National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ba biological assessment

  1. PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This biological assessment (BA) is to provide the information necessary for formal consultation between the Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) regarding the effects of the Proposed Action as required pursuant to Section 7(a)(2) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

  2. Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2014-07-24

    Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now more than 50 years old. Plans are underway to refit these aging turbines with new runners. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when upgrading the turbines. In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is demonstrated. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We present an application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  3. Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance This review covers the BioPA method used to analyze the biological performance of proposed designs to help ensure the safety of fish passing through the turbines at the Priest Rapids Dam in Grant County, Washington. Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance (483.71 KB) More Documents & Publications

  4. California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment Biological Assessment for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project San Luis Obispo County, California High Plains Ranch II, LLC (HPR II), a wholly owned subsidiary of SunPower Corporation, Systems ("SunPower") proposes to construct a 250-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) energy plant, the California Valley Solar Ranch Project (CVSR Project or Project), on a 4,747acre site in

  5. Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance (483.71 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydropower R&D: Recent Advances in Turbine Passage Technology Environmental ...

  6. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic

  7. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic

  8. Methods for isolation and viability assessment of biological organisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Letant, Sonia Edith; Baker, Sarah Elyse; Bond, Tiziana; Chang, Allan Shih-Ping

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of biological or chemical organisms can be accomplished using a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) system. The SERS system can be a single or a stacked plurality of photonic crystal membranes with noble-metal lined through pores for flowing analyte potentially containing the biological or chemical organisms. The through pores can be adapted to trap individual biological or chemical organisms and emit SERS spectra, which can then be detected by a detector and further analyzed for viability of the biological or chemical organism.

  9. Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, S.

    1997-03-01

    This report discusses the biological impact to the area around the Los Alamos National Laboratory of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator. In particular the impact to the soils, water quality, vegetation, and wildlife are discussed.

  10. Proliferation profile assessment of emerging biological weapons threats. Research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, M.G.; Bland, M.S.; Duann, T.P.; Tucker, A.B.

    1996-04-01

    This project develops a first generation biological warfare (BW) program system model for use in the DOD`s counterproliferation workstation, identifies key issues the U.S. military must address to assure its forces are prepared to fight in a BW environment, and develops a concise BW primer for use by any DOD activity requiring such information. The greatest lesson to be learned from this study is that only through the collective analysis of all the sub-systems of a suspected BW program will conclusive evidence of the program be found. Still, with current counterproliferation capabilities the U.S. may only be able to slow, not stop a motivated proliferant.

  11. Strategies for Assessment of the Biological Performance and Design of Hydroturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-05-05

    The biological response of fish to turbine passage has been of concern for several decades and emphasized recently by consideration of hydro as a 'green' power source. The current state-of-the-art of hydro-turbine biological performance assessment, while still inadequate, has advanced considerably the past 10 years. For example, the importance of assessment of exposure to pressure changes during turbine passage has been emphasized by findings of laboratory studies of rapid decompression. It is now very clear that hydroturbine biological assessment must consider the physiological state and behavior of fish at turbine entry and changes in physiological state that drive aspects of behavior during tailrace passage. Such considerations are in addition to concerns about exposure of fish to mechanical and pressure sources of injury during turbine passage. Experimental designs and assessment tools have evolved for acclimation of test fish, observation of test fish behavior at approach and upon exit from the turbine environment, and precise estimation of turbine passage mortality. Fish condition assessment continues to improve permitting better classification of observed injuries to injury mechanisms. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and other computer models permit detailed investigation of the turbine passage environment and development of hypotheses that can be tested in field studies using live fish. Risk assessment techniques permit synthesis of laboratory and in-field study findings and estimation of population level effects over a wide range of turbine operation scenarios. Risk assessment is also evolving to provide input to turbine runner design. These developments, and others, have resulted in more productive biological performance assessment studies and will continue to evolve and improve the quantity and quality of information obtained from costly live fish hydroturbine passage studies. This paper reviews the history of hydro-turbine biological

  12. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  13. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology @WIPP Life Begins at 250,000,000 Years WIPP's underground isn't just suited for physics experiments aiming to unlock the mysteries of the Universe, it is also a perfect "dig site" for biologists wanting to chronicle the history of life. 250 million years ago, the area around WIPP was all part of the Permian Sea. Today, the salt beds that make up the WIPP underground provide a time capsule, of sorts, to this ancient era. Researchers have uncovered ancient bacteria, cellulose and

  14. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  15. Historical precedence and technical requirements of biological weapons use : a threat assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estes, Daniel P.; Vogel, Kathleen Margaret; Gaudioso, Jennifer Marie; Hickok, Lauren T.; Jung, Danielle F.; Barnett, Natalie Beth; Frerichs, Rebecca L.; Salerno, Reynolds Mathewson

    2004-05-01

    The threat from biological weapons is assessed through both a comparative historical analysis of the patterns of biological weapons use and an assessment of the technological hurdles to proliferation and use that must be overcome. The history of biological weapons is studied to learn how agents have been acquired and what types of states and substate actors have used agents. Substate actors have generally been more willing than states to use pathogens and toxins and they have focused on those agents that are more readily available. There has been an increasing trend of bioterrorism incidents over the past century, but states and substate actors have struggled with one or more of the necessary technological steps. These steps include acquisition of a suitable agent, production of an appropriate quantity and form, and effective deployment. The technological hurdles associated with the steps present a real barrier to producing a high consequence event. However, the ever increasing technological sophistication of society continually lowers the barriers, resulting in a low but increasing probability of a high consequence bioterrorism event.

  16. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  17. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24

    assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

  18. Sitewide biological risk assessment Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska: Risks to terrestrial receptors from diverse contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Becker, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) is located southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. Eielson AFB was listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List with a total of 64 potential terrestrial and aquatic source areas. Contaminants of concern include fuel and fuel components, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead. As part of the remedial investigations of these sites, a biological risk assessment (BRA) was conducted to estimate the risk of ecological effects on terrestrial receptors posed by contaminants in the Eielson environment. There are 32 mammal species, 117 bird species, 17 fish species, and 1 amphibian species known to inhabit Eielson AFB and vicinity. The BRA screened source areas based on completed biological exposure pathways, selected receptors for analysis, estimated exposure of receptors to contaminants, and compared these exposures to known toxicological effects. Lower Garrison Slough and Flightline Pond posed a substantial risk for shrikes and goshawks. Ingestion of PCBs constituted the primary pathway/contaminant combination contributing to this risk. The effects of the various sources of uncertainty in the ingestion exposure calculations for these sites were evaluated in a probabilistic risk assessment using Monte Carlo methods. There was an 11% risk of reproductive effects from PCBs for goshawks feeding from Flightline Pond and a 25 % risk from lower Garrison Slough. There was an 81 % risk of reproductive effects from PCB exposure for shrikes feeding near lower Garrison Slough.

  19. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  20. Baseline biological risk assessment for aquatic populations occurring near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.; Brandt, C.; Lewis, R.; Smith, R.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska was listed as a Superfund site in November 1989 with 64 potential source areas of contamination. As part of a sitewide remedial investigation, baseline risk assessments were conducted in 1993 and 1994 to evaluate hazards posed to biological receptors and to human health. Fish tissue, aquatic invertebrates, aquatic vegetation, sediment, and surface water data were collected from several on-site and off-site surface water bodies. An initial screening risk assessment indicated that several surface water sites along two major tributary creeks flowing through the base had unacceptable risks to both aquatic receptors and to human health because of DDTs. Other contaminants of concern (i.e., PCBs and PAHs) were below screening risk levels for aquatic organisms, but contributed to an unacceptable risk to human health. Additional samples was taken in 1994 to characterize the site-wide distribution of PAHs, DDTs, and PCBs in aquatic biota and sediments. Concentrations of PAHs were invertebrates > aquatic vegetation > fish, but concentrations were sufficiently low that they posed no significant risk to biological receptors. Pesticides were detected in all fish tissue samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were also detected in most fish from Garrison Slough. The pattern of PCB concentrations in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was related to their proximity to a sediment source in lower Garrison Slough. Ingestion of PCB-contaminated fish is the primary human-health risk driver for surface water bodies on Eielson AFB, resulting in carcinogenic risks > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for future recreational land-use at some sites. Principal considerations affecting uncertainty in the risk assessment process included spatial and temporal variability in media contaminant concentrations and inconsistencies between modelled and measured body burdens.

  1. Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, S.

    1998-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build, install, and operate a Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LMA) in Technical Area 53 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LEDA will demonstrate the accelerator technology necessary to produce tritium, but is not designed to produce tritium at LANL. USFWS reviewers of the Biological Assessment prepared for LEDA insisted that the main drainage be monitored to measure and document changes to vegetation, soils, wildlife, and habitats due to LEDA effluent discharges. The Biology Team of ESH-20 (LANL`s Ecology Group) has performed these monitoring activities during 1996 and 1997 to document baseline conditions before LEDA released significant effluent discharges. Quarterly monitoring of the outfall which will discharge LEDA blowdown effluent had one exceedance of permitted parameters, a high chlorine discharge that was quickly remedied. Samples from 12 soil pits in the drainage area contained no hydric indicators, such as organic matter in the upper layers, streaking, organic pans, and oxidized rhizospheres. Vegetation transacts in the meadows that LEDA discharges will flow through contained 44 species of herbaceous plants, all upland taxa. Surveys of resident birds, reptiles, and amphibians documented a fauna typical of local dry canyons. No threatened or endangered species inhabit the project area, but increased effluent releases may make the area more attractive to many wildlife species, an endangered raptor, and several other species of concern. Biological best management practices especially designed for LEDA are discussed, including protection of floodplains, erosion control measures, hazards posed by increased usage of the area by deer and elk and revegetation of disturbed areas.

  2. Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

    1993-04-06

    Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

  3. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  4. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  5. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  6. Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control and Biological Safety at the Los Alamos National Laboratory … December 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control and Biological Safety at the Los Alamos National Laboratory December 2015 Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  7. Biological alternatives to chemical identification for the ecotoxicological assessment of industrial effluents: The RTG-2 in vitro cytotoxicity test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castano, A. . Centro de Sanidad Ambiental); Vega, M.; Blazquez, T.; Tarazona, J.V. )

    1994-10-01

    Ecotoxicology is concerned with the effects of chemicals on biological systems. Identifying components of complex aqueous effluents poses special problems, and can be useless if there is a lack of information on the biological effects of the identified chemicals. Toxicity-based (bioassay-directed) sample fractionation can be very useful, but the small amount of fractioned material is a constraint that can be solved by using in vitro tests. The RTG-2 in vitro cytotoxicity test has been used to assess (a) the efficacy of a treatment plant in the aeronautics industry and (b) the exposure of fish and molluscs cultured in Esteiro Bay to the effluent of a fish-processing factory. Ecotoxicological assessments could be done without identifying the responsible chemicals. The RTG-2 test was used in combination with concentration/fractionation procedures. It proved that the toxicity of the liquid wastes from the aeronautics industry was eliminated by the treatment, and that molluscs and fish reared in Esteiro Bay had accumulated toxic chemicals dumped by the fish-processing factory. A combination of the RTG-2 cytotoxicity test and HPLC proved to give useful information even for chemicals not identified by GC-MS.

  8. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by

  9. Programmatic Biological Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    may also be present. Threatened, Endangered, and Culturally Sensitive Species The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) list of threatened, endangered, candidate, and proposed...

  10. Ba{sub 2}phenanthrene is the main component in the Ba-doped phenanthrene superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xun-Wang; Huang, Zhongbing; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-12-14

    We have systematically investigated the crystal structure of Ba-doped phenanthrene with various Ba doping levels by the first-principles calculations combined with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra simulations. Although the experimental stoichiometry ratio of Ba atom and phenanthrene molecule is 1.5:1, the simulated XRD spectra, space group symmetry and optimized lattice parameters of Ba{sub 1.5}phenanthrene are not consistent with the experimental ones, while the results for Ba{sub 2}phenanthrene are in good agreement with the measurements. The strength difference of a few XRD peaks can be explained by the existence of pristine phenanthrene. Our findings suggest that instead of uniform Ba{sub 1.5}phenanthrene, there coexist Ba{sub 2}phenanthrene and undoped phenanthrene in the superconducting sample. The electronic calculations indicate that Ba{sub 2}phenanthrene is a semiconductor with a small energy gap less than 0.05 eV.

  11. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  12. NO2 uptake under practically relevant conditions on BaO/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Szanyi, Janos

    2012-02-14

    The formation of nitrites and nitrates (Ba(NOx)2) under practically relevant conditions (PNO2 up to 1.0 Torr and T = 500 K) and their thermal decomposition on BaO (>20 monolayer equivalent (MLE))/Pt(1 1 1) were studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), infrared reflection absorption (IRA), and Xray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies. The exposure of BaO to 1.0 × 10−8 Torr NO2 at 500 K leads to the formation of a Ba(NOx)2 layer with small, disordered crystalline nitrate clusters. Under these conditions (PNO2 = 1.0 × 10−8 Torr and T = 500 K) only the top portion of the BaO layer converts to Ba(NOx)2 and the nitrites in this Ba(NOx)2 layer stay without converting completely to nitrates even after 100 min of NO2 exposure. In the thermal decomposition of Ba(NOx)2, first nitrites decompose, releasing NO and then the decomposition of nitrates occurs via two pathways releasing NO2 and NO + O2. At 500 K and PNO2 ≥ 1.0 × 10−7 Torr, first NO2 reacts with BaO to form small disordered crystalline Ba(NO3)2 particles and then these particles agglomerate to form large, well-ordered (bulk-like) crystalline nitrates as the NO2 exposure increases. The thermal decomposition of these well-ordered, bulk-like crystalline nitrate aggregates occurs in two steps releasing NO2 and NO + O2 in each step in two different temperature regions. NO2 pressure ≥1.0 × 10−5 Torr is required for the complete oxidation of initially formed nitrites to nitrates and the full nitration of the BaO layer at 500 K sample temperature. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US

  13. Biological Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  14. Crystal Structure and Thermodynamic Stability of Ba/Ti-Substituted Pollucites for Radioactive Cs/Ba Immobilization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Hongwu; Chavez, Manuel E.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Garino, Terry J.; Schwarz, Haiqing L.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Rademacher, David X.; Nenoff, Tina Maria

    2015-04-23

    An analogue of the mineral pollucite (CsAlSi2O6), CsTiSi2O6.5 has a potential host phase for radioactive Cs. However, as 137Cs and 135Cs transmute to 137Ba and 135Ba, respectively, through the beta decay, it is essential to study the structure and stability of this phase upon Cs → Ba substitution. In this work, two series of Ba/Ti-substituted samples, CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5 and CsxBa1-xTiSi2O7-0.5x, (x = 0.9 and 0.7), were synthesized by high-temperature crystallization from their respective precursors. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis reveal that while CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5 samples are phase-pure, CsxBa1-xTiSi2O7-0.5x samples contain Cs3x/(2+x)Ba(1-x)/(2+x)TiSi2O6.5 pollucites (i.e., also two-Cs-to-one-Ba substitution) and a secondary phase, fresnoitemore » (Ba2TiSi2O8). Thus, the CsxBa1-xTiSi2O7-0.5x series is energetically less favorable than CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5. To study the stability systematics of CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5 pollucites, high-temperature calorimetric experiments were performed at 973 K with or without the lead borate solvent. Enthalpies of formation from the constituent oxides (and elements) have thus been derived. Our results show that with increasing Ba/(Cs + Ba) ratio, the thermodynamic stability of these phases decreases with respect to their component oxides. Hence, from the energetic viewpoint, continued Cs → Ba transmutation tends to destabilize the parent silicotitanate pollucite structure. However, the Ba-substituted pollucite co-forms with fresnoite (which incorporates the excess Ba), thereby providing viable ceramic waste forms for all the Ba decay products.« less

  15. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  16. Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.~I LALI i~E REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L.~ ~ -_77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r _________ rment of the Surveilance Prograrn of the High-Level Storage- Tanks at Hanford P. E WOOD Robert J. Catln, Deputy Directat - Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview Office of Environment MARCH 1980 Report to the U.S. Departrent of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Washkngon, DC C March 27, 1980

  17. Hydrodynamic Modeling Analysis for Leque Island and zis a ba Restoration Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, Jonathan M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2015-01-31

    Ducks Unlimited, Inc. in collaboration with Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians have proposed the restoration of Leque Island and zis a ba (formerly Matterand) sites near the mouth of Old Stillaguamish River Channel in Port Susan Bay, Washington. The Leque Island site, which is owned by WDFW, consists of nearly 253 acres of land south of Highway 532 that is currently behind a perimeter dike. The 90-acres zis a ba site, also shielded by dikes along the shoreline, is located just upstream of Leque Island and is owned by Stillaguamish Tribes. The proposed actions consider the removal or modification of perimeter dikes at both locations to allow estuarine functions to be restored. The overall objective of the proposed projects is to remove the dike barriers to 1) provide connectivity and access between the tidal river channel and the restoration site for use by juvenile migrating salmon and 2) create a self-sustaining tidal marsh habitat. Ducks Unlimited engaged Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Port Susan Bay, Skagit Bay, and the interconnecting Leque Island region for use in support of the feasibility assessment for the Leque Island and zis a ba restoration projects. The objective of this modeling-based feasibility assessment is to evaluate the performance of proposed restoration actions in terms of achieving habitat goals while assessing the potential hydraulic and sediment transport impacts to the site and surrounding parcels of land.

  18. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature...

  19. SeeBA Energiesysteme GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SeeBA Energiesysteme GmbH Place: Stemwede, Germany Zip: 32351 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind energy project developer, from planning through to implementation...

  20. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  1. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  2. Theoretical Biology and Biophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Modeling biological systems and analysis and informatics of molecular and cellular biological data Mathematical BiologyImmunology Fundamental ...

  3. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  4. On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Story Behind the BaBar Database System Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database System The BaBar database ...

  5. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  6. Biological Evaluation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Assessment, Fort Gordon Drop Zone, Mr. Robert Drumm, Chief, Natural Resource Branch, ... Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield Field, 2008, Sustainable Range Field Card, ...

  7. Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ... ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ...

  8. Innovative methodology for the synthesis of Ba-M hexaferrite BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, M.A.; Helmy, N.; El-Dek, S.I.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscope images for the BaFe12O19. - Highlights: BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}nanoparticles were prepared in single-phase from organometallic precursors. BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} possesses small size 65 nm, H{sub C} = 3695 Oe and M{sub s} = 58 emu/g. This method of preparation could be extended in the synthesis of other metal oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: In this piece of work, high quality and homogeneity, barium hexaferrite (BaM) BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles were prepared from organometallic precursors for the 1st time. This method is based on the formation of supramolecular crystal structure of Ba[Fe(H{sub 3}NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 3})]Cl{sub 7}8H{sub 2}O. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} at two different annealing temperatures namely 1000 C and 1200 C were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope TEM and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results show that monophasic nanoparticles of hexaferrites were obtained. Nanoparticles of crystallite size 4050 nm distinguished by narrow distribution and excellent homogeneity were obtained with superior magnetic properties which suggested single-domain particles of Ba-M hexaferrite.

  9. Crystal Structure and Thermodynamic Stability of Ba/Ti-Substituted Pollucites for Radioactive Cs/Ba Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Hongwu; Chavez, Manuel E.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Garino, Terry J.; Schwarz, Haiqing L.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Rademacher, David X.; Nenoff, Tina Maria

    2015-04-23

    An analogue of the mineral pollucite (CsAlSi2O6), CsTiSi2O6.5 has a potential host phase for radioactive Cs. However, as 137Cs and 135Cs transmute to 137Ba and 135Ba, respectively, through the beta decay, it is essential to study the structure and stability of this phase upon Cs → Ba substitution. In this work, two series of Ba/Ti-substituted samples, CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5 and CsxBa1-xTiSi2O7-0.5x, (x = 0.9 and 0.7), were synthesized by high-temperature crystallization from their respective precursors. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis reveal that while CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5 samples are phase-pure, CsxBa1-xTiSi2O7-0.5x samples contain Cs3x/(2+x)Ba(1-x)/(2+x)TiSi2O6.5 pollucites (i.e., also two-Cs-to-one-Ba substitution) and a secondary phase, fresnoite (Ba2TiSi2O8). Thus, the CsxBa1-xTiSi2O7-0.5x series is energetically less favorable than CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5. To study the stability systematics of CsxBa(1-x)/2TiSi2O6.5 pollucites, high-temperature calorimetric experiments were performed at 973 K with or without the lead borate solvent. Enthalpies of formation from the constituent oxides (and elements) have thus been derived. Our results show that with increasing Ba/(Cs + Ba) ratio, the thermodynamic stability of these phases decreases with respect to their component oxides. Hence, from the energetic viewpoint, continued Cs → Ba transmutation tends to destabilize the parent silicotitanate pollucite structure. However, the Ba-substituted pollucite co-forms with fresnoite (which incorporates the excess Ba

  10. Ba2TeO: A new layered oxytelluride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen, J. B.; Tokumoto, T. D.; McGill, S. A.; Singh, D. J.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-02-01

    For single crystals of the new semiconducting oxytelluride phase, Ba2TeO, we synthesized from barium oxide powder and elemental tellurium in a molten barium metal flux. Ba2TeO crystallizes in tetragonal symmetry with space group P4/nmm (#129), a=5.0337(1) Å, c=9.9437(4) Å, Z=2. The crystals were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction, heat capacity and optical measurements. Moreover, the optical measurements along with electronic band structure calculations indicate semiconductor behavior with a band gap of 2.93 eV. Resistivity measurements show that Ba2TeO is highly insulating.

  11. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial ... and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. ...

  12. Symmetry-Breaking Orbital Anisotropy Observed for Detwinned Ba...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Symmetry-Breaking Orbital Anisotropy Observed for Detwinned Ba(Fe (1-X) Co (X) ) (2) As (2) Above the Spin Density Wave Transition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  13. The analysis of Ytrium doped BaZrO3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced Power Stability for Proton Conducting Solid Oxides Fuel Cells Report Title: Computational modeling, synthesis, and characterization of BaZr 1-x Y x O 3- solid state ...

  14. Transition probabilities in the X(5) candidate {sup 122}Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bizzeti, P. G.; Giannatiempo, A.; Melon, B.; Perego, A.; Sona, P.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Tonev, D.; Ur, C. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Marginean, R.; Menegazzo, R.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Michelagnoli, C.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Nespolo, M.

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the possible X(5) character of {sup 122}Ba, suggested by the ground-state band energy pattern, the lifetimes of the lowest yrast states of {sup 122}Ba have been measured, via the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The relevant levels have been populated by using the {sup 108}Cd({sup 16}O,2n){sup 122}Ba and the {sup 112}Sn({sup 13}C,3n){sup 122}Ba reactions. The B(E2) values deduced in the present work are compared to the predictions of the X(5) model and to calculations performed in the framework of the IBA-1 and IBA-2 models.

  15. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  16. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  17. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanicallybiologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Maria, Francesco Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global

  18. Processing of R-Ba-Cu-O superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H.

    1998-02-23

    Precipitation processes were developed to introduce second phases as flux pinning centers in Gd-Ba-Cu-O and Nd-Ba-Cu-O superconductors. In Gd-Ba-Cu-O, precipitation is caused by the decrease of the upper solubility limit of Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} solid solution (Gd123ss) in low oxygen partial pressure. Processing of supersaturated Gd{sub 1.2}Ba{sub 1.8}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} in low oxygen partial pressure can produce dispersed second phases. Gd211 is formed as a separate phase while extensive Gd124 type stacking fault is formed instead of a separate CuO phase. As a result of the precipitation reaction, the transition temperature and critical current density are increased. In Nd-Ba-Cu-O, precipitation is caused by the decrease of the lower solubility limit of Nd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} solid solution (Nd123ss) in oxygen. DTA results reveal the relative stability of Nd123ss in different oxygen partial pressures. In 1 bar oxygen partial pressure, Nd123ss with x = 0.1 is the most stable phase. In lower oxygen partial pressures, the most stable composition shifts towards the stoichiometric composition. The relative stability changes faster with decreasing oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, processing in oxygen and air tends to produce broad superconducting transitions but sharp transitions can be achieved in 0.01 bar and 0.001 bar oxygen partial pressures. While the lower solubility limits in 0.01 bar and 0.001 bar oxygen partial pressures remain at x = 0.00, the solubility limits in oxygen and air show a narrowing with decreasing temperature. Because of the narrowing of the solubility range in oxygen, oxygen annealing of Nd123 initially processed in low oxygen partial pressures will result in precipitation of second phases. The equilibrium second phase is BaCuO{sub 2} for temperature above 608 C, and at lower temperatures the equilibrium second phases are Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 3.3} and Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 5+y}. However, annealing at

  19. Observation of excited states in /sup 128/Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Zhi-zheng; Guo Ying-xiang; Pan Zong-you; Xiao Jian-min; Lei Xiang-guo; Liu Hong-ye; Sun Xi-jun

    1987-01-01

    Excited states in /sup 128/Ba have been investigated via the /sup 120/Sn (/sup 12/C, 4n..gamma..) /sup 128/Ba reaction by means of in-beam gamma spectroscopy. A 12/sup +/ state other than the previously reported one is observed according to the properties of the 935.0 keV ..gamma..-ray. It does not belong to the ground-state band. Two new interband transitions, 224.8 keV and 632.7 keV, are observed and assigned to sidefeeding between the negative-parity band and ground-state band.

  20. Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid You are ...

  1. Searches for Light New Physics at BaBar (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Searches for Light New Physics at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Searches for Light New Physics at BaBar Authors: ...

  2. Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment You are ...

  3. Electric control of magnetism at the Fe/BaTiO3 interface (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface Interfacial ...

  4. Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using ...

  5. Electric control of magnetism at the Fe/BaTiO3 interface (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface You are accessing a ...

  6. Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle You are accessing a document from the ...

  7. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops & Summer Schools Summer Students Structural Molecular Biology Illuminating ... major experimental driver for structural biology research, serving the needs of a large ...

  8. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work ...

  9. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells, viruses), plant or soil samples (USDA quarantines), recombinant DNA, or blood-borne pathogen. Biological Use Authorization The great majority of biological work at...

  10. Structural phase transitions in BaPrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saines, Paul J.; Kennedy, Brendan J. Smith, Ronald I.

    2009-04-02

    The crystal structures adopted by BaPrO{sub 3} at and above ambient temperature have been examined using a combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction. BaPrO{sub 3} has been established to undergo a series of phase transitions from Pbnmorthorhombic{yields}Ibmmorthorhombic{yields}R3-bar crhombohedral{yields}Pm3-barm cubic. BaPrO{sub 3} is the second A{sup 2+}B{sup 4+}O{sub 3} perovskite found to adopt rhombohedral symmetry in preference to the I4/mcm tetragonal structure. Analysis of the octahedral tilting through the rhombohedral to cubic phase transition indicates that this transformation is continuous and tricritical in nature. The tricritical behaviour of this transition is likely to be a result of the competition between tetragonal and rhombohedral structures to be the preferred phase, with the rhombohedral symmetry adopted by BaPrO{sub 3} being stabilised by the unusually large B-site cation.

  11. Biological conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  12. Hysteretic electrical transport in BaTiO{sub 3}/Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3}/Ge heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngai, J. H.; Kumah, D. P.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.

    2014-02-10

    We present electrical transport measurements of heterostructures comprised of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} epitaxially grown on Ge. Sr alloying imparts compressive strain to the BaTiO{sub 3}, which enables the thermal expansion mismatch between BaTiO{sub 3} and Ge to be overcome to achieve c-axis oriented growth. The conduction bands of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} are nearly aligned with the conduction band of Ge, which facilitates electron transport. Electrical transport measurements through the dielectric stack exhibit rectifying behavior and hysteresis, where the latter is consistent with ferroelectric switching.

  13. Quarkonium Spectroscopy and New States from BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, L.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2007-06-08

    We review results on charmonium and bottomonium spectroscopy by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. More space is reserved to the new results like the observation of hadronic non-B{bar B} {Upsilon}(4S) decays and the investigation on the production and decay properties of the recently discovered charmonium-like states X(3872) and Y (4260). These results are preliminary, unless otherwise specified.

  14. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Biology Group hosted a 3-day comprehensive workshop on the use of non-crystalline small-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques in structural biology research. ...

  15. Structural and chemical characterization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagar, K.; Recnik, A.; Sturm, S.; Gajovic, A.; Ceh, M.

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized with EPD into AAO templates. {yields} Nanorods are composed of crystalline, nanosized grains with pseudo-cubic structure. {yields} Integrowth of hexagonal BaTiO{sub 3} polymorph within pseudo-cubic structure was observed. -- Abstract: An electron-microscopy investigation was performed on BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods that were processed by sol-gel electrophoretic deposition (EPD) into anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods grown within the template membranes had diameters ranging from 150 to 200 nm, with an average length of 10-50 {mu}m. By using various electron-microscopy techniques we showed that the processed BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were homogeneous in their chemical composition. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were always polycrystalline and were composed of well-crystallized, defect-free, pseudo-cubic BaTiO{sub 3} grains, ranging from 10 to 30 nm. No intergranular phases were observed between the BaTiO{sub 3} grains. A low-temperature hexagonal polymorph that is coherently intergrown with the BaTiO{sub 3} perovskite matrix was also observed as a minor phase. When annealing the AAO templates containing the BaTiO{sub 3} sol in an oxygen atmosphere the presence of the hexagonal polymorph was diminished.

  16. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaO/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Mei, Donghai; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Weaver, Jason F.; Szanyi, Janos

    2010-12-02

    The formation of adsorbed O (Oad) species and their reactivities in CO oxidation on BaO/Pt(111) (at two BaO coverages) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), infrared reflection absorption (IRA) and X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies. In neither of these two systems was the Pt(111) surface completely covered with BaO. On the system with lower BaO coverage (~45 % of the Pt(111) surface is covered by BaO), two different Oad species form following the adsorption of O2 at 300 K: O adsorbed on BaO-free Pt(111) sites (OPt) and at the Pt-BaO interface (Oint). On the system with higher BaO coverage (~60 % of the Pt(111) surface is covered by BaO), two types of Oint are seen at the Pt-BaO interface. The desorption of OPt from the BaO-free portion of the Pt(111) surface gives an O2 desorption peak with a maximum desorption rate at ~690 K. Migration of Oint to the Pt(111) sites and their recombinative desorption give two explosive desorption features at ~760 and ~790 K in the TPD spectrum. The reactivities of these Oad species with CO to form CO2 follow their sequence of desorption; i.e., the OPt associated with the BaO-free Pt(111) surface, which desorbs at 690 K, reacts first with CO, followed by the Oint species at the Pt-BaO interface (first the one that desorbs at ~760 K and finally the one that is bound the most strongly to the interface, and desorbs at ~790 K). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  17. Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion Kahuku Wind Power, LLC, Construction of the Kahuku Wind Power Facility in Kahuku, O'ahu, Hawaii Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion (4.75 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1726: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1374: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions

  18. Water adsorption induced in-plane domain switching on BaTiO{sub 3} surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Wang, B. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study, the influences of the adsorption of water molecules on the changes in the atomic and electric structures of BaTiO{sub 3} surface were investigated using ab initio calculation. Water molecules are molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface, which makes electrons transfer from water molecules to the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. The redistribution of electrons in the BaTiO{sub 3} surface layers weakens the Ba-O interactions and strengthens the Ti-O interactions, so that the Ti atom shifts in TiO{sub 2} plane, i.e., an in-plane domain switching. The adsorption of water molecules on BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces also results in a reduction in the surface rumpling.

  19. Inter-atomic force constants of BaF{sub 2} by diffuse neutron scattering measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakuma, Takashi Makhsun,; Sakai, Ryutaro; Xianglian; Takahashi, Haruyuki; Basar, Khairul; Igawa, Naoki; Danilkin, Sergey A.

    2015-04-16

    Diffuse neutron scattering measurement on BaF{sub 2} crystals was performed at 10?K and 295?K. Oscillatory form in the diffuse scattering intensity of BaF{sub 2} was observed at 295?K. The correlation effects among thermal displacements of F-F atoms were obtained from the analysis of oscillatory diffuse scattering intensity. The force constants among neighboring atoms in BaF{sub 2} were determined and compared to those in ionic crystals and semiconductors.

  20. Ba{sub 2}TeO: A new layered oxytelluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen, J.B.; Tokumoto, T.D.; McGill, S.A.; Singh, D.J.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-02-15

    Single crystals of the new semiconducting oxytelluride phase, Ba{sub 2}TeO, were synthesized from barium oxide powder and elemental tellurium in a molten barium metal flux. Ba{sub 2}TeO crystallizes in tetragonal symmetry with space group P4/nmm (#129), a=5.0337(1) Å, c=9.9437(4) Å, Z=2. The crystals were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction, heat capacity and optical measurements. The optical measurements along with electronic band structure calculations indicate semiconductor behavior with a band gap of 2.93 eV. Resistivity measurements show that Ba{sub 2}TeO is highly insulating. - Graphical abstract: Starting from a simple stacking of rocksalt layers, the final structure of Ba{sub 2}TeO can be obtained by accommodation of structural strain via atom displacements. Density of states calculations and optical absorbance measurements show that Ba{sub 2}TeO has a band gap of 2.93 eV, indicative of semiconductor behavior. - Highlights: • Single crystal synthesis of a new layered oxytelluride, Ba{sub 2}TeO. • The structure features inverse PbO-type BaO layers and NaCl-type BaTe layers. • Optical absorbance show Ba{sub 2}TeO to be a semiconductor with a 2.93 eV gap. • Density of states indicate a small hybridization between Te 5p and Ba 5d states. • The BaTe (BaO) layers dominate the heat capacity at low (high) temperatures.

  1. Method of forming superconducting Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessels, Bruce W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Richeson, Darrin S.; Tonge, Lauren M.; Zhang, Jiming

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming a superconducting Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O film is disclosed, which comprises depositing a Ba-Ca-Cu-O film on a substrate by MOCVD, annealing the deposited film and heat-treating the annealed film in a closed circular vessel with TlBa.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x and cooling to form said superconducting film of TlO.sub.m Ba.sub.2 Ca.sub.n-1 Cu.sub.n O.sub.2n+2, wherein m=1,2 and n=1,2,3.

  2. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  3. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  4. A A S BA IMPORTANT ISSUES W BOOK TWO O

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    i * A * A S BA IMPORTANT ISSUES W BOOK TWO O * - U.S. Department of Energy, Transition 2008 - HOT Issue Papers Section 1 - Energy 1-1 Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * CCS could be developed and accelerated to meet aggressive C02 emissions goals. This strategy includes FutureGen and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). * July 2009 - Select CCPI recipients (closes 1/15/09) * December 2009 - Award FutureGen based on a December 2008 selection 1-2 Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Partnership

  5. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Contact Us Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Kirsten McCabe Emerging Threats Program Manager Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We

  6. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically modified the organisms to harvest light more efficiently for maximum production. Overview of Research and Highlights Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using their renowned expertise in genomics, computation, and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. Systems

  7. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  8. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  9. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  10. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and ...

  11. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  12. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  13. Biological sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  14. Direct spectroscopic evidence for completely filled Cu 3d shell in BaCu₂As₂ and α – BaCu₂Sb₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, S. F.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Nie, S. M.; Miao, H.; Xu, N.; Qian, T.; Saparov, B.; Fang, Z.; Biermann, S.; et al

    2015-06-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to extract the band dispersion and the Fermi surface of BaCu₂As₂ and α - BaCu₂Sb₂. While the Cu 3d bands in both materials are located around 3.5 eV below the Fermi level, the low-energy photoemission intensity mainly comes from As 4p states, suggesting a completely filled Cu 3d shell. The splitting of the As 3d core levels and the lack of pronounced three-dimensionality in the measured band structure of BaCu₂As₂ indicate a surface state likely induced by the cleavage of this material in the collapsed tetragonal phase, which is consistent with our observation of amore » Cu⁺¹ oxidation state. However, the observation of Cu states at similar energy in α - BaCu₂Sb₂ without the pnictide-pnictide interlayer bonding characteristic of the collapsed tetragonal phase suggests that the short interlayer distance in BaCu₂As₂ follows from the stability of the Cu⁺¹ rather than the other way around. Our results confirm the prediction that BaCu₂As₂ is an sp metal with weak electronic correlations.« less

  15. Dipole strength distributions in the stable Ba isotopes {sup 134-138}Ba: A study in the mass region of a nuclear shape transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheck, M.; Garrel, H. von; Belic, D.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H.H.; Stedile, F.; Tsoneva, N.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Stoyanov, C.

    2004-10-01

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions in the odd-mass isotopes {sup 135,137}Ba were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end point energies of 4.1, 3.1, and 2.5 MeV. Numerous excited states, most of them unknown so far, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The results for {sup 137}Ba are compared with calculations in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Model. The new data for {sup 135,137}Ba complete the systematics of low-lying dipole excitations as observed for the even Ba isotopes {sup 134,136,138}Ba in previous NRF experiments in Stuttgart. The complete systematics within the Ba isotopic chain, exhibiting a nuclear shape transition, is discussed with respect to E1 two-phonon excitations, M1 scissors mode excitations, and in regard to the new critical point symmetries.

  16. Direct spectroscopic evidence for completely filled Cu 3d shell in BaCu₂As₂ and α – BaCu₂Sb₂

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S. F.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Nie, S. M.; Miao, H.; Xu, N.; Qian, T.; Saparov, B.; Fang, Z.; Biermann, S.; Sefat, Athena S.; Ding, H.

    2015-06-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to extract the band dispersion and the Fermi surface of BaCu₂As₂ and α - BaCu₂Sb₂. While the Cu 3d bands in both materials are located around 3.5 eV below the Fermi level, the low-energy photoemission intensity mainly comes from As 4p states, suggesting a completely filled Cu 3d shell. The splitting of the As 3d core levels and the lack of pronounced three-dimensionality in the measured band structure of BaCu₂As₂ indicate a surface state likely induced by the cleavage of this material in the collapsed tetragonal phase, which is consistent with our observation of a Cu⁺¹ oxidation state. However, the observation of Cu states at similar energy in α - BaCu₂Sb₂ without the pnictide-pnictide interlayer bonding characteristic of the collapsed tetragonal phase suggests that the short interlayer distance in BaCu₂As₂ follows from the stability of the Cu⁺¹ rather than the other way around. Our results confirm the prediction that BaCu₂As₂ is an sp metal with weak electronic correlations.

  17. Submillimeter and microwave residual losses in epitaxial films of Y-Ba-Cu-O and Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Richards, P.L.; Garrison, S.M.; Newman, N.; Eom, C.B.; Geballe, T.H.; Etemad, S.; Inam, A.; Venkatesan, T.; Martens, J.S.; Lee, W.Y.; Bourne, L.C.

    1992-03-01

    We have used a novel bolometric technique and a resonant technique to obtain accurate submillimeter and microwave residual loss data for epitaxial thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} and Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. For all films we obtain good agreement between the submillimeter and microwave data, with the residual losses in both the Y-Ba-Cu-O and Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films scaling approximately as frequency squared below {approximately} 1 THz. We are able to fit the losses in the Y-Ba-Cu-O films to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity, in good agreement with results from a Kramers-Kronig analysis of the loss data. We observe strong phonon structure in the Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films for frequencies between 2 and 21 THz, and are unable to fit these losses to the simple weakly coupled grain model. This is in strong contrast to the case for other high {Tc} superconductors such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, where phonon structure observed in ceramic samples is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of the electronic screening due to the high conductivity of the a-b planes.

  18. Phonon properties of BaFe?X? (X=S, Se) spin ladder compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Popovicq, Z. V.; Petrovic, C.; Scepanovic, M.; Lazarevic, N.; Opacic, M.; Radonjic, M. M.; Tanaskovic, D.; Lei, Hechang

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by themorelattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.less

  19. Nanocrystalline BaTiO3 powder via ambient conditions sol process (Prop.2001-071)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payzant, E Andrew; Wang, X.; Hu, Michael Z.; Blom, Douglas Allen

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} particles have been prepared by ambient condition sol (ACS) process starting from soluble precursors of barium and titanium yielding a mixed oxide/hydroxide gel. The gel was peptized and crystallized in water under a refluxing condition. Higher initial pH and Ba/Ti ratio led to smaller crystallite sizes of BaTiO{sub 3} powders. Organic mineralizer, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), can adsorb on the BaTiO{sub 3} nuclei and inhibited further growth of the particles. Adding a polymer during BaTiO{sub 3} synthesis led to a smaller particle size and increased redispersibility of the particles in water.

  20. Biological and Chemical Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitch, P J

    2002-12-19

    The LLNL Chemical & Biological National Security Program (CBNP) provides science, technology and integrated systems for chemical and biological security. Our approach is to develop and field advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical or biological weapons. Recent events show the importance of civilian defense against terrorism. The 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo's subway served to catalyze and focus the early LLNL program on civilian counter terrorism. In the same year, LLNL began CBNP using Laboratory-Directed R&D investments and a focus on biodetection. The Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act, passed in 1996, initiated a number of U.S. nonproliferation and counter-terrorism programs including the DOE (now NNSA) Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (also known as CBNP). In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was formed. The NNSA CBNP and many of the LLNL CBNP activities are being transferred as the new Department becomes operational. LLNL has a long history in national security including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In biology, LLNL had a key role in starting and implementing the Human Genome Project and, more recently, the Microbial Genome Program. LLNL has over 1,000 scientists and engineers with relevant expertise in biology, chemistry, decontamination, instrumentation, microtechnologies, atmospheric modeling, and field experimentation. Over 150 LLNL scientists and engineers work full time on chemical and biological national security projects.

  1. Catalytic decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Weaver, Jason F.; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-04-07

    The decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 formed on BaO/Pt(111) (Pt(111) surface is partially covered by BaO) in the presence of CO was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), infrared reflection absorption (IRA) and X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies. The exposure of BaO/Pt(111) to elevated NO2 pressure (1.0×10-4 Torr) at 450 K leads to the formation of Ba(NO3)2, chemisorbed O (OPt) and Pt-oxide-like domains. During TPD, the Ba(NO3)2 begins to thermally decompose near 490 K, releasing NO and NO2 with the maximum NOx desorption rate seen at 605 K. The OPt species formed following the exposure of BaO/Pt(111) to NO2 react with CO to release CO2 at 450 K. The consumption of OPt during CO oxidation initiates the migration of O from the Pt-oxide-like domains to the chemisorbed phase, where the CO oxidation reaction occurs. Therefore, the removal of OPt by CO leads to the reduction of oxidized Pt, and to the formation of metallic Pt(111) domains, where, subsequently, catalytic decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 can take place. The Pt-catalyzed decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 occurs readily at 450 K, a temperature much lower than the onset of the decomposition temperature of Ba(NO3)2 in the presence of oxidized Pt. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  3. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  4. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  5. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Science Biological Science The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a mosquito, its primary host. Although five different species of Plasmodium can cause malaria, Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe disease. | Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons. <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/malaria-researchers-find-weakness-global-killer">Read more</a> The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a

  6. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological and Environmental Research Biological and Environmental Research Understanding how genomic information is translated to functional capabilities, and the roles of Earth's biogeochemical systems so we can predict climate decades or centuries into the future. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske (505) 665-4800 Email James Bossert (505) 667-3644 Email Manvendra Dubey (505) 665-3128 Email Kim Nitschke (505) 667-1186 Email Phil Jones (505) 667-6387 Email Cathy Wilson (505) 667-0202 Email Conducting

  7. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  8. Green Biologics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biologics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Biologics Place: Oxfordshire, United Kingdom Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: Oxfordshire-based industrial biotech...

  9. Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment 2010 (FRA 2010) covers all seven thematic elements of sustainable forest management: Extent of forest resources Forest biological diversity Forest health and...

  10. Y-Ba-Cu-O films prepared by a paint-on method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, I.; Qiu, C.X.

    1988-02-29

    Polycrystalline films of Y-Ba-Cu-O with a thickness of about 20--40 ..mu..m have been prepared on alumina substrates using a paint-on method. The liquid source used was obtained by mixing powder of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BaCO/sub 3/, and CuO in liquid triethanolamine. Several Y-Ba-Cu-O films with an onset temperature of about 100 K and a zero resistance temperature of 85 K have been obtained after a short heat treatment at 1000 /sup 0/C in flowing O/sub 2/.

  11. OTEC environmental biological oceanographic program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, E.O.

    1981-07-01

    One of the major goals of the OTEC biological field measurement program is to assess the effect of OTEC operations on the environment. Prior understanding of the natural variability of the tropical oceanic plankton community is the most important method for determining changes due to operation of an OTEC plant. The spatial and temporal patterns of the plankton community in terms of absolute number, biomass and species composition have been investigated at potential OTEC sites. Considerable data exist which document the changes with depth of all three measurements. Diel fluctuations in number and species composition have been studied at one site. While horizontal and seasonal patterns of variability likely exist at all sites, they are subtle and remain somewhat unclear. Attempts are now being made to determine the overall trophic structure of the plankton community at these sites using these data, gut content analysis, and information already in the literature.

  12. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  13. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Suffian N. [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-11-27

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity. We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22210 m Jm?2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundariesmaking a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower assessed ordered moments from longer spatial and/or time averaging and should be considered directly.

  14. Observation in BaBar of a Narrow Resonance in the D{sub s} pi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Dsub s pisup 0 System at 2317 MeVcsup 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation in BaBar of a Narrow Resonance in the Dsub s pisup 0 System at ...

  15. Ba2TeO as an optoelectronic material: First-principles study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Jifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2015-05-21

    The band structure, optical and defects properties of Ba2TeO are systematically investigated using density functional theory with a view to understanding its potential as an optoelectronic or transparent conducting material. Ba2TeO crystallizes with tetragonal structure (space group P4/nmm) and with a 2.93 eV optical band gap1. We find relatively modest band masses for both electrons and holes suggesting applications. Optical properties show a infrared-red absorption when doped. This could potentially be useful for combining wavelength filtering and transparent conducting functions. Furthermore, our defect calculations show that Ba2TeO is intrinsically p-type conducting under Ba-poor condition. However, the spontaneous formation of themore » donor defects may constrain the p-type transport properties and would need to be addressed to enable applications.« less

  16. Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the$\\gamma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...to pi0 Transition Form Factor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the gammagamma*to pi0 ...

  17. Thickness dependence of hydrogen permeability for Ni-BaCe{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Thickness dependence of hydrogen permeability for Ni-BaCesub 0.8Ysub 0.2Osub 3-delta. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thickness dependence of ...

  18. Ba{sub 2}TeO as an optoelectronic material: First-principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J.; Siegrist, Theo

    2015-05-21

    The band structure, optical, and defects properties of Ba{sub 2}TeO are systematically investigated using density functional theory with a view to understanding its potential as an optoelectronic or transparent conducting material. Ba{sub 2}TeO crystallizes with tetragonal structure (space group P4/nmm) and with a 2.93 eV optical bandgap [Besara et al., J. Solid State Chem. 222, 60 (2015)]. We find relatively modest band masses for both electrons and holes suggesting applications. Optical properties show infrared-red absorption when doped. This could potentially be useful for combining wavelength filtering and transparent conducting functions. Furthermore, our defect calculations show that Ba{sub 2}TeO is intrinsically p-type conducting under Ba-poor condition. However, the spontaneous formation of the donor defects may constrain the p-type transport properties and would need to be addressed to enable applications.

  19. Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba( Fe 1 - x M x ) 2 As...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba( Fe 1 - x M x ) 2 As 2 ( M Co ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials ...

  20. Morphology and Composition cycle of BaO/Al2O3 NSR Catalysts during...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    spectroscopy and microscopy study Morphology and Composition cycle of BaOAl2O3 NSR Catalysts during NO2 Uptake and Release: A multi spectroscopy and microscopy study 2005 Diesel ...

  1. The U5+ compound Ba9Ag10U4S24: Synthesis, structure, and electronic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The U5+ compound Ba9Ag10U4S24: Synthesis, structure, and electronic properties This ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud ...

  2. Building America Team (BA-PIRC) - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy BA-PIRC) - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building America Team (BA-PIRC) - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Eric Martin, Florida Solar Energy Center Building America research projects develop and demonstrate market-ready building solutions that improve the energy efficiency of new and existing homes, increasing comfort, health, safety, and durability. When fully deployed, proven solutions will reduce building-related energy use in new and existing residential building stock by 30% and 25%,

  3. Crystallography and Physical Properties of BaCo2As2, Ba0.94K0.06Co2As2, and Ba0.78K0.22Co2As2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, V K; Quirinale, Dante G; Lee, Yongbin; Harmon, Bruce N; Furukawa, Yuji; Ogloblichev, V V; Huq, A; Abernathy, D L; Stephens, P W; McQueeney, Robert J; Kreyssig, Aandreas; Goldman, Alan I; Johnston, David C

    2014-08-01

    The crystallographic and physical properties of polycrystalline and single crystal samples of BaCo2As2 and K-doped Ba{1-x}K{x}Co2As2 (x = 0.06, 0.22) are investigated by x-ray and neutron powder diffraction, magnetic susceptibility chi, magnetization, heat capacity Cp, {75}As NMR and electrical resistivity rho measurements versus temperature T. The crystals were grown using both Sn flux and CoAs self-flux, where the Sn-grown crystals contain 1.6-2.0 mol% Sn. All samples crystallize in the tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm). For BaCo2As2, powder neutron diffraction data show that the c-axis lattice parameter exhibits anomalous negative thermal expansion from 10 to 300 K, whereas the a-axis lattice parameter and the unit cell volume show normal positive thermal expansion over this T range. No transitions in BaCo2As2 were found in this T range from any of the measurements. Below 40-50 K, we find rho ~ T^2 indicating a Fermi liquid ground state. A large density of states at the Fermi energy D(EF) ~ 18 states/(eV f.u.) for both spin directions is found from low-T Cp(T) measurements, whereas the band structure calculations give D(EF) = 8.23 states/(eV f.u.). The {75}As NMR shift data versus T have the same T dependence as the chi(T) data, demonstrating that the derived chi(T) data are intrinsic. The observed {75}As nuclear spin dynamics are consistent with the presence of ferromagnetic and/or stripe-type antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations. The crystals of Ba{0.78}K{0.22}Co2As2 were grown in Sn flux and show properties very similar to those of undoped BaCo2As2. On the other hand, the crystals from two batches of Ba{0.94}K{0.06}Co2As2 grown in CoAs self-flux show evidence of weak ferromagnetism at T < 10 K with small ordered moments at 1.8 K of 0.007 and 0.03 muB per formula unit, respectively.

  4. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchn, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ ? 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two ?-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via ?-decay, the J? = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keV in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.

  5. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ → 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two γ-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via β-decay, the Jπ = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keVmore » in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.« less

  6. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  7. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  8. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K.

    1992-01-01

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  9. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K.

    1992-12-31

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  10. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of CaTiO3, SrTiO3, BaTiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Infrared spectroscopy of CaTiO3, SrTiO3, BaTiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 thin films, and (BaTiO3)5(SrTiO3)5 superlattice grown on SrRuO3SrTiO3(001) substrates Citation Details In-Document ...

  12. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  13. Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of The Biological and

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Environmental Research Advisory Committee | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of The Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Current BERAC Charges Archive of BERAC Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Charges/Reports Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of

  14. Work Function Reduction by BaO: Growth of Crystalline Barium Oxide on Ag(001) and Ag(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droubay, Timothy C.; Kong, Lingmei; Chambers, Scott A.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-02-01

    Ultrathin films of barium oxide were grown on Ag(001) and Ag(111) using the evaporation of Ba metal in an O2 atmosphere by molecular beam epitaxy. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy reveals that films consisting of predominantly BaO or BaO2 result in Ag(001) work function reductions of 1.74 eV and 0.64 eV, respectively. On the Ag(001) surface, Ba oxide growth is initiated by two-dimensional nucleation of epitaxial BaO, followed by a transition to three-dimensional dual-phase nucleation of epitaxial BaO and BaO2. Three-dimensional islands of primarily BaO2(111) nucleate epitaxially on the Ag(111) substrate leaving large patches of Ag uncovered. We find no indication of chemical reaction or charge transfer between the films and the Ag substrates. These data suggest that the origin of the observed work function reduction is largely due to a combination of BaO surface relaxation and an electrostatic compressive effect.

  15. Abengoa Mojave Final Biological Opinion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Opinion on Mojave Solar, LLC's Mojave Solar Project, San Bernardino County, California (8-8-11-F-3)

  16. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M.; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.

    2007-11-01

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  17. Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Kovarik, Libor; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry

    2014-08-07

    Radionuclide 137Cs is one of the major fission products that dominate heat generation in spent fuels over the first 300 hundred years. A durable waste form for 137Cs that decays to 137Ba is needed to minimize its environmental impact. Aluminosilicate pollucite CsAlSi2O6 is selected as a model waste form to study the decay-induced structural effects. While Ba-containing precipitates are not present in charge-balanced Cs0.9Ba0.05AlSi2O6, they are found in Cs0.9Ba0.1AlSi2O6 and identified as monoclinic Ba2Si3O8. Pollucite is susceptible to electron irradiation induced amorphization. The threshold density of the electronic energy deposition for amorphization is determined to be ~235 keV/nm3. Pollucite can be readily amorphized under F+ ion irradiation at 673 K. A significant amount of Cs diffusion and release from the amorphized pollucite is observed during the irradiation. However, cesium is immobile in the crystalline structure under He+ ion irradiation at room temperature. The critical temperature for amorphization is not higher than 873 K under F+ ion irradiation. If kept at or above 873 K all the time, the pollucite structure is unlikely to be amorphized; Cs diffusion and release are improbable. A general discussion regarding pollucite as a potential waste form is provided in this report.

  18. Hybrid molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, Abhinav Dewey, John; Yun, Hwanhui; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jalan, Bharat

    2015-11-15

    Owing to its high room-temperature electron mobility and wide bandgap, BaSnO{sub 3} has recently become of significant interest for potential room-temperature oxide electronics. A hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach for the growth of high-quality BaSnO{sub 3} films is developed in this work. This approach employs hexamethylditin as a chemical precursor for tin, an effusion cell for barium, and a radio frequency plasma source for oxygen. BaSnO{sub 3} films were thus grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) and LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrates. Growth conditions for stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3} were identified. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations, characteristic of a layer-by-layer growth mode were observed. A critical thickness of ∼1 nm for strain relaxation was determined for films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} using in situ RHEED. Scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirmed the cube-on-cube epitaxy and composition. The importance of precursor chemistry is discussed in the context of the MBE growth of BaSnO{sub 3}.

  19. Lattice dynamics of BaFe2X3(X=S,Se) compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Popović, Z. V.; Šćepanović, M.; Lazarević, N.; Opačić, M.; Radonjić, M. M.; Tanasković, D.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe₂X₃ (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe₂S₃ (BaFe₂Se₃) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe₂S(Se)₃ is supported by themore » lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe₂Se₃ below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.« less

  20. Significant increase of Curie temperature in nano-scale BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yueliang; Liao, Zhenyu; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Longtu

    2014-11-03

    The low Curie temperature (T{sub c}?=?130?C) of bulk BaTiO{sub 3} greatly limits its applications. In this work, the phase structures of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 2.5?nm to 10?nm were studied at various temperatures by using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with an in-situ heating holder. The results implied that each BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticle was composed of different phases, and the ferroelectric ones were observed in the shells due to the complicated surface structure. The ferroelectric phases in BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles remained at 600?C, suggesting a significant increase of T{sub c}. Based on the in-situ TEM results and the data reported by others, temperature-size phase diagrams for BaTiO{sub 3} particles and ceramics were proposed, showing that the phase transition became diffused and the T{sub c} obviously increased with decreasing size. The present work sheds light on the design and fabrication of advanced devices for high temperature applications.

  1. Investigation of the {sup 128}Ba nucleus with the (p,t) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pascu, S.; Cata-Danil, Gh.; Bucurescu, D.; Marginean, N.; Zamfir, N. V.; Graw, G.; Gollwitzer, A.; Hofer, D.; Valnion, B. D.

    2009-06-15

    The low lying states in {sup 128}Ba have been investigated for the first time with the {sup 130}Ba(p,t){sup 128}Ba reaction. The experiment was performed at the Munich Q3D magnetic spectrograph with a 25-MeV proton beam and a high-resolution, 1.5-m-long focal plane detector. As a result of this experiment 27 excited levels with energies below 3.7 MeV have been observed for the first time, significantly increasing (by {approx}50%) the number of levels observed in {sup 128}Ba. Angular distributions of tritons were measured and their comparison with the distorted wave Born approximation calculation allowed in most cases spin and parity assignments for the nuclear levels. The experimental two-neutron transition strengths with transferred angular momentum L=0 and 2 are compared with the predictions of the IBA-1 model with a new set of parameters. The results indicate for the first time from a hadronic probe perspective a transitional structure close to the O(6) symmetry for the {sup 128}Ba nucleus, confirming previous conclusions of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy studies.

  2. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  3. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  4. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Greater Prairie-Chickens | Department of Energy Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens This report summarizes the results of a seven-year, DOE-funded research project, conducted by researchers from Kansas State University and the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative, to assess the effects of wind energy development in

  5. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  6. Ba2TeO: A new layered oxytelluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen, J. B.; Tokumoto, T. D.; McGill, S. A.; Singh, D. J.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-02-01

    For single crystals of the new semiconducting oxytelluride phase, Ba2TeO, we synthesized from barium oxide powder and elemental tellurium in a molten barium metal flux. Ba2TeO crystallizes in tetragonal symmetry with space group P4/nmm (#129), a=5.0337(1) Å, c=9.9437(4) Å, Z=2. The crystals were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction, heat capacity and optical measurements. Moreover, the optical measurements along with electronic band structure calculations indicate semiconductor behavior with a band gap of 2.93 eV. Resistivity measurements show that Ba2TeO is highly insulating.

  7. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  8. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen ...

  9. Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control and Biological Safety at the Los Alamos National Laboratory - December 2015 | Department of Energy Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control and Biological Safety at the Los Alamos National Laboratory - December 2015 Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control and Biological Safety at the Los Alamos National Laboratory - December 2015 December 2015 Review of Work Planning and Control and Biological Safety at the

  10. Spin-driven multiferroics in BaYFeO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cong, Jun-Zhuang; Shen, Shi-Peng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Yan, Li-Qin; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Sun, Young

    2015-05-07

    We report on the spin-driven multiferroic property and magnetoelectric effect in the lately synthesized compound BaYFeO{sub 4}. Due to its peculiar crystal structure, the system exhibits complex magnetic phases with multiple transitions. The dielectric and pyroelectric measurements evidence a spin-driven multiferroic state raised by the cycloidal spin structure below T{sub 1} = 36 K. Strong magnetoelectric effect has also been observed in the multiferroic state. The origin of noncollinear cycloidal spin structure in BaYFeO{sub 4} is believed to arise from the interactions between low-dimensional magnetic columns.

  11. Crystal structures and phase transitions in Ba{sub 2}HoTaO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, Brendan J. Saines, Paul J.; Kubota, Yoshiki; Minakata, Chiharu; Hano, Hiroko; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki

    2007-11-06

    The structure of the cation-ordered double perovskite Ba{sub 2}HoTaO{sub 6} was examined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction at fine temperature intervals over the range of 90-300 K. Ba{sub 2}HoTaO{sub 6} has a cubic structure in space group Fm3-barm at room temperature. A proper ferroelastic phase transition to I4/m tetragonal symmetry occurs near approximately 260 K. Analysis of the spontaneous tetragonal strain versus temperature indicated that the phase transition is second order in nature.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of hollow mesoporous BaFe12O19 spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Park, J; Hong, YK; Lane, AM

    2015-02-01

    A facile method is reported to synthesize hollow mesoporous BaFe12O19 spheres using a template-free chemical etching process. Hollow BaFe12O19 spheres were synthesized by conventional spray pyrolysis. The mesoporous structure is achieved by alkaline ethylene glycol etching at 185 degrees C, with the porosity controlled by the heating time. The hollow porous structure is confirmed by SEM, TEM, and FIB-FESEM characterization. The crystal structure and magnetic properties are not significantly affected after the chemical etching process. The formation mechanism of the porous structure is explained by grain boundary etching. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electron-hole asymmetry, Dirac fermions, and quantum magnetoresistance in BaMnBi2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Lijun; Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Wang, Limin; Wang, Aifeng; Petrovic, C.

    2016-03-28

    Here, we report two-dimensional quantum transport and Dirac fermions in BaMnBi2 single crystals. BaMnBi2 is a layered bad metal with highly anisotropic conductivity and magnetic order below 290 K. Magnetotransport properties, nonzero Berry phase, small cyclotron mass, and the first-principles band structure calculations indicate the presence of Dirac fermions in Bi square nets. Quantum oscillations in the Hall channel suggest the presence of both electron and hole pockets, whereas Dirac and parabolic states coexist at the Fermi level.

  14. The luminescence of BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles upon high-energy excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Halyatkin, O. O.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Mitina, N. E.; Zaichenko, A. S.; Rodnyi, P. A.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Gektin, A. V.

    2014-08-07

    The dependence of X-ray excited luminescence intensity on BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size was studied. A sharp decrease of self-trapped exciton luminescence intensity was observed when the nanoparticle size is less than 80?nm. The main mechanism of the luminescence quenching is caused by the escape of electrons from the nanoparticles. Escape of electrons from nanoparticles is confirmed by the considerable increase of luminescence intensity of the polystyrene scintillator with embedded BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles comparing with pure polystyrene scintillator.

  15. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  16. Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba(Fe1 xMx)2As2 (M = Co...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba(Fe1 xMx)2As2 (M Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba(Fe1 xMx)2As2 (M ...

  17. Fermi surfaces and Phase Stability of Ba(Fe1-xMx))2As2 (M=Co...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermi surfaces and Phase Stability of Ba(Fe1-xMx))2As2 (MCo, Ni, Cu, Zn) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi surfaces and Phase Stability of Ba(Fe1-xMx))2As2 (MCo,...

  18. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-15

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6} and the ternary hexaborides Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6} (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB{sub 6} (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials.

  19. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Select Agents Inspection Report: IG-0681, Concerns Regarding a Non-Viable (Dead) "Anthrax Sport" Research Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Inspection ...

  20. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field ... Maxwell's equations show that electromagnetic radiation is generated when charged ...

  1. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Welcome to the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database The U.S. ... This database contains abstracts of research projects supported by the program. Work was ...

  2. Atomic and electronic structure of the ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3}/Ge(001) interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Kurt D.; Ponath, Patrick; Posadas, Agham B.; Demkov, Alexander A.; McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J.; Aoki, Toshihiro

    2014-06-16

    In this study, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of BaTiO{sub 3} on Ge(001) by molecular beam epitaxy using a thin Zintl template buffer layer. A combination of density functional theory, atomic-resolution electron microscopy and in situ photoemission spectroscopy is used to investigate the electronic properties and atomic structure of the BaTiO{sub 3}/Ge interface. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron micrographs reveal that the Ge(001) 2??1 surface reconstruction remains intact during the subsequent BaTiO{sub 3} growth, thereby enabling a choice to be made between several theoretically predicted interface structures. The measured valence band offset of 2.7?eV matches well with the theoretical value of 2.5?eV based on the model structure for an in-plane-polarized interface. The agreement between the calculated and measured band offsets, which are highly sensitive to the detailed atomic arrangement, indicates that the most likely BaTiO{sub 3}/Ge(001) interface structure has been identified.

  3. Synthesis and Structure Determination of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors LaAMnSnO6 (A = Sr Ba)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T Yang; T Perkisas; J Hadermann; M Croft; A Ignatov; M Greenblatt

    2011-12-31

    LaAMnSnO{sub 6} (A = Sr, Ba) have been synthesized by high temperature solid-state reactions under dynamic 1% H{sub 2}/Ar flow. Rietveld refinements on room temperature powder X-ray diffraction data indicate that LaSrMnSnO{sub 6} crystallizes in the GdFeO{sub 3}-structure, with space group Pnma and, combined with transmission electron microscopy, LaBaMnSnO{sub 6} in Imma. Both space groups are common in disordered double-perovskites. The Mn{sup 3+} and Sn{sup 4+} ions whose valence states were confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are completely disordered over the B-sites and the BO{sub 6} octahedra are slightly distorted. LaAMnSnO{sub 6} are ferromagnetic semiconductors with a T{sub C} = 83 K for the Sr- and 66 K for the Ba-compound. The title compounds, together with the previously reported LaCaMnSnO{sub 6} provide an interesting example of progression from Pnma to Imma as the tolerance factor increases. An analysis of the relationship between space group and tolerance factor for the series LaAMnMO{sub 6} (A = Ca, Sr, Ba; M = Sn, Ru) provides a better understanding of the symmetry determination for double perovskites.

  4. Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Control and Biological Safety at the Los Alamos National Laboratory - December 2015 Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control and ...

  5. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous

  6. Energy from biological processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This assessment responds to a request by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation for an evaluation of the energy potential of various sources of plant and animal matter (biomass). This report complements an earlier OTA report on the Application of Solar Technology to Today's Energy Needs in evaluating the major solar energy resources available to the United States. The findings also will serve as part of the material to be used in an upcoming OTA assessment of synthetic fuels for transportation. This volume presents analyses of prominent biomass issues, summaries of four biomass fuel cycles, a description of biomass' place in two plausible energy futures, and discussions of policy options for promoting energy from biomass. The four fuel cycles - wood, alcohol fuels, grasses and crop residues, and animal wastes - were chosen because of their near- to mid-term energy potential and because of the public interest in them. A second volume presents technical analyses of the resource base, conversion technologies, and end uses that provide a basis for the discussion in this volume. Also included in Volume II are various unconventional approaches to bioenergy production as well as the use of biomass to produce chemicals.

  7. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of the fully fluorinated compound 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Oliver; Wright, Adrian J.; Berry, Frank J.; Smith, Ronald I.; Slater, Peter R.

    2013-02-15

    The compound 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F (P6{sub 3}/mmc) was synthesised by the low temperature fluorination of 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d} using polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) as a fluorination agent. Structural characterisation by XRD and NPD suggests that the local positions of the oxygen and fluorine atoms vary with no evidence for ordering on the anion sites. This compound shows antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature with antiparallel alignment of the magnetic moments along the c-axis. The use of PVDF also allows the possibility of tuning the fluorine content in materials of composition 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d}F{sub y} to any value of 0BaFeO{sub 2}F. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the hexagonal perovskite phase 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d}F{sub y} were prepared via low temperature fluorination using PVDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A structural investigation of the compounds BaFeO{sub 2}F is presented in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This analysis suggests differences for the local coordination of O{sup 2-} and F{sup -} anions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-BaFeO{sub 2}F shows antiferromagnetic ordering at 300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic moments align parallel to the a-axis.

  8. Controlled synthesis and optical properties of BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} crystals via ethanol/water solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Qinghua; Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10039 ; Li, Zhi; Ma, Wangjing; Shi, Yao; Yang, Xinmin

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile and cost-effective approach for the controlled synthesis of BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} crystals is introduced. The structures and morphologies of the obtained products are affected by the amount of water and ethanol in the solvent mixtures. Highlights: ► Precipitation route for preparing BaFBr nano and micro crystals in water/ethanol solvent mixtures. ► Controlled growth of BaFBr nano crystals by tuning the volume ratio of Ethanol/water. ► Luminescence properties after annealing at 200 °C are investigated. ► Short lifetimes of photoluminescence and photostimulated luminescence in BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} nano crystals are presented. ► Shortened lifetimes in BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} nano crystals demonstrate that they are promising materials for use in X-ray imaging systems. -- Abstract: BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} crystals with different structures were successfully fabricated via a simple precipitation method using ethanol/water mixtures as solvents. The amount of ethanol in the solvent mixtures played a significant role in the formation of final products, enabling the well-controlled growth of the BaFBr crystals. A possible formation mechanism was proposed based on the results of controlled experiments. The phases and morphologies of the resulting samples were systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and elementary analysis. The optical properties of the annealed BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} nano-cuboids were investigated using photoluminescence (PL), photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSL) and kinetic decays. Faster decay behaviors demonstrate that these BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors are promising materials for applications in optical storage fields. Furthermore, it is envisaged that this environmentally benign method can be extended to prepare other fluoride halides.

  9. INTERNAL ASSESSMENT COVER SHEETS, IB Biology I/II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? December 7, 2015 - 4:41pm Addthis This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please view it in a modern browser. If you are using IE9, you can also view the interactive here Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer KEY FACTS New interactive lets you compare annual carbon emissions of U.S.

  10. Thermodynamic and nonstoichiometric behavior of the GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetenbaum, M.

    1998-09-29

    Electromotive force (EMF) measurements of oxygen fugacities as a function of stoichiometry have been made on the GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system in the temperature range {approximately}400-600 C by means of an oxygen titration technique with an yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. Equations for the variation of oxygen partial pressure with composition and temperature have been derived from our EMF measurements. The shape of the 400 C isotherms as a function of oxygen stoichiometry for the Gd and Nd cuprate systems suggests the presence of miscibility gaps at values of x that are higher than those in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system. For a given oxygen stoichiometry, oxygen partial pressures above Gd-123 and Nd-123 cuprate systems are higher (above x = 6.5) than that for the Y-123 system. A thermodynamic assessment and intercomparison of our partial pressure measurements with the results of related measurements will be presented.

  11. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of the fluorinated compound 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Oliver; Berry, Frank J.; Bauer, Jessica; Wright, Adrian J.; Knight, Kevin S.; Slater, Peter R.

    2013-07-15

    The compounds 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.27}F{sub 0.5} have been synthesised by the low temperature fluorination of 15R-BaFeO{sub 3−d}F{sub 0.2} using polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) as a fluorination agent. The materials have been structurally characterised by Rietveld analysis of the X-ray- and HRPD-powder neutron diffraction data. A detailed analysis of bond valence sums suggests that the oxide and fluoride ions order on the different anion sites. A reinvestigation of our recently published structure (Clemens et al., 2013) [34] of 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F is also reported and incorporation of fluoride in h-type layers is also confirmed in this compound. The magnetic moments for 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.25}F{sub 0.5} align in the a/b-plane with antiferromagnetic alignment of the moments between adjacent layers, and are flipped by 90° as compared to the precursor compound. 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F exhibits very robust antiferromagnetism with a Néel temperature between 300 and 400 °C. - Graphical abstract: The crystal and magnetic structure of the perovskite phase 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F. - Highlights: • 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.27}F{sub 0.5}were prepared via low temperature fluorination using PVDF. • A structural investigation of the compounds BaFeO{sub 2}F is presented in detail. • This analysis suggests ordering of O{sup 2−} and F{sup −} anions between different layers. • 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F shows antiferromagnetic ordering at 300 K with T{sub N} ∼300–400 °C. • The magnetic moments align in the a/b-plane.

  12. ASSESSMENT REPORT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Its scientific programs focus on materials, neutron science, energy, high performance computing, systems biology, and national security. During fiscal year (FY) 2013,...

  13. Wind Resource and Feasibility Assessment Report for the Lummi Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DNV Renewables Inc.; J.C. Brennan & Associates, Inc.; Hamer Environmental L.P.

    2012-08-31

    This report summarizes the wind resource on the Lummi Indian Reservation (Washington State) and presents the methodology, assumptions, and final results of the wind energy development feasibility assessment, which included an assessment of biological impacts and noise impacts.

  14. Crystal structure and physical properties of quaternary clathrates Ba{sub 8}Zn{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}Si{sub y}, Ba{sub 8}(Zn,Cu){sub x}Ge{sub 46-x} and Ba{sub 8}(Zn,Pd){sub x}Ge{sub 46-x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasir, Navida; Grytsiv, Andriy; Melnychenko-Koblyuk, Nataliya; Rogl, Peter; Bednar, Ingeborg; Bauer, Ernst

    2010-10-15

    Three series of vacancy-free quaternary clathrates of type I, Ba{sub 8}Zn{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}Si{sub y}, Ba{sub 8}(Zn,Cu){sub x}Ge{sub 46-x}, and Ba{sub 8}(Zn,Pd){sub x}Ge{sub 46-x}, have been prepared by reactions of elemental ingots in vacuum sealed quartz at 800 {sup o}C. In all cases cubic primitive symmetry (space group Pm3n, a{approx}1.1 nm) was confirmed for the clathrate phase by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray single crystal analyses. The lattice parameters show a linear increase with increase in Ge for Ba{sub 8}Zn{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}Si{sub y}. M atoms (Zn, Pd, Cu) preferably occupy the 6d site in random mixtures. No defects were observed for the 6d site. Site preference of Ge and Si in Ba{sub 8}Zn{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}Si{sub y} has been elucidated from X-ray refinement: Ge atoms linearly substitute Si in the 24k site whilst a significant deviation from linearity is observed for occupation of the 16i site. A connectivity scheme for the phase equilibria in the 'Ba{sub 8}Ge{sub 46}' corner at 800 {sup o}C has been derived and a three-dimensional isothermal section at 800 {sup o}C is presented for the Ba-Pd-Zn-Ge system. Studies of transport properties carried out for Ba{sub 8{l_brace}}Cu,Pd,Zn{r_brace}{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x} and Ba{sub 8}Zn{sub x}Si{sub y}Ge{sub 46-x-y} evidenced predominantly electrons as charge carriers and the closeness of the systems to a metal-to-insulator transition, fine-tuned by substitution and mechanical processing of starting material Ba{sub 8}Ge{sub 43}. A promising figure of merit, ZT {approx}0.45 at 750 K, has been derived for Ba{sub 8}Zn{sub 7.4}Ge{sub 19.8}Si{sub 18.8}, where pricey germanium is exchanged by reasonably cheap silicon. - Graphical abstract: Quaternary phase diagram of Ba-Pd-Zn-Ge system at 800 {sup o}C.

  15. Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development PNNL-18567.pdf (1.2 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1772: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1772: Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0521: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

  16. Biological Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Science Biological Science The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a mosquito, its primary host. Although five different species of Plasmodium can cause malaria, Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe disease. | Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons. <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/malaria-researchers-find-weakness-global-killer">Read more</a> The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a

  17. Michael Levitt and Computational Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Levitt and Computational Biology Resources with Additional Information * Publications Michael Levitt Courtesy of Linda A. Cicero / Stanford News Service Michael Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... Levitt ... shares the ... prize with Martin Karplus ... and Arieh Warshel ... "for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems." Levitt's work focuses on

  18. Single crystal growth and characterization of the large-unit-cell compound Cu13Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesche, Anton; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2013-10-31

    Single crystals of Cu13Ba were successfully grown out of BaCu self flux. Temperature dependent magnetization, M (T ), electrical resistivity, ?(T)?(T), and specific heat, Cp(T)Cp(T), data are reported. Isothermal magnetization measurements, M(H)M(H), show clear de Haas-van Alphen oscillations at T = 2 K for applied fields as low as View the MathML source?0H=1T. An anomalous behavior of the magnetic susceptibility is observed up to T ? 50 K reflecting the effect of de Haas-van Alphen oscillations at fairly high temperatures. The field- and temperature-dependencies of the magnetization indicate the presence of diluted magnetic impurities with a concentration of the order of 0.01 at.%. Accordingly, the minimum and lower temperature rise observed in the electrical resistivity at and below T = 15 K is attributed to the Kondo-impurity effect.

  19. Melt-processing of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors for improved levitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Zhong, W.; Emerson, J.E.; McDaniel, R.L.

    1994-04-01

    Melt processed bulk YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) superconductors are of considerable interest in the application of low-friction, superconducting permanent magnet bearings and flywheel-energy-storage devices. The mechanisms of enhanced flux pinning in the melt processed samples has been the subject of many investigations. Fine precipitates of Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} (211) are considered potential flux-pinning sites by many investigators. Several groups have reported the refinement of 211 precipitates through Pt additions. In this paper, the authors describe the melt processing of YBCO with additives such as 211, Pt, and Ag. Large single domain regions are obtained using small SmBa2Cu3O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (Sm-123) single crystal seeds. The microstructure and levitation forces are measured and reported here.

  20. Optical properties of Pr-doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, Adriano B. Mello, Ana C. S. de; Valerio, Mrio E. G.; Rezende, Marcos V. dos S.; Baldochi, Sonia L.

    2014-08-07

    Crystalline samples of Pr-doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} (BaYF) were prepared by zone melting technique. The pure phase obtained was identified by X-ray diffraction measurement. Optical absorption result was evaluated and it showed that the formation of the absorption bands can be connected to color centers generated by radiation in the matrix. Radioluminescence emission measurements after excitation by X-ray showed that the material exhibited components responsible for long lasting phosphorescence. Short decay times were also evaluated, the measurements showed a fast component around 70?ns associated to the 4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1} ? 4f{sup 2} transition of the Pr{sup 3+} ion. The Thermoluminescence (TL) results indicate the presence of two trapping centers.

  1. Solution-Derived Bi(ZnTi)O3 - BaTiO3 Thin Films with Bulk-like...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Solution-Derived Bi(ZnTi)O3 - BaTiO3 Thin Films with Bulk-like Permittivity. Abstract not provided. Authors: Meyer, Kelsey Elizabeth ; Kotula, Paul Gabriel ; Brennecka, ...

  2. Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba(Fe1-xMx)2As2 (M = Co...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fermi surfaces and phase stability of Ba(Fe1-xMx)2As2 (M Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) ... (EFRC); Center for Defect Physics in Structural Materials (CDP) Sponsoring Org: USDOE ...

  3. Recent Results on D0 - Anti-D0 Mixing from BaBar and Belle (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Recent Results on D0 - Anti-D0 Mixing from BaBar and Belle Authors: Neri, Nicola ; Pisa U. INFN, Pisa Publication Date: 2013-06-04 OSTI Identifier: 1082815 Report ...

  4. Data:3dfe9516-886e-413a-baed-ae8390939e0b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dfe9516-886e-413a-baed-ae8390939e0b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  5. Infrared-optical spectroscopy of transparent conducting perovskite (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Dongmin; Yu, Kwangnam; Jun Chang, Young; Choi, E. J.; Sohn, Egon; Hoon Kim, Kee

    2014-01-13

    We have performed optical transmission, reflection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and Hall effect measurements on the electron-doped La{sub x}Ba{sub 1x}SnO{sub 3} (x?=?0.04) transparent thin films. From the infrared Drude response and plasma frequency analysis we determine the effective mass of the conducting electron m*?=?0.35m{sub 0}. In the visible-UV region the optical band gap shifts to high energy in (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} by 0.18?eV compared with undoped BaSnO{sub 3} which, in the context of the Burstein-Moss analysis, is consistent with the infrared-m*. m* of BaSnO{sub 3} is compared with other existing transparent conducting oxides (TCO), and implication on search for high-mobility TCO compounds is discussed.

  6. K and Mn co-doped BaCd{sub 2}As{sub 2}: A hexagonal structured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    K and Mn co-doped BaCdsub 2Assub 2: A hexagonal structured bulk diluted magnetic semiconductor with large magnetoresistance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: K and Mn ...

  7. A Measurement of the Exclusive Branching Fraction for B → π K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aspinwall, Marie Louise

    2002-02-01

    This thesis presents an exclusive measurement of the branching fraction B for the rare charmless hadronic B decays to πK final states. A sample of 22.57±0.36 million BB pairs was collected with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II B Factory, during the Run 1 data taking period (1999-2000).

  8. Information resources and the correlation of response patterns between biological end points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malling, H.V.; Wassom, J.S.

    1990-12-31

    This paper focuses on the analysis of information for mutagenesis, a biological end point that is important in the overall process of assessing possible adverse health effects from chemical exposure. 17 refs.

  9. Dielectric investigations in nanostructured tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silveira, L.G.D.; Alves, M.F.S.; Ctica, L.F.; Gotardo, R.A.M.; Nascimento, W.J.; Garcia, D.; Eiras, J.A.; Santos, I.A.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? Nanostructured BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics processed by an innovative protocol. ? Dielectric relaxations related to strains and vacancies. ? Dielectric and ferroelectric properties enhanced by strain. - Abstract: In this paper, structural and dielectric properties of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics obtained under extreme conditions were investigated. The temperature dependent dielectric investigations revealed that the phase transition temperatures of the BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics were raised as a function of residual strains associated to the nanostructuration, while structural characterizations showed a tetragonal arrangement at room temperature. From the frequency dependence analyses of the imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity, impedance and modulus function, three relaxation processes were identified. Two of them exhibit activation energies of 0.45 and 0.63 eV, and were attributed to single and double-ionization of oxygen vacancies. The whole set of results also indicated that the electrons resulting from the ionization of oxygen vacancies are trapped and do not contribute to the electrical conductivity, while the physical properties of the analyzed samples were enhanced by retaining a strained microstructure.

  10. Growth and self-assembly of BaTiO{sub 3} nanocubes for resistive switching memory cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Dewei, E-mail: D.Chu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Lin, Xi; Younis, Adnan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Li, Chang Ming [Chongqing Key Lab for Advanced Materials and Clean Energies of Techonologies Dean, Institute for Clean Energy and Advanced Materials, Southwest University, Chongqing (China); Dang, Feng [Research Center for Materials Back Casting Technology (MBT Center), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Li, Sean [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the self-assembled BaTiO{sub 3} nanocubes based resistive switching memory capacitors are fabricated with hydrothermal and drop-coating approaches. The device exhibits excellent bipolar resistance switching characteristics with ON/OFF ratio of 5870, better reliability and stability over various polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} nanostructures. It is believed that the inter cube junctions is responsible for such a switching behaviour and it can be described by the filament model. The effect of film thickness on switching ratio (ON/OFF) was also investigated in details. - Graphical abstract: This work describes a novel resistive switching memory cell based on self-assembled BaTiO{sub 3} nanocubes. - Highlights: BaTiO{sub 3} nanocubes were prepared by one step facile hydrothermal method. Self-assembled BaTiO{sub 3} nanocubes thin films were obtained by drop-coating approach. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanocubes show excellent resistive switching properties for memory applications.

  11. Assessment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... SCADA Assessments Since 1999, Sandia has conducted numerous assessments of operational systems in hydroelectric dams; water treatment systems; electric power transmission, ...

  12. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Anthropogenic CO2 as a Feedstock for ...

  13. Repurposing the translation apparatus for synthetic biology ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biology Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 14, 2017 Title: Repurposing the translation apparatus for synthetic biology ...

  14. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioSolarH 2 Autofermentative biological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria G.C. Dismukes Rutgers University Waksman Institute and Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology ...

  15. Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production June 30, 2015 - 11:43am Addthis ...

  16. Air monitoring and detection of chemical and biological agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonelli, J.; Althouse, M.L.

    1999-06-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of SPIE`s remote sensing symposium which was held November 2--3, 1998 in Boston, Massachusetts. Topics of discussion include the following: system simulations, atmospheric modeling, and performance prediction studies of chemical warfare remote sensing technologies; ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence and aerosol detection methods for remote sensing of biological warfare agents; passive detection methods for remote detection of chemical warfare agents; and lidar-based system performance assessments, demonstrations, and new concepts for chemical warfare/biological warfare detection.

  17. The new barium zinc mercurides Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} and BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} - Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Michael; Wendorff, Marco; Roehr, Caroline

    2012-12-15

    The title compounds Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} and BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. Their crystal structures, which both represent new structure types, have been determined using single crystal X-ray data. The structure of Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} (orthorhombic, oP28, space group Pmmn, a=701.2(3), b=1706.9(8), c=627.3(3)pm, Z=2, R1=0.0657) contains folded 4{sup 4} Hg nets, where the meshes form the bases of flat rectangular pyramids resembling the structure of BaAl{sub 4}. The flat pyramids are connected via Hg-Zn/Hg bonds, leaving large channels at the folds, in which Ba(1) and Hg(2) atoms alternate. Whereas the remaining Hg/Zn atoms form a covalent 3D network of three- to five-bonded atoms with short M-M distances (273-301 pm; CN 9-11), the Hg(2) atoms in the channels adopt a comparatively large coordination number of 12 and increased distances (317-348 pm) to their Zn/Hg neighbours. In the structure of BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} (cubic, cI320, space group I4{sup Macron }3d, a=2025.50(7) pm, Z=64, R1=0.0440), with a chemical composition not much different from that of Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10}, the Zn/Hg atoms of the mixed positions M(1/2) are arranged in an slightly distorted primitive cubic lattice with a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 subcell relation to the unit cell. The 24 of the originating 64 cubes contain planar cis tetramers Hg(5,6){sub 4} with Hg in a nearly trigonal planar or tetrahedral coordination. In another 24 of the small cubes, two opposing faces are decorated by Hg(3,4){sub 2} dumbbells, two by Ba(2) atoms respectively. The third type of small cubes are centered by Ba(1) atoms only. The complex 3D polyanionic Hg/Zn network thus formed is compared with the Hg partial structure in Rb{sub 3}Hg{sub 20} applying a group-subgroup relation. Despite their different overall structures, the connectivity of the negatively charged Hg atoms, the rather metallic Zn bonding characteristic

  18. Ba-filled Ni–Sb–Sn based skutterudites with anomalously high lattice thermal conductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschinger, W.; Rogl, Gerda; Grytsiv, A.; Michor, H.; Heinrich, P. R.; Mueller, H.; Puchegger, S.; Klobes, B.; Hermann, Raphael P.; Reinecker, M.; et al

    2016-06-21

    Here, in this study, novel filled skutterudites BayNi4Sb12-xSnx (ymax = 0.93) have been prepared by arc melting followed by annealing at 250, 350 and 450°C up to 30 days in vacuum-sealed quartz vials. Extension of the homogeneity region, solidus temperatures and structural investigations were performed for the skutterudite phase in the ternary Ni–Sn–Sb and in the quaternary Ba–Ni–Sb–Sn systems. Phase equilibria in the Ni–Sn–Sb system at 450°C were established by means of Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray Powder Diffraction (XPD). With rather small cages Ni4(Sb,Sn)12, the Ba–Ni–Sn–Sb skutterudite system is perfectly suited to study the influence of filler atomsmore » on the phonon thermal conductivity. Single-phase samples with the composition Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8, Ba0.42Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8 and Ba0.92Ni4Sb6.7Sn5.3 were used to measure their physical properties, i.e. temperature dependent electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. The resistivity data demonstrate a crossover from metallic to semiconducting behaviour. The corresponding gap width was extracted from the maxima in the Seebeck coefficient data as a function of temperature. Single crystal X-ray structure analyses at 100, 200 and 300 K revealed the thermal expansion coefficients as well as Einstein and Debye temperatures for Ba0.73Ni4Sb8.1Sn3.9 and Ba0.95Ni4Sb6.1Sn5.9. These data were in accordance with the Debye temperatures obtained from the specific heat (4.4 K < T < 140 K) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (10 K < T < 290 K). Rather small atom displacement parameters for the Ba filler atoms indicate a severe reduction in the “rattling behaviour” consistent with the high levels of lattice thermal conductivity. The elastic moduli, collected from Resonant Ultrasonic Spectroscopy ranged from 100 GPa for Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8 to 116 GPa for Ba0.92Ni4Sb6.7Sn5.3. The thermal expansion coefficients were 11.8 × 10-6 K-1 for Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8 and 13.8 × 10-6 K-1 for Ba0.92Ni4

  19. Continuous cross-over from ferroelectric to relaxor state and piezoelectric properties of BaTiO{sub 3}-BaZrO{sub 3}-CaTiO{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benabdallah, F.; Veber, P. Prakasam, M.; Viraphong, O.; Maglione, M.; Shimamura, K.

    2014-04-14

    Optimal properties like piezoelectricity can be found in polarizable materials for which the structure changes sharply under small composition variations in the vicinity of their morphotropic phase boundary or the triple point in their isobaric temperature-composition phase diagram. In the latter, lead-free (Ba{sub 0.850}Ca{sub 0.150})(Ti{sub 0.900}Zr{sub 0.100})O{sub 3} ceramics exhibit outstanding piezoelectric coefficients. For the first time, we report the growth of piezoelectric lead-free single crystals in the BaTiO{sub 3}-BaZrO{sub 3}-CaTiO{sub 3} pseudo-ternary system. The stoichiometry control in the CaO-BaO-TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution led to single crystals with various compositions ranging from (Ba{sub 0.857}Ca{sub 0.143})(Ti{sub 0.928}Zr{sub 0.072})O{sub 3} to (Ba{sub 0.953}Ca{sub 0.047})(Ti{sub 0.427}Zr{sub 0.573})O{sub 3}. We evidenced a continuous cross-over from a ferroelectric state at high titanium content to a relaxor one on increasing the zirconium content. Such a property tuning is rather seldom observed in lead-free ferroelectrics and confirms what was already reported for ceramics. Single crystal with (Ba{sub 0.838}Ca{sub 0.162})(Ti{sub 0.854}Zr{sub 0.146})O{sub 3} composition, which has been grown and oriented along [001] crystallographic direction, displayed electromechanical coefficients d{sub 31} and k{sub 31} of 93 pC.N{sup −1} and 0.18, respectively, near the room temperature (T = 305 K)

  20. Biological effects of electric fields: EPRI's role

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavet, R.

    1982-07-01

    Since 1973 the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has supported research to evaluate the biological effects which may result from exposure to electric fields produced by AC overhead transmission lines; more recently, EPRI has also begun DC research. Through 1981 EPRI will have expended $8.7M on these efforts. Ongoing AC projects are studying a variety of lifeforms exposed to electric fields; these include humans, miniature swine, rats, honeybees, chick embryos, and crops. The status of these projects is discussed. The DC program has not as yet produced data. These studies will add to the current data base so as to enable a more complete assessment of health risks which may be associated with exposure to electric fields at power frequencies.

  1. Electrical and thermal properties of Fe substituted double-filled Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballikaya, Sedat; Uzar, Neslihan; Yildirim, Saffettin; Salvador, James R.

    2013-01-15

    Fe-substituted double-filled Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} (x=0.1, y=0.2 and z=0.0-0.4 nominal) compounds were synthesized using a melting-annealing-spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed by measuring the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and the Hall coefficient. The sign of the Hall coefficient indicates that electrons are the dominant carriers in all compounds except Ba{sub 0.1}Yb{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.4}Co{sub 3.6}Sb{sub 12}. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and the carrier concentration reflect the transition from extrinsic to intrinsic behavior depending on the amount of Fe substituted for Co. Jonker and Ioffe analyses are applied to Fe-substituted double-filled Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} compounds in order to evaluate the range of minimum and maximum power factors achievable in n-type filled skutterudite compounds at room temperature (300 K). The predicted maximum room temperature power factor values in the range of 15-45 {mu}W/K{sup 2} cm are comparable to experimentally reported values of n-type skutterudite compounds. - Graphical abstract: Room temperature Jonker plot of Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} samples. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TE properties of Ba{sub x}Yb{sub y}Fe{sub z}Co{sub 4-z}Sb{sub 12} compounds were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jonker and Ioffe analysis applied in order to predict the range of power factor achievable at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal conductivity is strongly suppressed with increasing of Fe substitution on Co site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We see that small quantities of Fe on Co site is beneficial on enhancement ZT value.

  2. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Environment, Safety and Health Assessments The Department of Energy's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the Office of Enterprise Assessments, is responsible for conducting assessments to provide information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public, and environment from hazards present at Department sites and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for

  3. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  4. Preparation, photoluminescent properties and luminescent dynamics of BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Hua, Ruinian; Liu, Tianqing; Zhao, Jun; Na, Liyan; Chen, Baojiu

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Rice-shaped BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors were synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal process. The as-prepared BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} are composed of many particles with an average diameter of 40 nm. When excited at 260 nm, the sharp line emission located at 361 nm of Eu{sup 2+} was observed. The optimum doping concentration of Eu{sup 2+} was confirmed to be 5 mol%. The strong ultraviolet emission of Eu{sup 2+} ions in BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanoparticles suggests that these nanoparticles may have potential applications for sensing, solid-state lasers and spectrometer calibration. - Highlights: • BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors were synthesized via a mild hydrothermal process. • The Van and Huang models were used to research the mechanism of concentration quenching. • The optimum doping concentration of Eu2+ was confirmed to be 5 mol%. - Abstract: Eu{sup 2+}-doped BaAlF{sub 5} nanophosphors were synthesized via a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. The final products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. XRD results showed that the prepared samples are single-phase. The FE-SEM and TEM images indicated that the prepared BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors are composed of many rice-shaped particles with an average diameter of 40 nm. When excited at 260 nm, BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors exhibit the sharp line emissions of Eu{sup 2+} at room temperature. The optimum doping concentration of Eu{sup 2+} was confirmed to be 5 mol%. The Van and Huang models were used to study the mechanism of concentration quenching and the electric dipole–dipole interaction between Eu{sup 2+} can be deduced to be a dominant for quenching fluorescence in BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors. The strong ultraviolet emission of Eu{sup 2+} in BaAlF{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} nanophosphors suggests that

  5. Robust antiferromagnetism preventing superconductivity in pressurized (Ba0.61K0.39)Mn2Bi2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Dachun; Dai, Xia; Le, Congcong; Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Guo, Jing; Gao, Peiwen; Zhang, Shan; Zhou, Yazhou; et al

    2014-12-05

    BaMn2Bi2 possesses an iso-structure of iron pnictide superconductors and similar antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground state to that of cuprates, therefore, it receives much more attention on its properties and is expected to be the parent compound of a new family of superconductors. When doped with potassium (K), BaMn2Bi2 undergoes a transition from an AFM insulator to an AFM metal. Consequently, it is of great interest to suppress the AFM order in the K-doped BaMn2Bi2 with the aim of exploring the potential superconductivity. Here, we report that external pressure up to 35.6 GPa cannot suppress the AFM order in the K-doped BaMn2Bi2more » to develop superconductivity in the temperature range of 300 K–1.5 K, but induces a tetragonal (T) to an orthorhombic (OR) phase transition at ~20 GPa. Theoretical calculations for the T and OR phases, on basis of our high-pressure XRD data, indicate that the AFM order is robust in the pressurized Ba0.61K0.39Mn2Bi2. Utlimately, both of our experimental and theoretical results suggest that the robust AFM order essentially prevents the emergence of superconductivity.« less

  6. Facile synthesis of Ba1-xKxFe?As? superconductors via hydride route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikina, Julia V. [Univ. of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Batuk, Maria [Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Abakumov, Artem M. [Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Kauzlarich, Susan M. [Univ. of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-12-03

    We have developed a fast, easy, and scalable synthesis method for Ba1-xKxFe?As? (0 ? x ? 1) superconductors using hydrides BaH? and KH as a source of barium and potassium metals. Synthesis from hydrides provides better mixing and easier handling of the starting materials, consequently leading to faster reactions and/or lower synthesis temperatures. The reducing atmosphere provided by the evolved hydrogen facilitates preparation of oxygen-free powders. By a combination of methods we have shown that Ba1-xKxFe?As? obtained via hydride route has the same characteristics as when it is prepared by traditional solid-state synthesis. Refinement from synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data confirms a linear dependence of unit cell parameters upon K content as well as the tetragonal to orthorhombic transition at low temperatures for compositions with x < 0.2. Magnetic measurements revealed dome-like dependence of superconducting transition temperature Tc upon K content with a maximum of 38 K for x close to 0.4. Electron diffraction and high-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy indicates an absence of Ba/K ordering, while local inhomogeneity in the Ba/K distribution takes place at a scale of several angstroms along [110] crystallographic direction.

  7. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  8. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  9. Reaction dynamics and photochemistry of divalent systems. [Reaction of Ba with NO sub 2 , H sub 2 O, methanol, ClO sub 2 , O sub 3; photodissociation of NO sub 3 radical and OClO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.F.

    1992-05-01

    Results are presented of molecular beam studies of bimolecular and unimolecular reactions of Ba. Chapter 1 discusses the reaction Ba + NO{sub 2}. Formation of the dominant BaO({sup 1}{Sigma}) + NO products resulted primarily from decay of long-lived Ba{sup +}NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} collision complexes. Secondary mechanisms led to formation of forward scattered, internally excited BaO, and BaNO + O. D{sub o}(Ba-NO) = 65{plus minus}20 kcal/mol. Reactions of ground state and electronically excited Ba with water and alcohols are examined in Chapter 2. Reaction of Ba({sup 1}S) + H{sup 2}O led to BaO + H{sub 2}, whereas excited state Ba({sup 1}D) + H{sub 2}O reacted to form BaOH + H. Collisions between Ba and CH{sub 3}OH led to BaOCH{sub 3} + H. Radical channels involve H-atom migration and are promoted by excitation of the incident Ba atom. In Chapter 3, reactions of Ba({sup 1}S) with ClO{sub 2}2 and O{sub 3} are discussed. Again, direct and complex mechanisms were observed. Formation of BaCl + O{sub 2} from decomposition of Ba{sup +}ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} accounted for 10% of total reaction crass section. Although Ba + O{sub 3} {yields} BaO + 0{sub 2} occurs primarily by direct reaction mechanisms, the secondary channel Ba + 0{sub 3} {yields} BaO{sub 2} + 0 involved decay of long lived Ba{sup +}O{sub 3}{sup {minus}} intermediates. D{sub o}(Ba{minus}O{sub 2}) = 120 {plus minus}20 kcal/mol. Photodissociation dynamics of NO{sub 3} is explored in chapter 4. Visible excitation leads to formation of NO + 0{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} + O. Wavelength dependence of branching ratios is investigated. D{sub o}(O-NO{sub 2}) = 48.55 kcal/mole ;and calculate {Delta}H{sub f}(NO{sub 3}) = 17.75 kcal/mole (298K). Chapter 5 discusses the photodissociation of OClO in a molecular beam. Although ClO({sup 2}II) + O({sup 3}P) is dominant, Cl({sup 2}P) + O{sub 2} also forms, with a max yield of 3.9{plus minus}0.8% near 404nm.

  10. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen; Norberg, Stefan T.; Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G.; Mohn, Chris E.

    2011-11-15

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  11. Crystal and electronic structures of two new iron selenides: Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10} and BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berthebaud, David; Perez, Olivier; Tobola, Janusz; Pelloquin, Denis; Maignan, Antoine

    2015-10-15

    The new ternary selenides, Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10} and BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 4,} were synthesized from a reaction of appropriate amounts of elements at high temperature in a silica sealed tube, and their structures were resolved using X-ray single crystal diffraction. BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 4} crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4/m with a=8.008(9) Å and c=5.483(3) Å as cell parameters. It is a new compound with a structure isotypical to the sulfide BaFe{sub 2}S{sub 4} which belongs to the infinitely adaptive structures series Ba{sub 1+x}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4}. The second compound, Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10}, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n with a=8.8593(1) Å, b=8.8073(1) Å, c=12.2724(1) Å and β=109.037(6)° as cell parameters. It exhibits an original structure with a new type of iron selenide polyhedra. These data were consistent with the powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analyses. Their electronic structures point towards metallicity and electronic correlations for both selenides. - Graphical abstract: Experimental [010] oriented ED pattern and corresponding HREM image of Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10}. Image calculated with a focus and thickness to 15nm and 8 nm respectively is inserted. Bright contrasts are correlated to Se rows belonging to FeSe{sub 3}(Se{sub 2}){sup 2−}–FeSe{sub 6}–FeSe{sub 3}(Se{sub 2}){sup 2−} trimers. The corresponding structure projection is also shown. - Highlights: • Two new barium iron selenide compounds. • An original structure type Ba4Fe3Se10. • Electronic structure calculations.

  12. Structure and transport in high pressure oxygen sputter-deposited BaSnO{sub 3−δ}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Koustav; Ambwani, Palak; Xu, Peng; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Leighton, C. E-mail: leighton@umn.edu; Jalan, Bharat E-mail: leighton@umn.edu

    2015-06-01

    BaSnO{sub 3} has recently been identified as a high mobility wide gap semiconductor with significant potential for room temperature oxide electronics. Here, a detailed study of the high pressure oxygen sputter-deposition, microstructure, morphology, and stoichiometry of epitaxial BaSnO{sub 3} on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) and MgO(001) is reported, optimized conditions resulting in single-phase, relaxed, close to stoichiometric films. Most significantly, vacuum annealing is established as a facile route to n-doped BaSnO{sub 3−δ}, leading to electron densities above 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}, 5 mΩ cm resistivities, and room temperature mobility of 20 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in 300-Å-thick films on MgO(001). Mobility limiting factors, and the substantial scope for their improvement, are discussed.

  13. Engineered unique elastic modes at a BaTiO3/2x1-Ge(001) interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumah, D. P.; Dogan, M.; Ngai, J. H.; Qiu, D.; Zhang, Z.; Su, D.; Specht, E. D.; Ismail-Beigi, S.; Ahn, C. H.; Walker, F. J.

    2016-03-07

    Here, the strong interaction at an interface between a substrate and thin film leads to epitaxy and provides a means of inducing structural changes in the epitaxial film. These induced material phases often exhibit technologically relevant electronic, magnetic, and functional properties. The 2×1 surface of a Ge(001) substrate applies a unique type of epitaxial constraint on thin films of the perovskite oxide BaTiO3 where a change in bonding and symmetry at the interface leads to a non-bulk-like crystal structure of the BaTiO3. While the complex crystal structure is predicted using first-principles theory, it is further shown that the details ofmore » the structure are a consequence of hidden phases found in the bulk elastic response of the BaTiO3 induced by the symmetry of forces exerted by the germanium substrate.« less

  14. Formation of BaSi{sub 2} heterojunction solar cells using transparent MoO{sub x} hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, W.; Takabe, R.; Baba, M.; Takeuchi, H.; Toko, K.; Hara, K. O.; Usami, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2015-03-23

    Heterojunction solar cells that consist of 15?nm thick molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub x}, x?BaSi{sub 2} layers were demonstrated. Rectifying current-voltage characteristics were observed when the surface of BaSi{sub 2} was exposed to air. When the exposure time was decreased to 1?min, an open circuit voltage of 200?mV and a short circuit current density of 0.5?mA/cm{sup 2} were obtained under AM1.5 illumination. The photocurrent density under a reverse bias voltage of ?1 V reached 25?mA/cm{sup 2}, which demonstrates the significant potential of BaSi{sub 2} for solar cell applications.

  15. Long-range magnetic ordering in Ba{sub 2}CoS{sub 3}: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Headspith, D.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Battle, P.D. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Francesconi, M.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.g.francesconi@hull.ac.uk

    2007-10-15

    Neutron powder diffraction has been used to determine the magnetic structure of the quasi-one-dimensional compound Ba{sub 2}CoS{sub 3}, which contains linear [001] chains of vertex-sharing CoS{sub 4} tetrahedra, spaced apart by Ba{sup 2+} cations. At 1.5 K the Co{sup 2+} cations in the chains are antiferromagnetically ordered with an ordered magnetic moment of 1.97(4) {mu}{sub B} per cation aligned along [100]. Each Co{sup 2+} cation is ferromagnetically aligned with four cation in neighbouring chains and antiferromagnetically aligned with two others. - Graphical abstract: Neutron powder diffraction has been used to prove that Ba{sub 2}CoS{sub 3} shows long-range antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures, despite the quasi-one-dimensional arrangement of the CoS{sub 4} tetrahedra in the crystal structure.

  16. Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report summarizes an event hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s Advanced Algal Systems Program in May 2016. The purpose of the Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop was to collect input from experts in the field of algal biology regarding (1) the current state of algal biological tools, including our understanding of algal biology and biochemistry, available molecular toolboxes, omics databases, and other resources; (2) challenges to developing and applying a full suite of biological tools to improve algae performance and system robustness; and (3) strategies to advance progress toward commercial algal biofuels.

  17. Reversible Electrochemical Insertion of Lithium into Type I Ba8AlySi46-y Clathrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying; Raghavan, Rahul; Wagner, Nicholas; Davidowski, Stephen; Baggetto, Loic; Zhao, Ran; Cheng, Qian; Holland, Gregory p; Yarger, Jeffery L; Veith, Gabriel M; Ellis-Terrell, Carol; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai; Chan, Candace

    2015-01-01

    Silicon clathrates contain cage-like structures that can encapsulate various guest atoms or molecules. Here we present an electrochemical evaluation of type I silicon clathrates based on Ba8AlySi46-y for the anode material in lithium-ion batteries. Post-cycling characterization with NMR and XRD show no discernible structural or volume changes even after electrochemical insertion of 44 Li into the clathrate structure. The observed properties are in stark contrast with lithiation of other silicon anodes, which become amorphous and suffer from larger volume changes. The lithiation/delithiation processes are proposed to occur in single phase reactions at approximately 0.2 and 0.4 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively, distinct from other diamond cubic or amorphous silicon anodes. Reversible capacities as high as 499 mAh g-1 at a 5 mA g-1 rate were observed for silicon clathrate with composition Ba8Al8.54Si37.46, corresponding to Li:Si of 1.18:1. The results show that silicon clathrates could be promising durable anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

  18. High critical currents in heavily doped (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox superconductor tapes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Gharahcheshmeh, M. Heydari; Xu, A.; Galstyan, E.; Delgado, L.; Cantoni, C.

    2015-01-20

    REBa2Cu3Ox superconductor tapes with moderate levels of dopants have been optimized for high critical current density in low magnetic fields at 77 K, but they do not exhibit exemplary performance in conditions of interest for practical applications, i.e., temperatures less than 50 K and fields of 2–30 T. Heavy doping of REBCO tapes has been avoided by researchers thus far due to deterioration in properties. Here, we report achievement of critical current densities (Jc) above 20 MA/cm2 at 30 K, 3 T in heavily doped (25 mol. % Zr-added) (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox superconductor tapes, which is more than three times higher thanmore » the Jc typically obtained in moderately doped tapes. Pinning force levels above 1000 GN/m3 have also been attained at 20 K. A composition map of lift factor in Jc (ratio of Jc at 30 K, 3 T to the Jc at 77 K, 0 T) has been developed which reveals the optimum film composition to obtain lift factors above six, which is thrice the typical value. A highly c-axis aligned BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumn defect density of nearly 7 × 1011 cm–2 as well as 2–3nm sized particles rich in Cu and Zr have been found in the high Jc films.« less

  19. Direct evidence of octupole deformation in neutron-rich 144Ba

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Butler, P. A.; Campbell, C. M.; et al

    2016-03-17

    Here, the neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1/2 = 11.5 s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0–mg/cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, < 31–∥M(E3)∥01+ >= 0.65(+17–23) eb3/2, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probabilitymore » of 48(+25–34) W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.« less

  20. Role of magnetism in superconductivity of BaFe2As2: Study of 5d Au-doped crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Li; Cao, Huibo; McGuire, Michael A.; Kim, J. S.; Stewart, G. R.; Sefat, Athena Safa

    2015-09-09

    We investigate properties of BaFe2As2 (122) single crystals upon gold doping, which is the transition metal with the highest atomic weight. The Au substitution into the FeAs-planes of 122 crystal structure (Au-122) is only possible up to a small amount of ~3%. We find that 5d is more effective in reducing magnetism in 122 than its counter 3d Cu, and this relates to superconductivity. We provide evidence of short-range magnetic fluctuations and local lattice inhomogeneities that may prevent strong percolative superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xAux)2As2.

  1. Unit-cell thick BaTiO{sub 3} blocks octahedral tilt propagation across oxide heterointerface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, Daisuke Aso, Ryotaro; Kurata, Hiroki; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2014-05-14

    We fabricated SrRuO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3}/GdScO{sub 3} heterostructures in which the BaTiO{sub 3} layer is one unit cell thick by pulsed laser deposition and elucidated how the BaTiO{sub 3} layer influences structural and magneto-transport properties of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer through octahedral connections across the heterointerface. Our X-ray-diffraction-based structural characterizations show that while an epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} layer grown directly on a GdScO{sub 3} substrate is in the monoclinic phase with RuO{sub 6} octahedral tilts, a one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO{sub 3} layer inserted between SrRuO{sub 3} and GdScO{sub 3} stabilizes the tetragonal SrRuO{sub 3} layer with largely reduced RuO{sub 6} tilts. Our high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy observations provide an atomic-level view of the octahedral connections across the heterostructure and reveal that the BaTiO{sub 3} layer only one unit cell thick is thick enough to stabilize the RuO{sub 6}-TiO{sub 6} octahedral connections with negligible in-plane oxygen atomic displacements. This results in no octahedral tilts propagating into the SrRuO{sub 3} layer and leads to the formation of a tetragonal SrRuO{sub 3} layer. The magneto-transport property characterizations also reveal a strong impact of the octahedral connections modified by the inserted BaTiO{sub 3} layer on the spin-orbit interaction of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer. The SrRuO{sub 3} layer on BaTiO{sub 3}/ GdScO{sub 3} has in-plane magnetic anisotropy. This is in contrast to the magnetic anisotropy of the monoclinic SrRuO{sub 3} films on the GdScO{sub 3} substrate, in which the easy axis is ?45 to the film surface normal. Our results demonstrate that the one-unit-cell-thick layer of BaTiO{sub 3} can control and manipulate the interfacial octahedral connection closely linked to the structure-property relationship of heterostructures.

  2. Morphology and Composition cycle of BaO/Al2O3 NSR Catalysts during NO2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uptake and Release: A multi spectroscopy and microscopy study | Department of Energy Morphology and Composition cycle of BaO/Al2O3 NSR Catalysts during NO2 Uptake and Release: A multi spectroscopy and microscopy study Morphology and Composition cycle of BaO/Al2O3 NSR Catalysts during NO2 Uptake and Release: A multi spectroscopy and microscopy study 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_kim.pdf (868.73 KB) More Documents &

  3. Interaction between BaCO{sub 3} and OPC/BFS composite cements at 20 {sup o}C and 60 {sup o}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utton, C.A.; Gallucci, E.; Hill, J.; Milestone, N.B.

    2011-03-15

    A BaCO{sub 3} slurry, containing radioactive {sup 14}C, is produced during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This slurry is encapsulated in a Portland-blastfurnace slag composite cement. The effect of BaCO{sub 3} on the hydration of OPC and Portland-blastfurnace slag cements has been studied in this work. Samples containing a simulant BaCO{sub 3} slurry were cured for up to 720 days at 20 and 60 {sup o}C and analysed by XRD, SEM(EDX) and ICC. BaCO{sub 3} reacted with OPC to precipitate BaSO{sub 4} from a reaction between soluble sulfate and BaCO{sub 3}. Calcium monocarboaluminate subsequently formed from the carbonate released. The monocarboaluminate precipitated as crystals in voids formed during hydration. At 60 {sup o}C in OPC, it was not identified by XRD, suggesting the phase is unstable in this system around this temperature. In the Portland-blastfurnace slag cements containing BaCO{sub 3}, less monocarboaluminate and BaSO{sub 4} were formed, but the hydration of BFS was promoted and monocarboaluminate was stable up to 60 {sup o}C.

  4. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e.,more » P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.« less

  5. Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify

  6. ASSESSMENT REPORT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Assessment Report on "Audit Coverage of Cost Allowability for Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex LLC During Fiscal Year 2013 ...

  7. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  8. Potential variation around grain boundaries in BaSi{sub 2} films grown on multicrystalline silicon evaluated using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baba, Masakazu; Tsukahara, Daichi; Toko, Kaoru; Hara, Kosuke O.; Usami, Noritaka; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Suemasu, Takashi

    2014-12-21

    Potential variations across the grain boundaries (GBs) in a 100?nm thick undoped n-BaSi{sub 2} film on a cast-grown multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) substrate are evaluated using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM). The ?-2? X-ray diffraction pattern reveals diffraction peaks, such as (201), (301), (410), and (411) of BaSi{sub 2}. Local-area electron backscatter diffraction reveals that the a-axis of BaSi{sub 2} is tilted slightly from the surface normal, depending on the local crystal plane of the mc-Si. KFM measurements show that the potentials are not significantly disordered in the grown BaSi{sub 2}, even around the GBs of mc-Si. The potentials are higher at GBs of BaSi{sub 2} around Si GBs that are formed by grains with a Si(111) face and those with faces that deviate slightly from Si(111). Thus, downward band bending occurs at these BaSi{sub 2} GBs. Minority carriers (holes) undergo a repelling force near the GBs, which may suppress recombination as in the case of undoped n-BaSi{sub 2} epitaxial films on a single crystal Si(111) substrate. The barrier height for hole transport across the GBs varies in the range from 10 to 55?meV. The potentials are also higher at the BaSi{sub 2} GBs grown around Si GBs composed of grains with Si(001) and Si(111) faces. The barrier height for hole transport ranges from 5 to 55?meV. These results indicate that BaSi{sub 2} GBs formed on (111)-dominant Si surfaces do not have a negative influence on the minority-carrier properties, and thus BaSi{sub 2} formed on underlayers, such as (111)-oriented Si or Ge and on (111)-oriented mc-Si, can be utilized as a solar cell active layer.

  9. Magnetic and nonlinear optical properties of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakanth, S.; Venugopal Rao, S.; Hamad, Syed; James Raju, K. C.

    2015-05-15

    In our earlier studies the BaTiO{sub 3} samples were processed at higher temperatures like 1000{sup o}C and explained the observed magnetism in it. It is found that the charge transfer effects are playing crucial role in explaining the observed ferromagnetism in it. In the present work the samples were processed at lower temperatures like 650{sup o}C-800{sup o}C. The carrier densities in these particles were estimated to be ∼ 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} range. The band gap is in the range of 2.53eV to 3.2eV. It is observed that magnetization increased with band gap narrowing. The higher band gap narrowed particles exhibited increased magnetization with a higher carrier density of 1.23×10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} near to the Mott critical density. This hint the exchange interactions between the carriers play a dominant role in deciding the magnetic properties of these particles. The increase in charge carrier density in this undoped BaTiO{sub 3} is because of oxygen defects only. The oxygen vacancy will introduce electrons in the system and hence more charge carriers means more oxygen defects in the system and increases the exchange interactions between Ti3+, Ti4+, hence high magnetic moment. The coercivity is increased from 23 nm to 31 nm and then decreased again for higher particle size of 54 nm. These particles do not show photoluminescence property and hence it hints the absence of uniformly distributed distorted [TiO5]-[TiO6] clusters formation and charge transfer between them. Whereas these charge transfer effects are vital in explaining the observed magnetism in high temperature processed samples. Thus the variation of magnetic properties like magnetization, coercivity with band gap narrowing, particle size and charge carrier density reveals the super paramagnetic nature of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles. The nonlinear optical coefficients extracted from Z-scan studies suggest that these are potential candidates for optical imaging and signal processing

  10. The new Hg-rich barium indium mercurides BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7−x} (x=3.1) and BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11−x} (x=0–2.8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendorff, Marco; Schwarz, Michael; Röhr, Caroline

    2013-07-15

    The title compounds BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7−x} (x=3.1(1)) and BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11−x} (x=0–2.8) were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. Their crystal structures have been determined using single crystal X-ray data. BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7−x} (x=3.1(1)) crystallizes in a new structure type (orthorhombic, oC16, space group Cmmm: a=512.02(1), b=1227.68(3), c=668.61(2) pm, Z=2, R1=0.0311). In the structure, the atoms of the three crystallographically different mixed In/Hg positions form planar nets of four-, six- and eight-membered rings. These nets are shifted against each other such that the four-membered rings form empty distorted cubes. The cubes are connected via common edges, corners and folded ladders, which are also found in BaIn{sub 2}/BaHg{sub 2} (KHg{sub 2} structure type) and BaIn (α-NaHg type). The Ba atoms are centered in the eight-membered rings and exhibit an overall coordination number of 20. The [BaM{sub 20}] polyhedra and twice as many distorted [M{sub 8}] cubes tesselate the space. BaIn{sub 2.8}Hg{sub 8.2} (cubic, cP36, space group Pm3{sup ¯}m, a=961.83(1) pm, Z=3, R1=0.0243) is the border compound of the phase width BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11−x} of the rare BaHg{sub 11} structure type. In the structure, ideal [M{sub 8}] cubes (at the corners of the unit cell) and BaM{sub 20} polyhedra (at the edges of the unit cell) represent the building blocks comparable to the other new In mercuride. In accordance with the increased In/Hg content, additional M-pure regions appear: the center of the unit cell contains a huge [Hg(1)M(2){sub 12}M(3,4){sub 32}] polyhedron, a Hg-centered cuboctahedron of In/Hg atoms surrounded by a capped cantellated cube of 32 additional M atoms. For both structure types, the bonding situation and the ‘coloring’, i.e. the In/Hg distribution of the polyanionic network, are discussed considering the different sizes of the atoms and the charge distribution (Bader AIM charges), which have been

  11. Consequence Assessment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume focuses on the process of performing timely initial assessments necessary to support critical first decisions and the continuous process of refining those initial assessments as more information and resources become available. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  12. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT 1 Advanced Composites Materials and their Manufacture 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ................................................................................................ 2 4 2. Technology Potential and Assessment .................................................................................................. 4 5 2.1 The Potential for Advanced Composites for Clean Energy Application Areas

  13. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.J. Horkley; K.P E.M. Gantz; J.E. Davis; R.R. Lewis; J.P. Crow; C.A. Poole; T.S. Grimes; J.J. Giglio

    2015-03-01

    t Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure spike solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for age determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution,

  14. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure spike solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for age determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.

  15. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure “spike” solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for “age” determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determinemore » 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.« less

  16. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure “spike” solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for “age” determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.

  17. Thermoelectric and Structural Characterization of Ba2Ho(Cu3-xCox)O6+y

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong-Ng, W.; Li, Q.; Yang, Z.; Hu, Y.F.; Huang, Q.; Lowhorn, N.; Otani, M.; Kaduk, J.A.

    2009-03-18

    The search for thermoelectric materials for power generation and for solid-state cooling has led to increased interest of layered cobalt-containing oxides because of their thermal stability at high temperature and their desirable thermoelectric properties. This paper examines the effect of substitution of Co in the layered pervoskite Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} (x = 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 1.0). Structural analysis using the neutron Rietveld refinement technique reveals that when x {le} 0.4, Co substitutes mainly for Cu in the 'chain sites' of the Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} structure. As x > 0.4, Co also enters in the Cu-O 'plane sites' as well. The thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} samples were studied in the temperature range of 10-390 K. In general, as the cobalt content x increases, the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of these samples increase while the thermal conductivity decreases. Among the five Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} compositions, the x = 0.4 member gives the highest figure of merit ZT of {approx} 0.02 at approximately 270 K.

  18. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  19. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2013-10-15

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  20. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  1. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental Insights in Biology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1982-07-27

    Research supported by OHER [Office of Health and Environmental Research] and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  3. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental in Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1983-01-20

    Research supported by OHER and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  4. Microscopic description of spherical to {gamma}-soft shape transitions in Ba and Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2010-03-15

    The rapid transition between spherical and {gamma}-soft shapes in Ba and Xe nuclei in the mass region A>=130 is analyzed using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce the characteristic evolution of excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities, and in general, a good agreement with available data is obtained. The calculated spectra display fingerprints of a second-order shape phase transition that can approximately be described by analytic solutions corresponding to the E(5) dynamical symmetry.

  5. Proton Form Factors And Related Processes in BaBar by ISR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferroli, R.B.; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /INFN, Rome

    2007-02-12

    BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and drops. In particular it is well established a sharp drop near threshold, where evidence for structures in multihadronic channels has also been found. Other unexpected and spectacular features of the Nucleon form factors are reminded, the behavior of space-like G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} and the neutron time-like form factors.

  6. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of (Ba,In) double-filled skutterudites via randomly arranged micropores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Jian; Zhao, Wen-Yu E-mail: zhangqj@whut.edu.cn; Wei, Ping; Zhu, Wan-Ting; Zhou, Hong-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yuan; Tang, Ding-Guo; Lei, Bing; Zhang, Qing-Jie E-mail: zhangqj@whut.edu.cn

    2014-04-07

    Porous (Ba,In) double-filled skutterudite materials with pore diameter about 14??m were prepared by the decomposition of metastable ZnSb inclusions induced by the Zn sublimation. Transport measurements revealed that the Seebeck coefficient was increased due to the electron filtering effect induced by nanostructures in the surfaces of pores, the electrical conductivity was almost unchanged because of the percolation effect of conducted network composed of filled skutterudites, and the lattice thermal conductivity was dramatically suppressed due to the enhanced pore-edge boundary scattering of long-wavelength phonons. As a result, a maximum ZT of 1.36 was obtained, increased by 22.5% as compared to that of the bulk material with same chemical composition. This work demonstrates that by introducing porous structures is thought to be an efficient approach to improve the thermoelectric performance of bulk materials.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation of triplons in Ba3Cr2O8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaime, Marcelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kohama, Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aczel, A [MCMASTER UNIV; Ninios, K [UNIV OF FL; Chan, H [UNIV OF FL; Balicas, L [NHMFL; Dabkowska, H [MCMASTER UNIV; Like, G [MCMASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    By performing heat capacity, magnetocaloric effect, torque magnetometry and force magnetometry measurements up to 33 T, we have mapped out the T-H phase diagram of the S = 1/2 spin dimer compound Ba{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8}. We found evidence for field-induced magnetic order between H{sub cl} = 12.52(2) T and H{sub c2} = 23.65(5) T, with the maximum transition temperature T{sub c} {approx} 2.7 K at H {approx} 18 T. The lower transition can likely be described by Bose-Einstein condensation of triplons theory, and this is consistent with the absence of any magnetization plateaus in our magnetic torque and force measurements. In contrast, the nature of the upper phase transition appears to be quite different as our measurements suggest that this transition is actually first order.

  8. Computer modeling of Y-Ba-Cu-O thin film deposition and growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burmester, C.; Gronsky, R. ); Wille, L. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-07-01

    The deposition and growth of epitaxial thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} are modeled by means of Monte Carlo simulations of the deposition and diffusion of Y, Ba, and Cu oxide particles. This complements existing experimental characterization techniques to allow the study of kinetic phenomena expected to play a dominant role in the inherently non-equilibrium thin film deposition process. Surface morphologies and defect structures obtained in the simulated films are found to closely resemble those observed experimentally. A systematic study of the effects of deposition rate and substrate temperature during in-situ film fabrication reveals that the kinetics of film growth can readily dominate the structural formation of the thin film. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Magnetic structure and spin excitations in BaMn2Bi2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Calder, Stuart A.; Saparov, Bayrammurad I; Cao, H. B.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2014-02-19

    We present a single crystal neutron scattering study of BaMn2Bi2, a recently synthesized material with the same ThCr2Si2type structure found in several Fe-based unconventional superconducting materials. We show long range magnetic order, in the form of a G-type antiferromagnetic structure, to exist up to 390 K with an indication of a structural transition at 100 K. Utilizing inelastic neutron scattering we observe a spin-gap of 16 meV, with spin-waves extending up to 55 meV. We find these magnetic excitations are well fit to a J1-J2-Jc Heisenberg model and present values for the exchange interactions. The spin wave spectrum appears tomore » be unchanged by the 100 K structural phase transition.« less

  10. Self-trapped exciton and core-valence luminescence in BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Chornodolskyy, Ya. M.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Myagkota, O. S.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gektin, A. V.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Rodnyi, P. A.

    2013-11-21

    The influence of the BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size on the intensity of the self-trapped exciton luminescence and the radiative core-valence transitions is studied by the luminescence spectroscopy methods using synchrotron radiation. The decrease of the self-trapped exciton emission intensity at energies of exciting photons in the range of optical exciton creation (h? ? E{sub g}) is less sensitive to the reduction of the nanoparticle sizes than in the case of band-to-band excitation, where excitons are formed by the recombination way. The intensity of the core-valence luminescence shows considerably weaker dependence on the nanoparticle sizes in comparison with the intensity of self-trapped exciton luminescence. The revealed regularities are explained by considering the relationship between nanoparticle size and photoelectron or photohole thermalization length as well as the size of electronic excitations.