understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling, microbial ecology, and rapid rate evolutionary processes such as horizontal gene transfer by viruses and plasmids. A global assembly of the generated dataset resulted in a massive set (5Gbp) of genome fragments that provide context to the majority of the generated data that originated from uncultivated organisms. Our Synthetic Biology team has made significant progress towards the goal of synthesizing a minimal mycoplasma genome that will have all of the machinery for independent life. This project, once completed, will provide fundamentally new knowledge about requirements for microbial life and help to lay a basic research foundation for developing microbiological approaches to bioenergy.

  2. Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment in the decomposition of organic matter during the composting process. However, microbial communities active in composts of bacterial communities in livestock manure compost was determined based on terminal restriction fragment

  3. Bacterial phytopathogens and genome science Joa~ o C Setubal1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setubal, João Carlos

    Bacterial phytopathogens and genome science Joa~ o C Setubal1 , Leandro M Moreira2 and Ana CR da Silva3 There are now fourteen completed genomes of bacterial phytopathogens, all of which have been generated in the past six years. These genomes come from a phylogenetically diverse set of organisms

  4. Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fertin, Guillaume

    Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

  5. Atmospheric cloud water contains a diverse bacterial community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kourtev, P. S.; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shepson, Paul B.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric cloud water contains an active microbial community which can impact climate, human health and ecosystem processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Most studies on the composition of microbial communities in clouds have been performed with orographic clouds that are typically in direct contact with the ground. We collected water samples from cumulus clouds above the upper U.S. Midwest. The cloud water was analyzed for the diversity of bacterial phylotypes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. DGGE analyses of bacterial communities detected 17e21 bands per sample. Sequencing confirmed the presence of a diverse bacterial community; sequences from seven bacterial phyla were retrieved. Cloud water bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by members of the cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes.

  6. Steps in the bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Mora; Howard Yu; Yoshiyuki Sowa; Ned S. Wingreen

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a highly efficient rotary machine used by many bacteria to propel themselves. It has recently been shown that at low speeds its rotation proceeds in steps [Sowa et al. (2005) Nature 437, 916--919]. Here we propose a simple physical model that accounts for this stepping behavior as a random walk in a tilted corrugated potential that combines torque and contact forces. We argue that the absolute angular position of the rotor is crucial for understanding step properties, and show this hypothesis to be consistent with the available data, in particular the observation that backward steps are smaller on average than forward steps. Our model also predicts a sublinear torque-speed relationship at low torque, and a peak in rotor diffusion as a function of torque.

  7. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  8. drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate, 647 (1964). 6. W. J. Drury, Water Environ. Res. 71, 1244 (1999). 7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Current Drinking Water Standards (2000). 8

  9. Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    -chamber microbial fuel cells Zhiyong Ren a,c , Ramaraja P. Ramasamy b,1 , Susan Red Cloud-Owen b , Hengjing Yan 2010 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Electricity Biofilm Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy a b s t r in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated

  10. Effects of age and composition of field-produced biofilms on oyster larval setting Alaina H. Campbella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Rima B.

    no inhibitory effect. In contrast, the percentage of organic matter was negatively correlated with oyster set. An important negative effect observed during the study period was heavy predation by Stylochus ellipticusEffects of age and composition of field-produced biofilms on oyster larval setting Alaina H

  11. Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in Aquatic Systems: Interactions with Radionuclides (234Th (IV), 129 I) and Biofilms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Saijin

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory and field investigations were carried out to elucidate the importance of natural organic matter in aquatic systems, i.e., trace element scavenging (e.g., 234Th) by exopolymeric substances (EPS), formation of biofilms, as well...

  12. Mechanical reaction-diffusion model for bacterial population dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngamsaad, Waipot

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of mechanical interaction between cells on the spreading of bacterial population was investigated in one-dimensional space. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation has been formulated as a model for this dynamics. In this model, the bacterial cells are treated as the rod-like particles that interact, when contacting each other, through the hard-core repulsion. The repulsion introduces the exclusion process that causes the fast diffusion in bacterial population at high density. The propagation of the bacterial density as the traveling wave front in long time behavior has been analyzed. The analytical result reveals that the front speed is enhanced by the exclusion process---and its value depends on the packing fraction of cell. The numerical solutions of the model have been solved to confirm this prediction.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities in air et al. 2007; You et al. 2007). Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

  14. Use of Optical Mapping in Bacterial Genome Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Dibyendu [University of Florida

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dibyendu Kumar from the University of Florida discusses whole-genome optical mapping to help validate bacterial genome assemblies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  15. 1220 Comment sufficient to meet bacterial needs (let alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the recycling of organic carbon by consumers may help to explain apparently excessive demands of consumers- has led to the assertion that bacterial sec- toplankton supply in the summer epilim- ondary production

  16. Studies of bacterial homeostasis Sinorhizobium meliloti and Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Bryan William

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its plant host Medicago sativa, offers a tractable model to explore the bacterial requirements for endocytic survival in a eukaryotic host. It has been shown that during ...

  17. Motor-Driven Bacterial Flagella and Buckling Instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard Vogel; Holger Stark

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Many types of bacteria swim by rotating a bundle of helical filaments also called flagella. Each filament is driven by a rotary motor and a very flexible hook transmits the motor torque to the filament. We model it by discretizing Kirchhoff's elastic-rod theory and develop a coarse-grained approach for driving the helical filament by a motor torque. A rotating flagellum generates a thrust force, which pushes the cell body forward and which increases with the motor torque. We fix the rotating flagellum in space and show that it buckles under the thrust force at a critical motor torque. Buckling becomes visible as a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the thrust force. A second buckling transition occurs at an even higher motor torque. We attach the flagellum to a spherical cell body and also observe the first buckling transition during locomotion. By changing the size of the cell body, we vary the necessary thrust force and thereby obtain a characteristic relation between the critical thrust force and motor torque. We present a sophisticated analytical model for the buckling transition based on a helical rod which quantitatively reproduces the critical force-torque relation. Real values for motor torque, cell body size, and the geometry of the helical filament suggest that buckling should occur in single bacterial flagella. We also find that the orientation of pulling flagella along the driving torque is not stable and comment on the biological relevance for marine bacteria.

  18. Bacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine Environments in California, with Ecologically Sustainable Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwill, Edward R.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title: Reducing microbial contamination in runoff fromBacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine

  19. Escherichia coli Enhanced Hydrogen Production, Genome-wide Screening for Extracellular DNA, and Influence of GGDEF Proteins on Early Biofilm Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Torres, Viviana

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for applications such as production of biofuels and biofilm control. The aims of this work were the application of protein engineering to increase E. coli hydrogen production, the identification of the proteins regulating extracellular DNA production (e...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

  1. Insights from twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jun, Se Ran [ORNL; Nookaew, Intawat [ORNL; Leuze, Michael Rex [ORNL; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Lund, Ole [Technical University of Denmark; Kora, Guruprasad H [ORNL; Wassenaar, Trudy [Molecular Microbiology & Genomics Consultants, Zotzenheim, Germany; Poudel, Suresh [ORNL; Ussery, David W [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first two complete bacterial genome sequences were published in 1995, the science of bacteria has dramatically changed. Using third-generation DNA sequencing, it is possible to completely sequence a bacterial genome in a few hours and identify some types of methylation sites along the genome as well. Sequencing of bacterial genome sequences is now a standard procedure, and the information from tens of thousands of bacterial genomes has had a major impact on our views of the bacterial world. In this review, we explore a series of questions to highlight some insights that comparative genomics has produced. To date, there are genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. However, the distribution is quite skewed towards a few phyla that contain model organisms. But the breadth is continuing to improve, with projects dedicated to filling in less characterized taxonomic groups. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system provides bacteria with immunity against viruses, which outnumber bacteria by tenfold. How fast can we go? Second-generation sequencing has produced a large number of draft genomes (close to 90 % of bacterial genomes in GenBank are currently not complete); third-generation sequencing can potentially produce a finished genome in a few hours, and at the same time provide methlylation sites along the entire chromosome. The diversity of bacterial communities is extensive as is evident from the genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. Genome sequencing can help in classifying an organism, and in the case where multiple genomes of the same species are available, it is possible to calculate the pan- and core genomes; comparison of more than 2000 Escherichia coli genomes finds an E. coli core genome of about 3100 gene families and a total of about 89,000 different gene families. Why do we care about bacterial genome sequencing? There are many practical applications, such as genome-scale metabolic modeling, biosurveillance, bioforensics, and infectious disease epidemiology. In the near future, high-throughput sequencing of patient metagenomic samples could revolutionize medicine in terms of speed and accuracy of finding pathogens and knowing how to treat them.

  2. Control of biofilm formation in marine environment using some N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor Schiff bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubey, R.S.; Dubey, R.S.; Upadhyay, S.N.; Namboodhiri, T.K.G. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adhesion of microorganisms onto materials surface mediated by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) lead to an important modification of the metal-solution interface. The requirement of modern civilization with the heightened sense of environmental responsibilities and quality of life can be met by using some eco-friendly microbiocides with different spectra of activity. Some N{sub 2}O{sub 2} donor Schiff base compounds were synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR and ESR spectroscopy. These compounds were found effective in controlling the growth of biofilm of E. coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Thiobacillus thiooxidans on copper surface. The optimum concentration of these compounds are in the range of 1--10 ppm. Various electrochemical, microbiological and surface-analytical techniques were used to monitor the biofilm in the presence of microbiocides.

  3. alkaliphilic sulfo-oxidizing bacterial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxis MIT - DSpace Summary: Bacterial chemotaxis, a remarkable...

  4. Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Abstract: Electron transporting multiheme...

  5. Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Assessment of the bacterial diversity of treated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the microbiota in treated and untreated milk samples during cold storage at 4 °C or 8 °C up to 7 days. Three processing, and the health of dairy cattle (Frank et al. 2002). Cold storage on farms and processing plants, thermization, and microfiltration during cold storage. They found that dominant bacterial species were

  7. SGM Special Moving folded proteins across the bacterial cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Tracy

    -containing proteins are essential for most types of bacterial respiratory and photo- synthetic energy metabolism by the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient. The TatA protein probably forms the transport channel while metabolism in most environments depends upon the bacterium being able to produce cofactor-containing pro

  8. Electricity-producing bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , glucose, cysteine, bovine serum albumin and ethanol [6­ 11] to complex mixtures of organic matter including domes- tic (human), animal, food-processing and meat-packing wastewaters [10,12­14]. With slight-electrochemically assisted microbial reactor (BEAMR) [15,16] or simply as the bacterial electrolysis of organic matter [17

  9. REGULAR ARTICLE Characterization of bacterial endophytes of sweet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    REGULAR ARTICLE Characterization of bacterial endophytes of sweet potato plants Zareen Khan.V. 2009 Abstract Endophytic bacteria associated with sweet potato plants (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) were by the endophytes had any role in protecting the cells against adverse conditions, different stress tests were

  10. Making Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Avoid water having a dark color, an odor or containing floating materials since such things may indicate or floating matter. 2. Boil the water vigorously for at least 10 minutes. 3. After it cools, the waterMaking Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations Monty C. Dozier

  11. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  12. Low-Cost Sensor Can Diagnose Bacterial Infections Copyright 2011 by Virgo Publishing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Low-Cost Sensor Can Diagnose Bacterial Infections Copyright 2011 by Virgo Publishing. http diagnose bacterial infections in only a few hours. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer Bacterial infections really sensor. Led by University of Illinois chemistry professor Ken Suslick, the team published its results

  13. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifer drawdown from vegetation and irrigation often reduce stream flow; however, several large pools and stretches of the stream retain water throughout the year, except during extreme drought. Base flow in the stream is typically sustained by small... map of the Buck Creek watershed 7 Major aquifers in Texas (Source: Texas Water Development Board) Groundwater Two aquifers, the Seymour and Blaine, underlie the Buck Creek watershed and supply the bulk of available groundwater. The Seymour...

  14. How the xap Locus Put Electrical “Zap” in Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnuson, Timothy S.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of microbial mineral respiration remains an experimental challenge. In this issue of Journal of Bacteriology, Rollefson et al. (11) present a foundational study on the functionality of the biofilm matrix in Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model dissimilatory metal respiring bacterium (DMRB). In this study, the investigators identify an extracellular polysaccharide scaffold or network that entraps redox-active proteins, thus positioning these proteins for optimal electron transfer from the membrane-bound respiratory supercomplexes to a mineral phase electron acceptor. The distinguishing feature of this study is the perspective, in that the team examined specifically exopolysaccharide formation and how it enables entrapment and tethering of redox proteins in the vicinity of the cell. Previous studies on Geobacter (10) and Shewanella (4) have focused primarily on the presence and functionality of conductive pili and nanowires, proteinaceous structures that also enable and enhance extracellular electron transfer. Rollefson et al. remind investigators in this field that many microbial systems have redundancy in essential functions, and in the case of DMRB, it is clearly critical that more than one mechanism exists to ensure

  15. Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark I. (Warrenville, IL); Sanville-Millard, Cynthia (Plainfield, IL); Chatterjee, Ranjini (Park Ridge, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

  16. Differentiation of Microbial Species and Strains in Coculture Biofilms by Multivariate Analysis of Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Montana State University; Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Cui, Yang; Hofstetter, Theresa; Liu, Suet Yi; Bernstein, Hans C.; Carlson, Ross P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Hanley, Luke

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7.87 to 10.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon energies were used in laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to analyze biofilms comprised of binary cultures of interacting microorganisms. The effect of photon energy was examined using both tunable synchrotron and laser sources of VUV radiation. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the MS data to differentiate species in Escherichia coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae coculture biofilms. PCA of LDPI-MS also differentiated individual E. coli strains in a biofilm comprised of two interacting gene deletion strains, even though these strains differed from the wild type K-12 strain by no more than four gene deletions each out of approximately 2000 genes. PCA treatment of 7.87 eV LDPI-MS data separated the E. coli strains into three distinct groups two ?pure? groups and a mixed region. Furthermore, the ?pure? regions of the E. coli cocultures showed greater variance by PCA when analyzed by 7.87 eV photon energies than by 10.5 eV radiation. Comparison of the 7.87 and 10.5 eV data is consistent with the expectation that the lower photon energy selects a subset of low ionization energy analytes while 10.5 eV is more inclusive, detecting a wider range of analytes. These two VUV photon energies therefore give different spreads via PCA and their respective use in LDPI-MS constitute an additional experimental parameter to differentiate strains and species.

  17. Publications by Gene Therapy Center Members January 2009 to December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bacterial Otitis Media, the Chinchilla Middle Ear, and Biofilms. J Infect Dis. 5. Bakac, A., Schouten, M

  18. Super-slime! The impact of changing environment on aquatic biofilm carbon cycling Susan Waldron & Vernon Phoenix (Geographical and Earth Sciences, GES, University of Glasgow)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    Super-slime! The impact of changing environment on aquatic biofilm carbon cycling Susan Waldron is a crucial environment in which to consider the fate of exported terrestrial carbon in the aquatic system. To a large extent the fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may be controlled by reprocessing within

  19. Distance matters: the impact of gene proximity in bacterial gene regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otto Pulkkinen; Ralf Metzler

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Following recent discoveries of colocalization of downstream-regulating genes in living cells, the impact of the spatial distance between such genes on the kinetics of gene product formation is increasingly recognized. We here show from analytical and numerical analysis that the distance between a transcription factor (TF) gene and its target gene drastically affects the speed and reliability of transcriptional regulation in bacterial cells. For an explicit model system we develop a general theory for the interactions between a TF and a transcription unit. The observed variations in regulation efficiency are linked to the magnitude of the variation of the TF concentration peaks as a function of the binding site distance from the signal source. Our results support the role of rapid binding site search for gene colocalization and emphasize the role of local concentration differences.

  20. Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandelwal, Mudrika

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    of bacterial cellulose gel produced at ridged PDMS/liquid interfaces (scale bar 50 ?m) [113] b) SEM images of the cellulose networks produced under voltage gradient 0.45 V/cm (scale bar 1?m)[114] 2.8 Cellulose Nanoparticles The properties, functionality... Few microns 20 x 20 5 x 20-30 Algae 100-4000 nm 8 x 20 nm Tunicates 50-500 nm 3-5 nm Plant, wood % crystallinity and % cellulose content increases Acid hydrolysis Acid hydrolysis 26 Figure 2.18: Cellulose nanoparticles a) SEM image...

  1. Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladden, John Michael

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  2. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof EnergyBILIWG:Background: Today'sEnergy Bacterial

  3. Metabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterial symbiosis of sharpshooters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metabolic Complementarity and Genomics of the Dual BacterialMetabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterialthe other. ) Comparative genomics. The predicted proteomes

  4. Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

  5. Stimulation of Alexandrium fundyense growth by bacterial assemblages from the Bay of Fundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooney-Varga, Juliette N.

    on Alexandrium fundyense str. CB301 growth. Methods and Results: Bacterial assemblages were collected from into axenic CB301 cultures. Bacterial assemblages dramatically enhanced CB301 growth. Retrieval and analysis factors that control Alexandrium distributions (e.g. Anderson et al. 1983, 1990a; Rasmussen and Richardson

  6. Elucidation of Functional Groups on Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacterial Surfaces Using Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    important role in different biogeochemical processes, including contaminant trans- port and degradation,1,2 mineral dissolution and precipi- tation,3 and metal sorption by minerals and their redox transformations.4 these bacterial reactions. In addition, bacterial transport through porous media, adhesion to minerals

  7. Influence of bacterial uptake on deep-ocean dissolved organic Jrgen Bendtsen and Claus Lundsgaard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, David

    loop in the aphotic zone based on new measurements of deep ocean bacterial metabolism. These together ocean circulation, we show that the observed gradient of DOC in the deep North Atlantic can be explained by the temperature dependence of bacterial metabolic activity in conjunction with the formation of deep-water at high

  8. Impact of swapping soils on the endophytic bacterial communities of pre-domesticated,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    Impact of swapping soils on the endophytic bacterial communities of pre-domesticated, ancient://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/14/233 #12;RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Impact of swapping soils on the endophytic bacterial,3 , George Lazarovits2 and Manish N Raizada1* Abstract Background: Endophytes are microbes that live within

  9. Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

  10. Dying for Good: Virus-Bacterium Biofilm Co-evolution Enhances Environmental Fitness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Hongjun; Squier, Thomas C.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Commonly used in biotechnology applications, filamentous M13 phage are non-lytic viruses that infect E. coli and other bacteria, with the potential to promote horizontal gene transfer in natural populations with synthetic biology implications for engineering community systems. Using the E. coli strain TG1, we have investigated how a selective pressure involving elevated levels of toxic chromate, mimicking that found in some superfund sites, alters population dynamics following infection with either wild-type M13 phage or an M13-phage encoding a chromate reductase (Gh-ChrR) capable of the reductive immobilization of chromate (ie, M13-phageGh-ChrR). In the absence of a selective pressure, M13-phage infection results in a reduction in bacterial growth rate; in comparison, in the presence of chromate there are substantial increases in both cellular killing and biomass formation following infection of E. coli strain TG1with M13-phageGh-ChrR that is dependent on chromate-reductase activity. These results are discussed in terms of community structures that facilitate lateral gene transfer of beneficial traits that enhance phage replication, infectivity, and stability against environmental change.

  11. Structure-based receptor MIMICS targeted against bacterial superantigen toxins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Goutam (Santa Fe, NM); Hong-Geller, Elizabeth (Los Alamos, NM); Shiflett, Patrick R. (Los Alamos, NM); Lehnert, Nancy M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes on a superantigen molecule against which they are designed. The anti-superantigen "receptor mimetics" or "chimeras" are rationally designed to recreate the modality of superantigen binding directly to both the TCR and the MHC-II receptor, and are capable of acting as decoys for superantigen binding, effectively out-competing the host T-cell and MHC-II receptors, the natural host receptors.

  12. Molecular structure and dynamics in bacterial mercury resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Shi, Liang [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Susan M [ORNL] [ORNL; Summers, Anne O [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF MARKER PROTEINS IDENTIFIED IN WHOLE CELL EXTRACTS FOR BACTERIAL SPECIATION USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooken, Jennifer M.; Fox, Karen F.; Fox, Alvin; Wunschel, David S.

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ASSESSMENT OF MARKER PROTEINS IDENTIFIED IN WHOLE CELL EXTRACTS FOR BACTERIAL SPECIATION USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

  14. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  15. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, Mark T

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  16. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  17. Favorable interaction between photooxidation and bacterial degradation of anthracene in sea water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rontani, J.F.; Rambeloarisoa, E.; Bertrand, J.C.; Giusti, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed bacterial community isolated from a marine biotope highly polluted with hydrocarbons proved to be able to use anthraquinone, a product of anthracene photooxidation considered as a relatively stable molecule in a marine medium.

  18. Protein activation of a ribozyme: the role of bacterial RNase P protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Protein activation of a ribozyme: the role of bacterial RNase P protein Amy H Buck1 , Andrew B Dalby2 , Alexander W Poole2,3 , Alexei V Kazantsev2 and Norman R Pace2, * 1 Department of Chemistry

  19. Local Environmental Pollution Strongly Influences Culturable Bacterial Aerosols at an Urban Aquatic Superfund Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    Local Environmental Pollution Strongly Influences Culturable Bacterial Aerosols at an Urban Aquatic Information ABSTRACT: In polluted environments, when microbial aerosols originate locally, species composition of the aerosols should reflect the polluted source. To test the connection between local environmental pollution

  20. Bacterial Influence on the bloom dynamics of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayali, Xavier

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bacterial colonization (Droop & Elson 1966, Kogure et al.subsequent uptake by algae (Droop 2007), the acquisition ofa review. Natural Toxins 3:65-74 Droop MR (2007) Vitamins,

  1. Bacterial influence on the bloom dynamics of the Dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayali, Xavier

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bacterial colonization (Droop & Elson 1966, Kogure et al.subsequent uptake by algae (Droop 2007), the acquisition ofa review. Natural Toxins 3:65-74 Droop MR (2007) Vitamins,

  2. Abstract Successful transformation of plant tissue using Agrobacterium relies on several factors including bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    Abstract Successful transformation of plant tissue using Agrobacterium relies on several factors including bacterial infection, host recognition, and transformation competency of the target tissue particle bombardment, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of this tissue has not been demonstrated. We

  3. Stable nitrogen isotope measurements of marine bacterial proteins and nucleic acids: tracers of microbial activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovacs, Jeffrey Paul

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable nitrogen isotopes ([]15N) can trace elemental cycling in aquatic ecosystems if the enzyme mediated fractionations associated with nutrient uptake and assimilation are negligible or consistently predictable. In this study, bacterial proteins...

  4. Construction and characterization of a peach binary bacterial artificial chromosome library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wakefield, Laura

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batch] has been proposed as a model organism for woody perennials. To facilitate genomic research in peach, a binary bacterial artificial chromosome (BIBAC) library of var. Texking was constructed using a plant...

  5. Siderophore production by heterotrophic bacterial isolates from the Costa Rica upwelling dome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krey, Whitney B. (Whitney Blair)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont) An increased understanding of heterotrophic bacterial strategies for acquiring nutrients and trace elements is critical for elucidating their impact on biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. It is estimated that iron ...

  6. Diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in dioxin-contaminated sediments from the Houston ship channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (SG-6) to 30cm (11261). Dehalococcoides diversity was centered on Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 and Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. Overall bacterial diversity in HSC sediments was dominated by Proteobacteria, especially Deltaproteobacteria...

  7. Oil bioremediation in salt marsh mesocosms as influenced by nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial seeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Alan Lee

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glasshouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of N and P fertilization and bacterial seeding on crude oil degradation in salt marsh mesocosms containing marsh soil and Spartina alterniflora. Fertilization with urea, NH4, and N03...

  8. Oil bioremediation in salt marsh mesocosms as influenced by nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial seeding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Alan Lee

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glasshouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of N and P fertilization and bacterial seeding on crude oil degradation in salt marsh mesocosms containing marsh soil and Spartina alterniflora. Fertilization with urea, NH4, and N03...

  9. Comparison of the mechanism of transmembrane signaling in bacterial chemoreceptors and sensor kinases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Scott Michael

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Membrane-bound receptors transmit information from the cell exterior to the cell interior. Bacterial receptors capable of transmitting this information include sensor kinases, which control gene expression via response regulators, and methyl...

  10. Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen; accepted 17 April 2002 Keywords: Bacteria, compost, biocontrol disease suppression, grey snow mould Composting is the degradation of organic materials through the activities of diverse microorganisms

  11. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Malus floribunda 821 and contig construction for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korban, Schuyler S.

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Malus floribunda 821 and contig construction of 31 584 clones has been constructed from M. floribunda 821. From the analysis of 88 randomly selected

  12. Structural investigations of hydroxylase proteins and complexes in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormick, Michael S. (Michael Scott)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxgenases (BMMs) such as toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), phenol hydroxylase (PH), and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation reactions at a carboxylatebridged ...

  13. Bacterial influence on uranium oxidation reduction reactions : implications for environmental remediation and isotopic composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Lisa Maureen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial influence on the chemistry and speciation of uranium has some important impacts on the environment, and can be exploited usefully for the purposes of environmental remediation of uranium waste contamination. ...

  14. Coulter counter determination of bacterial growth and cellular size change following ??Co gamma irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaston, Gary W

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Ma)or Subject: Biophysics COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON APPROVED as to style and content by: ead...

  15. Use of semiconducting polymer sensors to detect bacterial cultures in medium and in irradiated ground beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivers, Andrea M

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USE OF SEMICONDUCTING POLYMER SENSORS TO DETECT BACTERIAL CULTURES IN MEDIUM AND IN IRRADIATED GROUND BEEF A Thesis by ANDREA M. IVERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology USE OF SEMICONDUCTING POLYMER SENSORS TO DETECT BACTERIAL CULTURES IN MEDIUM AND IN IRRADIATED GROUND BEEF A Thesis by ANDREA M. IVERS Submitted...

  16. Coulter counter determination of bacterial growth and cellular size change following ??Co gamma irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaston, Gary W

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Ma)or Subject: Biophysics COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON APPROVED as to style and content by: ead...

  17. Development of rapid microbial methods for lysine quantification in feed ingredients based on green fluorescent protein fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalova-Zhekova, Vesela I.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -determination of bioavailable lysine in feedstuffs is important. An optical density (OD) based microbiological assay for lysine determination using E. coli lysine auxotroph has been previously developed. However, because the assay is based on bacterial growth response...

  18. Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

  19. Compensation for L212GLU in bacterial reaction centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.K.; Deng, Y.L.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sebban, P. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif/Yvette (France). CNRS

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In wild-type bacterial reaction centers (RC), residue L212Glu, which is located about 5 {Angstrom} away from Q{sub B}, is involved in the delivery of the second proton to Q{sub B{sup 2}{minus}} [1-4]. We previously constructed the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala double mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus, and it is incapable of photosynthetic growth (PS{sup {minus}}) due to interruption of the proton transfer pathway to Q{sub B}[3,4]. We have isolated several photocompetent (PS{sup +}) phenotypic revertants of this L212-L213AA double mutant [3-7]. The compensatory mutations that restore function in these strains are diverse and show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is absolutely required for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer. Genotypic revertant and second-site mutations, located within the Q{sub B} binding picket or at more distant sites, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213 to restore photocompetence. One of the phenotypic revertants of the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant carries a genotypic reversion of L213Ala to Asp; the Ala substitution at L212 remains. We were intrigued that this L212Glu {yields} Ala mutant R. capsulatus is photocompetent, while the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant of R. sphaeroides is not, particularly since the sequence identity in the Q{sub B} site of these two strains is 90{percent} [8]. To this end, we constructed the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant in R. capsulatus, and it is also PS{sup {minus}}. To determine the function that is lost in the L212Gln mutant but restored by Ala at that site, we selected four PS{sup +} revertants from the L212Gln strain.

  20. LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Tier 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Lab Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies Initiative (TMTI). The high-level goal of TMTI is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve those goals, TMTI has a near term need to obtain more sequence information across a large range of pathogens, near neighbors, and across a broad geographical and host range. Our role in this project is to research available sequence data for the organisms of interest and identify critical microbial sequence and knowledge gaps that need to be filled to meet TMTI objectives. This effort includes: (1) assessing current genomic sequence for each agent including phylogenetic and geographical diversity, host range, date of isolation range, virulence, sequence availability of key near neighbors, and other characteristics; (2) identifying Subject Matter Experts (SME's) and potential holders of isolate collections, contacting appropriate SME's with known expertise and isolate collections to obtain information on isolate availability and specific recommendations; (3) identifying sequence as well as knowledge gaps (eg virulence, host range, and antibiotic resistance determinants); (4) providing specific recommendations as to the most valuable strains to be placed on the DTRA sequencing queue. We acknowledge that criteria for prioritization of isolates for sequencing falls into two categories aligning with priority queues 1 and 2 as described in the summary. (Priority queue 0 relates to DTRA operational isolates whose availability is not predictable in advance.) 1. Selection of isolates that appear to have likelihood to provide information on virulence and antibiotic resistance. This will include sequence of known virulent strains. Particularly valuable would be virulent strains that have genetically similar yet avirulent, or non human transmissible, counterparts that can be used for comparison to help identify key virulence or host range genes. This approach will provide information that can be used by structural biologists to help develop therapeutics and vaccines. We have pointed out such high priority strains of which we are aware, and note that if any such isolates should be discovered, they will rise to the top priority. We anticipate difficulty locating samples with unusual resistance phenotypes, in particular. Sequencing strategies for isolates in queue 1 should aim for as complete finishing status as possible, since high-quality initial annotation (gene-calling) will be necessary for the follow-on protein structure analyses contributing to countermeasure development. Queue 2 for sequencing determination will be more dynamic than queue 1, and samples will be added to it as they become available to the TMTI program. 2. Selection of isolates that will provide broader information about diversity and phylogenetics and aid in specific detection as well as forensics. This approach focuses on sequencing of isolates that will provide better resolution of variants that are (or were) circulating in nature. The finishing strategy for queue 2 does not require complete closing with annotation. This queue is more static, as there is considerable phylogenetic data, and in this report we have sought to reveal gaps and make suggestions to fill them given existing sequence data and strain information. In this report we identify current sequencing gaps in both priority queue categories. Note that this is most applicable to the bacterial pathogens, as most viruses are by default in queue 1. The Phase I focus of this project is on viral hemorrhagic fever viruses and Category A bacterial agents as defined to us by TMTI. We have carried out individual analyses on each species of interest, and these are included as chapters in this report. Viruses and bacteria are biologically very distinct from each other and require different methods of analysis and criteria for sequencing prioritization. Therefore, we will describe our methods, analyses and conclusions separately for each category.

  1. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy of nickel sorption in a natural river biofilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    was likely sorbed to Mn­Fe minerals on the sheath. These STXM results have probed nano-scale biogeochemistry for selective Ni contamination of the food chain and for developing bioremediation strategies. Received 08 May, mobility and bioavailability of trace and contaminant metals alike. In nature, micro-organisms often

  2. LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Task 1.4.2 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lam, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Good progress has been made on both bacterial and viral sequencing by the TMTI centers. While access to appropriate samples is a limiting factor to throughput, excellent progress has been made with respect to getting agreements in place with key sources of relevant materials. Sharing of sequenced genomes funded by TMTI has been extremely limited to date. The April 2010 exercise should force a resolution to this, but additional managerial pressures may be needed to ensure that rapid sharing of TMTI-funded sequencing occurs, regardless of collaborator constraints concerning ultimate publication(s). Policies to permit TMTI-internal rapid sharing of sequenced genomes should be written into all TMTI agreements with collaborators now being negotiated. TMTI needs to establish a Web-based system for tracking samples destined for sequencing. This includes metadata on sample origins and contributor, information on sample shipment/receipt, prioritization by TMTI, assignment to one or more sequencing centers (including possible TMTI-sponsored sequencing at a contributor site), and status history of the sample sequencing effort. While this system could be a component of the AFRL system, it is not part of any current development effort. Policy and standardized procedures are needed to ensure appropriate verification of all TMTI samples prior to the investment in sequencing. PCR, arrays, and classical biochemical tests are examples of potential verification methods. Verification is needed to detect miss-labeled, degraded, mixed or contaminated samples. Regular QC exercises are needed to ensure that the TMTI-funded centers are meeting all standards for producing quality genomic sequence data.

  3. Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

  4. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  5. Multi-Scale Imaging of Respiratory Bacterial Infection Using Fiber Microendoscopy and Whole-Animal Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bixler, Joel Nathan

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    for bacterial detection. The basic design is similar to the system previously reported for use in bacterial imaging in situ (29). A light emitting diode (Thorlabs M530L2) centered at 530 nm with a 31 nm bandwidth was used for fluorescence excitation... of the microendoscope system. LED: light emitting diode; L1: collimating lens; F1: excitation filter; D: dichroic beamsplitter; Obj: Microscope objective; F2: Emission filter; L2: focusing lens. 10 3.2 Incorporation of Fiber Microendoscope Into Whole...

  6. Multi-Scale Imaging of Respiratory Bacterial Infection Using Fiber Microendoscopy and Whole-Animal Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bixler, Joel Nathan

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    for bacterial detection. The basic design is similar to the system previously reported for use in bacterial imaging in situ (29). A light emitting diode (Thorlabs M530L2) centered at 530 nm with a 31 nm bandwidth was used for fluorescence excitation... of the microendoscope system. LED: light emitting diode; L1: collimating lens; F1: excitation filter; D: dichroic beamsplitter; Obj: Microscope objective; F2: Emission filter; L2: focusing lens. 10 3.2 Incorporation of Fiber Microendoscope Into Whole...

  7. Bacterial degradation of styrene involving a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent styrene monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmans, S; Van Der Werf, M.J.; De Bont, J.A.M. (Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By using styrene as the sole source of carbon and energy in concentrations of 10 to 500 {mu}M, 14 strains of aerobic bacteria and two strains of fungi were isolated from various soil and water samples. In cell extracts of 11 of the bacterial isolates, a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-requiring styrene monooxygenase activity that oxidized styrene oxide (phenyl oxirane) was detected. In one bacterial strain (S5), styrene metabolism was studied in more detail. In addition to styrene monooxygenase, cell extracts from strain S5 contained styrene oxide isomerase and phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. A pathway for styrene degradation via styrene oxide and phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetic acid is proposed.

  8. The bacterial leaf spot disease of castorbeans. I.A study of the inheritance of resistance. II. Some elemental components associated with physiological resistance. III. A histological evaluation of resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, D. Donald

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of material, basic knowledge and understanding of the genetical and of the physiological mechanism of resistance and susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot would be of considerable help in developing resistant lines. This knowledge would be particularly... examination might also lead to an adequate explanation of physiological phenomena associated with resistance. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of genetic studies made with resistant and susceptible lines, of physiological studies...

  9. BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT from: EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 82(38), September 18, 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT from: EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL conditions as uranium, this study site serves as an excellent surrogate for uranium-contaminated sites BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT http://www.ce.berkeley.edu/~rubin/EOS_finalversion

  10. Effect of seawater-freshwater cross-transplantations on viral dynamics and3 bacterial diversity and production4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the transplanted seawater and freshwater35 bacteria (SB-t and FB-t treatments) was stimulated up to 256% and 221%, respectively,36 compared to controls. The stimulation of bacterial production and carbon demand was37 accompanied by a decrease in bacterial richness. Net viral production was stimulated by 81% in38 SB

  11. Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, James J (Newton, MA); Kobayashi, Hideki (Yokohama, JP); Kearn, Mads (Ottawa, CA); Araki, Michihiro (Minatoku, JP); Friedland, Ari (Boston, MA); Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

  12. Intermediate Products in the Bacterial Decomposition of Hexadecanol and Octadecanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, W. D.

    , an excess of water has been naturally provided which has allowed the development of large population and industrial centers. But the long term and recently accelerated return of water-borne wastes from these centers to water bodies has caused a critical...

  13. Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Richard

    Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor Chien-Jung Loa,b , Yoshiyuki potential difference. It consists of an 50-nm rotor and up to 10 independent stators anchored to the cell of electrical and chemical potential. All 25 torque­speed curves had the same concave-down shape as fully

  14. Survival curves of heated bacterial spores:1 Effect of environmental factors on Weibull parameters2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    be applied for canning process calculations.24 Key words:25 Weibull distribution, Heat treatment pH, recovery1 Survival curves of heated bacterial spores:1 Effect of environmental factors on Weibull heat13 resistance for non-log linear survival curves. One simple model derived from the Weibull14

  15. Production of volatile fatty acids as a result of bacterial interactions in the cecum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that the C. butyricum strain fermented lactose and D-lactic acid to butyric and acetic acids, whereas L-lactic acid was not fermented. The V. alcalescens strain did not ferment lactose and fermented L better than D of lactose (up to 20 %) to the diet increases bacterial fermentation in the large intestine and cecum

  16. Effect of a lactic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation characteristics of cereal and alfalfa forages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    fermentation (lowering pH, increasing lactic acid to acetic acid ratio, reducing ammonia), especially underEffect of a lactic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation characteristics of cereal and corn. Data on the effect of inoculants on the fermentation characteristics of cereal silages

  17. Seasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their metabolic activities, microbial populations mediate the impact of high gradient regions on ecologicalSeasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the CRCM. Initial experiments with the environmental microarrays were

  18. Application of Bacterial Biocathodes in Microbial Fuel Cells Zhen He, Largus T. Angenent*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Application of Bacterial Biocathodes in Microbial Fuel Cells Zhen He, Largus T. Angenent breakthroughs are made. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell, Biofuel cell, Biocathode, Potentiostat-poised half cell, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are special types of biofuel cells, producing electric power by utilizing

  19. THEORETICAL STUDY ON SOME -LACTAMS AS SUBSTRATES OF THE BACTERIAL MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ACRB PUMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    THEORETICAL STUDY ON SOME -LACTAMS AS SUBSTRATES OF THE BACTERIAL MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ACRB PUMPB pump is a part of the most important multidrug efflux system of gram-negative bacteria, which excretes recognition site (PRS) of the AcrB pump was also performed. Parsimonius PLS models were obtained (Q2 > 0.67, R

  20. Partitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    flow of spring water from the high-temperature to low-temperature facies. These results suggest of depositional facies models that correlate (1) the depth, velocity, temperature, and chemistry of waterPartitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot Springs

  1. First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa BY T. A of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria, South Africa. E-mail: Teresa. Coutinho@FABI.up.ac.za; 3 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry, University of the Orange Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa; 4 Agricultural

  2. Soft Bacterial Polyester-Based Shape Memory Nanocomposites Featuring Reconfigurable Nanostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Soft Bacterial Polyester-Based Shape Memory Nanocomposites Featuring Reconfigurable Nanostructure; published online 13 December 2011 DOI: 10.1002/polb.23021 ABSTRACT: In this work, a novel soft shape memory even in the fixed state. Taking advantage of the shape memory ability as well as the softness

  3. Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern Evan Torline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern of its residents are living without access to clean drinking water. This simple issue causes terrible community of Mol, Haiti before the implementation of a chlorine water filtration system in it. A handful

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE The structure of the bacterial and archaeal community in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE The structure of the bacterial and archaeal community in a biogas digester biogas digesters at different scales and for different applications for treating rural wastes is well 16S rDNA, anaerobic digestion, biogas digester, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE

  5. 1 | P a g e Chem 124H Organic Chemistry Case Study #2: "Overcoming Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    resistance worldwide: causes, challenges and responses" Nat. Med. 2004, 10, pS122. c) "MRSA" (wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mrsa. The most notable resistant bacterium is Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA, "Superbug and sterilization are essential in hospitals to prevent the spread of MRSA and other resistant bacterial infections

  6. Viscosity of Bacterial Suspensions: Hydrodynamic Interactions and Self-Induced Noise Shawn D. Ryan,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlyand, Leonid

    Viscosity of Bacterial Suspensions: Hydrodynamic Interactions and Self-Induced Noise Shawn D. Ryan, 2011) The viscosity of a suspension of swimming bacteria is investigated analytically and numerically fluid, result in a dramatic reduction of the effective viscosity. In agreement with experiments

  7. A Novel Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for Automated tuning of PID controllers of UAVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    A Novel Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for Automated tuning of PID controllers of UAVs John Oyekan, Colchester CO3 4SQ, United Kingdom Email: jooyek@essex.ac.uk; hhu@essex.ac.uk Abstract--Up to now, PID of a PID controller for a UAV. This approach relies on the bacteria foraging technique to guide the search

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Effect of grazers and viruses on bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    , and the stimulation of viral production (compared to the treatment with no eukaryotic predators) was more variable experiments. Nevertheless, the stimulation of bacterial production was more variable between seasons than and production in two contrasting trophic lakes Lyria Berdjeb, Thomas Pollet, Isabelle Domaizon and Stéphan

  9. Changes in Bacterial and Fungal Communities across Compost Recipes, Preparation Methods, and Composting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Changes in Bacterial and Fungal Communities across Compost Recipes, Preparation Methods, and Composting Times Deborah A. Neher1 *, Thomas R. Weicht1 , Scott T. Bates2 , Jonathan W. Leff3 , Noah Fierer3 of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America Abstract Compost production is a critical component

  10. This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Integr. Biol. Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Tom

    This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Integr. Biol. Microfluidics for bacterial 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00049c Microfluidics is revolutionizing the way we study the motile behavior system to understand how cells and organisms sense and respond to gradients. Using microfluidics to study

  11. A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein- Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial Transcriptional Regulatory Protein Fur

  12. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other (received for review September 20, 2005) Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pi- lus oneidensis MR-1 produces electrically conductive nanowires in response to electron-acceptor limitation. We

  13. Improved Yield and Diverse Finished Bacterial Genomes using Pacific Biosciences RS II SMRT Sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Improved Yield and Diverse Finished Bacterial Genomes using Pacific Biosciences RS II SMRT-Cruz, Alvaro Godinez, Luke J. Tallon Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, effective, and highly accurate platform for generation of complete microbial genome sequences. As early

  14. GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum that were more aluminum-tolerant than the non-transgenic control, confirming that citrate synthase overexpression can be a useful tool to help achieve aluminum tolerance. Keywords Acid soils Á Aluminum toxicity Á

  15. Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Satish C.; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Fein, Jeremy

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this exploratory study is to provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the impact of bacterial sulfhydryl groups on the bacterial uptake, speciation, methylation and bioavailability of Hg and redox changes of uranium. The relative concentration and reactivity of different functional groups present on bacterial surfaces will be determined, enabling quantitative predictions of the role of biosorption of Hg under the physicochemical conditions found at contaminated DOE sites.The hypotheses we propose to test in this investigation are as follows- 1) Sulfhydryl groups on bacterial cell surfaces modify Hg speciation and solubility, and play an important role, specifically in the sub-micromolar concentration ranges of metals in the natural and contaminated systems. 2) Sulfhydryl binding of Hg on bacterial surfaces significantly influences Hg transport into the cell and the methylation rates by the bacteria. 3) Sulfhydryls on cell membranes can interact with hexavalent uranium and convert to insoluble tetravalent species. 4) Bacterial sulfhydryl surface groups are inducible by the presence of metals during cell growth. Our studies focused on the first hypothesis, and we examined the nature of sulfhydryl sites on three representative bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive aerobic soil species; Shewanella oneidensis, a facultative gram-negative surface water species; and Geobacter sulfurreducens, an anaerobic iron-reducing gram-negative species that is capable of Hg methylation; and at a range of Hg concentration (and Hg:bacterial concentration ratio) in which these sites become important. A summary of our findings is as follows- ? Hg adsorbs more extensively to bacteria than other metals. Hg adsorption also varies strongly with pH and chloride concentration, with maximum adsorption occurring under circumneutral pH conditions for both Cl-bearing and Cl-free systems. Under these conditions, all bacterial species tested exhibit almost complete removal of Hg from the experimental solutions at relatively low bacterial concentrations. ? Synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopic studies of these samples indicate that the structure and the coordination environment of Hg surface complexes on bacterial cell walls change dramatically- with sulfhydryls as the dominant Hg-binding groups in the micromolar and submicromolar range, and carboxyls and phosphoryls dominating at high micromolar concentrations. ? Hg interactions change from a trigonal or T-shaped HgS{sub 3} complex to HgS or HgS{sub 2} type complexes as the Hg concentration increases in the submicromolar range. Although all bacterial species studied exhibited the same types of coordination environments for Hg, the relative concentrations of the complexes change as a function of Hg concentration.

  16. Developing Backwash Protocols for Floating-Bead Filters: A Model of Solids-Loading and Biofilm-Retention Effects on Nitrification1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ammonia and carbon load but ultimately by reducing flow through the filter. For extended SRTs of improved washing mechanisms are currently being studied at LSU. The bubble-washed bead filter (BBF) uses

  17. Biofilm assembly | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13, 2014 "Microecosystems" used to study producer-consumer networks in microbial mats Scanning and transmission electron micrograph of the unicyanobacterial consortia Phormidesmis...

  18. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the aerobic and facultative bacterial flora of voided canine urine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Jane

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bacteria occurring at the external 8, 9, 16, 18, 21, 27 urethral orifice. ' ' ' ' ' Neither bladder catheterization nor midstream sampling oi' voided urine guarantees a urine specimen free of bacteria which have colonized the urethra. Catheterization... to occur during collection 7, 16, 18, 27 from canines. In human urology, differentation is usually accomplished by bacterial counts on catheterized samples, bladder aspirates, or voided midstream samples collected aseptically. ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' These 5...

  19. Correlation between leukotoxin production of Pasteurella haemolytica and bacterial culture conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fann, Hsing Fu

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    predispose animals to P. haemolytica Al. Other bacterial infections, including other serovars of P. haemolytica as well as P. multocida, Corynebacterium pyogenes, and Baemophilus somnus appear to be much less important. P. haemolytica alone has been shown... biotypes (A and T) by colony morphology and carbohydrate fermentation patterns. Several serotypes of P. Aaemolytica are normal inhabitants of the nasal cavity of cattle. Before shipment, cultures from the nasal cavity of healthy cattle often yield...

  20. Study on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells and fluidity changes in model bacterial membranes using optical microscopy techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Christine Shiang Yee

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis optical microscopy techniques are used to consider aspects of viral and bacterial infections. In part 1, the physical effects of cytomegalovirus on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells are studied; in part ...

  1. Bacterial production and microbial food web structure in a large arctic river and the coastal Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    in the surface waters decreased across the salinity gradient, dropping from 51,000 (river) to 30 (sea) cells m. Glucose enrichment experiments indicated that bacterial metabolism was carbon limited in the Mackenzie

  2. Reference: Biol. Bull. 179: 332-339. (December, 1990) The Anatomy and Morphology of the Adult Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    lens and thick reflector that appear to permit the squid to control the quality of bacterial light in the sand during the day and forages at night over shallow-water sand flats. E. scolopes shares

  3. Elucidation of the pathways responsible for the biosynthesis of UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine in bacterial pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Michael James

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly-modified, bacterial sugar N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) has been implicated in the pathogenicity of certain microbes through its incorporation onto various protein virulence factors. In particular, ...

  4. Lateral Flow Capillary Concentration for Rapid Bacterial Identification Aaron V. Mull, Dr. Kent Voorhees, Dr. Christopher Cox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lateral Flow Capillary Concentration for Rapid Bacterial Identification Aaron V. Mull, Dr. Kent 80401 Introduc)on Materials and Methods Abstract Future Work Acknowledgments Immunoassay Design and Spectra Results Eliminate false positives and false negatives

  5. MODULATION OF THE NF-KAPPA B SIGNALING PATHWAY BY THE BACTERIAL TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM EFFECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiaofei

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a bacterial injection system expressed by many Gram-negative bacteria. During the last two decades, the repertoire of T3SS effectors has been greatly explored, and several mechanisms ...

  6. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    160 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Degree options BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences in arts subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA

  7. Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, Johannes

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

  8. Improved Bacterial and Viral Recoveries from 'Complex' Samples using Electrophoretically Assisted Acoustic Focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, K; Rose, K; Jung, B; Fisher, K; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated front-end sample preparation technologies can significantly enhance the sensitivity and reliability of biodetection assays [1]. We are developing advanced sample preparation technologies for biowarfare detection and medical point-of-care diagnostics using microfluidic systems with continuous sample processing capabilities. Here we report an electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing technique to rapidly extract and enrich viral and bacterial loads from 'complex samples', applied in this case to human nasopharyngeal samples as well as simplified surrogates. The acoustic forces capture and remove large particles (> 2 {micro}m) such as host cells, debris, dust, and pollen from the sample. We simultaneously apply an electric field transverse to the flow direction to transport small ({le} 2 {micro}m), negatively-charged analytes into a separate purified recovery fluid using a modified H-filter configuration [Micronics US Patent 5,716,852]. Hunter and O'Brien combined transverse electrophoresis and acoustic focusing to measure the surface charge on large particles, [2] but to our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration combining these two techniques in a continuous flow device. Marina et al. demonstrated superimposed dielectrophoresis (DEP) and acoustic focusing for enhanced separations [3], but these devices have limited throughput due to the rapid decay of DEP forces. Both acoustic standing waves and electric fields exert significant forces over the entire fluid volume in microchannels, thus allowing channels with larger dimensions (> 100 {micro}m) and high throughputs (10-100 {micro}L/min) necessary to process real-world volumes (1 mL). Previous work demonstrated acoustic focusing of microbeads [4] and biological species [5] in various geometries. We experimentally characterized our device by determining the biological size-cutoff where acoustic radiation pressure forces no longer transport biological particles. Figure 1 shows images of E.Coli ({approx}1 {micro}m) and yeast ({approx}4-5 {micro}m) flowing in a microchannel (200 {micro}m deep, 500 {micro}m wide) at a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min. The E.Coli does not focus in the acoustic field while the yeast focuses at the channel centerline. This result suggests the acoustic size-cutoff for biological particles in our device lies between 2 and 3 {micro}m. Transverse electrophoresis has been explored extensively in electric field flow fractionation [6] and isoelectric focusing devices [7]. We demonstrated transverse electrophoretic transport of a wide variety of negatively-charged species, including fluorophores, beads, viruses, E.Coli, and yeast. Figure 2 shows the electromigration of a fluorescently labeled RNA virus (MS2) from the lower half of the channel to the upper half region with continuous flow. We demonstrated the effectiveness of our electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing device by separating virus-like particles (40 nm fluorescent beads, selected to aid in visualization) from a high background concentration of yeast contaminants (see Figure 3). Our device allows for the efficient recovery of virus into a pre-selected purified buffer while background contaminants are acoustically captured and removed. We also tested the device using clinical nasopharyngeal samples, both washes and lavages, and demonstrated removal of unknown particulates (>2 ?m size) from the sample. Our future research direction includes spiking known amounts of bacteria and viruses into clinical samples and performing quantitative off-chip analysis (real-time PCR and flow cytometry).

  9. Bacterial total maximum daily load (TMDL): development and evaluation of a new classification scheme for impaired waterbodies of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Sabu

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    functions corresponding to NCDC and NEXRAD rainfall datasets ............................... 224 6.4 FOA results corresponding to NCDC ............................................................. 226 6.5 FOA results corresponding to NEXRAD... ................................................... 238 6.12 Means and standard deviations of FOA and MCS..........................................239 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION According to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 131, all States, Territories, and authorized Tribes...

  10. Bioinspired Engineering for Microbial Sensing: The Development of Bacterial Sensing Methodologies Based on Fluorescence Staining and Microfluidic Emission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunez, Vicente

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Biological Engineering 2010, 4, No pp given;Annals of biomedical engineering 2009, 37 (6), 1190-205.new biomaterials and tissue engineering in ophthalmology.

  11. Bioinspired Engineering for Microbial Sensing: The Development of Bacterial Sensing Methodologies Based on Fluorescence Staining and Microfluidic Emission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunez, Vicente

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pg. 155 3. Chapter 3. Microfluidics for Biosensing andand-peel fabrication for microfluidics: what's in it forcross-section PDMS microfluidics system for replication of

  12. Bacterial total maximum daily load (TMDL): development and evaluation of a new classification scheme for impaired waterbodies of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Sabu

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    functions corresponding to NCDC and NEXRAD rainfall datasets ............................... 224 6.4 FOA results corresponding to NCDC ............................................................. 226 6.5 FOA results corresponding to NEXRAD... ................................................... 238 6.12 Means and standard deviations of FOA and MCS..........................................239 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION According to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 131, all States, Territories, and authorized Tribes...

  13. Bioinspired Engineering for Microbial Sensing: The Development of Bacterial Sensing Methodologies Based on Fluorescence Staining and Microfluidic Emission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunez, Vicente

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. R. , Time-resolved europium(III) excitation spectroscopy:for sensitization of europium(III) luminescence. Inorganicof Terbium(III) and Europium(III) Chelates with Pyridine-

  14. Bacterial Microcompartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 -concentrating-mechanism (CCM): functional components, CiFirst quantitative model of CCM function in cyanobacteria.a necessary component of the CCM in cyanobacteria. TABLE 1

  15. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We apply a principal component analysis across the initial sample set to draw correlations between sample variables and changes in microbiome populations.

  16. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative duodenal fluid versus duodenal mucosa cultures in German Shepherd Dogs with spontaneous small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delles, Edward Kevin

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a combination of maldigestion, malabsorption and bacterial fermentation in the upper small intestine. ~' Bacterial fermentation of dietary carbohydrates makes them unavailable to the host and contributes to diarrhea through the osmotic effects... of the chemical byproducts, particularly fatty acids. 3~ Anaerobic bacterial proteases destroy brush border enzymes that aid in digestion of carbohydrates in the small boweL"' Incompletely digested carbohydrates are fermented in the colon to alcohols and fatty...

  17. Expression patterns of FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 map to bacterial entry sites in plant shoots and roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Martina; Wyrsch, Ines; Strutt, James; Wimalasekera, Rinukshi; Webb, Alex; Boller, Thomas; Robatzek, Silke

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    /v) bromophenol blue], proteins retained on the beads were eluted by SDS–PAGE sample loading buffer and separated by 7% SDS–PAGE. FLS2 was detected by immunoblot analyses with anti-FLS2 antibodies (Chinchilla et al., 2006). MAPK activation in roots Isolated... 107, 14502–14507. Bulgarelli D, Schlaeppi K, Spaepen S, Ver Loren van Themaat E, Schulze-Lefert P. 2013. Structure and functions of the bacterial microbiota of plants. Annual Review of Plant Biology 64, 807–838. Chinchilla D, Bauer Z, Regenass M...

  18. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mouser, P.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial communityThe impact of ammonium availability on microbial communityin response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate

  19. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  20. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    150 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development MA or BSc (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA degree, and students most interested in Science subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development should apply for the BSc degree. Subject

  1. Solid State Electron Transfer via Bacterial Nanowires: Contributions Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Geophysical Response of Biostimulated Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estella Atekwana

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of organic matter by microorganisms provides a source of electrical potential or so-called 'self potential' (SP) that can be measured by using a voltmeter. During this process electrons are being produced as a waste-product and bacterial cells have to dispose of these to allow for the complete biodegradation of organic matter. Especially in anaerobic microbial communities, exo-cellular electron transfer is the most important driving force behind this process and organisms have developed different, but also similar, ways to transfer electrons to other microorganisms. Recently, it has been postulated that direct electron transfer from cell-to-cell is actually done by 'hard-wired' microorganisms. This shuttling of electrons is most likely done by certain c-type cytochromes that form the functional part of electrically conductive nanowires. In this study we investigated if nanowires can explain the geoelectrical (self potential and spectral induced polarization) signals observed at some biostimulated environments such as DOE sites. The objectives of our project are to: (1) investigate any temporal changes in the geophysical signatures (Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP)) associated with nanowires of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type and mtrc/omcA deletion mutant, (2) demonstrate that mutant strains of bacteria that produce nonconductive nanowires do not contribute to geoelectrical responses. We accomplished the following: (1) Provided training to students and a postdoctoral fellow that worked on the project, (2) Conducted several SP & IP measurements correlating the distribution of nanowires and SIP/SP signals in partial fulfillment of object No. 1 and 2. On the following we will report and discuss the results of our last experiment with some emphasis on the source mechanisms of both SP and IP associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type in sand columns.

  2. Application of cyclic voltammetry to investigate enhanced catalytic current generation by biofilm-modified anodes of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    to be useful for powering small electronic devices such as a meteorological buoy. Here we present a 5-step is broadly applicable and may be useful to develop strategies for optimizing power generation by MFCs. 896

  3. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% ?-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  4. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  5. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  6. Influence of genetic background, races of the pathogen and plant parts on evaluation of resistance to bacterial blight of cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pool, William Larry

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on evaluation of resistance to bacterial blight. Parents with the B4, BlBp, and BpB3 genes and three susceptible parents were used in the experiment. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW In 1935 Simpson and Weindling (34) selected Stoneville 20 from Stoneville 2A... were homogenous within the (BpB3 x T) population. CHAPTER V SUMMARY AND CDNCL USION Conclusions concerning genetirs of resistance to bacterial blight were influenced by the genetic backgrounds used in thi's study. The BSm m&nor gene complex...

  7. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Report on SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2 0 1 1 ­ 2 0 1 2 ISCN-GULF Charter Report #12;3 1. FACILITIES with projects of our University's Cell for Sustainable Development; it also presents evidence for steady alike. THIS REPORT This is the second report on sustainable development at the University of Luxembourg

  8. Development And Evaluation Of Stable Isotope And Fluorescent Labeling And Detection Methodologies For Tracking Injected Bacteria During In Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark E. Fuller; Tullis C. Onstott

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a research project conducted to develop new methods to label bacterial cells so that they could be tracked and enumerated as they move in the subsurface after they are introduced into the groundwater (i.e., during bioaugmentation). Labeling methods based on stable isotopes of carbon (13C) and vital fluorescent stains were developed. Both approaches proved successful with regards to the ability to effectively label bacterial cells. Several methods for enumeration of fluorescently-labeled cells were developed and validated, including near-real time microplate spectrofluorometry that could be performed in the field. However, the development of a novel enumeration method for the 13C-enriched cells, chemical reaction interface/mass spectrometry (CRIMS), was not successful due to difficulties with the proposed instrumentation. Both labeling methodologies were successfully evaluated and validated during laboratory- and field-scale bacterial transport experiments. The methods developed during this research should be useful for future bacterial transport work as well as other microbial ecology research in a variety of environments. A full bibliography of research articles and meeting presentations related to this project is included (including web links to abstracts and full text reprints).

  9. Bruce Walcheck: Role of neutrophils in acute lung injury, bacterial lung infection, and sepsis (cell based assays and in vivo studies in mice).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    Bruce Walcheck: Role of neutrophils in acute lung injury, bacterial lung infection, and sepsis, eosinophils, and macrophages in the ( ) oapplie lungs (cell based assays and in vivo studies in mice) Alice). Mike Murtaugh: Pathogenesis of lung inflammation during bacterial and viral pneumonia (cell based

  10. Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

  11. Construction of force measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and investigations of biophysical properties of bacterial adhesion organelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical tweezers are a technique in which microscopic-sized particles, including living cells and bacteria, can be non-intrusively trapped with high accuracy solely using focused light. The technique has therefore become a powerful tool in the field of biophysics. Optical tweezers thereby provide outstanding manipulation possibilities of cells as well as semi-transparent materials, both non-invasively and non-destructively, in biological systems. In addition, optical tweezers can measure minute forces (< 10-12 N), probe molecular interactions and their energy landscapes, and apply both static and dynamic forces in biological systems in a controlled manner. The assessment of intermolecular forces with force measuring optical tweezers, and thereby the biomechanical structure of biological objects, has therefore considerably facilitated our understanding of interactions and structures of biological systems. Adhesive bacterial organelles, so called pili, mediate adhesion to host cells and are therefore crucial...

  12. Nucleotide-induced conformational motions and transmembrane gating dynamics in a bacterial ABC transporter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flechsig, Holger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins that mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP hydrolysis. We report results of coarse-grained dynamical simulations performed for the bacterial heme transporter HmuUV. Based on the nucleotide-free structure, we have constructed a ligand-elastic-network description for this protein and investigated ATP-induced conformational motions in structurally resolved computer experiments. As we found, interactions with nucleotides resulted in generic motions which are functional and robust. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact and the transmembrane domains were rotated. The heme channel was broadened in the ligand-bound complex and the gate to the cytoplasm, which was closed in the nucleotide-free conformation, was rendered open by a mechanism that involv...

  13. Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption onto natural microbial mats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption Received 8 May 2004; received in revised form 7 January 2005; accepted 15 February 2005 Abstract Adsorption. The occurrence of M-type tetrad effect suggests that REE form inner sphere complexes during their adsorption onto

  14. Get a whiff of this: Low-cost sensor can diagnose bacterial April 27th, 2011 in Chemistry / Analytical Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Get a whiff of this: Low-cost sensor can diagnose bacterial infections April 27th, 2011 in Chemistry / Analytical Chemistry Enlarge A colorimetric sensor array is placed in an Petri dish for culturing bacteria and scanned with an ordinary flatbed photo scanner kept inside a lab incubator. The dots

  15. Harnessing Bacterial Power in Microscale Actuation A. Agung Julius, M. Selman Sakar, Edward Steager, U Kei Cheang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    of using man made structures that are modeled after biological systems, we utilize actual microorganisms some microfabrication aspects of the challenge and quantitative mathematical modeling of the system. WeHarnessing Bacterial Power in Microscale Actuation A. Agung Julius, M. Selman Sakar, Edward Steager

  16. Molecular graphics approach to bacterial AcrB proteinb-lactam antibiotic molecular recognition in drug efflux mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Molecular graphics approach to bacterial AcrB protein­b-lactam antibiotic molecular recognition graphics study of the pump components AcrB and TolC, 16 b-lactam antibiotics and 7 other substrates; Multidrug resistance; Molecular graphics; Vestibules; Pore 1. Introduction Transmembrane solute transporters

  17. 604 Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 604629 This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw Tanvir Ahmed,a Thomas S. Shimizub and Roman Stocker*a Received 1st June 2010, Accepted 11th August 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00049c Microfluidics is revolutionizing the way we to gradients. Using microfluidics to study chemotaxis of free-swimming bacteria presents experimental

  18. Quantitative Drug Structure Complex Geometry Relationships in -Lactam Efflux by Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Pump AcrAB-TolC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Quantitative Drug Structure ­ Complex Geometry Relationships in -Lactam Efflux by BacterialAB-TolC pump in E. coli. Two main drug efflux mechanism are shown, one starting in the periplasm, and other of 1-20. Most drugs expose positive, amphiphilic or hydrophobic heads (R or R1) toward predominantly

  19. The Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer from the Special Pair to the Carotenoid in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    to the prediction that the energy of 3BM is 200 ( 70 cm-1 above that of 3P in wild-type RCs; this analysisThe Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer from the Special Pair to the Carotenoid in Bacterial of triplet energy transfer from the primary electron donor P, a bacteriochlorophyll dimer, to the carotenoid

  20. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  1. Wastewater treatment by aerobic granular biofilmWastewater treatment by aerobic granular biofilmaste ate t eat e t by ae ob c g a u a b o Aeration pulses to improve N eliminationAeration pulses to improve N-eliminationAeration pulses to improve N eliminat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wastewater treatment by aerobic granular biofilmWastewater treatment by aerobic granular wastewater treatment p p denitrification Nitrification is the oxidation from ammonium (NH +) first activated sludge for biological N-elimination is a two step process: aerobic nitrification and anoxicp g g g

  2. Physical descriptions of the bacterial nucleoid at large scales, and their biological implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo G. Benza; Bruno Bassetti; Kevin D. Dorfman; Vittore F. Scolari; Krystyna Bromek; Pietro Cicuta; Marco Cosentino Lagomarsino

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental and theoretical approaches have attempted to quantify the physical organization (compaction and geometry) of the bacterial chromosome with its complement of proteins (the nucleoid). The genomic DNA exists in a complex and dynamic protein-rich state, which is highly organised at various length scales. This has implications on modulating (when not enabling) the core biological processes of replication, transcription, segregation. We overview the progress in this area, driven in the last few years by new scientific ideas and new interdisciplinary experimental techniques, ranging from high space- and time-resolution microscopy to high-throughput genomics employing sequencing to map different aspects of the nucleoid-related interactome. The aim of this review is to present the wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical findings coherently, from a physics viewpoint. We also discuss some attempts of interpretation that unify different results, highlighting the role that statistical and soft condensed matter physics, and in particular classic and more modern tools from the theory of polymers, plays in describing this system of fundamental biological importance, and pointing to possible directions for future investigation.

  3. Nucleotide-induced conformational motions and transmembrane gating dynamics in a bacterial ABC transporter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger Flechsig

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins that mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP hydrolysis. We report results of coarse-grained dynamical simulations performed for the bacterial heme transporter HmuUV. Based on the nucleotide-free structure, we have constructed a ligand-elastic-network description for this protein and investigated ATP-induced conformational motions in structurally resolved computer experiments. As we found, interactions with nucleotides resulted in generic motions which are functional and robust. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact and the transmembrane domains were rotated. The heme channel was broadened in the ligand-bound complex and the gate to the cytoplasm, which was closed in the nucleotide-free conformation, was rendered open by a mechanism that involved tilting motions of essential transmembrane helices. Based on our findings we propose that the HmuUV transporter behaves like a `simple' mechanical device in which, induced by binding of ATP ligands, linear motions of the nucleotide-binding domains are translated into rotational motions and internal tilting dynamics of the transmembrane domains that control gating inside the heme pathway.

  4. Software Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

  5. Analysis of Substrate Access to Active Sites in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenase Hydroxylases: X-Ray Crystal Structure of Xenon-Pressurized Phenol Hydroxylase from Pseudomonas Sp Ox1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormick, Michael S.

    In all structurally characterized bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase proteins, a series of hydrophobic cavities in the ?-subunit trace a conserved path from the protein exterior to the carboxylate-bridged ...

  6. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs ...

  7. Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar January 21, 2015...

  8. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a bacterial pure culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, J.R.; Ackerman, C.E.; Scow, K.M.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bacterial strain, PM1, which is able to utilize methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as its sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from a mixed microbial consortium in a compost biofilter capable of degrading MTBE. Initial linear rates of MTBE degradation by 2 x 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1} were 0.07, 1.17, and 3.56 {mu}g ml{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} for initial concentrations of 5, 50, and 500 {mu}g MTBE ml{sup {minus}1}, respectively. When incubated with 20 {mu}g of uniformly labeled [{sup 14}C]MTBE ml{sup {minus}1}, strain PM1 converted 46% to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and 19% to {sup 14}C-labeled cells within 120 h. This yield is consistent with the measurement of protein accumulation at different MTBE concentrations from which was estimated a biomass yield of 0.18 of cells mg MTBE{sup {minus}1}. Strain PM1 was inoculated into sediment core material collected from a contaminated groundwater plume at Port Hueneme, California, in which there was no evidence of MTBE degradation. Strain PM1 readily degraded 20 {micro}g of MTBE ml{sup {minus}1} added to the core material. The rate of MTBE removal increased with additional inputs of 20 {micro}g of MTBE ml{sup {minus}1}. These results suggest that PM1 has potential for use in the remediation of MTBE-contaminated environments.

  9. Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomic Development

  10. Investigations of Rhizobium biofilm formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujishige, Nancy A; Kapadia, Neel N; De Hoff, Peter L; Hirsch, Ann M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sheet of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) had been placed inside theindividual wells of a 96-well PVC plate (Falcon 3911, Bectonplate containing a tab of PVC. The plate was placed on top

  11. Bacterial reduction of crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxides in single phase suspensions and subsurface materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, J.M.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Li, S.M.; Kennedy, D.W.; Smith, S.C.; Gassman, P.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiologic reduction of synthetic and geologic Fe{sup 3+} oxides associated with four Pleistocene-age, Atlantic coastal plain sediments was investigated using a dissimilatory Fe reducing bacterium (Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32) in bicarbonate buffer. Experiments investigated whether phosphate and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, (AQDS, a humic acid analogue) influenced the extent of crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxide bioreduction and whether crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxides in geologic materials are more or less reducible than comparable synthetic phases. Anaerobic incubations (10{sup 8} organisms/mL) were performed both with and without PO{sub 4} and AQDS that functions as an electron repository and shuttle. The production of Fe{sup 2+} (solid and aqueous) was followed with time, as was mineralogy by X-ray diffraction. The synthetic oxides were reduced in a qualitative trend consistent with their surface area and free energy: hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) > goethite > hematite. Bacterial reduction of the crystalline oxides was incomplete in spite of excess electron donor. Biogenic formation of vivianite [Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O] and siderite (FeCO{sub 3}) was observed; the conditions of their formation was consistent with their solubility. The geologic Fe{sup 3+} oxides showed a large range in reducibility, approaching 100% in some materials. The natural oxides were equally or more reducible than their synthetic counterparts, in spite of association with non-reducible mineral phases (e.g., kaolinite). The reducibility of the synthetic and geologic oxides was weakly effected by PO{sub 4}, but was accelerated by AQDS. CN32 produced the hydroquinone form of AQDS (AHDS), that, in turn, had thermodynamic power to reduce the Fe{sup 3+} oxides. As a chemical reductant, it could reach physical regions of the oxide not accessible by the organism. Electron microscopy showed that crystallite size was not the primary factor that caused differences in reducibility between natural and synthetic crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxide phases. Crystalline disorder and microheterogeneities may be more important.

  12. Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent raman spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active...

  13. Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active...

  14. Contributions of Bacterial Surface Polymers, Electrostatics, and Cell Elasticity to the Shape of AFM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    silicon nitride AFM tip and three different Escherichia coli K12 strains, each having a different length development, and marine biofouling. Although macroscopic properties of bacteria such as hydrophobicity

  15. FULL-FIELD INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( cm ---1 ) Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Activity in Biofilms Using Microfluidics H.Y. Holman, et al., PNAS, 106, 12599 (2009) H.Y. Holman, et al., Anal. Chem., 81,...

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  17. Preparation and dielectric properties of SiC nanowires self-sacrificially templated by carbonated bacterial cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Lixia; Ma, Yongjun; Dai, Bo [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhou, Yong [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), School of Physics, National Lab of Solid State Microstructure, ERERC, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), School of Physics, National Lab of Solid State Microstructure, ERERC, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Jinsong [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Pei, Chonghua, E-mail: peichonghua@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? A new material – CBC is introduced as a template to prepare SiC nanowires. ? SiC nanowires are synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si. ? The highest ?? of ?-SiC nanowires is obtained at 1400 °C. -- Abstract: SiC nanowires were synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si in Ar atmosphere at 1350–1450 °C, using carbonated bacterial cellulose (CBC) as carbon template and a reactant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and vector network analyzer were employed to characterize the samples. The diameter of the resulting ?-SiC nanowires changes with calcination temperatures, specifically, 35–60 nm for 1350 °C, 40–80 nm for 1400 °C, and 30–60 nm for 1450 °C. The ?-SiC nanowires obtained at 1400 °C possess the highest ?? of complex permittivity.

  18. Characterization and field trials of a bioluminescent bacterial reporter of iron bioavailability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    reporters, constructed by fusing the fepA­fes promoter of Escherichia coli (an Enterobactin biosynthesis 2003 Abstract To better understand Fe cycling in marine and freshwater systems, we have developed: wilhelm@utk.edu (S.W. Wilhelm). www.elsevier.com/locate/marchem Marine Chemistry 83 (2003) 31­46 #12

  19. Coimmunopurification of Phosphorylated Bacterial-and Plant-Type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylases with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaxton, William

    with the Plastidial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Developing Castor Oil Seeds1,2[W][OA] R. Glen Uhrig, Brendan O (R.G.U., B.O., H.E.S., W.C.P.), Department of Chemistry (Y.-M.S.), and Department of Biochemistry (W

  20. Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Bioconversion to Bacterial Single Cell Protein for Animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OF EUTROPHIC NUTRIENTS FROM WASTEWATER AND THEIR BIOCONVERSION TO BACTERIAL SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FOR ANIMAL FEED plants. The two major eutrophic nutrients present in effluents from municipal treatment plants

  1. Syntheses and anti-MRSA activities of the C3 analogs of mansonone F, a potent anti-bacterial sesquiterpenoid: insights into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Young-Ger

    Syntheses and anti-MRSA activities of the C3 analogs of mansonone F, a potent anti-bacterial sesquiterpenoid: insights into its structural requirements for anti-MRSA activity Dong-Yun Shin,a Sun Nam Kim June 2004 Available online 3 July 2004 Abstract--Syntheses and excellent anti-MRSA activities

  2. Supplementary Note 1. Sequencing, assembly and annotation. Sequencing. The zebra finch DNA for shotgun sequencing, and for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    for shotgun sequencing, and for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and cosmid libraries was derived from-sister. High molecular weight genomic DNA was prepared from the muscle of Black 17. The frozen tissue sample was placed on dry ice and sliced with a fine blade as small as possible, and immediately suspended in 100 m

  3. A DNA Pairing-enhanced Conformation of Bacterial RecA Proteins* Received for publication, August 4, 2003, and in revised form, October 3, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Michael M.

    A DNA Pairing-enhanced Conformation of Bacterial RecA Proteins* Received for publication, August 4A proteins of Escherichia coli (Ec) and Deino- coccus radiodurans (Dr) both promote a DNA strand exchange- stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB). In the absence of SSB, the initiation of strand exchange is greatly en

  4. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  5. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  6. Psychology of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milfont, Taciano Lemos

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,Psychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck andPsychology of Sustainable Development. Norwell, MA: Kluwer

  7. Psychology of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milfont, Taciano Lemos

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,out historical aspects of sustainable development and itsPsychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck and

  8. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  9. Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and implementation of watershed protection plans for each watershed. The Leon River is listed as an impaired water body for elevated levels of E. coli and does not support its designated contact recreation use. The Lampasas River was also considered impaired...

  10. Perpetual Development Dror Feitelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Perpetual Development Dror Feitelson Basic Seminar on Software Engineering Hebrew University 2009 it #12;Lifecycle Models Waterfall Spiral Unified process Agile / extreme Emphasize development till Requirements Feature requests #12;Perpetual Development Lifecycle time size initial development #12;Perpetual

  11. Final Report Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER20307 Lipopolysaccharide Structures and Genes Required for Root Nodule Development August 1, 2004 to July 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, K. Dale

    2008-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project dealt with the plant-bacterial symbiosis that gives rise to root nodules on leguminous plants in which the bacteria carry out nitrogen fixation. Nitrogen fixation, like carbon dioxide fixation, is essential for life on planet earth, and this symbiosis is estimated to account for half of all nitrogen fixed on land. Aside from being important for the sustenance of global life, this ability allows legumes to grow without nitrogen fertilizers. Basic studies such as this project are aimed at understanding the symbiosis well enough that eventually it can be engineered into important crop species so that they no longer depend on nitrogen fertilizer for growth. The production and distribution of excessive fertilizer needed for optimal crop yields is responsible for a significant portion of the energy costs in agriculture. The specific aims of this work were to further the understanding of a bacterial factor that is essential for the symbiotic infection process. This factor is a bacterial surface molecule, lipopolysaccharide O antigen. In this project we showed that, not only the presence, but the specific structure of this molecule is crucial for infection. Although the success of bacterial infections in many pathogenic and mutualistic interactions have been shown to depend on intact O antigen, it has been very rare to establish that specific features of the structure are important. One of the features in this case is the presence of one additional methyl group on one sugar in the O antigen. It is very surprising that such a minor change should have an observable effect. This work sets the stage for biochemical studies of possible plant receptors that may be involved. During the course of this grant period, we developed a method of testing the importance of this bacterial component at stages of nodule development beyond the step that is blocked by null mutation. The method works adequately for this purpose and is being improved. It has implications for testing the roles of other important bacterial factors at multiple stages of nodule development. The project also investigated the biosynthesis of this bacterial factor. It has a complex structure and the first accomplishment was the determination of the sequences of genetic regions known to be important. Next the discovered genes were mutated to identify the 26 that are required for its synthesis. In addition, six others were discovered that are believed to change its structure under various environmental conditions. By studying mutants affected in specific genes, genes were associated with each of the predicted steps in the biosynthesis. Current work is testing the predicted biosynthetic model with studies conducted in vitro with bacterial extracts. Overall, the work funded by this grant establishes this system as a model for host-bacterial interactions based on specific polysaccharide structure. All areas that are needed for a comprehensive model have been significantly advanced: the biological function, the structural features that are crucial, the complete set of bacterial genes involved, and a model for the biosynthesis.

  12. Individual Development and Excutive Development Plan Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to OPM, an individual development plan (IDP) is a tool to assist employees in career and personal development. Its primary purpose is to help employees reach short and long-term career...

  13. Tanpopo cosmic dust collector: Silica aerogel production and bacterial DNA contamination analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Yano, Hajime; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrophobic silica aerogels with ultra-low densities have been designed and developed as cosmic dust capture media for the Tanpopo mission which is proposed to be carried out on the International Space Station. Glass particles as a simulated cosmic dust with 30 \\mu m in diameter and 2.4 g/cm^3 in density were successfully captured by the novel aerogel at a velocity of 6 km/s. Background levels of contaminated DNA in the ultra-low density aerogel were lower than the detection limit of a polymerase chain reaction assay. These results show that the manufactured aerogel has good performance as a cosmic dust collector and sufficient quality in respect of DNA contamination. The aerogel is feasible for the biological analyses of captured cosmic dust particles in the astrobiological studies.

  14. Clean development mechanism: Perspectives from developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sari, Agus P.; Meyers, Stephen

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the political acceptability and workability of CDM by and in developing countries. At COP-3 in Kyoto in 1997, the general position among developing countries changed from strong rejection of joint implementation to acceptance of CDM. The outgrowth of CDM from a proposal from Brazil to establish a Clean Development Fund gave developing countries a sense of ownership of the idea. More importantly, establishing support for sustainable development as a main goal for CDM overcame the resistance of many developing countries to accept a carbon trading mechanism. The official acceptance of CDM is not a guarantee of continued acceptance, however. Many developing countries expect CDM to facilitate a substantial transfer of technology and other resources to support economic growth. There is concern that Annex I countries may shift official development assistance into CDM in order to gain carbon credits, and that development priorities could suffer as a result. Some fear that private investments could be skewed toward projects that yield carbon credits. Developing country governments are wary regarding the strong role of the private sector envisioned for CDM. Increasing the awareness and capacity of the private sector in developing countries to initiate and implement CDM projects needs to be a high priority. While private sector partnerships will be the main vehicle for resource transfer in CDM, developing country governments want to play a strong role in overseeing and guiding the process so that it best serves their development goals. Most countries feel that establishment of criteria for sustainable development should be left to individual countries. A key issue is how CDM can best support the strengthening of local capacity to sustain and replicate projects that serve both climate change mitigation and sustainable development objectives.There is support among developing countries for commencing CDM as soon as possible. Since official commencement must await the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, many developing countries support the establishment of an Interim Phase starting in 2000, with possible retroactive crediting once the Protocol enters into force.

  15. Direct Metal Transfer Between Periplasmic Proteins Identifies a Bacterial Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagai, I.; Rensing, C.; Blackburn, N.; McEvoy, M.M.

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metals require exquisite handling within cells to ensure that cells are not harmed by an excess of free metal species. In Gram-negative bacteria, copper is required in only small amounts in the periplasm, not in the cytoplasm, so a key aspect of protection under excess metal conditions is to export copper from the periplasm. Additional protection could be conferred by a periplasmic chaperone to limit the free metal species prior to export. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that two periplasmic proteins, CusF and CusB, of the Escherichia coli Cu(I)/Ag(I) efflux system undergo a metal-dependent interaction. Through the development of a novel X-ray absorption spectroscopy approach using selenomethionine labeling to distinguish the metal sites of the two proteins, we have demonstrated transfer of Cu(I) occurs between CusF and CusB. The interaction between these proteins is highly specific, as a homologue of CusF with a 51% identical sequence and a similar affinity for metal, did not function in metal transfer. These experiments establish a metallochaperone activity for CusF in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, serving to protect the periplasm from metal-mediated damage.

  16. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Locations

  17. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen 1 of 5 This office coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional and state classified personnel. Customized training and orga- nizational development consulting services

  18. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Joan Hamory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook of Development Economics, Volume I (pp. 713-762).Journal of Development Economics, 81, 80-96. Behrman, JereJournal of Development Economics, 79, 349-373. Dercon,

  19. Leadership and Organisational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    Change Leadership and Organisational Development Consultancy Conflict Resolution Leadership and Management Development Leadership Team Building Coaching for individuals and teams Leadership Development Assessments Group Dynamics and Team Building Facilitation and Strategic Planning Leadership and Organisational

  20. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location the top of the page ·Choose the "Training & Organizational Development" from the selection box ·Select

  1. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Training and Organizational Development Contacts: Ellen Audley Customer Support, (970) 491-professional staff and state classi- fied personnel. Customized training and organizational development consulting of the page ·Choose the "Training & Organizational Development" from the selection box ·Select the "Login" tab

  2. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen and state classified personnel. Customized training and organizational development consulting services the "Register for Workshops" button near the top of the page ·Choose the "Training & Organizational Development

  3. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson the top of the page ·Choose the "Training & Organizational Development" from the selection box ·Select

  4. What is Community Development?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Greg

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication offers a practical definition of community development for county Extension educators. It also offers examples of goals and objectives for various resource development areas in a community. A list of community development...

  5. Steroselective metabolism of dizen(a,h)anthracene to trans-dihydrodiols and their activation to bacterial mutagens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, K.L.; Schollmeier, M.; Frank, H.; Oesch, F. (Univ. of Mainz (West Germany))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DBA), a carcinogenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ubiquitous in the environment, is metabolized by the hepatic microsomal fraction of immature Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with Aroclor 1254 to 27 ethyl acetate-extractable metabolites. More than half of these metabolites (51%) consisted of trans-1,2-; -3,4-; and -5,6-dihydrodiols including their identified secondary metabolites. The three trans-dihydrodiols were highly enriched in their R,R enantiomers as determined by high performance liquid chromatography on suitable chiral stationary phases. Determination of the bacterial mutagenicity by measuring the reversion rate of histidine-dependent Salmonella typhimurium TA100 to histidine prototrophy revealed marked differences in the mutagenicity of the enantiomers of the trans-dihydrodiols of DBA when activated by the same metabolizing system as used in the metabolism studies. In the case of trans-1,2- and -5,6-dihydrodiol, the S,S enantiomers were converted to more mutagenic metabolites than their corresponding optical antipodes, whereas in the case of trans-3,4-dihydrodiol it was the R,R enantiomer that produced the stronger mutagens. Therefore, both regio- and stereoselectivity of the metabolizing enzymes attribute to the dominant role of trans-3,4-dihydrodiol in the mutagenicity of DBA.

  6. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  7. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of Live and LC-NMR Microbial Metabolomics Methods for Systems Biology Studies: A Test Case Relevant to Biofuels Production Project start date: Spring 2009 EMSL Lead...

  8. Bacterial Source Tracking in Impaired Watersheds: Evaluation of Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods for Increased Source Specificity and Improved Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Emily C

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    % of the isolates unidentified (Hauck, 2006). Trinity River An urban BST project was sponsored by TCEQ in the Trinity River Basin in Dallas in 2005. The TMDL project is currently close to the implementation plan phase, but BST was conducted in the early..., and dogs in pets (Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research, 2006). Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco and Belton Lake The Lake Waco and Belton Lake study was a significant collaboration of the Texas Farm Bureau, TSSWCB...

  9. Understanding the Pathogenesis of Streptococcus iniae Infection in Fish and Development of an Effective Vaccine for Use in Aquaculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish health, bacterial infections, Streptococcus iniae, virulence factor, vaccine, aquaculture, striped bass

  10. Regional Development Authorities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance...

  11. Coal Development (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

  12. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Ridgway

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20, 1976 LBL-5293 NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banksof California. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banks andof practical heat engines based on this phenomenon is

  13. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

  14. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C. Erec, E-mail: stebbins@rockefeller.edu [The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex from Yersinia reveals the bacterial state of a protein that adopts different folds in the host and pathogen environments. Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycH–YopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-called ?-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the ?-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the ?-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed.

  15. In vivo metabolism of 2,2 prime -diaminopimelic acid from gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells by ruminal microorganisms and ruminants and its use as a marker of bacterial biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masson, H.A.; Denholm, A.M.; Ling, J.R. (Univ. College of Wales (United Kingdom))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cells of Bacillus megaterium GW1 and Escherichia coli W7-M5 were specifically radiolabeled with 2,2{prime}-diamino (G-{sup 3}H) pimelic acid (({sup 3}H)DAP) as models of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Two experiments were conducted to study the in vivo metabolism of 2,2{prime}-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) in sheep. In experiment 1, cells of ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled B. megaterium GW1 were infused into the rumen of one sheep and the radiolabel was traced within microbial samples, digesta, and the whole animal. Bacterially bound ({sup 3}H)DAP was extensively metabolized, primarily (up to 70% after 8 h) via decarboxylation to ({sup 3}H)lysine by both ruminal protozoa and ruminal bacteria. Recovery of infused radiolabel in urine and feces was low (42% after 96 h) and perhaps indicative of further metabolism by the host animal. In experiment 2, ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled B. megaterium GW1 was infused into the rumens of three sheep and ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled E. coli W7-W5 was infused into the rumen of another sheep. The radioactivity contents of these mutant bacteria were insufficient to use as tracers, but the metabolism of DAP was monitored in the total, free, and peptidyl forms. Free DAP, as a proportion of total DPA in duodenal digesta, varied from 0 to 9.5%, whereas peptidyl DAP accounted for 8.3 to 99.2%.

  16. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    ­ Encourage research and innovation in sustainable development 14 - Standard of Living, EconomySUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2011-2012 #12;2 Table of Contents UNIVERSIT� LAVAL AT A GLANCE 3 A WORD FROM THE RECTOR 4 A WORD FROM THE EXECUTIVE VICE-RECTOR, DEVELOPMENT 5 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

  17. Geothermal development opportunities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of the Seminar on geothermal development opportunities in developing countries, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy and presented by the National Geothermal Association. The overall objectives of the seminar are: (1) Provide sufficient information to the attendees to encourage their interest in undertaking more geothermal projects within selected developing countries, and (2) Demonstrate the technological leadership of US technology and the depth of US industry experience and capabilities to best perform on these projects.

  18. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  19. Developing a Marketing Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

  20. Essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keniston, Daniel Eben

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 looks at the empirical estimation of the welfare impacts of bargaining. Bargaining for retail goods is common in developing countries, but rare in the developed world. The welfare implications of this difference ...

  1. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keats, Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of EconomicJournal of Development Economics 87(1): 57-75. [21] Ozier,Journal of Development Economics 94, 151-163. [9] Delavande,

  2. Leadership Development Negotiationand Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    Leadership Development Negotiationand Conflict Resolution College of Continuing Education Your The Leadership Development Workshop Effective Negotiating and Influencing Skills Resolving Workplace Conflict High Impact Presentation Skills Mediation: Breaking the Impasse Personal Leadership: Leading the Self

  3. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen & Organizational Development" from the selection box ·Select the "Login" tab and login ·Select the "Add Class" tab

  4. Developing a Marketing Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

  5. Internet Polling Development Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, P.; Lockhart, D.; Haberl, J. S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report which documents the development of Internet-based data logger polling. The project consists of two main tasks: the development of automated polling procedures that can be launched remotely with no operator input...

  6. China Business Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einmahl, Uwe

    China Business Development Postgraduate Programme #12;Programme: China Business Development with China: Intercultural Management 3 1 Daily life and business behaviour explained from a cultural perspective Chinese strategic thinking China's political constellation and its impact on business life Human

  7. RELAP-7 Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the second quarter, the Reactor team drafted software development guidance documents and a software quality assurance plan.

  8. Instrument Development Lab | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fabrication Circuit boards Component integration Custom enclosures Microfabrication 3D Printing Facilities and equipment Fully equipped electronics development lab Equipment...

  9. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development Day Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Nuclear Medicine Topics: Pathways of Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care ...

  10. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  11. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  12. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  13. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  14. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  15. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  16. Sustainable Development Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    Sustainable Development Report 2010-2011 #12;2 Table of Contents Université Laval at a glance 2-2011 highlights 9 University community initiatives 15 Sustainable development educational program 21 Research and creativity in sustainable development 24 Awards, recognition, and distinctions 28 Implementation

  17. Digital Media Developing Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Digital Media Developing Digital Media Digital Media Case Study During 2012, IT Services component of student and staff development." In terms of the use of digital media for teaching, Mark Dixon this digital content, mentorship of paramedic students was informal and delivered locally. According to Mairéad

  18. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  19. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  20. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  1. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  2. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  3. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  4. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  5. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  6. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  7. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  8. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Wilmington, DE)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

  9. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, D.L.; Ramachandra, M.

    1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

  10. Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIAL JohnE P T EProductionby I.

  11. Crystal structure of a tetrameric GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase from a bacterial GDP-D-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, N.A.; Mulichak, A.M.; Lam, J.S.; Rocchetta, H.L.; Garavito, R.M. (MSU); (Guelph); (PG)

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    D-Rhamnose is a rare 6-deoxy monosaccharide primarily found in the lipopolysaccharide of pathogenic bacteria, where it is involved in host-bacterium interactions and the establishment of infection. The biosynthesis of D-rhamnose proceeds through the conversion of GDP-D-mannose by GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose, which is subsequently reduced to GDP-D-rhamnose by a reductase. We have determined the crystal structure of GMD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in complex with NADPH and GDP. GMD belongs to the NDP-sugar modifying subfamily of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) enzymes, all of which exhibit bidomain structures and a conserved catalytic triad (Tyr-XXX-Lys and Ser/Thr). Although most members of this enzyme subfamily display homodimeric structures, this bacterial GMD forms a tetramer in the same fashion as the plant MUR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The cofactor binding sites are adjoined across the tetramer interface, which brings the adenosyl phosphate moieties of the adjacent NADPH molecules to within 7 {angstrom} of each other. A short peptide segment (Arg35-Arg43) stretches into the neighboring monomer, making not only protein-protein interactions but also hydrogen bonding interactions with the neighboring cofactor. The interface hydrogen bonds made by the Arg35-Arg43 segment are generally conserved in GMD and MUR1, and the interacting residues are highly conserved among the sequences of bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs. Outside of the Arg35-Arg43 segment, residues involved in tetrameric contacts are also quite conserved across different species. These observations suggest that a tetramer is the preferred, and perhaps functionally relevant, oligomeric state for most bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs.

  12. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazzi, Samuel Ali

    are weak,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 2004, 86,Essays in Development Economics A dissertation submitted indegree Doctor of Philosophy in Economics by Samuel Ali Bazzi

  13. ORISE: Web Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of these...

  14. Synergizing in Cyberinfrastructure Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bietz, Matthew J.; Baumer, Eric P.; Lee, Charlotte P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships with grantees to develop new collaborations (approach potential grantees directly and work with them towith and among its grantees. The project was designed around

  15. NOx Sensor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and advanced testing facilities. - EmiSense LLC: licensed LLNL NOx technology and CRADA partners for continued development. Relevance - If 33% of U.S. drivers switched to...

  16. Individual Development Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To be effective, training decisions made at the organizational and departmental levels must be informed by the needs of the individual. An individual development plan (IDP) is cooperatively...

  17. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  19. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  20. Introducing Web Application Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Introducing Web Application Development Instructor: Dr Wei Ding Development Instructor: Dr.Wei Ding Fall 2009 1CS 437/637 Database-BackedWeb Sites andWeb Services Introduction: Internet vs. World Wide Web Internet is an interconnected network of thousands ofInternet is an interconnected network

  1. Technical Assistance to Developers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

  2. Perturbing the folding energy landscape of the bacterial immunity protein Im7 by site-specific N-linked glycosylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Mark

    N-linked glycosylation modulates protein folding and stability through a variety of mechanisms. As such there is considerable interest in the development of general rules to predict the structural consequences of site-specific ...

  3. Liga developer apparatus system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boehme, Dale R. (Pleasanton, CA); Bankert, Michelle A. (San Francisco, CA); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to fabricate precise, high aspect ratio polymeric molds by photolithograpic process is described. The molds for producing micro-scale parts from engineering materials by the LIGA process. The invention is a developer system for developing a PMMA photoresist having exposed patterns comprising features having both very small sizes, and very high aspect ratios. The developer system of the present invention comprises a developer tank, an intermediate rinse tank and a final rinse tank, each tank having a source of high frequency sonic agitation, temperature control, and continuous filtration. It has been found that by moving a patterned wafer, through a specific sequence of developer/rinse solutions, where an intermediate rinse solution completes development of those portions of the exposed resist left undeveloped after the development solution, by agitating the solutions with a source of high frequency sonic vibration, and by adjusting and closely controlling the temperatures and continuously filtering and recirculating these solutions, it is possible to maintain the kinetic dissolution of the exposed PMMA polymer as the rate limiting step.

  4. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both...

  5. Microsystem product development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

  6. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final amongst university's invested in sustainable development. Our small but mighty size allows us to build through positive sustainable practices. As the Sustainable Development Summer Intern I am fortunate enough

  7. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 1 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final of Bishop's University. The role of the Sustainable Development Summer Intern (SDSI) is to coordinate and organize sustainable development information and activities during the summer months. Ensuring

  8. Training and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Training and Development Administration Assistant Vice Chancellor Lori Castro VC Business Senior Manager Conflict Resolution Nancy Heischman Training Coordinator Vacant Principal Technical Training Consultant Frank Widman Health Care Facilitator / Interim Benefits Manager Frank Trueba Disability

  9. Microbioreactors for bioprocess development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhiyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microbioreactor integrated with automated sensors and actuators as a step towards high-throughput bioprocess development. In particular, this thesis ...

  10. Political elites and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Querubín Borrero, Pablo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three essays on the behavior of political elites and their effect on economic development. The first two chapters focus on political dynasties in the Philippines while the third chapter analyzes ...

  11. USABC Battery Separator Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Separator Development P.I. - Ron Smith Presenter - Kristoffer Stokes, Ph.D. Celgard, LLC Project ID ES007 May 10, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

  12. Development of Photoresists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    attack aluminium and Al-containing alloys/compounds and hereby may contaminate the sub- strate with Al traces. `AZ® Developer' (metal ion containing) is optimized for lowest aluminium attack, but shows

  13. JPRS report, nuclear developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains articles concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China; (2) Japan, North Korea, South Korea; (3) Bulgaria; (4) Argentina, Brazil, Honduras; (5) India, Iran, Pakistan, Syria; (6) Soviet Union; and (7) France, Germany, Turkey.

  14. Sustaining development in Detroit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resnick, Noah Samuel, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this thesis is to propose a strategy for stabilizing and increasing the disparate pieces of development that form the traces of the once great industrial city of Detroit. It focuses primarily on Fordism as a ...

  15. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

  16. Essays on development finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gregory M. (Gregory Mark)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three essays that examine investment choices in less developed countries. Chapter 1 examines how the structure of existing microfinance contracts may discourage risky but high-expected return ...

  17. Laboratory Directed Research & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ......................................................................43 Measuring Dark Energy and Dark Matter Using Gravitational Lensing ............................................................11 Development of an Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Facility for Condensed Matter Physics Challenges Electrochemical Fuel Generation from Water and Carbon Dioxide..............................................19

  18. Sun Academic Developer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCusker, Guy

    on the planet! #12;Free Developer Tools · Includes N etB eans 6.0 Java S tudio Creator 2 (now in N B 6.0) Java

  19. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Change 2 approved 06-13-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1A.

  20. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Cancels DOE O 361.1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 2.

  1. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  2. Resolving the Electron Transfer Kinetics in the Bacterial Reaction Center by Pulse Polarized 2-D Photon Echo Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    : Energy Conversion and Storage; Energy and Charge Transport In the reaction centers (RCs) of purple with highest energy conversion efficiencies.2-4 Recent developments in laser technology allow one to follow Photon Echo Spectroscopy Benjamin P. Fingerhut* and Shaul Mukamel* Chemistry Department, University

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Todd

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to mineralize it to CaCO3. We have established synchrotronand their influence on CaCO3 crystal nucleation andpeptides for enhancement of CaCO3 nucleation on bacterial

  4. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  5. Radiochemical method development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, M.D.; Aldstadt, J.H.; Alvarado, J.S.; Crain, J.S.; Orlandini, K.A.; Smith, L.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed methods for chemical characterization of the environment under a multitask project that focuses on improvement of radioanalytical methods with an emphasis on faster and cheaper routine methods. The authors have developed improved methods for separation of environmental levels of technetium-99, radium, and actinides from soil and water; separation of actinides from soil and water matrix interferences; and isolation of strontium. They are also developing methods for simultaneous detection of multiple isotopes (including nonradionuclides) by using a new instrumental technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The new ICP-MS methods have greater sensitivity and efficiency and could replace many radiometric techniques. They are using flow injection analysis to integrate and automate the separation methods with the ICP-MS methodology. The final product of all activities will be methods that are available (published in the U.S. Department of Energy`s analytical methods compendium) and acceptable for use in regulatory situations.

  6. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  7. Global developments in MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feller, L.W. [CMAI, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended to provide an overview of some of the recent developments in MTBE demand growth worldwide and the impact of these developments on MTBE demand in the future. It provides a perspective of the influence of developments in the US on the worldwide MTBE markets. The public`s outcry regarding oxygenates in gasoline, and specifically MTBE, that has been evolving in the US during the past several months is in response to a politically mandated requirement for a fuel that contains oxygen that is provided by MTBE or ethanol. This public unrest had negatively impacted the market price for MTBE at the time this paper was being prepared. However, the author believes that MTBE, because of its clean octane capabilities, will continue to be used as an octane blendstock for gasoline in increasing quantities worldwide as we move through lead phasedown in West Europe and other countries that are experiencing pollution problems relating to exhaust emissions from internal combustion engines. The objectives of this paper are as follows: review developments in MTBE demand 1990--2000; identify regions where MTBE demand growth will occur; review production growth for MTBE, both historical and forecast; examine world trade patterns during the period; assess methanol demand growth during the period; analyze MTBE`s regional price bias; and provide a forecast of future MTBE price trends.

  8. Technology Forecasting Scenario Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Forecasting and Scenario Development Newsletter No. 2 October 1998 Systems Analysis was initiated on the establishment of a new research programme entitled Technology Forecasting and Scenario and commercial applica- tion of new technology. An international Scientific Advisory Panel has been set up

  9. Safeguards Professional Development Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilligan, Kimberly V [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Across the international field of safeguards there has been a rising awareness of the need for development of the next generation of safeguards professionals. The 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Symposium includes a suggested topic of 'developing safeguards professionals.' This can first be addressed by making university students and young professionals aware of safeguards and the unique career opportunities it encompasses. Then, once someone decides to go into safeguards he/she needs to be offered professional development opportunities in order to become a more effective member of the international safeguards community. This paper begins to do that by reviewing opportunities currently available. There are not many opportunities that are well advertised and this paper will serve to raise awareness of what does already exist and therefore benefit the international safeguards community. The current opportunities that will be discussed include training programs, graduate degrees, organizational outreach, professional networks, and intensive topic specific programs. The paper will also identify current needs and holes in the current offerings of professional development opportunities and suggest ways they can be filled. In the conclusion the paper addresses what types of programs are still needed.

  10. International Policy International Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Research Strategy 2006-2009 International Policy Energy Adaptation International Development Coasts Change Research. Our strategy builds upon our previous work on integrated assessment, energy, adaptation of time. In this spirit, the Centre reconfirms its vision statement: "The Tyndall Centre is the UK network

  11. Cities and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The information and communications revolution has spawned the idea of the "smart city," which places the relevant technologies at the heart of systems that collect and respond to information: smart power grids, smartCities and Sustainable Development By: Jeffrey D. Sachs NOV 25, 2013 NEW YORK ­ Tacloban

  12. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temkin, Richard [MIT

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  13. GCFR development status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the major design features of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor being developed in the United States principally at General Atomic Company. The report gives the general design strategy and highlights the design features of the reactor core and the nuclear steam supply components. It describes the design results on plant safety and licensing.

  14. Global Development Our Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

  15. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  16. 2008 Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such issues as endangered species, private property rights, wetlands, timber management, and air and water2008 Program Natural Resources Leadership Development Institute It is the policy of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service that all persons have equal opportunity and access to its

  17. MECO Production Target Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

  18. Zhu part of team to receive R&D 100 Award | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the life of lithium-ion batteries, eliminating biofilms - and developing biofuels, microbial fuel cells and other technologies. Zihua Zhu, EMSL scientist on time-of-flight...

  19. Insider protection technology developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foesch, J.; Bortniak, P.; Waddoups, I.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluates and develops new techniques and technologies to ensure the integrity of special nuclear material (SNM) against potential insider threats. We have evaluated several types of sensor technologies and subsystems to monitor and/or track materials and personnel. This past year`s effort has been directed at characterizing commercial developments that meet the Department of Energy`s (DOE) needs in some of these areas. Some of these evaluations are complete and some are still in progress. This paper discusses our work with infrared light (IR), radio frequency (RF), and RF proximity technologies. After these technologies are judged to be applicable to DOE`s needs, we incorporate them into the generic, real time, personnel tracking and material monitoring system.

  20. Geothermal materials development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

  1. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program was to develop regenerable sorbents for use in the temperature range of 343 to 538 C (650 to 1000 F) to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal-derived fuel gases in a fluidized-bed reactor. The goal was to develop sorbents that are capable of reducing the H{sub 2}S level in the fuel gas to less than 20 ppmv in the specified temperature range and pressures in the range of 1 to 20 atmospheres, with chemical characteristics that permit cyclic regeneration over many cycles without a drastic loss of activity, as well as physical characteristics that are compatible with the fluidized bed application.

  2. PEATGAS process development status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.; Biljetina, R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1976, IGT has conducted over 200 peat-gasification tests in both laboratory- and process-development-unit (PDU)-scale equipment. The encouraging results demonstrate that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for the production of SNG. Based on a peat-gasification kinetic model developed from the laboratory and PDU data, cost estimates for commercial operation show that the conversion of peat to SNG by the PEATGAS process is competitive with other alternative SNG sources. If the results of a 19-month, $4 million feasibility study funded by the US Department of Energy are favorable, Minnesota Gas Co. plans to participate in the construction and operation of an 80 million SCF/day industrial plant for making SNG from peat.

  3. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order implements the Department's Acquisition Career Development program, mandatory for professionals in the GS-1102 and 1105 occupational procurement series, as well as others with significant procurement responsibilities. The Order also ensures that members of the acquisition workforce are aware of and adhere to the mandatory training and certification requirements. Cancels Acquisition Letter 98-06. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 1.

  4. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  5. Chemoinformatics in drug development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORAL PRESENTATION Open Access Chemoinformatics in drug development Colin R Groom From 7th German Conference on Chemoinformatics: 25 CIC-Workshop Goslar, Germany. 6-8 November 2011 It would be unimaginable to prosecute a drug discovery program... to the contributions that can be made as a candidate molecule progresses towards becoming part of a drug substance. This presentation will highlight the opportunities for the application of chemoinformatics techniques to the area of pharmaceutical materials science, a...

  6. Update on INSIGHTS Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed; Eric Burgett

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

  7. Issue Development sheet Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

  8. Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for...

  9. Advanced Dewatering Systems Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fine coal dewatering technology has been developed and tested in the present work. The work was funded by the Solid Fuels and Feedstocks Grand Challenge PRDA. The objective of this program was to 'develop innovative technical approaches to ensure a continued supply of environmentally sound solid fuels for existing and future combustion systems with minimal incremental fuel cost.' Specifically, this solicitation is aimed at developing technologies that can (i) improve the efficiency or economics of the recovery of carbon when beneficiating fine coal from both current production and existing coal slurry impoundments and (ii) assist in the greater utilization of coal fines by improving the handling characteristics of fine coal via dewatering and/or reconstitution. The results of the test work conducted during Phase I of the current project demonstrated that the new dewatering technologies can substantially reduce the moisture from fine coal, while the test work conducted during Phase II successfully demonstrated the commercial viability of this technology. It is believed that availability of such efficient and affordable dewatering technology is essential to meeting the DOE's objectives.

  10. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

  11. Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

  12. Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds Compiled by Erwin Wodarczak and Melanie Hardbattle Projects series Sous-fonds Description o "Women and Sustainable Development: Canadian Perspectives (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Fonds Description Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds. ­ 1985

  13. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program (SESCDP): This...

  14. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Textile Engineering Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  15. Kansas Certified Development Companies (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas Certified Development Companies (CDC) assist businesses by developing loan packages that meet the financial need of a project. These packages often contain multiple sources of project...

  16. Nuclear Safety Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

  17. Developing better biomass feedstock | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing better biomass feedstock Developing better biomass feedstock Released: September 04, 2014 Multi-omics unlocking the workings of plants Kim Hixson, an EMSL research...

  18. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  19. Leadership Development | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professional Development Resource WIST Talk: The Art of Networking video Leadership Development Argonne has a long-term vision for its workforce, recognizing that future challenges...

  20. Economic Development Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing...

  1. Cooperative Research & Development Agreements | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRADA SHARE Cooperative Research and Development Agreement A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) allows non-federal entities (industry, universities,...

  2. Product development practices that matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nisheeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product Development consists of activities to transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. Several waves of improvements in technological innovation and product development have ...

  3. The Clean Development Mechanism and Power Sector Reforms in Developing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : joint implementation (JI), international emissions trading (IET) and the CDM · JI allows developed

  4. Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department Environment Division Forest Correa Pertti Veijalainen Harri Ahveninen Inter-American Development Bank Washington, D.C. Sustainable. At the IDB the work was supervised by Kari Keipi of the Sustainable Development Department (SDS). Bank staff

  5. Photonics Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLVâ??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average homeâ??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nationâ??s energy consumption â?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

  6. SRNL LDRD - Developed Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u a l r e7332999Developed

  7. ORISE: Health Literacy Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and RiskEnvironmentLiteracy Development

  8. Eltron Research & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the “base” program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastman’s site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOE’s decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

  9. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  10. RSMASS system model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Gallup, D.R.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RSMASS system mass models have been used for more than a decade to make rapid estimates of space reactor power system masses. This paper reviews the evolution of the RSMASS models and summarizes present capabilities. RSMASS has evolved from a simple model used to make rough estimates of space reactor and shield masses to a versatile space reactor power system model. RSMASS uses unique reactor and shield models that permit rapid mass optimization calculations for a variety of space reactor power and propulsion systems. The RSMASS-D upgrade of the original model includes algorithms for the balance of the power system, a number of reactor and shield modeling improvements, and an automatic mass optimization scheme. The RSMASS-D suite of codes cover a very broad range of reactor and power conversion system options as well as propulsion and bimodal reactor systems. Reactor choices include in-core and ex-core thermionic reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors, particle bed reactors, and prismatic configuration reactors. Power conversion options include thermoelectric, thermionic, Stirling, Brayton, and Rankine approaches. Program output includes all major component masses and dimensions, efficiencies, and a description of the design parameters for a mass optimized system. In the past, RSMASS has been used as an aid to identify and select promising concepts for space power applications. The RSMASS modeling approach has been demonstrated to be a valuable tool for guiding optimization of the power system design; consequently, the model is useful during system design and development as well as during the selection process. An improved in-core thermionic reactor system model RSMASS-T is now under development. The current development of the RSMASS-T code represents the next evolutionary stage of the RSMASS models. RSMASS-T includes many modeling improvements and is planned to be more user-friendly. RSMASS-T will be released as a fully documented, certified code at the end of 1998. A radioisotope space power system model RISMASS is also under development. RISMASS will optimize and predict system masses for radioisotope power sources coupled with close-spaced thermionic diodes. Although RSMASS-D models have been developed for a broad variety of space nuclear power and propulsion systems, only a few concepts will be included in the releasable RSMASS-T computer code. A follow-on effort is recommended to incorporate all previous models as well as solar power system models into one general code. The proposed Space Power and propulsion system MASS (SPMASS) code would provide a consistent analysis tool for comparing a very broad range of alternative power and propulsion systems for any required power level and operating conditions. As for RSMASS-T the SPMASS model should be a certified, fully documented computer code available for general use. The proposed computer program would provide space mission planners with the capability to quickly and cost effectively explore power system options for any space mission. The code should be applicable for power requirements from as low as a few milliwatts (solar and isotopic system options) to many megawatts for reactor power and propulsion systems.

  11. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

  12. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  13. Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

  14. Misadventures in Conservation and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    and Development Projects in Indonesian national parks, the global trade in electronic waste, and the regulation

  15. The economic development of Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khader, B.; El-Wifati, B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book focuses on the development of the Libyan economy over the last decade. The book surveys both the structural developments in the Libyan economy and the experience of the individual sectors. It considers the potential for industrial development and the prospects for agriculture both in terms of natural resources and political commitments. The book also examines developments in the service sector especially banking.

  16. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

  17. Geothermal development in Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

  18. Development of turbodrill tachometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.; Neudecker, J.W.; Shoemaker, H.D.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reliable tachometer has been developed for use with turbodrills. The tachometer utilizes a set of partially blanked turbine blades to produce a pressure pulse in the drilling mud flow stream each time the turbodrill rotates one revolution. The pressure pulses are transmitted through the mud in the drill pipes to the surface where they are detected, processed and RPM read out. The frequency of the pulse signals is a direct measure of the turbodrill rotary speed. Drilling motor test stand trials demonstrated the reliabiity and accuracy of the tachometer. The pulsing blades were then installed on geothermal turbodrills used in drilling the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory geothermal well EE-2. The tachometer allowed continual monitoring and control of turbodrill speed at LASL and was successfully used to depths in excess of 10,000 feet. The success of the high temperature turbodrills in EE-2 is attributed in part to the tachometer.

  19. Supervisory Control Strategy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 4 of this collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focused on the design of the hierarchical supervisory control for multiple-module units. The state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – made developing a detailed hierarchical control difficult at this time. However, other simultaneous and ongoing efforts have contributed to providing the needed information. This report summarizes the results achieved under Task 4 of this Financial Assistance Award. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 discusses the IRIS control functions. Next, it briefly reviews the current control concepts, and then reviews the maneuvering requirements for the IRIS plant. It closes by noting the benefits that automated sequences have in reducing operator workload. Section 3 examines reactor loading in the frequency domain to establish some guidelines for module operation, paying particular attention to strategies for using process steam for desalination and/or district heating. The final subsection discusses the implications for reactor control, and argues that using the envisioned percentage (up to 10%) of the NSSS thermal output for these purposes should not significantly affect the NSSS control strategies. Section 4 uses some very general economic assumptions to suggest how one should approach multi-module operation. It concludes that the well-known algorithms used for economic dispatching could be used to help manage a multi-unit IRIS site. Section 5 addresses the human performance factors of multi-module operation. Section 6 summarizes our conclusions.

  20. ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John J. Kilbane II; William Bogan

    2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter included the fractionation of extracts prepared from several varieties of pepper plants, and using several solvents, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A preliminary determination of antimicrobial activities of the new extracts and fractions using a growth inhibition assay, and evaluation of the extracts ability to inhibit biofilm formation was also performed. The analysis of multiple extracts of pepper plants and fractions of extracts of pepper plants obtained by HPLC illustrated that these extracts and fractions are extremely complex mixtures of chemicals. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify the chemical constituents of these extracts and fractions to the greatest degree possible. Analysis of the chemical composition of various extracts of pepper plants has illustrated the complexity of the chemical mixtures present, and while additional work will be performed to further characterize the extracts to identify bioactive compounds the focus of efforts should now shift to an evaluation of the ability of extracts to inhibit corrosion in mixed culture biofilms, and in pure cultures of bacterial types which are known or believed to be important in corrosion.

  1. Geochemical Characterization Using Geophysical Data and Markov Chain Monte Carolo methods: A Case Study at the South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Murray, Chris; Roden, Eric; Majer, Ernest

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of field-scale geochemical parameters, such as extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III), influences microbial processes and thus the efficacy of bioremediation. Because traditional characterization of those parameters is invasive and laborious, it is rarely performed sufficiently at the field-scale. Since both geochemical and geophysical parameters often correlate to some common physical properties (such as lithofacies), we investigated the utility of tomographic radar attenuation data for improving estimation of geochemical parameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. The data used in this study included physical, geophysical, and geochemical measurements collected in and between several boreholes at the DOE South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia. Results show that geophysical data, constrained by physical data, provided field-scale information about extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III) in a minimally invasive manner and with a resolution unparalleled by other geochemical characterization methods. This study presents our estimation framework for estimating Fe(II) and Fe(III), and its application to a specific site. Our hypothesis--that geochemical parameters and geophysical attributes can be linked through their mutual dependence on physical properties--should be applicable for estimating other geochemical parameters at other sites.

  2. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  3. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  4. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

  5. Interactive development of RADTRAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, F.L.; Weiner, R.F.; Yoshimura, H.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Joy, H.W. [Belfort Engineering (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RADTRAN computer code for transportation risk analysis, which has been under continuous development at Sandia National Laboratories since 1977, has evolved from a purely research tool into a publicly available with a variety of applications. This expansion of the user community has substantially increased the need to make the system easier to use without decreasing its capabilities or the quality of output. A large set of modifiable RADTRAN input files has been available via TRANSNET for several years. One approach to assisting the user involves adding annotations/information to each of these files. A second approach is providing additional help in building new/modifying old input files. Keeping the proposed information/annotation files separate from but closely coupled to the modifiable input files within the TRANSNET shell system allows the modifiable input files to remain as regular input files while providing rapid, automatic access to, useful information about the analysis. In this way, the sample input files remain intact as regular RADTRAN input files and any files generated using associated on-line menus or editors may be readily converted into new input files. A single sample file is selected and used as an example to illustrate the prototype help features.

  6. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  7. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  8. Women Empowerment and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duflo, Esther

    Women empowerment and economic development are closely related: in one direction, development alone can play a major role in driving down inequality between men and women; in the other direction, empowering women may benefit ...

  9. Design of product development systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre Granados, Adrian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of successful new products in less time and using fewer resources is key to the financial success of most consumer product companies. In this thesis we have studied the development of new products and how ...

  10. Mechanisms of brain ventricle development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowery, Laura Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brain ventricles are a conserved system of fluid-filled cavities within the brain that form during the earliest stages of brain development. Abnormal brain ventricle development has been correlated with neurodevelopmental ...

  11. Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

  12. Tools for dynamic model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaber, Spencer Daniel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For this thesis, several tools for dynamic model development were developed and analyzed. Dynamic models can be used to simulate and optimize the behavior of a great number of natural and engineered systems, from the ...

  13. Industry Cluster Development Grant winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support small farmers in developing products and bringing them to market. Siete del Norte to help fund the development of the Northern New Mexico Food Hub and to reopen the...

  14. Refund for Economic Development (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Refund for Economic Development under the Tax Code for state tax refunds for economic development. Some Texas property owners may be eligible to receive refunds of state sales and use taxes and...

  15. Strategies for Developing Youth Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Strategies for Developing Youth Leadership Youth leadership development happens through shared of youth leadership opportunities because of misconceptions about their disability, segregation in school suggestions to create opportunities and encourage leadership in youth with and without disabilities: Encourage

  16. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough periodAutomotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi

  17. Welding Development W87 Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Newman; G. Gibbs; G. K. Hicken

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the development activities used to qualify the Gas Tungsten Arc (FTA) girth weld and the resistance stem attachments on the W87 Base Line (W87BL). Design of experiments was used throughout the development activities.

  18. Corruption, Institutions and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aidt, Toke S

    and in developing the underlying theory (Dasgupta, 2001, chapter 9; Hamilton and Clemens, 1999). Loosely speaking, sustainable development is related to an economy?s ability to maintain living standards through time. More precisely, Arrow et al. (2004) suggest... capita ?a direct measure of sustainable development ?and corruption. While corruption may have little average e¤ect on the growth rate of GDP per capita, it is a likely source of unsustainable development. Key words: Corruption, Growth, Sustainable...

  19. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  20. Systemic Signalling in Plant Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David

    develop continuously throughout their life cycle, constantly initiating new or- gans. They doSystemic Signalling in Plant Development David Jackson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring to the production of systemic signals that control the development of distant organs and tissues. Introduction