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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy measurements. Future applications of the SR-FTIR-based microfluidics approach may help explain why some bacteria maintain biofilms in given...

2

A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a Manjunath Hegde of biofilm community formation. Here, we describe the development of a PDMS-based two-layer microfluidic flow

Wood, Thomas K.

3

Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style composition ­ isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK) ­ on non-cohesive glass beads (,63 mm determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

4

Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 ? 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics andextracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

Gasper, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur...

7

Influence of sulfate reducing bacterial biofilm on corrosion behavior of low-alloy, high-strength steel (API-5L X80)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of sulfate reducing bacterial biofilm on corrosion behavior of low-alloy, high Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) Biofilm and iron sulfide a b s t r a c t The utilization of high strength carbon steels in oil and gas transportation systems has recently increased

8

Microfluidic Systems for Investigating Bacterial Chemotaxis and Colonization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall goal of this work was to develop and utilize microfluidic models for investigating bacterial chemotaxis and biofilm formation - phenotypes that play key roles in bacterial infections. Classical methods for investigating chemotaxis...

Englert, Derek Lynn

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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10

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare | NationalReal-Time

11

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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12

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare |

13

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare |Real-Time Chemical Imaging of

14

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermalOxide FuelReal-Time Chemical Imaging of

15

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermalOxide FuelReal-Time Chemical Imaging

16

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermalOxide FuelReal-Time Chemical

17

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermalOxide FuelReal-Time ChemicalReal-Time

18

biofilms | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel...

19

Permeabilizing biofilms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

Soukos, Nikolaos S. (Revere, MA); Lee, Shun (Arlington, VA); Doukas,; Apostolos G. (Belmont, MA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

EMSL - biofilms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biofilms en New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Support Analytical Infrastructure and Further Development of a Statewide Bacterial Source Tracking Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The project titled Support Analytical Infrastructure and Further Development of a Statewide Bacterial Source Tracking Library funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board was established to provide needed resources to expand...

DiGiovanni, G.; Casarez, E.; Gentry, T.; Martin, E.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Combinatorial discovery of polymers resistant to bacterial attachment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation pose key challenges to the optimal performance of medical devices. In this study, we determined the attachment of selected bacterial species to hundreds of polymeric ...

Hook, Andrew L

23

Electroactive Biofilms: Current Status and Future Research Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroactive biofilms generated by electrochemically active microorganisms have many potential applications in bioenergy and chemicals production. This review assesses the effects of microbiological and process parameters on enrichment of such biofilms as well as critically evaluates the current knowledge of the mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer in BES systems. First we discuss the role of biofilm forming microorganisms vs. planktonic microorganisms. Physical, chemical and electrochemical parameters which dictate the enrichment and subsequent performance of the biofilms are discussed. Potential dependent biological parameters including biofilm growth rate, specific electron transfer rate and others and their relationship to BES system performance is assessed. A review of the mechanisms of electron transfer in BES systems is included followed by a discussion of biofilm and its exopolymeric components and their electrical conductivity. A discussion of the electroactive biofilms in biocathodes is also included. Finally, we identify the research needs for further development of the electroactive biofilms to enable commercial applications.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Reguera, Gemma [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ringeisen, Bradley [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Wang, Zhiwu [ORNL; Feng, Yujie [Harbin Institute of Technology; Kim, Byung Hong [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid bacterial inclusion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

monomers and amyloids. Such transi- tions govern... processes as diverse as human protein-folding diseases, bacterial biofilm assembly, and the inheritance... that Q and N...

25

Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Stages common to all biofilms (medical and environmental) Stages unique to aquatic biofouling BiofilmThickness(m)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biofilms and support rational development of better antifouling materials. ST2, Project 1.11; March 2013 chemistry and features impact biofilm formation to enable rational development of new antifouling materials to mechanistic study of antifouling materials Begin ASTM method certification process Write proposals

27

Imaging biofilm architecture within porous media using synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging biofilm architecture within porous media using synchrotron-based X-ray computed. Wildenschild (2011), Imaging biofilm architecture within porous media using synchrotron-based X-ray computed synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) has been developed. Imaging biofilms in porous media

Wildenschild, Dorthe

28

Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Artificial teeth : dental biofilm analysis on a chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, an "artificial teeth" microfluidic device is developed that provides unprecedented control over the conditions required to simulate the growth of complex dental biofilm. Dental plaque formation is not only ...

Lam, Raymond Hiu-wai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Biofilm assembly | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I.ProgramBig SolBiofilm assembly Biofilm assembly

31

Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently

Mei, Chuansheng [IALR; Nowak, Jerzy [VPISU; Seiler, John [VPISU

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via...

33

Metabolic spatial variability in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain bacteria are capable of transferring electrons derived from respiratory metabolism to solid extracellular electron-accepting materials1-4. This ability allows the organisms to use conductive substrata as their sole electron sink, generating electricity that is available for practical applications5-7. Geobacter is a biofilm-forming genus capable of this extracellular electron transfer8-11. Evidence in the literature suggests that Geobacter cells produce a conductive matrix to gain access to electron-accepting surfaces12,13. It has been hypothesized that cells that are more than tens of microns from the electron-accepting surface cannot respire because of electrical resistance in the matrix and thus remain metabolically inactive14-16. To test this hypothesis, we sought to determine whether the entire biofilm remains metabolically active and able to respire on an electron-accepting surface as the biofilm thickness increases. We developed and used a novel electrochemical-nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) microimaging system capable of sustaining an electrochemically active biofilm on a polarized electrode inside a superconducting magnet, allowing for simultaneous NMR and electrochemical investigation of a biofilm for the first time. Here, we show that Geobacter biofilms can grow to several hundred microns thick while respiring on an electrode and that the top of the biofilm remains metabolically active. This is only possible if the cells near the top are able to transfer electrons through the initial biofilm matrix to the electrode. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to verify electron transfer to uranium ions by metabolically active cells near the top of the biofilm. Our results reveal that extracellular electron transfer is not prevented by electrical resistance, even when the biofilm is hundreds of microns thick. Furthermore, the electron donor may be the limiting factor for respiration and the base of the biofilm may be less active despite being in close proximity to the electrode. Long-range electron transfer across metabolically inactive regions within Geobacter biofilms adds a novel facet to our comprehension of electrochemically active biology.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Majors, Paul D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

In situ biofilm coupon device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsursface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our work is towards mechanistically understanding interactions of unsaturated bacterial biofilms and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with actinide metals and metal surrogates under vadose zone conditions. Because metal contaminants in the vadose zone co-occur with organic pollutants, some of our work has included experiments with organic pollutants.

Holden, Patricia

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacters conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Watermelon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial fruit blotch is a disease occurring sporadically in almost all areas of Texas where watermelons are grown. This publication discusses symptoms, diagnosis and disease development and management....

Isakeit, Thomas

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

39

Three-Dimensional Imaging and Quantification of Biomass and Biofilms in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method to resolve biofilms in three dimensions in porous media using high-resolution synchrotron-based x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) has been developed. Imaging biofilms in porous media without disturbing the natural spatial arrangement of the porous media and associated biofilm has been a challenging task, primarily because porous media generally precludes conventional imaging via optical microscopy; x-ray tomography offers a potential alternative. One challenge for using this method is that most conventional x-ray contrast agents are water-soluble and easily diffuse into biofilms. To overcome this problem, silver-coated microspheres were added to the fluid phase to create an x-ray contrast that does not diffuse into the biofilm mass. Using this approach, biofilm imaging in porous media was accomplished with sufficient contrast to differentiate between the biomass- and fluid-filled pore spaces. The method was validated by using a two-dimensional micro-model flow cell where both light microscopy and CMT imaging were used to im age the biofilm. The results of this work has been published in Water Resources Research (Iltis et al., 2010). Additional work needs to be done to optimize this imaging approach, specifically, we find that the quality of the images are highly dependent on the coverage of the biofilm with Ag particles, - which means that we may have issues in dead-end pore space and for very low density (fluffy) biofilms. What we can image for certain with this technique is the biofilm surface that is well-connected to flow paths and thus well-supplied with nutrients etc.

Dorthe Wildenschild

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilmsthe G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Laser-Generated Shockwaves for the Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization by modified Laser Spallation Technique (The Basic Laser Spallation Technique (Modified Laser Spallation Technique: Top-Down

Navarro, Artemio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite....

44

Analysis of the Multidimensional Effects in Biofilms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. W. Wimpenny, "Effect of EPS on biofilm structure andIndividual Cells and Continuum EPS Matrix," Biotechnologypolymeric substance (EPS). Free floating, planktonic

Hauser, Michael Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities,...

46

Bacterial Polybydroxyalkanoates Sang Yup Lee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, genetically engi- neered plants harboring the bacterial PHA biosynthesis genes are being developed of bacterial strains or plants that more efficiently synthesize PHAs will bring the costs down to make PHAs- pared with petrochemical derived plastics. Among the candidates for biodegradable plastics, PHAs have

47

Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - attached biofilm reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PreprintKey words: Bromate; kinetics; hydrogen; denitrification; biofilm; hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor... -mixed, hydrogen- based, membrane-biofilm ... Source:...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects biofilm formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biofilm was N-(3... Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... osmosis; biofilms; Pseudomonas ... Source:...

50

Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on implant infection will be very useful in understanding the chemistry of the biomaterial surfaces, which can deter the formation of biofilms. It is observed that the adsorption of BSA on the biomaterial surfaces increases with time and concentration, irrespective of their type and the nature of the EPS matrix of the bacterial biofilm is dependent on the amount of protein adsorbed on the biomaterial surface. The adsorption of protein (BSA) on the biomaterials, polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) has been stu...

Sinha, S Dutta; Maity, P K; Tarafdar, S; Moulik, S P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated biofilm reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bulk liquid BOD concentration on activity Summary: Nitrification . Denitrification . Wastewater. BOD inhibition . Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor. Membrane... aerated biofilm...

52

Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces Dao Janjaroen a , Fangqiong Ling a , Guillermo Monroy b , Nicolas Pathogens a b s t r a c t Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E

Boppart, Stephen

53

An Estimate of Biofilm Properties using an Acoustic Microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noninvasive measurements over a biofilm, a three-dimensional community of microorganisms immobilized at a substratum, were made using an acoustic microscope operating at frequencies up to 70 MHz. Spatial variation of surface heterogeneity, thickness, interior structure, and biomass of a living biofilm was estimated over a 2.5-mm by 2.5-mm region. Ultrasound based estimates of thickness were corroborated using optical microscopy and the nominal biofilm thickness was 100 microns. Experimental data showed that the acoustic microscope combined with signal processing was capable of imaging and making quantitative estimates of the spatial distribution of biomass within the biofilm. The revealed surface topology and interior structure of the biofilm provide data for use in advanced biofilm mass transport models. The experimental acoustic and optical systems, methods to estimate of biofilm properties and potential applications for the resulting data are discussed.

Good, Morris S.; Wend, Christopher F.; Bond, Leonard J.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Crawford, Susan L.; Daly, Don S.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed project was developed in response to the creeks listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

55

Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on implant infection will be very useful in understanding the chemistry of the biomaterial surfaces, which can deter the formation of biofilms. It is observed that the adsorption of BSA on the biomaterial surfaces increases with time and concentration, irrespective of their type and the nature of the EPS matrix of the bacterial biofilm is dependent on the amount of protein adsorbed on the biomaterial surface. The adsorption of protein (BSA) on the biomaterials, polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) has been studied and the formation of the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on them has been examined.

S Dutta Sinha; Susmita Chatterjee; P. K. Maity; S. Tarafdar; S. P. Moulik

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm PURPOSE. To assess the effects of NDM from cranberries on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formed

Jacob, Eshel Ben

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa forms biofilms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of reverse Summary: Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... wastewater effluent. P. aeruginosa biofilm...

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilms mediates Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of reverse Summary: Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... wastewater effluent. P. aeruginosa biofilm...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of reverse Summary: Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... osmosis; biofilms; Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilms exposed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of reverse Summary: Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... wastewater effluent. P. aeruginosa biofilm...

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - antistaphylococcal biofilm activity Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhance Persistence of a Synthetic Biofilm Consortium Summary: growth activity in flow- chamber biofilms. Appl Environ Microbiol 65: 4108-17. 25. Costerton JW, et al......

63

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature....

65

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

66

actinomyces israelii biofilm: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode biofilm several operational strategies for system optimization. ' INTRODUCTION Microbial fuel cells (MFCs |Environ. Sci. Technol. 2011, 45,...

67

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Various chemicals that inhibit the growth and/or the metabolism of corrosion-associated microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and methanogenic bacteria were evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit corrosion in experiments utilizing pure and mixed bacterial cultures, and planktonic cultures as well as mature biofilms. Planktonic cultures are easier to inhibit than mature biofilms but several compounds were shown to be effective in decreasing the amount of metal corrosion. Of the compounds tested hexane extracts of Capsicum pepper plants and molybdate were the most effective inhibitors of sulfate reducing bacteria, bismuth nitrate was the most effective inhibitor of nitrate reducing bacteria, and 4-((pyridine-2-yl)methylamino)benzoic acid (PMBA) was the most effective inhibitor of methanogenic bacteria. All of these compounds were demonstrated to minimize corrosion due to MIC, at least in some circumstances. The results obtained in this project are consistent with the hypothesis that any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion. This approach of controlling MIC by controlling the metabolism of biofilms is more environmentally benign than the current approach involving the use of potent biocides, and warrants further investigation.

Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; Gemma Husmillo; Kristine Lowe; J. Robert Paterek; John J. Kilbane II

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Liquid transport facilitated by channels in Bacillus subtilis biofilms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

| multicellularity | wrinkles Biofilms are dense multicellular communities of bacteria em- bedded in a self-produced remediation (10), plant protection (11), and microbial fuel cells (12). Biofilm growth and physiology rely on the transport of nutrients, waste, and sig- naling molecules, all of which are dissolved in water. For example

69

Spatial Distributions of Copper in Microbial Biofilms by Scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a biofilm may confer resistance to transient spikes in the bulk solution concentration of toxic metal), and toxins (e.g., anti- microbial agents (15) and heavy metals (10, 16)). Trace metals are also ubiquitous species by retarding metal diffusion and reducing the metal exposure of cells within the biofilm

Houston, Paul L.

70

Bacterial adhesion in structured environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofilms-surface-bound communities of microbes-are a major medical concern, as they can be sources of infection that are difficult to eradicate. Their formation starts with the attachment of bacteria to available surfaces-often ...

Friedlander, Ronn S. (Ronn Samuel)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,Physics DiagnosticsMicrochips.in biofilms

72

Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

Jiao, Yongqin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); D'Haeseleer, Patrik M [ORNL; Dill, Brian [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial chemotaxis, a remarkable behavioral trait which allows bacteria to sense and respond to chemical gradients in the environment, has implications in a broad range of fields including but not limited to disease ...

Ahmed, Tanvir, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Annual progress Report on research related to our research project Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsurface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of this research project is to investigate and optimize the mechanisms for in situ immobilization of Pu species by naturally-occurring bacteria. Specific research objectives are: (a) investigate the mechanism of bacterial accumulation and immobilization of plutonium species by biofilm formation under aerobic conditions and (b) to demonstrate the direct and indirect stabilization of Pu via dissimilatory reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

New, Mary

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Inter- and Intra-kingdom Signaling in Bacterial Chemotaxis, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the actions of NE are mediated primarily through the LasR, and not the RhlR QS system. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the chemo-sensing of the intra-kingdom signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2) by pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella...

Hegde, Manjunath

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxide production within a bacterial biofilm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

copper, zinc, lead, and arsenic by iron and manganese oxyhydroxide coatings on plankton in lakes polluted with mine and smelter

Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Moscow, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Effect of Heterogenous Structure in Mechanically Unstressed Biofilms on Overall Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A biofilm is a hydrated collection of micro­organisms concentrated together in a self­secreted matrix and industrial systems, dental plaque, algal mats, and waste­water treatment systems. Biofilm presence has

Klapper, Isaac

79

Role of AI-2 in oral biofilm formation using microfluidic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofilm formation. Microfluidic devices provide biomimetic environments and offer a simple method for executing multiple stimuli experiments simultaneously, thus, can be an extremely powerful tool in the study of QS in biofilms. In this study, we report...

Kim, Sun Ho

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - aureus biofilm maturation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geoffrey - Dpartement de Mathmatiques, Institut Galile, Universit Paris 13 Nord Collection: Mathematics 69 Insights on Escherichia coli biofilm formation and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bacterial Bleeding Canker of Horse Chestnut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a tree in phloem and cambium Horse chestnut bleeding canker ph ph + ca #12;Summary of Infection Pae;· Bacterial diseases represent an increasing threat to Britain's forest, woodland and amenity trees · The Pae epidemic provides an ideal opportunity to develop a system for tackling newly emerging tree diseases · We

82

Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct Switchgrass. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct...

83

Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

84

Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5? biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 2347% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ? 30 ?m before acidification to ? 60 ?m after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5? biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: Effectiveness of E.coli DH5? biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

A bacterial ratchet motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-propelling bacteria are a dream of nano-technology. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines could be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for micro-devices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric micro-gears can spontaneously rotate when immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the saw-toothed boundaries of a nano-fabricated rotor. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter's ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids.

R. Di Leonardo; L. Angelani; G. Ruocco; V. Iebba; M. P. Conte; S. Schippa; F. De Angelis; F. Mecarini; E. Di Fabrizio

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. Furthermore, we propose several experiments to elucidate the torque-speed relationship in motors where the number of stators may not be constant. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental features of the flagellar motor, including: torque-speed and speed-ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the puzzle of swarming experiments.

Kranthi K. Mandadapu; Jasmine A. Nirody; Richard M. Berry; George Oster

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by Bacterial Cells Displaying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by Bacterial Cells Displaying Synthetic Phytochelatins for enhanced bioaccumulation of toxic metals. Synthetic genes encoding for several metal strategy for develop- ing high-affinity bioadsorbents suitable for heavy metal removal. © 2000 John Wiley

Chen, Wilfred

88

A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Phylogenetic beta diversity in bacterial assemblages across ecosystems: deterministic versus stochastic processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing evidence emerged for non-random spatial distributions for microbes, but the underlying processes resulting in microbial assemblage variation among and within Earths ecosystems is still lacking. For instance, some studies showed that the deterministic processes by habitat specialization are important, while other studies hold that bacterial communities are assembled by neutral forces. Here we examine the relative importance of deterministic and stochastic processes for bacterial communities from subsurface environments, as well as stream biofilm, lake water, lake sediment and soil using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. We show that there is a general pattern in phylogenetic signal in species niches across recent evolutionary time for all studied habitats, enabling us to infer the influences of community assembly processes from patterns of phylogenetic turnover in community composition. The phylogenetic dissimilarities among habitat types were significantly higher than within them, and the communities were clustered according to their original habitat types. For communities within habitat types, the highest phylogenetic turnover rate through space was observed in subsurface environments, followed by stream biofilm on mountainsides, whereas the sediment assemblages across regional scales showed the lowest turnover rate. Quantifying phylogenetic turnover as the deviation from a null expectation suggested that measured environmental variables imposed strong selection on bacterial communities for nearly all sample groups, and for three sample groups, that spatial distance reflects unmeasured environmental variables that impose selection, as opposed to spatial isolation. Such characterization of spatial and environmental variables proved essential for proper interpretation of partial mantel results based on observed beta diversity metrics. In summary, our results clearly indicate a dominant role of deterministic processes on bacterial assemblages and highlight that bacteria show strong habitat associations that have likely emerged through evolutionary adaptation.

Wang, Jianjun; Shen, Jianhaua; Wu, Yucheng; Tu, Chen; Soininen , Janne; Stegen, James C.; He, Jizheng; Liu, Xingqi; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Enlou

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

The importance of live biofilms in corrosion protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letter The importance of live biofilms in corrosion protection Rongjun Zuo a , Esra Kus b , Florian, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, U-3222, Storrs, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion occurred within a few hours as indicated by characteristic changes in the impedance spectra. The corrosion

Wood, Thomas K.

91

Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D.N. (2008) Bacterial endophytes: recent developments andapplications for bacterial endophytes, including productionthat diazotrophic endophyte Herbaspirillum seropedicae could

Bernard, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

aeruginosa biofilm development: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that P. aeruginosa is prone to revise the interaction with its host during persistent lifestyle. Finally, sequence analysis of Pos-STM genes in longitudinally P. aeruginosa...

93

In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

Tinberg, Christine Elaine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Role of protein acetylation, formation and dispersal of biofilms, and their impact on insects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................... 34 3.3.6 Cellulose inhibits biofilm formation on polystyrene plates ........................................................................... 35 3.3.7 OmpA influences cellulose production and biofilm formation through CpxR... .................................................... 58 4.3.3 BdcA binds c-di-GMP to control phenotypes............. 60 4.3.4 BdcR (YjgJ) regulates bdcA ....................................... 61 4.3.5 Protein engineering of BdcA for biofilm dispersal..... 65 4.4...

Ma, Qun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - aureus biofilm formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 15 The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by Summary: The Effect of Nondialyzable...

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic eukaryotic biofilms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Materials Science 58 The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by Summary: The Effect of Nondialyzable...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamar blue biofilm Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 12 The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by Summary: The Effect of Nondialyzable...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - albicans biofilm formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Biotechnology 63 The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by Summary: The Effect of Nondialyzable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filter biofilm Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 APPLICATION OF IMMOBILIZED CELLS FOR AIR POLLUTION CONTROL Summary: , biotrickling filter, air pollution control, biofilms,...

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biofilm reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

electrochemically active bacteria on an electrode were therefore studied using anaerobic sewage sludge in a two... . By applying biofilm scraped from the anode of a working MFC to...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic wastewater biofilms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane... biofilm reactor Introduction One of the major challenges in wastewater treatment is achieving effective... et al. 2004). Nitrifying bacteria grow in the deep,...

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - anode biofilm transcriptomics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In total, 278 genes were repressed... ORIGINAL ARTICLE Physiology and genetic traits of reverse osmosis membrane biofilms: ... Source: Elimelech, Menachem - Department of...

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects downstream biofilm Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOTIC AGGREGATES AND BIOFILMS ERIC A. STRAUSS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences... water) ecosystems and is important for nutri- ent cycling, organic matter decomposition,...

106

aerobic packed-bed biofilm: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation Dietrich, Lars 98 Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater Environmental Management and...

107

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

Smith, Hal

108

Role of Rhizobium endoglucanase CelC2 in cellulose biosynthesis and biofilm formation on plant roots and abiotic surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for these bacteria. PVC tabs were used to examine the three-for biofilm-forming ability on PVC tabs. Wild type ANU843A-C) and biofilm formation on PVC (D-F) tabs of the studied

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Some issues in the modeling of movement of cells : chemotaxis, biofilms, algae, etc... Magali Ribot;Hyperbolic chemotaxis Hyperbolic chemotaxis on networks Models for biofilms Models for algae Hyperbolic

Ribot, Magali

110

Impact of Initial Biofilm Growth on the Anode Impedance of Microbial Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Impact of Initial Biofilm Growth on the Anode Impedance of Microbial Fuel Cells Ramaraja P: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the behavior of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) during: microbial fuel cells; biofilm; internal resis- tance; electrochemical impedance; polarization resistance

Mench, Matthew M.

111

Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Microalgal biofilm based technologies are of keen interest due to their high biomass concentrations and ability to utilize renewable resources, such as light and CO2. While photoautotrophic biofilms have long been used for wastewater remediation applications, biofuel production represents a relatively new and under-represented focus area. However, the direct measurement and characterization of fundamental parameters required for physiological analyses are challenging due to biofilm heterogeneity. This study evaluated oxygenic photosynthesis and biofuel precursor molecule production using a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) operated at field- and laboratory-scales for wastewater remediation and biofuel production, respectively. Clear differences in oxygenic-photosynthesis, respiration and biofuel-precursor capacities were observed between the two systems and different conditions based on light and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen depletion was not found to have the same effect on lipid accumulation compared to prior planktonic studies. Physiological characterizations of these microalgal biofilms identify potential areas for future process optimization.

Bernstein, Hans C.; Kesaano, Maureen; Moll, Karen; Smith, Terence; Gerlach, Robin; Carlson, Ross; Miller, Charles D.; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith; Gardner, Robert D.; Sims, Ronald C.

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current antibiotic crisis stems from two distinct phenomena-drug resistance, and drug tolerance. Resistance mechanisms such as drug efflux or modification prevent antibiotics from binding to their targets 1, allowing pathogens to grow. Antibiotic tolerance is the property of persister cells, phenotypic variants of regular bacteria 2. Antibiotics kill by corrupting targets, but these are inactive in dormant persisters, leading to tolerance. Persisters were first identified by Joseph Bigger in 1944, when he discovered a surviving sub-population of Staphylococcus following treatment with penicillin3. Persisters are largely responsible for recalcitrance of chronic diseases such as tuberculosis, and various infections associated with biofilms - endocarditis, osteomyelitis, infections of catheters and indwelling devices, and deep-seated infections of soft tissues 4. There are a number of redundant pathways involved in persister formation5,6 precluding development of drugs inhibiting their formation. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP 4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease resulting in death of growing cells 7. Here we show that ADEP4 activated ClpP becomes a fairly non-specific protease and kills persister cells by degradation of over 400 intracellular targets. clpP mutants are resistant to ADEP4 7, but we find that they display increased susceptibility to killing by a range of conventional antibiotics. Combining ADEP4 with rifampicin leads to eradication of persisters, stationary and biofilm populations of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in a deep-seated murine infection. Target corruption/activation provides an approach to killing persisters and eradicating chronic infections.

Conlon, Brian P.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Fleck, Laura E.; LaFleur, Michael D.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Coleman, K.; Leonard, Steve N.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lewis, Kim

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a Model for Understanding Bacterial Mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Mercury Methylation Contact: Cynthia Gilmour (gilmourc@si.edu, 443-482-2498) DOE/Office of Science/Biological & Environmental Research ·The ORNL Mercury Science Focus Area is developing the Hg-methylating bacterium as a model for understanding bacterial mercury methylation. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 77:3938-3951 (doi:10

115

PREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes Samuel Hiard, The Netherlands Received 27 March 2007 Available online 12 April 2007 Abstract In the post-genomic area Elements Detector), a tool developed for predicting regulons of DNA-binding proteins in bacterial genomes

Wehenkel, Louis

116

Microscale geochemical gradients in Hanford 300 Area sediment biofilms and influence of uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence and importance of microenvironments in the subsurface at contaminated sites were suggested by previous geochemical studies. However, no direct quantitative characterization of the geochemical microenvironments had been reported. We quantitatively characterized microscale geochemical gradients (dissolved oxygen (DO), H(2), pH, and redox potential) in Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms. Our results revealed significant differences in geochemical parameters across the sediment biofilm/water interface in the presence and absence of U(VI) under oxic and anoxic conditions. While the pH was relatively constant within the sediment biofilm, the redox potential and the DO and H(2) concentrations were heterogeneous at the microscale (<500-1000 ?m). We found microenvironments with high DO levels (DO hotspots) when the sediment biofilm was exposed to U(VI). On the other hand, we found hotspots (high concentrations) of H(2) under anoxic conditions both in the presence and in the absence of U(VI). The presence of anoxic microenvironments inside the sediment biofilms suggests that U(VI) reduction proceeds under bulk oxic conditions. To test this, we operated our biofilm reactor under air-saturated conditions in the presence of U(VI) and characterized U speciation in the sediment biofilm. U L(III)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed that 80-85% of the U was in the U(IV) valence state.

Nguyen, Hung D.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Proteomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of EPS with redox-active metals and radionuclides. Both bound and loosely associated EPS were extracted from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms prepared using a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, membrane lipids, and fatty acids in both bound and loosely associated EPS. Using a global proteomic approach, a total of 58 extracellular and outer membrane proteins were identified in the EPS. These included homologues of multiple S. oneidensis MR-1 proteins that potentially contribute to key physiological biofilm processes, such as biofilm-promoting protein BpfA, surface-associated serine protease, nucleotidases (CpdB and UshA), an extracellular lipase, and oligopeptidases (PtrB and a M13 family oligopeptidase lipoprotein). In addition, 20 redox proteins were found in extracted EPS. Among the detected redox proteins were the homologues of two S. oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA, which have been implicated in extracellular electron transfer. Given their detection in the EPS of Shewanella sp. HRCR 1 biofilms, c-type cytochromes may contribute to the possible redox activity of the biofilm matrix and play important roles in extracellular electron transfer reactions.

Cao, Bin; Shi, Liang; Brown, Roslyn N.; Xiong, Yijia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of best management practices are critical to implementing these efforts. Through more than 130Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along with low dissolved and participation vital to developing and implementing watershed-protection plans. Economic and Environmental

119

Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

Blake, Robert C.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electromagnetic Signals from Bacterial DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical reactions can be induced at a distance due to the propagation of electromagnetic signals during intermediate chemical stages. Although is is well known at optical frequencies, e.g. photosynthetic reactions, electromagnetic signals hold true for muck lower frequencies. In E. coli bacteria such electromagnetic signals can be generated by electric transitions between energy levels describing electrons moving around DNA loops. The electromagnetic signals between different bacteria within a community is a "wireless" version of intercellular communication found in bacterial communities connected by "nanowires". The wireless broadcasts can in principle be of both the AM and FM variety due to the magnetic flux periodicity in electron energy spectra in bacterial DNA orbital motions.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava; S. Sivasubramanian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The dynamics of surface detachment and quorum sensing in spatially controlled biofilm colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofilms represent a highly successful life strategy of bacteria in a very broad range of environments and often have negative implications for industrial and clinical applications, as their removal from surfaces and the ...

Jang, Hongchul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of bacteria that are held... and secretion of EPSs, but although some bacteria switch on EPS production at high cell densities in biofilms... , other bacteria switch it off. Nadell...

123

Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Wastewater Treatment Bruce E. Rittmann, Robert Nerenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Wastewater Treatment Bruce E. Rittmann, RobertCarty 2001). If soluble organic nitrogen can be held to a few tenths of a mg/L, the total N can

Nerenberg, Robert

125

Multidimensional Modeling of the Hydrogen-Based, Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Denitrification of Potable and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Potable and Wastewater Kelly Martin, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Notre Dame Monday, February 24, 2013 4 oxidized contaminants from drinking water and wastewater. A promising option, the membrane biofilm reactor

Kamat, Vineet R.

126

Effect of methanotrophic biofilm growth on the hydraulic conductivity of porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the physical properties of porous media. The key element influencing flow is the growth of a biofilm which coats the particles and clogs the pores. This thesis presents results of an investigation of the effect of microbial growth on the hydraulic... Afass in u Column Section (mg cells) = TOC?+ 2. 125 (7) Mathematical Model A mathematical model was used to describe biofilm induced changes in the flow parameters of porous media under biostimulated conditions. Because of the fragile nature...

Haby, Jeffrey J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Biosynthesis and structural characterization of silver nanoparticles from bacterial isolates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: In this study five bacterial isolates belong to different genera were found to be able to biosynthesize silver nanoparticles. Biosynthesis and spectral characterization are reported here. Highlights: {yields} About 300 bacterial isolates were screened for their ability to produce nanosilvers {yields} Five of them were potential candidates for synthesis of silver nanoparticles {yields} Production of silver nanoparticles was examined using UV-Vis, XRD, SEM and EDS. {yields} The presence of nanoparticles with all five bacterial isolates was confirmed. -- Abstract: This study aimed to develop a green process for biosynthesis of silver nanomaterials by some Egyptian bacterial isolates. This target was achieved by screening an in-house culture collection consists of 300 bacterial isolates for silver nanoparticle formation. Through screening process, it was observed that strains belonging to Escherichia coli (S30, S78), Bacillus megaterium (S52), Acinetobacter sp. (S7) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S54) were potential candidates for synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The extracellular production of silver nanoparticles by positive isolates was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results demonstrated that UV-visible spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver ion showed a peak at 420 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph showed formation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 15-50 nm. XRD-spectrum of the silver nanoparticles exhibited 2{theta} values corresponding to the silver nanocrystal that produce in hexagonal and cubic crystal configurations with different plane of orientation. In addition, the signals of the silver atoms were observed by EDS-spectrum analysis that confirms the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in all positive bacterial isolates.

Zaki, Sahar, E-mail: saharzaki@yahoo.com [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)] [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt); El Kady, M.F. [Fabrication Technology Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute (ATNMRI), Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria (Egypt)] [Fabrication Technology Department, Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute (ATNMRI), Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria (Egypt); Abd-El-Haleem, Desouky [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)] [Environmental Biotechnology Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Alexandria, 21934 New Burgelarab City (Egypt)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Long-Term Succession of Structure and Diversity of a Biofilm Formed in a Model Drinking Water Distribution System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Jorgensen, T. M; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Bacterial genes for stress | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U LY 2 9Bacterial genes

130

Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry evaluations, a more complete understanding of the balance between system additions (nutrients, groundwater) and biology can be achieved, thus increasing long-term predictions of performance. These analyses uniquely provide information that can be used in optimizing the overall performance, efficiency, and stability of the system both in real time as well as over the long-term, as the system design is altered or improved and/or new streams are added.

Lee, Michelle H.; Saurey, Sabrina D.; Lee, Brady D.; Parker, Kent E.; Eisenhauer, Emalee ER; Cordova, Elsa A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Leading Edge Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leading Edge Review Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution David M. Raskin,1 Rekha Seshadri,2 Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA 2 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive.02.002 The availability of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences has altered the study of bacte- rial pathogenesis

Mekalanos, John

132

SEED: ATP metabolism and its impact on biofilms Principal Investigators: Mark P. Brynildsen and A. James Link  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEED: ATP metabolism and its impact on biofilms Principal Investigators: Mark P. Brynildsen and A was to define the role of ATP metabolism in the formation, physiology, and material properties of biofilms. Using computational and experimental approaches we found that efficient ATP production and consumption

Petta, Jason

133

HYDROGEN-BASED, HOLLOW-FIBER MEMBRANE BIOFILM REACTOR FOR REDUCTION OF PERCHLORATE AND OTHER OXIDIZED CONTAMINANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN-BASED, HOLLOW-FIBER MEMBRANE BIOFILM REACTOR FOR REDUCTION OF PERCHLORATE AND OTHER be added. Hydrogen is an ideal electron donor, as it is non-toxic, inexpensive, and sparsely soluble. We tested a hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for reduction of perchlorate

Nerenberg, Robert

134

Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological Wastewater Treatment of the microbial communities within biological wastewater treatment reactors is incomplete due to limitations microbial community composition in five biological wastewater treatment reactors in China and the United

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

136

Corrosion control using regenerative biofilms (CCURB) on brass in different media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion control using regenerative biofilms (CCURB) on brass in different media D. OOrnek a , T of Chemical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion and Environmental The corrosion behavior of cartridge brass (UNS C26000) exposed to artificial seawater (AS) and Luria Bertani (LB

Wood, Thomas K.

137

Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms on Aluminum 2024 and Brass in Different Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion Control Using Regenerative Biofilms on Aluminum 2024 and Brass in Different Media F. Mansfeld,a, *,z H. Hsu,a D. O¨ rnek,b T. K. Wood,b and B. C. Syrettc a Corrosion and Environmental Effects Institute, Palo Alto, California 94303, USA The corrosion behavior of Al 2024-T3 and C26000 brass exposed

Wood, Thomas K.

138

Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial wastewater Jennifer L. Shore a,b , William S. M'Coy b , Claudia K. Gunsch a , Marc A. Deshusses a 2012 Available online 17 February 2012 Keywords: Moving bed biofilm reactor Industrial wastewater and industrial wastewater. No biotreatment was observed at 45 °C, although effective nitrification was rapidly

139

Hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor for reduction of perchlorate and other oxidized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor for reduction of perchlorate and other. For drinking water treatment, an electron donor must be added. Hydrogen is an ideal electron donor, as it is non-toxic, inexpensive, and sparsely soluble. We tested a hydrogen-based, hollow-fiber membrane

Nerenberg, Robert

140

Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system utilizing beneficial bacterial endophytes Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Final Report - Ferrographic Tracking of Bacterial Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed during the past three years has been extremely productive. Ferrographic capture was utilized in analysis of several thousand field samples collected from arrays of multilevel samplers during three intensive field campaigns conducted at two shallow sandy aquifer sites in Oyster, VA. This work has shown resulted in three important conclusions: (1) Ferrographic capture provides unparalleled low quantitation limits for bacterial cell enumeration (Johnson et al., 2000). (2) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of increased bacterial removal rates (from groundwater) that corresponded to increased populations of protozoa in the groundwater (Zhang et al., 2001). This novel data allowed determination of bacterial predation rates by protists in the field, a consideration that will be important for successful bioaugmentation strategies. (3) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of detachment of indigenous cells in response to breakthrough of injected cells in groundwater (Johnson et al., 2001). The implication of this unique observation is that bacterial transport, specifically bacterial attachment and detachment, may be much more dynamic than has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies. Dynamic attachment and detachment of bacteria in groundwater may lead to greatly increased transport distances over long terms relative to what has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies.

William P. Johnson

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

Iyer, Rashi (Los Alamos, NM); Ganguly, Kumkum (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

Iyer, Rashi S.; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bacterial Fermentative Hydrogen Production | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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145

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping a

146

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping amagnetic

147

Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Mep72, a Metzincin Protease That Is Preferentially Secreted by Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increased mortality (18, 19). A pair of two-component sensor systems have been identified that reciprocally regulate T3SS expression and biofilm formation (20, 21). As a result, biofilm cells often are thought of as being less virulent than planktonic cells... MAL-p2X(mep72)], BamI- MBP-Mep72 [pMAL-p2X(bamI, mep72)], and empty pMAL-p2X vector con- trol (pMAL-p2X) were spotted onto LB-agar plates with and without IPTG. The spotted dilutions were allowed to grow for 24 h before being photo- graphed. (B) Mep72...

Passmore, Ian J.; Nishikawa, Kahoko; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Bowden, Steven D.; Chung, Jade C. S.; Welch, Martin

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bacterial cooperation controlled by mobile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bacterial cooperation controlled by mobile elements: kin selection online 27 July 2011 Genes involved in bacterial cooperation and virulence are overrepresented on mobile elements (Nogueira et al., 2009). This highlights the importance of gene mobility in bacterial social

Rankin, Daniel

151

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these sources is needed to target best management practices and develop bacterial total maximum daily loads significant environmental challenges of the new millen- nium. According to the 2010 Texas Water Quality and current practices, scientific advances and improvements in application. Collaborators · Texas Agri

152

High Performance Bioanode Development for Fermentable Substrates via Controlled Electroactive Biofilm Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bioanode was optimized to generate current densities reaching 38.4 4.9 A m-2, which brings bioelectrochemical systems closer to commercial consideration. Glucose and lactate were fed together in a continuous or fed-batch mode. The current density increased from 2.3 A m-2 to 38.4 A m-2 over a 33 day period and remained stable thereafter. The coulombic efficiency ranged from 50% to 80%. A change in substrate concentration from 200 mg L-1 to 5 mg L-1 decreased maximum current density from 38.4 A m-2 to 12.3 A m-2. The anode consortia included Firmicutes (55.0%), Proteobacteria (41.8%) and Bacteroidetes (2.1%) constituting two potential electrogenic genera: Geobacter (6.8%) and Aeromonas (31.9%). The current production was found to be limited by kinetics during the growth period (33 days), and mass transfer, thereafter. The results indicate the necessity of removing spent biomass for efficient long term operation and treatment of wastewater streams.

Ichihashi, Osamu [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponses toInvestigatingAdaptedInvestor Flows andSulfur

154

Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Harnessing the Bacterial Power of Nanomagnets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9 HanfordCellHarnessing the Bacterial Power

157

Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2 MarchBacterial Cellulose

158

Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

160

acetic acid bacterial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

acute bacterial meningitis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and...

162

Lessons learned from bacterial transport research at the South Oyster Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi-investigator, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The experiments were conducted during the time period 1999-2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: (1) quantification of bacterial transport in physically, chemically and biologically heterogeneous aquifers, (2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, (3) scale effects in bacterial transport, (4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, (5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and (6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort. Lessons learned are summarized in each of these areas. The body of literature resulting from South Oyster Site research has been widely cited and continues to influence research into the controls exerted by aquifer heterogeneity on reactive transport (including microbial transport). It also served as a model (and provided valuable experience) for subsequent and ongoing highly-instrumented field research efforts conducted by DOE-sponsored investigators.

Scheibe, T.; Hubbard, S.S.; Onstott, T.C.; DeFlaun, M.F.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effects of biofilms, sunlight, and salinity on corrosion potential and corrosion initiation of stainless alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phenomenon of corrosion potential ennoblement on stainless alloys is well known for full strength seawater. This report presents data on the extent to which that process occurs as a function of salinity and sunlight level for: stainless steels S30400 and S31600; stainless alloys S44735 (29-4C), S44660 (Seacure), NO8367 (6XN) and N10276 (C-276); and R50250 (Ti-Gr2). The results showed that natural population biofilms formed from all salinity waters under low light level conditions were capable of ennobling the corrosion potentials of all test alloys, although R50250 was consistently ennobled the least. Both the amount of ennoblement and the highest steady potential reached were maximized in fresh water and decreased for all alloys with increasing salinity. The critical pitting potentials for all test alloys were measured in coastal seawater. In addition, the critical pitting potentials for alloys S30400 and S31600 were measured (or estimated from the literature) as a function of salinity. The effect of ennoblement on the initiation and propagation of crevice corrosion are currently under investigation. The effect of sunlight on corrosion potential ennoblement was examined for the super alloy N10276 (C-276). Mechanisms by which ennoblement may be affected by sunlight were discussed, and it was hypothesized that the phenomenon may be at least partially understood in terms of pH fluctuations within the biofilm under the influence of periodic changes in the rates of photosynthesis and respiration.

Dexter, S.C.; Zhang, H.-J. (Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (USA). Coll. of Marine Studies)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effect of Green Tea on Streptococcus mutans Metabolic Activity, Planktonic Growth, and Biofilm Activity in the Presence of Nicotine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Green Tea on Streptococcus mutans Metabolic Activity, Planktonic Growth, and Biofilm from dental plaque entering the bloodstream. Green Tea is a commonly consumed beverage, which has been known to reduce the number of dental cavities. Previous research has concluded that green tea contains

Zhou, Yaoqi

165

Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-chamber microbial fuel cells Zhiyong Ren a,c , Ramaraja P. Ramasamy b,1 , Susan Red Cloud-Owen b , Hengjing Yan 2010 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Electricity Biofilm Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy a b s t r in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated

Mench, Matthew M.

166

A green biocide enhancer for the treatment of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilms on carbon steel surfaces using glutaraldehyde  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale biocide uses such as oil field applications, it is highly desirable to make more effective use of biocides steel surfaces using glutaraldehyde Jie Wen a , Kaili Zhao a , Tingyue Gu a,*, Issam I. Raad b higher concentration of biocide is needed to treat biofilms compared to the dosage used to for planktonic

Gu, Tingyue

167

Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate, 647 (1964). 6. W. J. Drury, Water Environ. Res. 71, 1244 (1999). 7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Current Drinking Water Standards (2000). 8

Kurapov, Alexander

169

Coal desulfurization by bacterial treatment and column flotation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the literature showed that bacterial leaching, using the microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was a very effective technique for removing pyrite from coal, as it could dissolve even the finest pyrite particles without the need for expensive reagents or extreme processing conditions. Unfortunately, bacterial leaching is also rather slow, and so the initial goal of this research was to decrease the leaching time as much as possible. However, this still left the bacteria needing approximately a week to remove half of the pyritic sulfur, and so a faster technique was sought. Since it had been reported in the literature that T. ferrooxidans could be used to depress the flotation of pyrite during froth flotation of coal, this was investigated further. By studying the recovery mechanisms of coal-pyrite in froth flotation, it was found that pyrite was being recovered by entrainment and by locking to coal particles, not by true flotation of hydrophobic pyrite. Therefore, no pyrite depressant could be of any significant benefit for keeping pyrite out of the coal froth product, and it was much more important to prevent entrainment from occurring. Countercurrent flotation columns were invented to essentially eliminate entrainment effects, by washing the froth and reducing mixing of the froth and tailings products. Existing flotation columns tend to be quite simple, and in order to give reasonable product quality they must be very tall (typically 30--45 feet). As a result, they have difficulty in handling the high froth volumes which occur in coal flotation, and are awkward to install in existing plants. The bulk of this project therefore concentrated on developing an improved coal flotation column, and testing it under actual plant conditions.

Kawatra, S.K. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reconstruction of a Bacterial Genome from DNA Cassettes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This basic research program comprised two major areas: (1) acquisition and analysis of marine microbial metagenomic data and development of genomic analysis tools for broad, external community use; (2) development of a minimal bacterial genome. Our Marine Metagenomic Diversity effort generated and analyzed shotgun sequencing data from microbial communities sampled from over 250 sites around the world. About 40% of the 26 Gbp of sequence data has been made publicly available to date with a complete release anticipated in six months. Our results and those mining the deposited data have revealed a vast diversity of genes coding for critical metabolic processes whose phylogenetic and geographic distributions will enable a deeper understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling, microbial ecology, and rapid rate evolutionary processes such as horizontal gene transfer by viruses and plasmids. A global assembly of the generated dataset resulted in a massive set (5Gbp) of genome fragments that provide context to the majority of the generated data that originated from uncultivated organisms. Our Synthetic Biology team has made significant progress towards the goal of synthesizing a minimal mycoplasma genome that will have all of the machinery for independent life. This project, once completed, will provide fundamentally new knowledge about requirements for microbial life and help to lay a basic research foundation for developing microbiological approaches to bioenergy.

Christopher Dupont; John Glass; Laura Sheahan; Shibu Yooseph; Lisa Zeigler Allen; Mathangi Thiagarajan; Andrew Allen; Robert Friedman; J. Craig Venter

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment in the decomposition of organic matter during the composting process. However, microbial communities active in composts of bacterial communities in livestock manure compost was determined based on terminal restriction fragment

Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

172

Plant pathology Firestop: a chemical against bacterial diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant pathology Firestop: a chemical against bacterial diseases of fruit trees recently available Erwinia amylovora (fire blight) in pear and apple, and Pseudomonas syringae pv persicae (bacterial dieback) was as efficient as Bordeaux mixture and less efficient than the conventional antibiotics, streptomycin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

Atmospheric cloud water contains a diverse bacterial community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric cloud water contains an active microbial community which can impact climate, human health and ecosystem processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Most studies on the composition of microbial communities in clouds have been performed with orographic clouds that are typically in direct contact with the ground. We collected water samples from cumulus clouds above the upper U.S. Midwest. The cloud water was analyzed for the diversity of bacterial phylotypes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. DGGE analyses of bacterial communities detected 17e21 bands per sample. Sequencing confirmed the presence of a diverse bacterial community; sequences from seven bacterial phyla were retrieved. Cloud water bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by members of the cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes.

Kourtev, P. S.; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shepson, Paul B.; Konopka, Allan

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial rhinosinusitis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reponse to this persistent intraluminal bacterial infection leads... clearance of secretions from the lung and antibiotics to treat the chronic bacterial infection. Recent...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities involving bacterial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 > >> 81 Microbial Distributions and the Impact of Phosphorus on Bacterial Activity in Lake Erie Summary: Microbial Distributions and the Impact of Phosphorus on Bacterial...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting bacterial community Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of soil bacteria and documenting how soil bacterial communities are affected by specific environmental... The diversity and biogeography of soil bacterial...

177

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Use of Optical Mapping in Bacterial Genome Finishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dibyendu Kumar from the University of Florida discusses whole-genome optical mapping to help validate bacterial genome assemblies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Kumar, Dibyendu [University of Florida

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

1220 Comment sufficient to meet bacterial needs (let alone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the recycling of organic carbon by consumers may help to explain apparently excessive demands of consumers- has led to the assertion that bacterial sec- toplankton supply in the summer epilim- ondary production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mechanical reaction-diffusion model for bacterial population dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of mechanical interaction between cells on the spreading of bacterial population was investigated in one-dimensional space. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation has been formulated as a model for this dynamics. In this model, the bacterial cells are treated as the rod-like particles that interact, when contacting each other, through the hard-core repulsion. The repulsion introduces the exclusion process that causes the fast diffusion in bacterial population at high density. The propagation of the bacterial density as the traveling wave front in long time behavior has been analyzed. The analytical result reveals that the front speed is enhanced by the exclusion process---and its value depends on the packing fraction of cell. The numerical solutions of the model have been solved to confirm this prediction.

Ngamsaad, Waipot

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

How the xap Locus Put Electrical Zap in Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of microbial mineral respiration remains an experimental challenge. In this issue of Journal of Bacteriology, Rollefson et al. (11) present a foundational study on the functionality of the biofilm matrix in Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model dissimilatory metal respiring bacterium (DMRB). In this study, the investigators identify an extracellular polysaccharide scaffold or network that entraps redox-active proteins, thus positioning these proteins for optimal electron transfer from the membrane-bound respiratory supercomplexes to a mineral phase electron acceptor. The distinguishing feature of this study is the perspective, in that the team examined specifically exopolysaccharide formation and how it enables entrapment and tethering of redox proteins in the vicinity of the cell. Previous studies on Geobacter (10) and Shewanella (4) have focused primarily on the presence and functionality of conductive pili and nanowires, proteinaceous structures that also enable and enhance extracellular electron transfer. Rollefson et al. remind investigators in this field that many microbial systems have redundancy in essential functions, and in the case of DMRB, it is clearly critical that more than one mechanism exists to ensure

Magnuson, Timothy S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Differentiation of Microbial Species and Strains in Coculture Biofilms by Multivariate Analysis of Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

7.87 to 10.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon energies were used in laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to analyze biofilms comprised of binary cultures of interacting microorganisms. The effect of photon energy was examined using both tunable synchrotron and laser sources of VUV radiation. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the MS data to differentiate species in Escherichia coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae coculture biofilms. PCA of LDPI-MS also differentiated individual E. coli strains in a biofilm comprised of two interacting gene deletion strains, even though these strains differed from the wild type K-12 strain by no more than four gene deletions each out of approximately 2000 genes. PCA treatment of 7.87 eV LDPI-MS data separated the E. coli strains into three distinct groups two ?pure? groups and a mixed region. Furthermore, the ?pure? regions of the E. coli cocultures showed greater variance by PCA when analyzed by 7.87 eV photon energies than by 10.5 eV radiation. Comparison of the 7.87 and 10.5 eV data is consistent with the expectation that the lower photon energy selects a subset of low ionization energy analytes while 10.5 eV is more inclusive, detecting a wider range of analytes. These two VUV photon energies therefore give different spreads via PCA and their respective use in LDPI-MS constitute an additional experimental parameter to differentiate strains and species.

University of Illinois at Chicago; Montana State University; Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Cui, Yang; Hofstetter, Theresa; Liu, Suet Yi; Bernstein, Hans C.; Carlson, Ross P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Hanley, Luke

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

REGULAR ARTICLE Characterization of bacterial endophytes of sweet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULAR ARTICLE Characterization of bacterial endophytes of sweet potato plants Zareen Khan.V. 2009 Abstract Endophytic bacteria associated with sweet potato plants (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) were by the endophytes had any role in protecting the cells against adverse conditions, different stress tests were

Doty, Sharon Lafferty

185

Electricity-producing bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity-producing bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells Bruce E. Logan and John M 16802, USA Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are not yet commercialized but they show great promise bioenergy technology. Microbial fuel cells make it possible to generate electricity using bacteria It has

186

Making Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Avoid water having a dark color, an odor or containing floating materials since such things may indicate or floating matter. 2. Boil the water vigorously for at least 10 minutes. 3. After it cools, the waterMaking Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations Monty C. Dozier

187

ORIGINAL PAPER Assessment of the bacterial diversity of treated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the microbiota in treated and untreated milk samples during cold storage at 4 °C or 8 °C up to 7 days. Three processing, and the health of dairy cattle (Frank et al. 2002). Cold storage on farms and processing plants, thermization, and microfiltration during cold storage. They found that dominant bacterial species were

Boyer, Edmond

188

Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF. Abstract: Electron transporting multiheme...

189

Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Low-Cost Sensor Can Diagnose Bacterial Infections Copyright 2011 by Virgo Publishing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-Cost Sensor Can Diagnose Bacterial Infections Copyright 2011 by Virgo Publishing. http diagnose bacterial infections in only a few hours. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer Bacterial infections really sensor. Led by University of Illinois chemistry professor Ken Suslick, the team published its results

Suslick, Kenneth S.

191

Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

Donnelly, Mark I. (Warrenville, IL); Sanville-Millard, Cynthia (Plainfield, IL); Chatterjee, Ranjini (Park Ridge, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assessment Of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco And Belton Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time for sample delivery to the laboratory and initiation of analysis was maintained. Following incubation and enumeration using USEPA Method 1603, the Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco & Belton Lake Executive Summary J:\\742... of Contents J:\\742\\742880_TX_Farm_Bureau\\Reports\\Final_Report_2-2006\\TXFB_ReportFinal_020806.doc i February 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................ ES-1 SECTION 1...

Giovanni, G.

193

Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Gladden, John Michael

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nonlocal Bacterial Electron Transfer to Hematite Surfaces. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddy ArcheologicalSolartoNonlocal Bacterial

195

Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U LY 2 9Bacterial

196

Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2 MarchBacterial

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical bacterial respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tract by a bacterial molecule... coughing illness known as pertussis or whooping cough, persisting for weeks within the ... Source: Andrews, Anne M. - Huck Institutes of the...

198

Metabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterial symbiosis of sharpshooters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metabolic Complementarity and Genomics of the Dual BacterialMetabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterialthe other. ) Comparative genomics. The predicted proteomes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaliphilic sulfo-oxidizing bacterial...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bacterial Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering) Summary:...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial prostatitis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a free e-mail publication. It is published practically every day. DON'T MISS -- Mining bacterial... genomes reveals valuable 'hidden' drugs -- A new tool to excavate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial infections Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

both as an acute... , day 2 postinfection was defined as typical of an acute infection. Gross morphology, bacterial numbers... ), indicating that ZapA is important in ... Source:...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - air bacterial contamination Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 3 Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris* Summary: for bacterial...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Summary: AA...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - antagonistic bacterial interactions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract Aims: Isolation of bacterial antagonist for use in the biological control of phy... the antifungal molecule produced by the ... Source: Balaram , P. - Molecular...

205

Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Impact of swapping soils on the endophytic bacterial communities of pre-domesticated,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of swapping soils on the endophytic bacterial communities of pre-domesticated, ancient://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/14/233 #12;RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Impact of swapping soils on the endophytic bacterial,3 , George Lazarovits2 and Manish N Raizada1* Abstract Background: Endophytes are microbes that live within

Raizada, Manish N.

207

Stimulation of Alexandrium fundyense growth by bacterial assemblages from the Bay of Fundy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Alexandrium fundyense str. CB301 growth. Methods and Results: Bacterial assemblages were collected from into axenic CB301 cultures. Bacterial assemblages dramatically enhanced CB301 growth. Retrieval and analysis factors that control Alexandrium distributions (e.g. Anderson et al. 1983, 1990a; Rasmussen and Richardson

Rooney-Varga, Juliette N.

208

Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

Perfect, Ed

209

Molecular structure and dynamics in bacterial mercury resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Shi, Liang [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Susan M [ORNL] [ORNL; Summers, Anne O [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

Kingsley, Mark T.

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

Kingsley, Mark T

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

212

BREAKTHROUGHS IN FIELD-SCALE BACTERIAL TRANSPORT from: EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 82(38), September 18, 2001.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Microbial transport in the subsurface environment has been of interest for decades due to concerns included multi-scale hydrogeological characterization, numerical modeling of bacterial transport. In groundwater, the rate and extent of bacterial movement is controlled by pore water velocity and bacterial

Rubin, Yoram

213

Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen suppression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen; accepted 17 April 2002 Keywords: Bacteria, compost, biocontrol disease suppression, grey snow mould Composting is the degradation of organic materials through the activities of diverse microorganisms

Boland, Greg J.

216

Structural investigations of hydroxylase proteins and complexes in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial multicomponent monooxgenases (BMMs) such as toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), phenol hydroxylase (PH), and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation reactions at a carboxylatebridged ...

McCormick, Michael S. (Michael Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Discovery of Novel Materials with Broad Resistance to Bacterial Attachment Using Combinatorial Polymer Microarrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new class of bacteria-attachment-resistant materials is discovered using a multi-generation polymer microarray methodology that reduces bacterial attachment by up to 99.3% compared with a leading commercially available ...

Hook, Andrew L.

218

Bacterial influence on uranium oxidation reduction reactions : implications for environmental remediation and isotopic composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bacterial influence on the chemistry and speciation of uranium has some important impacts on the environment, and can be exploited usefully for the purposes of environmental remediation of uranium waste contamination. ...

Mullen, Lisa Maureen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Oil bioremediation in salt marsh mesocosms as influenced by nitrogen, phosphorus, and bacterial seeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasshouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of N and P fertilization and bacterial seeding on crude oil degradation in salt marsh mesocosms containing marsh soil and Spartina alterniflora. Fertilization with urea, NH4, and N03...

Wright, Alan Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Construction and characterization of a peach binary bacterial artificial chromosome library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batch] has been proposed as a model organism for woody perennials. To facilitate genomic research in peach, a binary bacterial artificial chromosome (BIBAC) library of var. Texking was constructed using a plant...

Wakefield, Laura

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Design, construction and characterization of a set of insulated bacterial promoters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have generated a series of variable-strength, constitutive, bacterial promoters that act predictably in different sequence contexts, span two orders of magnitude in strength and contain convenient sites for cloning and ...

Davis, Joseph H.

222

Protein activation of a ribozyme: the role of bacterial RNase P protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein activation of a ribozyme: the role of bacterial RNase P protein Amy H Buck1 , Andrew B Dalby2 , Alexander W Poole2,3 , Alexei V Kazantsev2 and Norman R Pace2, * 1 Department of Chemistry

Pace, Norman

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge bacterial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: activated sludge bacterial Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Summary: is a traditional build plant base don the...

224

The shielding effect of wild type iron reducing bacterial flora on the corrosion of linepipe steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shielding effect of wild type iron reducing bacterial flora on the corrosion of linepipe steel (iron reducing bacteria (IRB)) on API 5L ?52 carbon steel coupons was investigated. A wild type of IRB

225

Correlation between leukotoxin production of Pasteurella haemolytica and bacterial culture conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the in vitro growth characteristics of Pasteurella haemolytica was undertaken to determine the effect of media composition and available oxygen on bacterial growth. The rate and total growth, and the production of the exotoxin, leukotoxin...

Fann, Hsing Fu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Stable nitrogen isotope measurements of marine bacterial proteins and nucleic acids: tracers of microbial activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nucleic acids from cultures and environmental samples were analyzed to determine if protein []15N reliably reflects whole cell []15N. In batch culture experiments, the net fractionation between Vibrio harveyi and bacterial protein extracts, varied as a...

Kovacs, Jeffrey Paul

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Siderophore production by heterotrophic bacterial isolates from the Costa Rica upwelling dome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont) An increased understanding of heterotrophic bacterial strategies for acquiring nutrients and trace elements is critical for elucidating their impact on biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. It is estimated that iron ...

Krey, Whitney B. (Whitney Blair)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Favorable interaction between photooxidation and bacterial degradation of anthracene in sea water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mixed bacterial community isolated from a marine biotope highly polluted with hydrocarbons proved to be able to use anthraquinone, a product of anthracene photooxidation considered as a relatively stable molecule in a marine medium.

Rontani, J.F.; Rambeloarisoa, E.; Bertrand, J.C.; Giusti, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Coulter counter determination of bacterial growth and cellular size change following ??Co gamma irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Ma)or Subject: Biophysics COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON APPROVED as to style and content by: ead...

Gaston, Gary W

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Identification and characterization of a bacterial hydrosulphide ion channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrosulphide ion (HS{sup -}) and its undissociated form, hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), which are believed to have been critical to the origin of life on Earth, remain important in physiology and cellular signalling. As a major metabolite in anaerobic bacterial growth, hydrogen sulphide is a product of both assimilatory and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. These pathways can reduce various oxidized sulphur compounds including sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate. The dissimilatory sulphate reduction pathway uses this molecule as the terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, in which process it produces excess amounts of H{sub 2}S. The reduction of sulphite is a key intermediate step in all sulphate reduction pathways. In Clostridium and Salmonella, an inducible sulphite reductase is directly linked to the regeneration of NAD{sup +}, which has been suggested to have a role in energy production and growth, as well as in the detoxification of sulphite. Above a certain concentration threshold, both H{sub 2}S and HS{sup -} inhibit cell growth by binding the metal centres of enzymes and cytochrome oxidase, necessitating a release mechanism for the export of this toxic metabolite from the cell. Here we report the identification of a hydrosulphide ion channel in the pathogen Clostridium difficile through a combination of genetic, biochemical and functional approaches. The HS{sup -} channel is a member of the formate/nitrite transport family, in which about 50 hydrosulphide ion channels form a third subfamily alongside those for formate (FocA) and for nitrite (NirC). The hydrosulphide ion channel is permeable to formate and nitrite as well as to HS{sup -} ions. Such polyspecificity can be explained by the conserved ion selectivity filter observed in the channel's crystal structure. The channel has a low open probability and is tightly regulated, to avoid decoupling of the membrane proton gradient.

Czyzewski, Bryan K.; Wang, Da-Neng (NYUSM)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Bacterial reduction of selenium in coal mine tailings pond sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediment from a storage facility for coal tailings solids was assessed for its capacity to reduce selenium (Se) by native bacterial community. One Se{sup 6+}-reducing bacterium Enterobacter hormaechei (Tar11) and four Se{sup 4+}-reducing bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae (Tar1), Pseudomonasfluorescens (Tar3), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Tar6), and Enterobacter amnigenus (Tar8) were isolated from the sediment. Enterobacter horinaechei removed 96% of the added Se{sup 6+} (0.92 mg L{sup -1} from the effluents when Se6+ was determined after 5 d of incubation. Analysis of the red precipitates showed that Se{sup 6+} reduction resulted in the formation of spherical particles ({lt}1.0 {mu} m) of Se 0 as observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confirmed by EDAX. Selenium speciation was performed to examine the fate of the added Se{sup 6+} in the sediment with or without addition of Enterobacter hormaechei cells. More than 99% of the added Se{sup 6+} (about 2.5 mg L{sup -1}) was transformed in the nonsterilized sediment (without Enterobacter hormaechei cells) as well as in the sterilized (heat-killed) sediment (with Enterobacter hormaechei cells). The results of this study suggest that the lagoon sediments at the mine site harbor Se{sup 6+}- and Se{sup 4+} -reducing bacteria and may be important sinks for soluble Se (Se{sup 6+} and Se{sup 4+}). Enterobacter hormaechei isolated from metal-contaminated sediment may have potential application in removing Se from industrial effluents.

Siddique, T.; Arocena, J.M.; Thring, R.W.; Zhang, Y.Q. [University of North British Columbia, Prince George, BC (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Compensation for L212GLU in bacterial reaction centers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In wild-type bacterial reaction centers (RC), residue L212Glu, which is located about 5 {Angstrom} away from Q{sub B}, is involved in the delivery of the second proton to Q{sub B{sup 2}{minus}} [1-4]. We previously constructed the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala double mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus, and it is incapable of photosynthetic growth (PS{sup {minus}}) due to interruption of the proton transfer pathway to Q{sub B}[3,4]. We have isolated several photocompetent (PS{sup +}) phenotypic revertants of this L212-L213AA double mutant [3-7]. The compensatory mutations that restore function in these strains are diverse and show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is absolutely required for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer. Genotypic revertant and second-site mutations, located within the Q{sub B} binding picket or at more distant sites, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213 to restore photocompetence. One of the phenotypic revertants of the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant carries a genotypic reversion of L213Ala to Asp; the Ala substitution at L212 remains. We were intrigued that this L212Glu {yields} Ala mutant R. capsulatus is photocompetent, while the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant of R. sphaeroides is not, particularly since the sequence identity in the Q{sub B} site of these two strains is 90{percent} [8]. To this end, we constructed the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant in R. capsulatus, and it is also PS{sup {minus}}. To determine the function that is lost in the L212Gln mutant but restored by Ala at that site, we selected four PS{sup +} revertants from the L212Gln strain.

Hanson, D.K.; Deng, Y.L.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sebban, P. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif/Yvette (France). CNRS

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Tier 1 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Lab Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies Initiative (TMTI). The high-level goal of TMTI is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve those goals, TMTI has a near term need to obtain more sequence information across a large range of pathogens, near neighbors, and across a broad geographical and host range. Our role in this project is to research available sequence data for the organisms of interest and identify critical microbial sequence and knowledge gaps that need to be filled to meet TMTI objectives. This effort includes: (1) assessing current genomic sequence for each agent including phylogenetic and geographical diversity, host range, date of isolation range, virulence, sequence availability of key near neighbors, and other characteristics; (2) identifying Subject Matter Experts (SME's) and potential holders of isolate collections, contacting appropriate SME's with known expertise and isolate collections to obtain information on isolate availability and specific recommendations; (3) identifying sequence as well as knowledge gaps (eg virulence, host range, and antibiotic resistance determinants); (4) providing specific recommendations as to the most valuable strains to be placed on the DTRA sequencing queue. We acknowledge that criteria for prioritization of isolates for sequencing falls into two categories aligning with priority queues 1 and 2 as described in the summary. (Priority queue 0 relates to DTRA operational isolates whose availability is not predictable in advance.) 1. Selection of isolates that appear to have likelihood to provide information on virulence and antibiotic resistance. This will include sequence of known virulent strains. Particularly valuable would be virulent strains that have genetically similar yet avirulent, or non human transmissible, counterparts that can be used for comparison to help identify key virulence or host range genes. This approach will provide information that can be used by structural biologists to help develop therapeutics and vaccines. We have pointed out such high priority strains of which we are aware, and note that if any such isolates should be discovered, they will rise to the top priority. We anticipate difficulty locating samples with unusual resistance phenotypes, in particular. Sequencing strategies for isolates in queue 1 should aim for as complete finishing status as possible, since high-quality initial annotation (gene-calling) will be necessary for the follow-on protein structure analyses contributing to countermeasure development. Queue 2 for sequencing determination will be more dynamic than queue 1, and samples will be added to it as they become available to the TMTI program. 2. Selection of isolates that will provide broader information about diversity and phylogenetics and aid in specific detection as well as forensics. This approach focuses on sequencing of isolates that will provide better resolution of variants that are (or were) circulating in nature. The finishing strategy for queue 2 does not require complete closing with annotation. This queue is more static, as there is considerable phylogenetic data, and in this report we have sought to reveal gaps and make suggestions to fill them given existing sequence data and strain information. In this report we identify current sequencing gaps in both priority queue categories. Note that this is most applicable to the bacterial pathogens, as most viruses are by default in queue 1. The Phase I focus of this project is on viral hemorrhagic fever viruses and Category A bacterial agents as defined to us by TMTI. We have carried out individual analyses on each species of interest, and these are included as chapters in this report. Viruses and bacteria are biologically very distinct from each other and require different methods of analysis and criteria for sequencing prioritization. Therefore, we will describe our methods, analyses and conclusions separately for each category.

Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

LLNL Genomic Assessment: Viral and Bacterial Sequencing Needs for TMTI, Task 1.4.2 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good progress has been made on both bacterial and viral sequencing by the TMTI centers. While access to appropriate samples is a limiting factor to throughput, excellent progress has been made with respect to getting agreements in place with key sources of relevant materials. Sharing of sequenced genomes funded by TMTI has been extremely limited to date. The April 2010 exercise should force a resolution to this, but additional managerial pressures may be needed to ensure that rapid sharing of TMTI-funded sequencing occurs, regardless of collaborator constraints concerning ultimate publication(s). Policies to permit TMTI-internal rapid sharing of sequenced genomes should be written into all TMTI agreements with collaborators now being negotiated. TMTI needs to establish a Web-based system for tracking samples destined for sequencing. This includes metadata on sample origins and contributor, information on sample shipment/receipt, prioritization by TMTI, assignment to one or more sequencing centers (including possible TMTI-sponsored sequencing at a contributor site), and status history of the sample sequencing effort. While this system could be a component of the AFRL system, it is not part of any current development effort. Policy and standardized procedures are needed to ensure appropriate verification of all TMTI samples prior to the investment in sequencing. PCR, arrays, and classical biochemical tests are examples of potential verification methods. Verification is needed to detect miss-labeled, degraded, mixed or contaminated samples. Regular QC exercises are needed to ensure that the TMTI-funded centers are meeting all standards for producing quality genomic sequence data.

Slezak, T; Borucki, M; Lam, M; Lenhoff, R; Vitalis, E

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

Collins, James J (Newton, MA); Kobayashi, Hideki (Yokohama, JP); Kearn, Mads (Ottawa, CA); Araki, Michihiro (Minatoku, JP); Friedland, Ari (Boston, MA); Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

The bacterial leaf spot disease of castorbeans. I.A study of the inheritance of resistance. II. Some elemental components associated with physiological resistance. III. A histological evaluation of resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of material, basic knowledge and understanding of the genetical and of the physiological mechanism of resistance and susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot would be of considerable help in developing resistant lines. This knowledge would be particularly... examination might also lead to an adequate explanation of physiological phenomena associated with resistance. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of genetic studies made with resistant and susceptible lines, of physiological studies...

Poole, D. Donald

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Intermediate Products in the Bacterial Decomposition of Hexadecanol and Octadecanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an excess of water has been naturally provided which has allowed the development of large population and industrial centers. But the long term and recently accelerated return of water-borne wastes from these centers to water bodies has caused a critical...

Langley, W. D.

240

Changes in Bacterial and Fungal Communities across Compost Recipes, Preparation Methods, and Composting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in Bacterial and Fungal Communities across Compost Recipes, Preparation Methods, and Composting Times Deborah A. Neher1 *, Thomas R. Weicht1 , Scott T. Bates2 , Jonathan W. Leff3 , Noah Fierer3 of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America Abstract Compost production is a critical component

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seagrass Bed Sediments by Double-Gradient Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Ecology Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seagrass Bed Sediments by Double, including the presence or absence of vegetation, depth into sediment, and season. Double- gradient of these similarity coefficients were used to group banding patterns by depth into sediment, presence or absence

Sherman, Tim

242

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum reinhardtii was found to secrete substances that mimic the activity of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL's own AHL signals, providing evidence that the algal mimic affected quorum sensing-regulated functions

Meier, Iris

243

ORIGINAL ARTICLE The structure of the bacterial and archaeal community in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE The structure of the bacterial and archaeal community in a biogas digester biogas digesters at different scales and for different applications for treating rural wastes is well 16S rDNA, anaerobic digestion, biogas digester, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE

Lovley, Derek

244

1 | P a g e Chem 124H Organic Chemistry Case Study #2: "Overcoming Bacterial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistance worldwide: causes, challenges and responses" Nat. Med. 2004, 10, pS122. c) "MRSA" (wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mrsa. The most notable resistant bacterium is Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA, "Superbug and sterilization are essential in hospitals to prevent the spread of MRSA and other resistant bacterial infections

Reed, Christopher A.

245

Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division Ganhui Lana , Brian R. Danielsb-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low- density state to a high-density state and generates the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that Fts

Sun, Sean

246

A Novel Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for Automated tuning of PID controllers of UAVs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for Automated tuning of PID controllers of UAVs John Oyekan, Colchester CO3 4SQ, United Kingdom Email: jooyek@essex.ac.uk; hhu@essex.ac.uk Abstract--Up to now, PID of a PID controller for a UAV. This approach relies on the bacteria foraging technique to guide the search

Hu, Huosheng

247

Bacterial community structures are unique and resilient in full-scale bioenergy systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial community structures are unique and resilient in full-scale bioenergy systems Jeffrey J digestion is the most successful bioenergy technology worldwide with, at its core, undefined microbialFrac | community function | digester | sludge The production of bioenergy from wastes is an essential com- ponent

Hammerton, James

248

Structural Studies of a Bacterial Condensin Complex Reveal ATP-Dependent Disruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Studies of a Bacterial Condensin Complex Reveal ATP-Dependent Disruption of Intersubunit-like structures. Surprisingly, one of the two bound C-WHDs is forced to detach upon ATP-medi- ated engagement on the linker restrict cell growth. Thus ATP-dependent transient disruption of the MukB-MukF interaction, which

Lee, Jooyoung

249

Application of Bacterial Biocathodes in Microbial Fuel Cells Zhen He, Largus T. Angenent*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Application of Bacterial Biocathodes in Microbial Fuel Cells Zhen He, Largus T. Angenent breakthroughs are made. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell, Biofuel cell, Biocathode, Potentiostat-poised half cell, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are special types of biofuel cells, producing electric power by utilizing

250

Soil bacterial strains able to grow on the surface of oxidized polyethylene film containing prooxidant additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil bacterial strains able to grow on the surface of oxidized polyethylene film containing low-density polyethylene film containing prooxidant additives were isolated from three forest soils of adhering to the surface of oxidized polyethylene, growing there and possibly biodegrading its oxidation

Boyer, Edmond

251

THEORETICAL STUDY ON SOME -LACTAMS AS SUBSTRATES OF THE BACTERIAL MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ACRB PUMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THEORETICAL STUDY ON SOME -LACTAMS AS SUBSTRATES OF THE BACTERIAL MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ACRB PUMPB pump is a part of the most important multidrug efflux system of gram-negative bacteria, which excretes recognition site (PRS) of the AcrB pump was also performed. Parsimonius PLS models were obtained (Q2 > 0.67, R

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

252

Partitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow of spring water from the high-temperature to low-temperature facies. These results suggest of depositional facies models that correlate (1) the depth, velocity, temperature, and chemistry of waterPartitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot Springs

Fouke, Bruce W.

253

First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa BY T. A of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria, South Africa. E-mail: Teresa. Coutinho@FABI.up.ac.za; 3 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry, University of the Orange Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa; 4 Agricultural

254

Effect of a lactic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation characteristics of cereal and alfalfa forages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and alfalfa forages GR Khorasani, JJ Kennelly Department of agricultural, food and nutritional science, 545-551Research on the efficacy of inoculants has primarily focused on forages such as alfalfa, grass bacterial inoculant on the quality of cereal silages under practical conditions in Alberta, Canada. Alfalfa

Boyer, Edmond

255

A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein- Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial Transcriptional Regulatory Protein Fur

256

Polymerization of FtsZ, a Bacterial Homolog of Tubulin IS ASSEMBLY COOPERATIVE?*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymerization of FtsZ, a Bacterial Homolog of Tubulin IS ASSEMBLY COOPERATIVE?* Received-wide polymers. Here we show that the polymerization of these FtsZ filaments most closely resembles polymerization that includes GTP hydrol- ysis in the scheme. The model can account for the lengths of the Fts

Erickson, Harold P.

257

Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor Chien-Jung Loa,b , Yoshiyuki potential difference. It consists of an 50-nm rotor and up to 10 independent stators anchored to the cell of electrical and chemical potential. All 25 torque­speed curves had the same concave-down shape as fully

Berry, Richard

258

ORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce a 54 kDa ice-binding protein (GenBank EU694412) that is similar to ice-binding proteins previously- vival at sub-zero temperatures by producing proteins that bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystalsORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core James A. Raymond ? Brent C

Christner, Brent C.

259

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Integr. Biol. Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Integr. Biol. Microfluidics for bacterial 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00049c Microfluidics is revolutionizing the way we study the motile behavior system to understand how cells and organisms sense and respond to gradients. Using microfluidics to study

Shimizu, Tom

260

GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum tolerance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum that were more aluminum-tolerant than the non-transgenic control, confirming that citrate synthase overexpression can be a useful tool to help achieve aluminum tolerance. Keywords Acid soils Á Aluminum toxicity Á

Parrott, Wayne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Bacterial cellulose based hydrogel (BC-g-AA) and preliminary result of swelling behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, hydrogel based on Bacterial cellulose (BC) or local known as Nata de Coco, which grafted with monomer: Acrylic acid (AA) is synthesis by using gamma radiation technique. These hydrogel (BC-g-AA) has unique characteristic whereby responsive to pH buffer solution.

Hakam, Adil; Lazim, Azwan Mat [UKM-MIMOS Laboratory, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM) (Malaysia); Abdul Rahman, I. Irman [Laboratory of Gamma Radiation Instrument, Science Nuclear Program, School of Applied Physics, National University of Malaysia (UKM) (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other (received for review September 20, 2005) Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pi- lus oneidensis MR-1 produces electrically conductive nanowires in response to electron-acceptor limitation. We

263

Survival curves of heated bacterial spores:1 Effect of environmental factors on Weibull parameters2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be applied for canning process calculations.24 Key words:25 Weibull distribution, Heat treatment pH, recovery1 Survival curves of heated bacterial spores:1 Effect of environmental factors on Weibull heat13 resistance for non-log linear survival curves. One simple model derived from the Weibull14

Brest, Universit de

264

Production of volatile fatty acids as a result of bacterial interactions in the cecum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the C. butyricum strain fermented lactose and D-lactic acid to butyric and acetic acids, whereas L-lactic acid was not fermented. The V. alcalescens strain did not ferment lactose and fermented L better than D of lactose (up to 20 %) to the diet increases bacterial fermentation in the large intestine and cecum

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

265

Mercury and Other Heavy Metals Influence Bacterial Community Structure in Contaminated Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury and Other Heavy Metals Influence Bacterial Community Structure in Contaminated Streams Research The influences of uranium (U), mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) on the microbial community. #12;High concentrations of uranium, inorganic mercury, Hg(II) and methymercury (MeHg) have been

266

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1 , Christian L. Lauberb are personalized, we hypothesized that we could use the residual skin bacteria left on objects for forensic approach, this series ofstudies introducesa forensics approach that could eventually be used

Fierer, Noah

267

Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

160 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Degree options BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences in arts subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA

Brierley, Andrew

268

Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this exploratory study is to provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the impact of bacterial sulfhydryl groups on the bacterial uptake, speciation, methylation and bioavailability of Hg and redox changes of uranium. The relative concentration and reactivity of different functional groups present on bacterial surfaces will be determined, enabling quantitative predictions of the role of biosorption of Hg under the physicochemical conditions found at contaminated DOE sites.The hypotheses we propose to test in this investigation are as follows- 1) Sulfhydryl groups on bacterial cell surfaces modify Hg speciation and solubility, and play an important role, specifically in the sub-micromolar concentration ranges of metals in the natural and contaminated systems. 2) Sulfhydryl binding of Hg on bacterial surfaces significantly influences Hg transport into the cell and the methylation rates by the bacteria. 3) Sulfhydryls on cell membranes can interact with hexavalent uranium and convert to insoluble tetravalent species. 4) Bacterial sulfhydryl surface groups are inducible by the presence of metals during cell growth. Our studies focused on the first hypothesis, and we examined the nature of sulfhydryl sites on three representative bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive aerobic soil species; Shewanella oneidensis, a facultative gram-negative surface water species; and Geobacter sulfurreducens, an anaerobic iron-reducing gram-negative species that is capable of Hg methylation; and at a range of Hg concentration (and Hg:bacterial concentration ratio) in which these sites become important. A summary of our findings is as follows- ? Hg adsorbs more extensively to bacteria than other metals. Hg adsorption also varies strongly with pH and chloride concentration, with maximum adsorption occurring under circumneutral pH conditions for both Cl-bearing and Cl-free systems. Under these conditions, all bacterial species tested exhibit almost complete removal of Hg from the experimental solutions at relatively low bacterial concentrations. ? Synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopic studies of these samples indicate that the structure and the coordination environment of Hg surface complexes on bacterial cell walls change dramatically- with sulfhydryls as the dominant Hg-binding groups in the micromolar and submicromolar range, and carboxyls and phosphoryls dominating at high micromolar concentrations. ? Hg interactions change from a trigonal or T-shaped HgS{sub 3} complex to HgS or HgS{sub 2} type complexes as the Hg concentration increases in the submicromolar range. Although all bacterial species studied exhibited the same types of coordination environments for Hg, the relative concentrations of the complexes change as a function of Hg concentration.

Myneni, Satish C.; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Fein, Jeremy

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

MODULATION OF THE NF-KAPPA B SIGNALING PATHWAY BY THE BACTERIAL TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM EFFECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a bacterial injection system expressed by many Gram-negative bacteria. During the last two decades, the repertoire of T3SS effectors has been greatly explored, and several mechanisms ...

Gao, Xiaofei

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Elucidation of the pathways responsible for the biosynthesis of UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine in bacterial pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The highly-modified, bacterial sugar N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) has been implicated in the pathogenicity of certain microbes through its incorporation onto various protein virulence factors. In particular, ...

Morrison, Michael James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Charge Resonance Effects on Electronic Absorption Line Shapes: Application to the Heterodimer Absorption of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the formalism of Fano's treatment for atomic absorption line shapes associated with autoionization (Fano, UCharge Resonance Effects on Electronic Absorption Line Shapes: Application to the Heterodimer Absorption of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers Huilin Zhou and Steven G. Boxer* Department

Boxer, Steven G.

272

Lateral Flow Capillary Concentration for Rapid Bacterial Identification Aaron V. Mull, Dr. Kent Voorhees, Dr. Christopher Cox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lateral Flow Capillary Concentration for Rapid Bacterial Identification Aaron V. Mull, Dr. Kent 80401 Introduc)on Materials and Methods Abstract Future Work Acknowledgments Immunoassay Design and Spectra Results Eliminate false positives and false negatives

273

Study on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells and fluidity changes in model bacterial membranes using optical microscopy techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis optical microscopy techniques are used to consider aspects of viral and bacterial infections. In part 1, the physical effects of cytomegalovirus on lipid droplet dynamics in live cells are studied; in part ...

Wong, Christine Shiang Yee

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

Scholten, Johannes

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

150 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development MA or BSc (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA degree, and students most interested in Science subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development should apply for the BSc degree. Subject

Brierley, Andrew

276

Bacterial total maximum daily load (TMDL): development and evaluation of a new classification scheme for impaired waterbodies of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functions corresponding to NCDC and NEXRAD rainfall datasets ............................... 224 6.4 FOA results corresponding to NCDC ............................................................. 226 6.5 FOA results corresponding to NEXRAD... ................................................... 238 6.12 Means and standard deviations of FOA and MCS..........................................239 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION According to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 131, all States, Territories, and authorized Tribes...

Paul, Sabu

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Improved Bacterial and Viral Recoveries from 'Complex' Samples using Electrophoretically Assisted Acoustic Focusing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automated front-end sample preparation technologies can significantly enhance the sensitivity and reliability of biodetection assays [1]. We are developing advanced sample preparation technologies for biowarfare detection and medical point-of-care diagnostics using microfluidic systems with continuous sample processing capabilities. Here we report an electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing technique to rapidly extract and enrich viral and bacterial loads from 'complex samples', applied in this case to human nasopharyngeal samples as well as simplified surrogates. The acoustic forces capture and remove large particles (> 2 {micro}m) such as host cells, debris, dust, and pollen from the sample. We simultaneously apply an electric field transverse to the flow direction to transport small ({le} 2 {micro}m), negatively-charged analytes into a separate purified recovery fluid using a modified H-filter configuration [Micronics US Patent 5,716,852]. Hunter and O'Brien combined transverse electrophoresis and acoustic focusing to measure the surface charge on large particles, [2] but to our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration combining these two techniques in a continuous flow device. Marina et al. demonstrated superimposed dielectrophoresis (DEP) and acoustic focusing for enhanced separations [3], but these devices have limited throughput due to the rapid decay of DEP forces. Both acoustic standing waves and electric fields exert significant forces over the entire fluid volume in microchannels, thus allowing channels with larger dimensions (> 100 {micro}m) and high throughputs (10-100 {micro}L/min) necessary to process real-world volumes (1 mL). Previous work demonstrated acoustic focusing of microbeads [4] and biological species [5] in various geometries. We experimentally characterized our device by determining the biological size-cutoff where acoustic radiation pressure forces no longer transport biological particles. Figure 1 shows images of E.Coli ({approx}1 {micro}m) and yeast ({approx}4-5 {micro}m) flowing in a microchannel (200 {micro}m deep, 500 {micro}m wide) at a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min. The E.Coli does not focus in the acoustic field while the yeast focuses at the channel centerline. This result suggests the acoustic size-cutoff for biological particles in our device lies between 2 and 3 {micro}m. Transverse electrophoresis has been explored extensively in electric field flow fractionation [6] and isoelectric focusing devices [7]. We demonstrated transverse electrophoretic transport of a wide variety of negatively-charged species, including fluorophores, beads, viruses, E.Coli, and yeast. Figure 2 shows the electromigration of a fluorescently labeled RNA virus (MS2) from the lower half of the channel to the upper half region with continuous flow. We demonstrated the effectiveness of our electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing device by separating virus-like particles (40 nm fluorescent beads, selected to aid in visualization) from a high background concentration of yeast contaminants (see Figure 3). Our device allows for the efficient recovery of virus into a pre-selected purified buffer while background contaminants are acoustically captured and removed. We also tested the device using clinical nasopharyngeal samples, both washes and lavages, and demonstrated removal of unknown particulates (>2 ?m size) from the sample. Our future research direction includes spiking known amounts of bacteria and viruses into clinical samples and performing quantitative off-chip analysis (real-time PCR and flow cytometry).

Ness, K; Rose, K; Jung, B; Fisher, K; Mariella, Jr., R P

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Application of cyclic voltammetry to investigate enhanced catalytic current generation by biofilm-modified anodes of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) exploit the ability of some bacteria to couple oxidation of organic matter Microbial fuels cells (MFCs) rely on the ability of certain microorganisms to transfer electrons to anodes is broadly applicable and may be useful to develop strategies for optimizing power generation by MFCs. 896

Lovley, Derek

279

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 ISCN-GULF Charter Report #12;3 1. FACILITIES with projects of our University's Cell for Sustainable Development; it also presents evidence for steady alike. THIS REPORT This is the second report on sustainable development at the University of Luxembourg

van der Torre, Leon

280

Bacterial metabolite indole modulates incretin secretion from intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used as a control measurement. The dish was mounted in a perfusion chamber on an Olympus IX71 microscope with x40 oil-immersion objective, and imaged using an Orca-ER CCD camera. A 75W Xenon arc lamp and a monochromator (Cairn Research) controlled... ) expressed on the plasma membrane of L-cells, enhancing L-cell number and secretion (Cani et al., 2013; Petersen et al., 2014; Plaisancie et al., 1995; Psichas et al., 2014; Tarini and Wolever, 2010; Tolhurst et al., 2012). Many other bacterial metabolites...

Chimerel, Catalin; Emery, Edward; Summers, David K.; Keyser, Ulrich; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

T.C. Onstott

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% ?-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting.

Grant, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Zhong, R.; Wang, P.Z.; Chen, H.F.; Garcia, B.; Behme, R.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J. (University of Western Ontario (Canada))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solid State Electron Transfer via Bacterial Nanowires: Contributions Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Geophysical Response of Biostimulated Subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degradation of organic matter by microorganisms provides a source of electrical potential or so-called 'self potential' (SP) that can be measured by using a voltmeter. During this process electrons are being produced as a waste-product and bacterial cells have to dispose of these to allow for the complete biodegradation of organic matter. Especially in anaerobic microbial communities, exo-cellular electron transfer is the most important driving force behind this process and organisms have developed different, but also similar, ways to transfer electrons to other microorganisms. Recently, it has been postulated that direct electron transfer from cell-to-cell is actually done by 'hard-wired' microorganisms. This shuttling of electrons is most likely done by certain c-type cytochromes that form the functional part of electrically conductive nanowires. In this study we investigated if nanowires can explain the geoelectrical (self potential and spectral induced polarization) signals observed at some biostimulated environments such as DOE sites. The objectives of our project are to: (1) investigate any temporal changes in the geophysical signatures (Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP)) associated with nanowires of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type and mtrc/omcA deletion mutant, (2) demonstrate that mutant strains of bacteria that produce nonconductive nanowires do not contribute to geoelectrical responses. We accomplished the following: (1) Provided training to students and a postdoctoral fellow that worked on the project, (2) Conducted several SP & IP measurements correlating the distribution of nanowires and SIP/SP signals in partial fulfillment of object No. 1 and 2. On the following we will report and discuss the results of our last experiment with some emphasis on the source mechanisms of both SP and IP associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type in sand columns.

Estella Atekwana

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Program Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

Atencio, Julian J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Wastewater treatment by aerobic granular biofilmWastewater treatment by aerobic granular biofilmaste ate t eat e t by ae ob c g a u a b o Aeration pulses to improve N eliminationAeration pulses to improve N-eliminationAeration pulses to improve N eliminat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater treatment by aerobic granular biofilmWastewater treatment by aerobic granular wastewater treatment p p denitrification Nitrification is the oxidation from ammonium (NH +) first activated sludge for biological N-elimination is a two step process: aerobic nitrification and anoxicp g g g

288

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development And Evaluation Of Stable Isotope And Fluorescent Labeling And Detection Methodologies For Tracking Injected Bacteria During In Situ Bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a research project conducted to develop new methods to label bacterial cells so that they could be tracked and enumerated as they move in the subsurface after they are introduced into the groundwater (i.e., during bioaugmentation). Labeling methods based on stable isotopes of carbon (13C) and vital fluorescent stains were developed. Both approaches proved successful with regards to the ability to effectively label bacterial cells. Several methods for enumeration of fluorescently-labeled cells were developed and validated, including near-real time microplate spectrofluorometry that could be performed in the field. However, the development of a novel enumeration method for the 13C-enriched cells, chemical reaction interface/mass spectrometry (CRIMS), was not successful due to difficulties with the proposed instrumentation. Both labeling methodologies were successfully evaluated and validated during laboratory- and field-scale bacterial transport experiments. The methods developed during this research should be useful for future bacterial transport work as well as other microbial ecology research in a variety of environments. A full bibliography of research articles and meeting presentations related to this project is included (including web links to abstracts and full text reprints).

Mark E. Fuller; Tullis C. Onstott

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nucleotide-induced conformational motions and transmembrane gating dynamics in a bacterial ABC transporter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins that mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP hydrolysis. We report results of coarse-grained dynamical simulations performed for the bacterial heme transporter HmuUV. Based on the nucleotide-free structure, we have constructed a ligand-elastic-network description for this protein and investigated ATP-induced conformational motions in structurally resolved computer experiments. As we found, interactions with nucleotides resulted in generic motions which are functional and robust. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact and the transmembrane domains were rotated. The heme channel was broadened in the ligand-bound complex and the gate to the cytoplasm, which was closed in the nucleotide-free conformation, was rendered open by a mechanism that involv...

Flechsig, Holger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Contribution of bacterial cells to lacustrine organic matter based on amino sugars and D-amino acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is processed through the microbial loop (Ducklow, 2000). Fresh OM has high carbon-normalized yields of amino to the ASs, highest carbon normalized D-AA concentrations were found in the upper water column. For Lake Brienz 0.2­14% of the organic carbon pool originated from bacterial cells, compared to only 0

Wehrli, Bernhard

293

Get a whiff of this: Low-cost sensor can diagnose bacterial April 27th, 2011 in Chemistry / Analytical Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Get a whiff of this: Low-cost sensor can diagnose bacterial infections April 27th, 2011 in Chemistry / Analytical Chemistry Enlarge A colorimetric sensor array is placed in an Petri dish for culturing bacteria and scanned with an ordinary flatbed photo scanner kept inside a lab incubator. The dots

Suslick, Kenneth S.

294

The Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer from the Special Pair to the Carotenoid in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the prediction that the energy of 3BM is 200 ( 70 cm-1 above that of 3P in wild-type RCs; this analysisThe Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer from the Special Pair to the Carotenoid in Bacterial of triplet energy transfer from the primary electron donor P, a bacteriochlorophyll dimer, to the carotenoid

Boxer, Steven G.

295

Role of Charge Properties of Bacterial Envelope in Bactericidal Action of Human Group IIA Phospholipase A2 against  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phospholipases A2 (PLA2) po- tently kill Staphylococcus aureus. Highly cationic prop- erties of these PLA2 of the bacterial envelope important in Group IIA PLA2 action against S. aureus, we examined the effects. In comparison to the parent strain, isogenic dltA bacteria are 30­100 more sensitive to PLA2, whereas mpr

Gelb, Michael

296

Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption onto natural microbial mats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption of rare earth elements (REE) onto the cell walls of Bacillus subtilis (a gram-positive bacterium of the rocks in the geological record. D 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Rare earth elements

297

604 Integr. Biol., 2010, 2, 604629 This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics for bacterial chemotaxisw Tanvir Ahmed,a Thomas S. Shimizub and Roman Stocker*a Received 1st June 2010, Accepted 11th August 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ib00049c Microfluidics is revolutionizing the way we to gradients. Using microfluidics to study chemotaxis of free-swimming bacteria presents experimental

Entekhabi, Dara

298

Molecular graphics approach to bacterial AcrB proteinb-lactam antibiotic molecular recognition in drug efflux mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular graphics approach to bacterial AcrB protein­b-lactam antibiotic molecular recognition graphics study of the pump components AcrB and TolC, 16 b-lactam antibiotics and 7 other substrates; Multidrug resistance; Molecular graphics; Vestibules; Pore 1. Introduction Transmembrane solute transporters

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

299

Software Developers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

300

Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar January 21, 2015...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Investigations of Rhizobium biofilm formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sheet of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) had been placed inside theindividual wells of a 96-well PVC plate (Falcon 3911, Bectonplate containing a tab of PVC. The plate was placed on top

Fujishige, Nancy A; Kapadia, Neel N; De Hoff, Peter L; Hirsch, Ann M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Physical descriptions of the bacterial nucleoid at large scales, and their biological implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experimental and theoretical approaches have attempted to quantify the physical organization (compaction and geometry) of the bacterial chromosome with its complement of proteins (the nucleoid). The genomic DNA exists in a complex and dynamic protein-rich state, which is highly organised at various length scales. This has implications on modulating (when not enabling) the core biological processes of replication, transcription, segregation. We overview the progress in this area, driven in the last few years by new scientific ideas and new interdisciplinary experimental techniques, ranging from high space- and time-resolution microscopy to high-throughput genomics employing sequencing to map different aspects of the nucleoid-related interactome. The aim of this review is to present the wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical findings coherently, from a physics viewpoint. We also discuss some attempts of interpretation that unify different results, highlighting the role that statistical and soft condensed matter physics, and in particular classic and more modern tools from the theory of polymers, plays in describing this system of fundamental biological importance, and pointing to possible directions for future investigation.

Vincenzo G. Benza; Bruno Bassetti; Kevin D. Dorfman; Vittore F. Scolari; Krystyna Bromek; Pietro Cicuta; Marco Cosentino Lagomarsino

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nucleotide-induced conformational motions and transmembrane gating dynamics in a bacterial ABC transporter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins that mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP hydrolysis. We report results of coarse-grained dynamical simulations performed for the bacterial heme transporter HmuUV. Based on the nucleotide-free structure, we have constructed a ligand-elastic-network description for this protein and investigated ATP-induced conformational motions in structurally resolved computer experiments. As we found, interactions with nucleotides resulted in generic motions which are functional and robust. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact and the transmembrane domains were rotated. The heme channel was broadened in the ligand-bound complex and the gate to the cytoplasm, which was closed in the nucleotide-free conformation, was rendered open by a mechanism that involved tilting motions of essential transmembrane helices. Based on our findings we propose that the HmuUV transporter behaves like a `simple' mechanical device in which, induced by binding of ATP ligands, linear motions of the nucleotide-binding domains are translated into rotational motions and internal tilting dynamics of the transmembrane domains that control gating inside the heme pathway.

Holger Flechsig

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Synthesis of chalcogenide ternary and quaternary nanotubes through directed compositional alterations of bacterial As--S nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of chalcogenide ternary and quaternary nanotubes through directed compositional alterations of bacterial As--S nanotubes Shenghua Jiang,a Fang Liu,b Min-Gyu Kim,c Jae-Hong Lim,b Kun-Jae Lee--S--Se and As--Cd--S) and quaternary (i.e. As--Cd--S--Se) composite nanotubes were synthesized using biotic As

Chen, Wilfred

305

Analysis of Substrate Access to Active Sites in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenase Hydroxylases: X-Ray Crystal Structure of Xenon-Pressurized Phenol Hydroxylase from Pseudomonas Sp Ox1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In all structurally characterized bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase proteins, a series of hydrophobic cavities in the ?-subunit trace a conserved path from the protein exterior to the carboxylate-bridged ...

McCormick, Michael S.

306

Nozzle development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a bacterial pure culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bacterial strain, PM1, which is able to utilize methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as its sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from a mixed microbial consortium in a compost biofilter capable of degrading MTBE. Initial linear rates of MTBE degradation by 2 x 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1} were 0.07, 1.17, and 3.56 {mu}g ml{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} for initial concentrations of 5, 50, and 500 {mu}g MTBE ml{sup {minus}1}, respectively. When incubated with 20 {mu}g of uniformly labeled [{sup 14}C]MTBE ml{sup {minus}1}, strain PM1 converted 46% to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and 19% to {sup 14}C-labeled cells within 120 h. This yield is consistent with the measurement of protein accumulation at different MTBE concentrations from which was estimated a biomass yield of 0.18 of cells mg MTBE{sup {minus}1}. Strain PM1 was inoculated into sediment core material collected from a contaminated groundwater plume at Port Hueneme, California, in which there was no evidence of MTBE degradation. Strain PM1 readily degraded 20 {micro}g of MTBE ml{sup {minus}1} added to the core material. The rate of MTBE removal increased with additional inputs of 20 {micro}g of MTBE ml{sup {minus}1}. These results suggest that PM1 has potential for use in the remediation of MTBE-contaminated environments.

Hanson, J.R.; Ackerman, C.E.; Scow, K.M.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Bacterial reduction of crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxides in single phase suspensions and subsurface materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbiologic reduction of synthetic and geologic Fe{sup 3+} oxides associated with four Pleistocene-age, Atlantic coastal plain sediments was investigated using a dissimilatory Fe reducing bacterium (Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32) in bicarbonate buffer. Experiments investigated whether phosphate and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, (AQDS, a humic acid analogue) influenced the extent of crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxide bioreduction and whether crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxides in geologic materials are more or less reducible than comparable synthetic phases. Anaerobic incubations (10{sup 8} organisms/mL) were performed both with and without PO{sub 4} and AQDS that functions as an electron repository and shuttle. The production of Fe{sup 2+} (solid and aqueous) was followed with time, as was mineralogy by X-ray diffraction. The synthetic oxides were reduced in a qualitative trend consistent with their surface area and free energy: hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) > goethite > hematite. Bacterial reduction of the crystalline oxides was incomplete in spite of excess electron donor. Biogenic formation of vivianite [Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O] and siderite (FeCO{sub 3}) was observed; the conditions of their formation was consistent with their solubility. The geologic Fe{sup 3+} oxides showed a large range in reducibility, approaching 100% in some materials. The natural oxides were equally or more reducible than their synthetic counterparts, in spite of association with non-reducible mineral phases (e.g., kaolinite). The reducibility of the synthetic and geologic oxides was weakly effected by PO{sub 4}, but was accelerated by AQDS. CN32 produced the hydroquinone form of AQDS (AHDS), that, in turn, had thermodynamic power to reduce the Fe{sup 3+} oxides. As a chemical reductant, it could reach physical regions of the oxide not accessible by the organism. Electron microscopy showed that crystallite size was not the primary factor that caused differences in reducibility between natural and synthetic crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxide phases. Crystalline disorder and microheterogeneities may be more important.

Zachara, J.M.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Li, S.M.; Kennedy, D.W.; Smith, S.C.; Gassman, P.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Siderocalin/Enterobactin Interaction: A Link between Mammalian Immunity and Bacterial Iron Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siderophore enterobactin (Ent) is produced by enteric bacteria to mediate iron uptake. Ent scavenges iron and is taken up by the bacteria as the highly stable ferric complex [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. This complex is also a specific target of the mammalian innate immune system protein, Siderocalin (Scn), which acts as an anti-bacterial agent by specifically sequestering siderophores and their ferric complexes during infection. Recent literature suggesting that Scn may also be involved in cellular iron transport has increased the importance of understanding the mechanism of siderophore interception and clearance by Scn; Scn is observed to release iron in acidic endosomes and [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} is known to undergo a change from catecholate to salicylate coordination in acidic conditions, which is predicted to be sterically incompatible with the Scn binding pocket (also referred to as the calyx). To investigate the interactions between the ferric Ent complex and Scn at different pH values, two recombinant forms of Scn with mutations in three residues lining the calyx were prepared: Scn-W79A/R81A and Scn-Y106F. Binding studies and crystal structures of the Scn-W79A/R81A:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} and Scn-Y106F:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} complexes confirm that such mutations do not affect the overall conformation of the protein but do weaken significantly its affinity for [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. Fluorescence, UV-Vis and EXAFS spectroscopies were used to determine Scn/siderophore dissociation constants and to characterize the coordination mode of iron over a wide pH range, in the presence of both mutant proteins and synthetic salicylate analogs of Ent. While Scn binding hinders salicylate coordination transformation, strong acidification results in the release of iron and degraded siderophore. Iron release may therefore result from a combination of Ent degradation and coordination change.

Meux, Susan C.

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE-Funded Research on Bacterial Enzyme Could Lead to Cheaper...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) works with a broad spectrum of industrial, academic, agricultural, and nonprofit partners across the United States to develop and...

311

VAP Development: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper provides a plan to formalize the evaluation of newly developed VAPs and a framework for the development of value-added products through four different stages: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release.

Jensen, M; Collis, Fast, J; Flynn, C; Mather, J; McFarlane, S; Monroe, J; Sivaraman, C; Xie, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - allowing microbial translocation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MFC) research. This is highlighted by the rapid... (4), 589-604 Bacterial biofilms: the powerhouse of a microbial fuel cell Ashley E Franks1 , Nikhil... Malvankar1,2 & Kelly P...

313

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active...

Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Psychology of Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,out historical aspects of sustainable development and itsPsychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck and

Milfont, Taciano Lemos

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Psychology of Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,Psychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck andPsychology of Sustainable Development. Norwell, MA: Kluwer

Milfont, Taciano Lemos

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 14 Laboratory Procedures ........................................................................................ 14 Results ................................................................................................................. 15 Known... forming units (CFU) per 100 mL .................................................................................... 15 Table 6 Known source fecal samples collected in the Lampasas River Watershed . 17 Table 7 City, volume, and discharge location...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

Individual Development and Excutive Development Plan Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

According to OPM, an individual development plan (IDP) is a tool to assist employees in career and personal development. Its primary purpose is to help employees reach short and long-term career...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Preparation and dielectric properties of SiC nanowires self-sacrificially templated by carbonated bacterial cellulose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? A new material CBC is introduced as a template to prepare SiC nanowires. ? SiC nanowires are synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si. ? The highest ?? of ?-SiC nanowires is obtained at 1400 C. -- Abstract: SiC nanowires were synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si in Ar atmosphere at 13501450 C, using carbonated bacterial cellulose (CBC) as carbon template and a reactant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and vector network analyzer were employed to characterize the samples. The diameter of the resulting ?-SiC nanowires changes with calcination temperatures, specifically, 3560 nm for 1350 C, 4080 nm for 1400 C, and 3060 nm for 1450 C. The ?-SiC nanowires obtained at 1400 C possess the highest ?? of complex permittivity.

Wen, Lixia; Ma, Yongjun; Dai, Bo [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhou, Yong [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), School of Physics, National Lab of Solid State Microstructure, ERERC, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), School of Physics, National Lab of Solid State Microstructure, ERERC, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Jinsong [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Pei, Chonghua, E-mail: peichonghua@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Syntheses and anti-MRSA activities of the C3 analogs of mansonone F, a potent anti-bacterial sesquiterpenoid: insights into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syntheses and anti-MRSA activities of the C3 analogs of mansonone F, a potent anti-bacterial sesquiterpenoid: insights into its structural requirements for anti-MRSA activity Dong-Yun Shin,a Sun Nam Kim June 2004 Available online 3 July 2004 Abstract--Syntheses and excellent anti-MRSA activities

Suh, Young-Ger

323

Supplementary Note 1. Sequencing, assembly and annotation. Sequencing. The zebra finch DNA for shotgun sequencing, and for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for shotgun sequencing, and for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and cosmid libraries was derived from-sister. High molecular weight genomic DNA was prepared from the muscle of Black 17. The frozen tissue sample was placed on dry ice and sliced with a fine blade as small as possible, and immediately suspended in 100 m

Jarvis, Erich D.

324

Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Bioconversion to Bacterial Single Cell Protein for Animal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OF EUTROPHIC NUTRIENTS FROM WASTEWATER AND THEIR BIOCONVERSION TO BACTERIAL SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FOR ANIMAL FEED ......................................................................................................10 3. Nutritive quality of A. eutrophus biomass grown in wastewater (digester elutriate) as a protein

District of Columbia, University of the

325

Clean development mechanism: Perspectives from developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the political acceptability and workability of CDM by and in developing countries. At COP-3 in Kyoto in 1997, the general position among developing countries changed from strong rejection of joint implementation to acceptance of CDM. The outgrowth of CDM from a proposal from Brazil to establish a Clean Development Fund gave developing countries a sense of ownership of the idea. More importantly, establishing support for sustainable development as a main goal for CDM overcame the resistance of many developing countries to accept a carbon trading mechanism. The official acceptance of CDM is not a guarantee of continued acceptance, however. Many developing countries expect CDM to facilitate a substantial transfer of technology and other resources to support economic growth. There is concern that Annex I countries may shift official development assistance into CDM in order to gain carbon credits, and that development priorities could suffer as a result. Some fear that private investments could be skewed toward projects that yield carbon credits. Developing country governments are wary regarding the strong role of the private sector envisioned for CDM. Increasing the awareness and capacity of the private sector in developing countries to initiate and implement CDM projects needs to be a high priority. While private sector partnerships will be the main vehicle for resource transfer in CDM, developing country governments want to play a strong role in overseeing and guiding the process so that it best serves their development goals. Most countries feel that establishment of criteria for sustainable development should be left to individual countries. A key issue is how CDM can best support the strengthening of local capacity to sustain and replicate projects that serve both climate change mitigation and sustainable development objectives.There is support among developing countries for commencing CDM as soon as possible. Since official commencement must await the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, many developing countries support the establishment of an Interim Phase starting in 2000, with possible retroactive crediting once the Protocol enters into force.

Sari, Agus P.; Meyers, Stephen

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Essays in Development Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook of Development Economics, Volume I (pp. 713-762).Journal of Development Economics, 81, 80-96. Behrman, JereJournal of Development Economics, 79, 349-373. Dercon,

Hicks, Joan Hamory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

COMING SOON DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMING SOON DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING THE JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. · Rigorous analysis of existing development "solutions" through an engineering or economic lens. FOR MORE, interdisciplinary journal applying engineering and economic research to the problems of poverty. Published studies

Jacobs, Lucia

328

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen 1 of 5 This office coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional and state classified personnel. Customized training and orga- nizational development consulting services

329

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Locations

Stephens, Graeme L.

330

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location

Stephens, Graeme L.

331

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State University training and organiza- tional development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson

332

Training and Organizational Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State University training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson

Stephens, Graeme L.

333

Sustainable Development at University.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? After the Rio United Nations Conference on Enviroment and Development, the need of sustainable development obtained recognition from the vast majority of countries and (more)

Yao, Zhilei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Regional Development Authorities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance...

335

ORISE: Web Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of...

336

NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20, 1976 LBL-5293 NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banksof California. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banks andof practical heat engines based on this phenomenon is

Banks, Ridgway

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Coal Development (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

338

Tanpopo cosmic dust collector: Silica aerogel production and bacterial DNA contamination analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrophobic silica aerogels with ultra-low densities have been designed and developed as cosmic dust capture media for the Tanpopo mission which is proposed to be carried out on the International Space Station. Glass particles as a simulated cosmic dust with 30 \\mu m in diameter and 2.4 g/cm^3 in density were successfully captured by the novel aerogel at a velocity of 6 km/s. Background levels of contaminated DNA in the ultra-low density aerogel were lower than the detection limit of a polymerase chain reaction assay. These results show that the manufactured aerogel has good performance as a cosmic dust collector and sufficient quality in respect of DNA contamination. The aerogel is feasible for the biological analyses of captured cosmic dust particles in the astrobiological studies.

Tabata, Makoto; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Yano, Hajime; Yamagishi, Akihiko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Encourage research and innovation in sustainable development 14 - Standard of Living, EconomySUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2011-2012 #12;2 Table of Contents UNIVERSIT? LAVAL AT A GLANCE 3 A WORD FROM THE RECTOR 4 A WORD FROM THE EXECUTIVE VICE-RECTOR, DEVELOPMENT 5 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Laval, Université

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341

Geothermal development opportunities in developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the Seminar on geothermal development opportunities in developing countries, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy and presented by the National Geothermal Association. The overall objectives of the seminar are: (1) Provide sufficient information to the attendees to encourage their interest in undertaking more geothermal projects within selected developing countries, and (2) Demonstrate the technological leadership of US technology and the depth of US industry experience and capabilities to best perform on these projects.

Kenkeremath, D.C.

1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Understanding the Pathogenesis of Streptococcus iniae Infection in Fish and Development of an Effective Vaccine for Use in Aquaculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish health, bacterial infections, Streptococcus iniae, virulence factor, vaccine, aquaculture, striped bass

Nizet, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bacterial Source Tracking in Impaired Watersheds: Evaluation of Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods for Increased Source Specificity and Improved Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the isolates unidentified (Hauck, 2006). Trinity River An urban BST project was sponsored by TCEQ in the Trinity River Basin in Dallas in 2005. The TMDL project is currently close to the implementation plan phase, but BST was conducted in the early..., and dogs in pets (Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research, 2006). Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco and Belton Lake The Lake Waco and Belton Lake study was a significant collaboration of the Texas Farm Bureau, TSSWCB...

Martin, Emily C

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Essays in Development Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of EconomicJournal of Development Economics 87(1): 57-75. [21] Ozier,Journal of Development Economics 94, 151-163. [9] Delavande,

Keats, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Developing a Marketing Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

China Business Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China Business Development Postgraduate Programme #12;Programme: China Business Development with China: Intercultural Management 3 1 Daily life and business behaviour explained from a cultural perspective Chinese strategic thinking China's political constellation and its impact on business life Human

Einmahl, Uwe

348

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

RELAP-7 Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

During the second quarter, the Reactor team drafted software development guidance documents and a software quality assurance plan.

352

Sustainable Development Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Development Report 2010-2011 #12;2 Table of Contents Universit Laval at a glance 2-2011 highlights 9 University community initiatives 15 Sustainable development educational program 21 Research and creativity in sustainable development 24 Awards, recognition, and distinctions 28 Implementation

Laval, Universit

353

Digital Media Developing Digital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing Digital Media Developing Digital Media Digital Media Case Study During 2012, IT Services component of student and staff development." In terms of the use of digital media for teaching, Mark Dixon this digital content, mentorship of paramedic students was informal and delivered locally. According to Mairad

354

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Common components of industrial metal-working fluids as sources of carbon for bacterial growth. [Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-based metal-working fluids in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). Pure strains of predominating bacteria were isolated from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which were tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 x 10/sup 3/) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 10/sup 8/ CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified.

Foxall-vanAken, S.; Brown, J.A. Jr.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S. Jr.; Olsen, R.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

John J. Kilbane II

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Essays in Development Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are weak, Review of Economics and Statistics, 2004, 86,Essays in Development Economics A dissertation submitted indegree Doctor of Philosophy in Economics by Samuel Ali Bazzi

Bazzi, Samuel Ali

360

Individual Development Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To be effective, training decisions made at the organizational and departmental levels must be informed by the needs of the individual. An individual development plan (IDP) is cooperatively...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

USER MANUAL Developers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foundation, US Department of Energy Primary developers: Darius Abramavicius: 2003 -- 2010 (initiator) Wei.......................................................................7 3 Basic usage and functionality.....................................................................................13 A. System Made of Known Energy Levels...........................................................14

Mukamel, Shaul

362

Validated SCR Concept Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* CAE package study (urea tank, exhaust line) * Kinetic aftertreatment modeling (1D -> 3D) -> Validated model chain SCR concept development: * Optimization of SCR concept: *...

363

Attitudes towards sustainable development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this thesis is to offer up to date information on the international students knowledge and attitude towards sustainable development in Oulu University (more)

Olkinuora, Veera

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Wilmington, DE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

Crawford, D.L.; Ramachandra, M.

1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High Energy Physics (HEP) HEPPortalby I.

367

Growth & Development / Parental Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participate; if one parents is lost, fledging rates usually drop #12;Winkler reduced clutch size from 5 to 3Growth & Development / Parental Care #12;Embryonic Development Although the sequence of 42 stages the egg The hatching muscle helps the chick break out of the egg Parents typically dispose of the egg

Butler, Christopher J.

368

Technical Assistance to Developers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Development Michael Short  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plant for buses PEM fuel cell, 120 kW, hydrogen Automotive fuel cell systems for primary power PEM and technology development PEM fuel cell, 5 kW, hydrogen Fuel cell system for the Space Shuttle Orbiter Alkaline fuel cell development Continued commercialization Reduce product cost Reduce size and weight Increase

370

Wind Economic Development (Postcard)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sun Academic Developer Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sun Academic Developer Program Kim Jones Vice President Government, Education & Health Care Sun Microsystems, Inc. FY08 Campus Ambassador Programme Your Name Here Sun Microsystems, Inc. #12;2 FY08 Campus Ambassador Programme #12;3 Sun Academic Developer Initiative On-Campus Events and Contests Open Source

McCusker, Guy

372

Introducing Web Application Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introducing Web Application Development Instructor: Dr Wei Ding Development Instructor: Dr.Wei Ding Fall 2009 1CS 437/637 Database-BackedWeb Sites andWeb Services Introduction: Internet vs. World Wide Web Internet is an interconnected network of thousands ofInternet is an interconnected network

Ding, Wei

373

Internet Polling Development Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the development of a polling engine to launch the above procedures and pass the data on to the database server. This final report describes the automated polling procedures that have been developed for Synergistic, Highland and ABB loggers. This report also...

Klima, P.; Lockhart, D.; Haberl, J. S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

United Nations Development Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Concessions: Pilot Programs 7.5. Modernising Corn Stover Use in Rural Jilin Province, China 7United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Development Policy Energy and Atmosphere Programme. #12;5 Acknowledgements 6 Notes on Authors 7 Foreword 9 Executive Summary 27 Introduction: Energy

375

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Microsystem product development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Senior Director Student Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Senior Director Student Development & Services Janet Teasdale Assistant to the Vice President, Conferences & Food Operations (dual campus) Andrew Parr Chaplains Roberta Fraser Inter-Fraternity & Panhellenic Community Service Learning Margot Fryer Alma Mater Society UBCV Graduate Student Society UBCV

Michelson, David G.

378

Essays on development finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis consists of three essays that examine investment choices in less developed countries. Chapter 1 examines how the structure of existing microfinance contracts may discourage risky but high-expected return ...

Fischer, Gregory M. (Gregory Mark)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Renewable Development Fund (RDF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Xcel Energy's Renewable Development Fund (RDF) was created in 1999 pursuant to the 1994 Radioactive Waste Management Facility Authorization Law (Minn. Stat. 116C.779). Originally, Xcel Energy was...

380

Scott Koenig Development Officer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scott Koenig Development Officer Teri Lucie Thompson Senior Vice President & CMO UA FOUNDAT I/TV Station Mgr Frank Fregoso Chief Engineer Cheech Calenti IT Manager Ed Kesterson Radio Program Dir. AHSC

Utzinger, Urs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Community Development Fund (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available...

382

Laboratory Directed Research & Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................43 Measuring Dark Energy and Dark Matter Using Gravitational Lensing ............................................................11 Development of an Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Facility for Condensed Matter Physics Challenges Electrochemical Fuel Generation from Water and Carbon Dioxide..............................................19

Ohta, Shigemi

383

Political elites and development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation consists of three essays on the behavior of political elites and their effect on economic development. The first two chapters focus on political dynasties in the Philippines while the third chapter analyzes ...

Querubn Borrero, Pablo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Advanced Interconnect Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Sustaining development in Detroit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intent of this thesis is to propose a strategy for stabilizing and increasing the disparate pieces of development that form the traces of the once great industrial city of Detroit. It focuses primarily on Fordism as a ...

Resnick, Noah Samuel, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

USABC Battery Separator Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Separator Development P.I. - Ron Smith Presenter - Kristoffer Stokes, Ph.D. Celgard, LLC Project ID ES007 May 10, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

387

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Essays on development economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation is a collection of three independent papers in empirical development economics. The first chapter studies the effect of a family planning program in Bangladesh, which successfully reduced fertility, on ...

Ruthbah, Ummul Hasanath

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview NIST's Role in Implementing Executive Order 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" #12;Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity - February 12, 2013 "The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow

Bentz, Dale P.

390

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview NIST's Role in Implementing Executive Order 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" #12;Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2013 · "The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow

391

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

392

Training and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Development Administration Assistant Vice Chancellor Lori Castro VC Business Senior Manager Conflict Resolution Nancy Heischman Training Coordinator Vacant Principal Technical Training Consultant Frank Widman Health Care Facilitator / Interim Benefits Manager Frank Trueba Disability

California at Santa Cruz, University of

393

NOx Sensor Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

needed to meet emission targets and enable widespread use of diesel vehicles with better fuel economies: We are developing a novel sensor with the potential to meet OEM cost and...

394

Microbioreactors for bioprocess development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microbioreactor integrated with automated sensors and actuators as a step towards high-throughput bioprocess development. In particular, this thesis ...

Zhang, Zhiyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s July 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items mentioned include: (1) the merger of Entergy and Gulf States Utilities, (2) restart of the Sequoyah Fuels facility in Oklahoma, (3) development of the 7th and 8th nuclear units in Taiwan, (4) purchase of interest in Rio Algom, Ltd, and (5) acquisition of the Italian firm AGIP by a Canadian company.

NONE

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Cancels DOE O 361.1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 2.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Change 2 approved 06-13-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1A.

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

What is Community Development?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and community colleges: http://www.sbaonline.sba.gov/sbdc/ Physical, Natural and Cultural Resources ? TEX*A*SYST: http://waterhome.brc.tamus.edu ? Onsite Wastewater Treatment: http://ossf.tamu.edu ? Entrepreneurship Resources: http...: Community Development Programming Resources Focus Resources General ? Texas AgriLife Extension Service Educational Resource Center: http://agrilifebookstore.org ? Southern Rural Development Center: http://srdc.msstate.edu ? Appropriate Technology Transfer...

Taylor, Greg

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final amongst university's invested in sustainable development. Our small but mighty size allows us to build through positive sustainable practices. As the Sustainable Development Summer Intern I am fortunate enough

400

Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 Sustainable Development Summer Intern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 1 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final of Bishop's University. The role of the Sustainable Development Summer Intern (SDSI) is to coordinate and organize sustainable development information and activities during the summer months. Ensuring

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Perturbing the folding energy landscape of the bacterial immunity protein Im7 by site-specific N-linked glycosylation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N-linked glycosylation modulates protein folding and stability through a variety of mechanisms. As such there is considerable interest in the development of general rules to predict the structural consequences of site-specific ...

Chen, Mark

402

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developing countries "can significantly offset the adverse effects of climate change").Climate Change, 2 which calls on developed countries (but not developing countries)developing countries that will bear the bulk of the effects of climate change.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Emergency Response Guideline Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Radiochemical method development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed methods for chemical characterization of the environment under a multitask project that focuses on improvement of radioanalytical methods with an emphasis on faster and cheaper routine methods. The authors have developed improved methods for separation of environmental levels of technetium-99, radium, and actinides from soil and water; separation of actinides from soil and water matrix interferences; and isolation of strontium. They are also developing methods for simultaneous detection of multiple isotopes (including nonradionuclides) by using a new instrumental technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The new ICP-MS methods have greater sensitivity and efficiency and could replace many radiometric techniques. They are using flow injection analysis to integrate and automate the separation methods with the ICP-MS methodology. The final product of all activities will be methods that are available (published in the U.S. Department of Energy`s analytical methods compendium) and acceptable for use in regulatory situations.

Erickson, M.D.; Aldstadt, J.H.; Alvarado, J.S.; Crain, J.S.; Orlandini, K.A.; Smith, L.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Power Systems Development Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

Southern Company Services

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Renewable Energy Economic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Economic Development Dick Sheehy & Nate Monosoff, CH2M HILL March, 2010 #12;Contents 1. Who is CH2M HILL? 2. Why Do We Need Renewables? 3. Where Is The Wind Blowing? 4. Where Is The Sun Shining? 5. How To Catch Some Rays? 6. Renewable Related 2 Proprietary & Confidential #12;Where

407

Technology Forecasting Scenario Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Forecasting and Scenario Development Newsletter No. 2 October 1998 Systems Analysis was initiated on the establishment of a new research programme entitled Technology Forecasting and Scenario and commercial applica- tion of new technology. An international Scientific Advisory Panel has been set up

408

ECH Technology Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

Temkin, Richard [MIT

2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

409

Global Development Our Responsibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

410

Global developments in MTBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is intended to provide an overview of some of the recent developments in MTBE demand growth worldwide and the impact of these developments on MTBE demand in the future. It provides a perspective of the influence of developments in the US on the worldwide MTBE markets. The public`s outcry regarding oxygenates in gasoline, and specifically MTBE, that has been evolving in the US during the past several months is in response to a politically mandated requirement for a fuel that contains oxygen that is provided by MTBE or ethanol. This public unrest had negatively impacted the market price for MTBE at the time this paper was being prepared. However, the author believes that MTBE, because of its clean octane capabilities, will continue to be used as an octane blendstock for gasoline in increasing quantities worldwide as we move through lead phasedown in West Europe and other countries that are experiencing pollution problems relating to exhaust emissions from internal combustion engines. The objectives of this paper are as follows: review developments in MTBE demand 1990--2000; identify regions where MTBE demand growth will occur; review production growth for MTBE, both historical and forecast; examine world trade patterns during the period; assess methanol demand growth during the period; analyze MTBE`s regional price bias; and provide a forecast of future MTBE price trends.

Feller, L.W. [CMAI, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Graphite Technology Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

BIOANALYTICAL DEVELOPMENT OF A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- CHLORINATED DIBENZO-p- DIOXINS Evgenia G. Matveeva,1,2,* Elena V. Gribkova,1 James R. Sanborn,2 Shirley J. Gee of California, Davis, California 95616 ABSTRACT A homogeneous immunoassay for dioxins was developed using a phosphorescent label for detection. A dioxin derivative was conjugated to Pt-coproporphyrin. In the assay, when

Hammock, Bruce D.

413

Apple Professional Development Courses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apple Professional Development Courses Spring / Summer 2013 #12;2 Contents Foundation 12th July ­ i ­ Vision and Plan 11 14th June ­ Vision and Plan 11 #12;3 Get the most from your Apple products with MMU. Apple has created a series of workshops which are delivered by independent facilitators. These hands

414

Ocean Engineering Development Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

Wood, Stephen L.

415

ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sustainable development; uConservation of resources and biodiversity; uClimate change and carbon management; uES AND BIODIVERSITy B.1 - conservation genetics and biodiversity 29 PH. BARET, A.-L. JACQUEMART B.2 - Environmental of collective action arrangements and regulation for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use 41 T

Nesterov, Yurii

416

2008 Program Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such issues as endangered species, private property rights, wetlands, timber management, and air and water2008 Program Natural Resources Leadership Development Institute It is the policy of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service that all persons have equal opportunity and access to its

417

MECO Production Target Developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

McDonald, Kirk

418

Energy Efficiency Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Utility Efficiency Partnerships, Inc. (IUEP) has been a leader among the industry groups that have supported voluntary initiatives to promote international energy efficiency projects and address global climate change. The IUEP maintains its leadership by both supporting international greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction projects under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by partnering with U.S. and international organizations to develop and implement strategies and specific energy efficiency projects. The goals of the IUEP program are to (1) provide a way for U.S. industry to maintain a leadership role in international energy efficiency infrastructure projects; (2) identify international energy project development opportunities to continue its leadership in supporting voluntary market-based mechanisms to reduce GHG emissions; and (3) demonstrate private sector commitment to voluntary approaches to global climate issues. The IUEP is dedicated to identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in the registration of international energy efficiency projects that result in demonstrated voluntary reductions of GHG emissions. This Final Technical Report summarizes the IUEP's work in identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in development of these projects and IUEP's effort in creating international cooperative partnerships to support project development activities that develop and deploy technologies that (1) increase efficiency in the production, delivery and use of energy; (2) increase the use of cleaner, low-carbon fuels in processing products; and (3) capture/sequester carbon gases from energy systems. Through international cooperative efforts, the IUEP intends to strengthen partnerships for energy technology innovation and demonstration projects capable of providing cleaner energy in a cost-effective manner. As detailed in this report, the IUEP met program objectives and goals during the reporting period January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2002. At the request of the DOE, we have also included in this report additional activities during the reporting period January, 1999 through January, 2001. This additional information had been reported earlier in the Final Technical Reports that summarized activities undertaken in those earlier periods.

IUEP

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Zhu part of team to receive R&D 100 Award | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the life of lithium-ion batteries, eliminating biofilms - and developing biofuels, microbial fuel cells and other technologies. Zihua Zhu, EMSL scientist on time-of-flight...

420

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop regenerable sorbents for use in the temperature range of 343 to 538 C (650 to 1000 F) to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal-derived fuel gases in a fluidized-bed reactor. The goal was to develop sorbents that are capable of reducing the H{sub 2}S level in the fuel gas to less than 20 ppmv in the specified temperature range and pressures in the range of 1 to 20 atmospheres, with chemical characteristics that permit cyclic regeneration over many cycles without a drastic loss of activity, as well as physical characteristics that are compatible with the fluidized bed application.

Unknown

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PEATGAS process development status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1976, IGT has conducted over 200 peat-gasification tests in both laboratory- and process-development-unit (PDU)-scale equipment. The encouraging results demonstrate that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for the production of SNG. Based on a peat-gasification kinetic model developed from the laboratory and PDU data, cost estimates for commercial operation show that the conversion of peat to SNG by the PEATGAS process is competitive with other alternative SNG sources. If the results of a 19-month, $4 million feasibility study funded by the US Department of Energy are favorable, Minnesota Gas Co. plans to participate in the construction and operation of an 80 million SCF/day industrial plant for making SNG from peat.

Punwani, D.V.; Biljetina, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Geothermal materials development activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Insider protection technology developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories evaluates and develops new techniques and technologies to ensure the integrity of special nuclear material (SNM) against potential insider threats. We have evaluated several types of sensor technologies and subsystems to monitor and/or track materials and personnel. This past year`s effort has been directed at characterizing commercial developments that meet the Department of Energy`s (DOE) needs in some of these areas. Some of these evaluations are complete and some are still in progress. This paper discusses our work with infrared light (IR), radio frequency (RF), and RF proximity technologies. After these technologies are judged to be applicable to DOE`s needs, we incorporate them into the generic, real time, personnel tracking and material monitoring system.

Foesch, J.; Bortniak, P.; Waddoups, I.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

425

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order implements the Department's Acquisition Career Development program, mandatory for professionals in the GS-1102 and 1105 occupational procurement series, as well as others with significant procurement responsibilities. The Order also ensures that members of the acquisition workforce are aware of and adhere to the mandatory training and certification requirements. Cancels Acquisition Letter 98-06. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 1.

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 586-8061 Fax: (202) 586-9811 E-mail: patrick.davis@ee.doe.gov Fuel Cell Core Technology R&D JoAnn Milliken (202) 586-2480 Fax: (202) 586-9811 E-mail: joann.milliken@ee.doe.gov Fuel Cell System Development Donna Ho (202) 586-8000 Fax: (202) 586-9811 E-mail: donna.ho@ee.doe.gov Mailing Address U.S. Department

427

Update on INSIGHTS Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

Not Listed; Eric Burgett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

ORISE: Standards development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACKRadiological programStandards development For 30 years,

429

Advanced Dewatering Systems Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new fine coal dewatering technology has been developed and tested in the present work. The work was funded by the Solid Fuels and Feedstocks Grand Challenge PRDA. The objective of this program was to 'develop innovative technical approaches to ensure a continued supply of environmentally sound solid fuels for existing and future combustion systems with minimal incremental fuel cost.' Specifically, this solicitation is aimed at developing technologies that can (i) improve the efficiency or economics of the recovery of carbon when beneficiating fine coal from both current production and existing coal slurry impoundments and (ii) assist in the greater utilization of coal fines by improving the handling characteristics of fine coal via dewatering and/or reconstitution. The results of the test work conducted during Phase I of the current project demonstrated that the new dewatering technologies can substantially reduce the moisture from fine coal, while the test work conducted during Phase II successfully demonstrated the commercial viability of this technology. It is believed that availability of such efficient and affordable dewatering technology is essential to meeting the DOE's objectives.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Bikini Atoll groundwater development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work.

Peterson, F.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for...

432

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds Compiled by Erwin Wodarczak and Melanie Hardbattle Projects series Sous-fonds Description o "Women and Sustainable Development: Canadian Perspectives (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Fonds Description Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds. 1985

Handy, Todd C.

434

Workplace Learning & Development UMass Amherst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workplace Learning & Development (WL&D) promotes employee and organizational growth, developmentWorkplace Learning & Development UMass Amherst 303 Goodell Amherst, MA 01003 Workplace Learning workshops to ALL UMass Amherst staff and faculty members. * Fall 2014 Programs Workplace Learning

Mountziaris, T. J.

435

Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

Minnesota, University of

436

Mack LNG vehicle development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to install a production-ready, state-of-the-art engine control system on the Mack E7G natural gas engine to improve efficiency and lower exhaust emissions. In addition, the power rating was increased from 300 brake horsepower (bhp) to 325 bhp. The emissions targets were oxides of nitrogen plus nonmethane hydrocarbons of less than 2.5 g/bhp-hr and particulate matter of less than 0.05 g/bhp-hr on 99% methane. Vehicle durability and field testing were also conducted. Further development of this engine should include efficiency improvements and oxides of nitrogen reductions.

Southwest Research Institute

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Photonics Research and Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLV??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average home??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nation??s energy consumption ?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development Tools at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSC Helps Develop Next-GenEMSL ResearchTools

439

Economic Development - SRSCRO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It is the mission ofEconomic Development

440

DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program (SESCDP): This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Economic Development Fund (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing...

442

Product development practices that matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product Development consists of activities to transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. Several waves of improvements in technological innovation and product development have ...

Gupta, Nisheeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nuclear Safety Research and Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

444

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is a written agreement between a non-federal partner and Battelle...

445

Cooperative Research & Development Agreements | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CRADA SHARE Cooperative Research and Development Agreement A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) allows non-federal entities (industry, universities,...

446

Kansas Certified Development Companies (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kansas Certified Development Companies (CDC) assist businesses by developing loan packages that meet the financial need of a project. These packages often contain multiple sources of project...

447

Post-2015 Development Agenda For Integrating Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Post Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) The Environment Research and Technology Development Fund S-11 / Beyond MDGs Japan Symposium The Environment Research and Technology Development Fund S-11 / Beyond MDGs and the environment, as well as consideration of integrated goals for achieving sustainable development, in order

Furui, Sadaoki

448

MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN 4.1 Introduction Once a decision rule has been developed, a disposition survey can be designed for the impacted materials and equipment (M costly and time-consuming development of redundant survey designs. The evaluation of existing SOPs

449

Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department Environment Division Forest Correa Pertti Veijalainen Harri Ahveninen Inter-American Development Bank Washington, D.C. Sustainable. At the IDB the work was supervised by Kari Keipi of the Sustainable Development Department (SDS). Bank staff

450

Eltron Research & Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the base program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastmans site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOEs decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

Bill Turner

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Architecture-Based Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scenarios 6 2.2.2 Quality-Specific Scenarios 7 2.3 Validation 7 3 Design the Architecture 9 3.1 Architectural Structures and Views 10 3.2 A Development Process 11 3.3 Validation 13 4 Document the Architecture 15 5 Analyze the Architecture 19 5.1 Architectural Reviews 19 5.1.1 Participants 20 5.1.2 Review Techniques 20 5.2 Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) 21 5.3 The Steps of the ATAM 22 5.3.1 Day 1 Activities 23 5.3.2 Day 2 Activities 25 5.3.3 Day 3 Activities 27 6 Realize the Architecture 29 7 Maintain the Architecture 31 8 Conclusions 33 References 35 ii CMU/SEI-99-TR-007 CMU/SEI-99-TR-007 iii List of Figures Figure 1-1 Steps of the Architecture-Based Development Process 2 Figure 2-1 Eliciting the Architectural Requirements 3 Figure 2-2 A Scenario-Elicitation Matrix 5 Figure 3-1 Architecture Design 9 Figure 4-1 Architecture Documentation 15 Figure 5-1 Architecture Analysis 19 Figure 5-2 The Activities of ATAM and Their Relative Importance Over Time 22 Figure 5-3 Dep...

Len Bass; Rick Kazman; Rick Kazman; Product Line Systems; Mario Moya

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

RSMASS system model development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RSMASS system mass models have been used for more than a decade to make rapid estimates of space reactor power system masses. This paper reviews the evolution of the RSMASS models and summarizes present capabilities. RSMASS has evolved from a simple model used to make rough estimates of space reactor and shield masses to a versatile space reactor power system model. RSMASS uses unique reactor and shield models that permit rapid mass optimization calculations for a variety of space reactor power and propulsion systems. The RSMASS-D upgrade of the original model includes algorithms for the balance of the power system, a number of reactor and shield modeling improvements, and an automatic mass optimization scheme. The RSMASS-D suite of codes cover a very broad range of reactor and power conversion system options as well as propulsion and bimodal reactor systems. Reactor choices include in-core and ex-core thermionic reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors, particle bed reactors, and prismatic configuration reactors. Power conversion options include thermoelectric, thermionic, Stirling, Brayton, and Rankine approaches. Program output includes all major component masses and dimensions, efficiencies, and a description of the design parameters for a mass optimized system. In the past, RSMASS has been used as an aid to identify and select promising concepts for space power applications. The RSMASS modeling approach has been demonstrated to be a valuable tool for guiding optimization of the power system design; consequently, the model is useful during system design and development as well as during the selection process. An improved in-core thermionic reactor system model RSMASS-T is now under development. The current development of the RSMASS-T code represents the next evolutionary stage of the RSMASS models. RSMASS-T includes many modeling improvements and is planned to be more user-friendly. RSMASS-T will be released as a fully documented, certified code at the end of 1998. A radioisotope space power system model RISMASS is also under development. RISMASS will optimize and predict system masses for radioisotope power sources coupled with close-spaced thermionic diodes. Although RSMASS-D models have been developed for a broad variety of space nuclear power and propulsion systems, only a few concepts will be included in the releasable RSMASS-T computer code. A follow-on effort is recommended to incorporate all previous models as well as solar power system models into one general code. The proposed Space Power and propulsion system MASS (SPMASS) code would provide a consistent analysis tool for comparing a very broad range of alternative power and propulsion systems for any required power level and operating conditions. As for RSMASS-T the SPMASS model should be a certified, fully documented computer code available for general use. The proposed computer program would provide space mission planners with the capability to quickly and cost effectively explore power system options for any space mission. The code should be applicable for power requirements from as low as a few milliwatts (solar and isotopic system options) to many megawatts for reactor power and propulsion systems.

Marshall, A.C.; Gallup, D.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Textile Engineering Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Developing Human Performance Measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRCs risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Development of turbodrill tachometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable tachometer has been developed for use with turbodrills. The tachometer utilizes a set of partially blanked turbine blades to produce a pressure pulse in the drilling mud flow stream each time the turbodrill rotates one revolution. The pressure pulses are transmitted through the mud in the drill pipes to the surface where they are detected, processed and RPM read out. The frequency of the pulse signals is a direct measure of the turbodrill rotary speed. Drilling motor test stand trials demonstrated the reliabiity and accuracy of the tachometer. The pulsing blades were then installed on geothermal turbodrills used in drilling the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory geothermal well EE-2. The tachometer allowed continual monitoring and control of turbodrill speed at LASL and was successfully used to depths in excess of 10,000 feet. The success of the high temperature turbodrills in EE-2 is attributed in part to the tachometer.

McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.; Neudecker, J.W.; Shoemaker, H.D.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Macroencapsulation development at Pantex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pantex Plant is developing an innovative skid-mounted macroencapsulation technology (called a mobile treatment unit, MTU) that will economically dispose low-level radioactive mixed waste debris. Pantex`s macroencapuslation technology spin-welds a polyethylene top onto a polyethylene receiver to form a jacket that encapsulates a fifty-five (55) gallon steel drum of compacted low-level radioactive and mixed waste debris. The annulus formed by the fifty-five gallon drum and the polyethylene jacket is filled with a material (either foam or grout) to eliminate voids in the final waste form. The US EPA verified that the use of a polyethylene jacket constitutes macroencapsulation in a letter to Chemical Waste Management, Inc., dated September 19, 1995. The EPA letter stipulated that this treatment technology should not be used for D008, radioactive lead solids, and that the final waste form should be structurally sound and resistant to degradation.

Yokum, J.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geothermal development in Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The economic development of Libya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book focuses on the development of the Libyan economy over the last decade. The book surveys both the structural developments in the Libyan economy and the experience of the individual sectors. It considers the potential for industrial development and the prospects for agriculture both in terms of natural resources and political commitments. The book also examines developments in the service sector especially banking.

Khader, B.; El-Wifati, B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FORESTRY, GOVERNANCE AND NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Partners Group / Ministry of Natural Resources of Tourism, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252pp. Key

462

Networked Systems for Developing Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Bottom of the Pyramid !! Amartya Sen: Development as Freedom !! Paul Collier: The Bottom Billion

Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan

463

1998 wire development workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

465

Supervisory Control Strategy Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 4 of this collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focused on the design of the hierarchical supervisory control for multiple-module units. The state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design made developing a detailed hierarchical control difficult at this time. However, other simultaneous and ongoing efforts have contributed to providing the needed information. This report summarizes the results achieved under Task 4 of this Financial Assistance Award. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 discusses the IRIS control functions. Next, it briefly reviews the current control concepts, and then reviews the maneuvering requirements for the IRIS plant. It closes by noting the benefits that automated sequences have in reducing operator workload. Section 3 examines reactor loading in the frequency domain to establish some guidelines for module operation, paying particular attention to strategies for using process steam for desalination and/or district heating. The final subsection discusses the implications for reactor control, and argues that using the envisioned percentage (up to 10%) of the NSSS thermal output for these purposes should not significantly affect the NSSS control strategies. Section 4 uses some very general economic assumptions to suggest how one should approach multi-module operation. It concludes that the well-known algorithms used for economic dispatching could be used to help manage a multi-unit IRIS site. Section 5 addresses the human performance factors of multi-module operation. Section 6 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

466

Power Systems Development Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

None

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Power Systems Development Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

Southern Company Services

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Developing product platforms:analysis of the development process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several authors have highlighted the importance of companies enhancing their new product development process through a multiproduct

Roveda, Marco

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

469

ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter included the fractionation of extracts prepared from several varieties of pepper plants, and using several solvents, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A preliminary determination of antimicrobial activities of the new extracts and fractions using a growth inhibition assay, and evaluation of the extracts ability to inhibit biofilm formation was also performed. The analysis of multiple extracts of pepper plants and fractions of extracts of pepper plants obtained by HPLC illustrated that these extracts and fractions are extremely complex mixtures of chemicals. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify the chemical constituents of these extracts and fractions to the greatest degree possible. Analysis of the chemical composition of various extracts of pepper plants has illustrated the complexity of the chemical mixtures present, and while additional work will be performed to further characterize the extracts to identify bioactive compounds the focus of efforts should now shift to an evaluation of the ability of extracts to inhibit corrosion in mixed culture biofilms, and in pure cultures of bacterial types which are known or believed to be important in corrosion.

John J. Kilbane II; William Bogan

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Peace Corps / Youth & Community Development Youth and Community Development Volunteers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peace Corps / Youth & Community Development Youth and Community Development Volunteers Through engage in a wide variety of locally sustainable projects. Volunteers act as catalysts for change Development Sample Projects · Help young people form youth groups, clubs, sports teams, or extracurricular

Kaminsky, Werner

471

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

472

Tools for dynamic model development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For this thesis, several tools for dynamic model development were developed and analyzed. Dynamic models can be used to simulate and optimize the behavior of a great number of natural and engineered systems, from the ...

Schaber, Spencer Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Refund for Economic Development (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Refund for Economic Development under the Tax Code for state tax refunds for economic development. Some Texas property owners may be eligible to receive refunds of state sales and use taxes and...

474

Herty Advanced Materials Development Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

475

Mechanisms of brain ventricle development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brain ventricles are a conserved system of fluid-filled cavities within the brain that form during the earliest stages of brain development. Abnormal brain ventricle development has been correlated with neurodevelopmental ...

Lowery, Laura Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Design of product development systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of successful new products in less time and using fewer resources is key to the financial success of most consumer product companies. In this thesis we have studied the development of new products and how ...

Aguirre Granados, Adrian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Women Empowerment and Economic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Women empowerment and economic development are closely related: in one direction, development alone can play a major role in driving down inequality between men and women; in the other direction, empowering women may benefit ...

Duflo, Esther

478

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Corruption, Institutions and Economic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in developing the underlying theory (Dasgupta, 2001, chapter 9; Hamilton and Clemens, 1999). Loosely speaking, sustainable development is related to an economy?s ability to maintain living standards through time. More precisely, Arrow et al. (2004) suggest... capita ?a direct measure of sustainable development ?and corruption. While corruption may have little average eect on the growth rate of GDP per capita, it is a likely source of unsustainable development. Key words: Corruption, Growth, Sustainable...

Aidt, Toke S

480

Modelling sustainable development Ivar Ekeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling sustainable development Ivar Ekeland www.ceremade.dauphine.fr/~ekeland CERMADE.ceremade.dauphine.fr/~ekeland (CERMADE, Universite Paris-Dauphine)Modelling sustainable development Collloque Sorin, IHP, Juin 2012 1 / 17 #12;Sustainable development The de...nition given by the Brundtland commision to the UN (1987

Ekeland, Ivar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bacterial biofilm development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Asian Perspectives on Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asian Perspectives on Sustainable Development Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:00 10:30 a.m. Wrigley society can help spur a more sustainable growth. Pamela Mar's work focuses on Asian development, corporate and social development. Asia needs to rethink how it grows to ensure that social progress and environmental

Hall, Sharon J.

482

Systemic Signalling in Plant Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

develop continuously throughout their life cycle, constantly initiating new or- gans. They doSystemic Signalling in Plant Development David Jackson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring to the production of systemic signals that control the development of distant organs and tissues. Introduction

Jackson, David

483

DASHboards: Enhancing Developer Situational Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DASHboards: Enhancing Developer Situational Awareness Oleksii Kononenko, Olga Baysal, Reid Holmes of software development "issues", such as bug fixes and discussions about features. Typically, developers://youtu.be/Jka_MsZet20 Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2.3 [Software Engineering]: Coding Tools and Tech- niques; D

Godfrey, Michael W.

484

USDA Rural Community Development Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Housing Service is seeking applications for Rural Community Development Initiative (RCDI) grants that will be awarded to organizations to provide criticial financial and technical assistance to recipients to develop and strengthen their capacity to carry out housing, community facilities, and community and economic development projects.

485

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ISSUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Challenges of sustainable development under globalization 1 Sari Jusi and Maarit Virtanen Irrigation-20 Challenges of sustainable development under globalisation Jeffrey D. Sachs Director, Earth Institute. The Earth Institute is organised around the theme of sustainable development. I want to talk about

486

Misadventures in Conservation and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Governance issues are at the heart of successful biodiversity conservation and sustainable development between biodiversity conservation and human development. She has studied Integrated ConservationMisadventures in Conservation and Development Friday, September 28, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch

Hall, Sharon J.

487

Geochemical Characterization Using Geophysical Data and Markov Chain Monte Carolo methods: A Case Study at the South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of field-scale geochemical parameters, such as extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III), influences microbial processes and thus the efficacy of bioremediation. Because traditional characterization of those parameters is invasive and laborious, it is rarely performed sufficiently at the field-scale. Since both geochemical and geophysical parameters often correlate to some common physical properties (such as lithofacies), we investigated the utility of tomographic radar attenuation data for improving estimation of geochemical parameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. The data used in this study included physical, geophysical, and geochemical measurements collected in and between several boreholes at the DOE South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia. Results show that geophysical data, constrained by physical data, provided field-scale information about extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III) in a minimally invasive manner and with a resolution unparalleled by other geochemical characterization methods. This study presents our estimation framework for estimating Fe(II) and Fe(III), and its application to a specific site. Our hypothesis--that geochemical parameters and geophysical attributes can be linked through their mutual dependence on physical properties--should be applicable for estimating other geochemical parameters at other sites.

Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Murray, Chris; Roden, Eric; Majer, Ernest

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

488

POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, H{sub 2}/converted carbon ratio, gasification rates, carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Test run GCT3 was started on December 1, 2000, with the startup of the thermal oxidizer fan, and was completed on February 1, 2001. This test was conducted in two parts; the loop seal was commissioned during the first part of this test run from December 1 through 15, which consisted of hot inert solids circulation testing. These initial tests provided preliminary data necessary to understand different parameters associated with the operation and performance of the loop seal. The loop seal was tested with coal feed during the second part of the test run and additional data was gathered to analyze reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance. In the second part of GCT3, the gasification portion of the test, from January 20 to February 1, 2001, the mixing zone and riser temperatures were varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures ranging from 200 to 240 psig. There were 306 hours of solid circulation and 184 hours of coal feed attained in GCT3.

Unknown

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Surface Water Development in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Government. Flood-control storage capacities at 26 major Texas reservoirs amounted to 17.4 million acre-feet in 1976. There is evi- dence of a changing national policy to keep economic development out of the flood plains. It appears that management... Water Development ................................. 30 Appendix Tables .......................................... 32 ......... Appendix A: Major Conservation Storage Reservoirs 40 endix B: Water Development Board Policy ............... 41 eferences...

McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

WE -ADKWindows Embedded Automotive Development Kit Benefits to the developer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WE -ADKWindows Embedded Automotive Development Kit Benefits to the developer: The Official-ADK, Microsoft Auto 4.1 installs on top of Windows® Embedded CE 6.0 R3 and adds automotive -specific an Automotive Infotainment Solution with Microsoft Auto 4.1 and Qualnetics WE

Narasayya, Vivek

493

Development and Extension Work The need for developing metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Horizontal transfer informed by and delivers to society at large Wastewater treatment plants-Prof. H. S. Shankar to the development of our predominantly rural economy, an ambivalent attitude seems to persist in the IITs engineers, innovative thinkers and engineer entrepreneurs; - To develop a special nexus with rural

Sohoni, Milind

494

Development and Health The impact of health on development in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· breakdown of health care delivery systems · inadequate application of TB control measures · increasing drug's population are at risk - increasing due to: · breakdown of health care delivery systems · growing drugDevelopment and Health The impact of health on development in Africa #12;Health challenges

Glasgow, University of

495

Developing country FDI and development: the case of the Chinese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's early investment in the Sudan by the Chinese National Oil Corporation (CNPC) and the consequent cascade * This paper examines the development implications of Chinese investment in the Sudan to enable a better understanding of the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) from developing countries. By examining China

Sheldon, Nathan D.

496

Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Economic Development Incentive Program (EDIP) is a tax incentive program designed to foster job creation and stimulate business growth throughout the Commonwealth. Participating companies may...

497

Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NOTE: The Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund has issued its [http://publicservicedept.vermont.gov/sites/psd/files/Topics/Renewable_En... Five Year Strategic Plan]. See the [http:/...

498

Industrial Development Fund (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Industrial Development Fund provides financing grants and loans through designated municipalities and counties to assist in infrastructure improvements for targeted industrial projects. The...

499

Wind Development on the Rosebud  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Wind Development on the Rosebud, given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

500

Large Business Development Program (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Large Business Development Program, administered by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, provides grants to large businesses for bondable business activities, including...