Sample records for ba biological assessment

  1. Roadmap: Biology -Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-BSCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Biology - Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-BSCI] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biological Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 2-May-12/LNHD This roadmap hours and minimum 42 upper- division credit hours #12;Roadmap: Biology - Bachelor of Arts [AS

  2. BA Economics and BA Financial Economics Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    BA Economics and BA Financial Economics ­ Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives The program will prepare graduates: 1. Understand the "economic way model economic decisions. 3. The ability to analyze historical and current events

  3. PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (1216...

  4. Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now more than 50 years old. Plans are underway to refit these aging turbines with new runners. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when upgrading the turbines. In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is demonstrated. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We present an application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  5. Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Page 1 of 23 B.S., B.A, Minor in Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mock, Kenrick

    Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Page 1 of 23 B.S., B.A, Minor in Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Version 1.3 Adopted by The Computer Science of Academic Affairs: #12;Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Page 2 of 23 TABLE

  6. Project 198740100 Assessment of Smolt Condition: Biological and Environmental Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Project 198740100 Assessment of Smolt Condition: Biological and Environmental Interactions detailed investigations of environmental and biological factors that influence smolt development environmental factors influence fish development, condition, and long-term survival. The proposed tasks describe

  7. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  8. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

  10. Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to analyze the biological performance of proposed designs to help ensure the safety of fish passing through the turbines at the Priest Rapids Dam in Grant County, Washington....

  11. BEE 2600 Principles of Biological Engineering Assessment of Fall Semester 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 2600 Principles of Biological Engineering Assessment of Fall Semester 2008 1. Course Outcomes 1 reactor, composting, enzyme kinetics and their interactions with pesticides, food sterilization. The class to design principles (c). 2. Assessment Methods/Metrics Homework problem sets were generated that had

  12. Strategies for Assessment of the Biological Performance and Design of Hydroturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological response of fish to turbine passage has been of concern for several decades and emphasized recently by consideration of hydro as a 'green' power source. The current state-of-the-art of hydro-turbine biological performance assessment, while still inadequate, has advanced considerably the past 10 years. For example, the importance of assessment of exposure to pressure changes during turbine passage has been emphasized by findings of laboratory studies of rapid decompression. It is now very clear that hydroturbine biological assessment must consider the physiological state and behavior of fish at turbine entry and changes in physiological state that drive aspects of behavior during tailrace passage. Such considerations are in addition to concerns about exposure of fish to mechanical and pressure sources of injury during turbine passage. Experimental designs and assessment tools have evolved for acclimation of test fish, observation of test fish behavior at approach and upon exit from the turbine environment, and precise estimation of turbine passage mortality. Fish condition assessment continues to improve permitting better classification of observed injuries to injury mechanisms. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and other computer models permit detailed investigation of the turbine passage environment and development of hypotheses that can be tested in field studies using live fish. Risk assessment techniques permit synthesis of laboratory and in-field study findings and estimation of population level effects over a wide range of turbine operation scenarios. Risk assessment is also evolving to provide input to turbine runner design. These developments, and others, have resulted in more productive biological performance assessment studies and will continue to evolve and improve the quantity and quality of information obtained from costly live fish hydroturbine passage studies. This paper reviews the history of hydro-turbine biological assessment, presents the current state-of-the-art, and identify areas needing improvement.

  13. BEE 260 Principles of Biological Engineering Assessment of Fall Semester 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 260 Principles of Biological Engineering Assessment of Fall Semester 2006 1. Course Outcomes 1 reactor, composting, enzyme kinetics and their interactions with pesticides, food sterilization. The class surgery, food safety and nanobiotechnology (j). 5. Students were introduced to design principles (c). 2

  14. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  15. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  16. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  17. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiological andU.S.Biology

  18. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

  19. Biologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis H. Kauffman

    2002-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers >protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  20. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  1. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  2. Mass balance to assess the efficiency of a mechanical-biological treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo Morais, J. de [Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie Environnementale, INSA-Lyon, LGCIE, F-69621 (France); Ducom, G. [Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie Environnementale, INSA-Lyon, LGCIE, F-69621 (France)], E-mail: gaelle.ducom@insa-lyon.fr; Achour, F.; Rouez, M.; Bayard, R. [Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie Environnementale, INSA-Lyon, LGCIE, F-69621 (France)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using mechanical-biological treatment of residual municipal solid waste, it is possible to significantly lower landfill volume and gas and leachate emissions. Moreover, the landfill characteristics are improved. The performance of the Mende (France) mechanical-biological treatment plant is assessed via mass balances coupled with manual sorting according to the MODECOM{sup TM} methodology and biochemical methane potential after 90 days of incubation. The site includes mechanical sorting operations, a rotary sequential bioreactor, controlled aerobic stabilisation corridors, maturation platforms, and a sanitary landfill site for waste disposal in separated cells. Results showed that several steps could be improved: after a first sieving step, about 12% of the potentially biodegradable matter is landfilled directly without any treatment; mechanical disintegration of papers and cardboards in the rotary sequential bioreactor is insufficient and leads to a high proportion of papers and cardboards being landfilled without further treatment. Two fine fractions go through stabilisation and maturation steps. At the end of the maturation step, about 54% of the potentially biodegradable matter is degraded. The biochemical methane potential after 90 days of incubation is reduced by 81% for one of the two fine fractions and reduced by 88% for the other one. Considering the whole plant, there is a reduction of nearly 20% DM of the entering residual municipal solid waste.

  3. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  4. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  5. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  6. BA War & Society Module Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    BA War & Society Module Information 2014-2015 www.swansea.ac.uk/artsandhumanities Arts Studies BA War & Society BA War & Society The scope and scale of the BA (Hons) War and Society degree Theories of War 1 (compulsory) HUA102 War and Warfare in the Modern World (compulsory) HIH118 World History

  7. Safe, secure and ethical? : assessing and regulating risks associated with synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regårdh, Pernilla C. (Pernilla Christina)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic biology is an emerging field, with a rapidly developing academic-industrial base and the promise of extensive product launches over the next few years. An intense debate over the risks and benefits of synthetic ...

  8. Development and use of site-specific chemical and biological criteria for assessing New Bedford Harbor pilot dredging project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.G.; Hansen, D.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical site-specific chemical and biological criteria were established to assess the impact of a pilot dredging project on water quality at the New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, USA, Superfund site. Because most existing chemical concentrations in the water column and indigenous biota exceeded federal and state water quality limits, the derivation of site-specific criteria was required. Prior to any operational phases of the project (i.e., dike construction, dredging), criteria values were developed from background concentrations of PCBs and metals in water and biota, as well as for the toxic effects of water quality on the biota. During each operational phase of the project, water samples were collected, analyzed within 16 h, and the data supplied to a management committee in order to assess the environmental impact of the previous days operation. The ambient unfiltered water concentration of PCBs and metals were the only chemical or biological criteria exceeded. Modification of the next days' operations resulted in a return of these concentrations to background levels. The combined use of site-specific criteria and a real-time decision making management process allowed for successful completion of the project with a minimal effect on water quality.

  9. Instream biological assessment of NPDES point source discharges at the Savannah River Site, 1997-1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site currently has 33 permitted NPDES outfalls that have been permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health an Environmental Control to discharge to SRS streams and the Savannah River. In order to determine the cumulative impacts of these discharges to the receiving streams, a study plan was developed to perform in-stream assessments of the fish assemblages, macroinvertebrate assemblages, and habitats of the receiving streams.

  10. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  11. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

  12. Assessment Plans College of Arts and Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Assessment Plans 9/18/2014 College of Arts and Architecture Dept Level Degree Program Plan Update LO Data Sched Architecture UG BA Architecture (Environmental Design) Y 2013 Y Y Y Architecture GR M Architecture Y 2014 Y Y Y Art UG BA Art Y 2007 Y Y N Art GR MFA Art Y 2013 Y Y Y Film and Photography UG BA

  13. Intermediate Major Full Major BUSIBA.I Intmd Business BA ARTHBA Art History BA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Studies HBS GEOSBS Geoscience BSG ESS.BA Exercise & Sport Sci BA GEOSHBS Geoscience HSG ESS.BS Exercise & Sport Sci BS GERMBA German BA ESS.HBS Exercise & Sport Sci HBS GERMHBA German HBA ESS.BS.T Exercise

  14. Biology 494 Biology Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    Biology 494 Biology Internship Guidelines The Biology Program encourages students to seek out and participate in internship opportunities that have a clear biological focus. Internships may be arranged may receive credit in Biology 494 (Biology Internship) for participation in internships, regardless

  15. Programmatic Biological Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1990. A field guide to western birds. Third edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 432 pp. Phillips, A.R. 1948. Geographic variation in Empidonax traillii....

  16. Biology reflective assessment curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Curriculum Design) by Cheryl Ann Bayley Committee in charge:P. Halter Copyright Cheryl Ann Bayley, 2011 All rightsreserved. The Thesis of Cheryl Ann Bayley is approved and it

  17. Programmatic Biological Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department of EnergyTheTheUpdate:50

  18. BA Philosophy, Politics and Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    BA Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) Module Information 2013-2014 Arts and Humanities College of www.swansea.ac.uk/artsandhumanities Department of Politcial and Cultural Studies #12;PPL at Swansea Swansea offers one of only two PPL degrees in the UK. Building on the successfully launch of our PPE

  19. annual hanford biology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: , B.A., Rodriguez, M. ., Weller, S.G.; UC Irvine 3:30 PM Natural Concluding remarks, Rose, M.R.; UC Irvine 6:15 PM Directors'...

  20. Donald Ostdiek Degree Offered: BA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Palaeoclimate and Human Response ARCH 313 Sustainable Architecture BIOS 323 Conservation Biology BIOS 325 Ecology CEVE 201 Introduction to Environmental Systems CEVE 306 Global Environmental Law and Sustainable

  1. Adaptive risk management for certifiably sustainable forestry B.A. Wintle a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaptive risk management for certifiably sustainable forestry B.A. Wintle a, *, D.B. Lindenmayer b Adaptive risk management Due diligence Monitoring Population viability analysis (PVA) Multi-model inference for biodiversity, (ii) formal risk assessment of competing management options that integrate impacts

  2. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for a comprehensive, system biology level analysis of a metal-reducing microbial community.

  3. Revised for 2012-2013 Find the Biology Curricula on the Web At

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    on Environmental Sciences BA Degree in Biology BS Degree in Biochemistry BS Degree in Biotechnology Minor.S. Biotechnology; B.S. Biology with Focus in Environmental Sciences; and a Minor in Biology. Short. Douglas Frank, Undergraduate Advisor for BS with Environmental Focus Room 446, LSC, 443-4529 dafrank

  4. Track Finding Efficiency in BaBar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Allmendinger; B. Bhuyan; D. N. Brown; H. Choi; S. Christ; R. Covarelli; M. Davier; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; A. Hafner; R. Kowalewski; O. Long; A. M. Lutz; M. Martinelli; D. R. Muller; I. M. Nugent; D. Lopes Pegna; M. V. Purohit; E. Prencipe; J. M. Roney; G. Simi; E. P. Solodov; A. V. Telnov; E. Varnes; R. Waldi; W. F. Wang; R. M. White

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe several studies to measure the charged track reconstruction efficiency and asymmetry of the BaBar detector. The first two studies measure the tracking efficiency of a charged particle using $\\tau$ and initial state radiation decays. The third uses the $\\tau$ decays to study the asymmetry in tracking, the fourth measures the tracking efficiency for low momentum tracks, and the last measures the reconstruction efficiency of $K_S^0$ particles. The first section also examines the stability of the measurements vs BaBar running periods.

  5. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: School of Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2011 Department: School of Architecture Department Head: Dr/Majors/Options Offered by Department B.A. in Environmental Design, B.A.Ed Master of Architecture, M.Arch #12;Architecture to the School of Architecture Faculty in Fall 2009 for their review. Based upon this review and any subsequent

  6. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  7. New Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoni, M.A.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Babar experiment at the SLAC B factory has accumulated a high luminosity that offers the possibility of systematic studies of quarkonium spectroscopy and of investigating rare new phenomena. Recent results in this field are presented. In recent times spectroscopy has become exciting again, after the discovery of new states that are not easily explained by conventional models. States such as the X(3872) and the Y(4260) could be new excited charmonium states, but require precise measurements for positive identification. The BaBar experiment [1] is installed at the asymmetric storage ring PEP-II. 90% of the data accumulated by BaBar are taken at the Y(4S) (10.58 GeV) and 10% just below (10.54 GeV). The BaBar detector includes a 5-layer, double-sided silicon vertex tracker and a 40-layer drift chamber in a 1.5 T solenoidal magnetic field, which detect charged particles and measures their momenta and ionization energy losses. Photons, electrons, and neutral hadrons are detected with a CsI(Tl)-crystal electromagnetic calorimeter. An internally reflecting ring-imaging Cherenkov is also used for particle id. Penetrating muon and neutral hadrons are identified by an array of resistive-plate chambers embedded in the steel of the flux return. The detector allows good track and vertex resolution, good particle id and good photon detection so it is especially suited for spectroscopy studies.

  8. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  9. Systems Biology. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology. Systems Biology. Abstract: The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most...

  10. Roadmap: Paralegal Studies Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-PLST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Paralegal Studies ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-PLST] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Sociology Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 7-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended on page 2 #12;Roadmap: Paralegal Studies ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-PLST] College of Arts and Sciences

  11. FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology Internal Use Version Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4: Total UD Credits: 46 Total Credits: 120 3/19/12 #12;FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

  12. Combined Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combined Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film Are you looking in Digital Journalism (DJ) and Communication, Media, and Film (CMF) is for you. That's because our DJ Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film We look forward to meeting you! Student

  13. Radioactive contamination of BaF2 crystal scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polischuk, O G; Bernabei, R; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Di Marco, A; Danevich, F A; Incicchitti, A; Poda, D V; Tretyak, V I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barium fluoride (BaF$_2$) crystal scintillators are promising detectors to search for double beta decay processes in $^{130}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 2619(3) keV) and $^{132}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 844(1) keV). The $^{130}$Ba isotope is of particular interest because of the indications on 2${\\beta}$ decay found in two geochemical experiments. The radioactive contamination of BaF$_2$ scintillation crystal with mass of 1.714 kg was measured over 113.4 hours in a low-background DAMA/R&D set-up deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (LNGS, Italy). The half-life of $^{212}$Po (present in the crystal scintillator due to contamination by radium) was estimated as $T_{1/2}$ = 298.8 $\\pm$ 0.8(stat.) $\\pm$ 1.4(syst.) ns by analysis of the events pulse profiles.

  14. Two- and Three-Body Charmless B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan; ,

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report recent measurements of rare charmless B decays performed by BaBar. The results are based on the final BaBar dataset of 424 fb{sup -1} collected at the PEP-II B-factory based at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The study of rare B decays is a key ingredient to meet two of the main goals of the B-factories: assessing the validity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP-violation by precisely measuring the elements of the Unitarity Triangle (UT), and searching for hints of New Physics (NP), or otherwise constraining NP scenarios, in processes which are suppressed in the Standard Model (SM). In loop processes, in particular, NP at some higher energy scale may manifest itself in the low energy effective theory as new couplings, such as those introduced by new very massive virtual particles in the loop. In NP searches hadronic uncertainties can play a major role, expecially for branching fraction measurements. Many theoretical uncertainties cancel in ratios of amplitudes, and most NP probes are therefore of this kind. In the following sections we report recent measurements, performed by the BaBar Collaboration, that are relevant to NP searches in charmless hadronic B decays.

  15. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  16. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  17. The interaction of NO2 with BaO: from cooperative adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The interaction of NO2 with BaO: from cooperative adsorption to Ba(NO3)2 formation. The interaction of NO2 with BaO: from cooperative adsorption to Ba(NO3)2 formation. Abstract:...

  18. Water-induced Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally Aged BaOAl2O3. Water-induced Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally Aged BaOAl2O3. Abstract: Phase changes in high...

  19. Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its environmental impact. Aluminosilicate pollucite CsAlSi2O6 is selected as a model waste form to study the decay-induced structural effects. While Ba-containing precipitates...

  20. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions.

  1. Page 1 | B.A. in Art History | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Art History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Coordinator: Dr. James Frakes (Rowe 218, jffrakes@uncc.edu, 704-687-0182). PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BA in Art

  2. assessing environmental risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Zoology 411 Environmental Risk Assessment Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Syllabus Zoology 411 Environmental Risk Assessment Professor: Michael Lydy Office: LSII, Room...

  3. assessing human risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  4. assessing health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  5. assess health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  6. Page 1 | B.A. in Middle Grades Education | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Middle Grades Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | B.A. in Middle Grades Education | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Middle 2 | B.A. in Middle Grades Education | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 Middle Grades Grades Education Academic Plan of Study College of Education Department of Middle, Secondary and K-12

  7. Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Master of Science in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (90 ECTS) Contact Information Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology.unifr.ch/msc Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology University of Bern Baltzerstrasse 6 CH

  8. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California, on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Harris, C.E.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1980 and 1986 DOE sponsored field studies to gather sufficient information to determine the status of the species on Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 and to evaluate the possible effects of MER. Transect surveys were conducted in 1979 and 1984 to document the distribution and relative density of fox dens. Radiotelemetry studies were initiated to provide information on reproductive success, den use patterns, responses to petroleum field activities, food habits, movement patterns and home ranges, and sources and rates of mortality. Techniques for conducting preconstruction surveys to minimize possible negative effects of MER activities on foxes plus a habitat restoration program were developed and implemented. DOE determined during this biological assessment that the construction projects and operational activities necessary to achieve and sustain MER may have adversely affected the San Joaquin kit fox and its habitat. However, the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of MER will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species because: (1) results of the extensive field studies did not provide evidence that MER effected negative changes in relative abundance, reproductive success, and dispersal of the species; (2) a successful policy of conducting preconstruction surveys to protect kit fox, their dens, and portions of their habitat was initiated; (3) the Secretary of the Interior did not designate critical habitat; (4) a habitat restoration plan was developed and implemented; (5) a monitoring program was implemented to periodically assess the status of kit fox; (6) a coyote control program was established with FWS to reduce predation on fox; and (7) administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil spills, restrict off-road vehicle (ORV) travel, and to prohibit hunting, trapping, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities, were maintained to protect kit fox.

  9. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California, on the endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys to determine the distribution and relative abundance of blunt-nosed leopard lizards on Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 were conducted in 1980 and 1981. In 1982 radiotelemetry and pitfall trapping techniques were used to gain additional information on the species and develop alternative methods of study. Incidental observations of blunt-nosed leopard lizards were recorded and used in the distribution information for NPR-1. DOE determined during this biological assessment that the construction projects and operational activities necessary to achieve and sustain MER have not adversely affected the blunt-nosed leopard lizard and its habitat, because only approximately 6% of the potential blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat on NPR-1 was disturbed by construction and operational activities. DOE believes that the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of MER will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species, because results of surveys indicated that blunt-nosed leopard lizards are mainly distributed near the periphery of Elk Hills where few petroleum developments occurred in the past and where they are unlikely to occur in the future. A policy of conducting preconstruction surveys to protect blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat was initiated, a habitat restoration plan was developed and implemented, and administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil spills, restrict off-road vehicle (ORV) travel, and to prohibit public access, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities were maintained.

  10. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    . Williams Professor of Biomedical Informations and Co-Director, Yale Computational Biology & Bioinformatics co-director of the Yale Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Program. In addition to the KeckBiological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series Dr. Mark B. Gerstein Albert L

  11. Genomics-Bioinformatics Day: "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology & Mathematical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    3rd Genomics-Bioinformatics Day: "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology on "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology & Mathematical Biology: Their Relationship". Genomics, Bioinformatics, Computational Biology have a tremendous appeal and these fields have originated or grown

  12. Distributed Online Conditions Database of the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Gaponenko, I.A.; Brown, D.N.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents CDB - The distributed Conditions Database of the BaBar Experiment. CDB is the second major iteration of the database deployed in BaBar for production use as of October 2002. It replaced the original version of the database used through the first three years of the data taking. The new design and its implementation aims to improve the performance and scalability of the original database and addresses the emerging challenges of the distributed data production and analysis system of the Experiment.

  13. Effect of BaO Morphology on NOx Abatement: NO Interaction with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as well as unsupported and ?-Al&8322;O&8323;-supported BaO clusters. Adsorption of NO&8322; over BaO of different morphologies studied with the same method allowed...

  14. Adsorption and Formation of BaO Overlayers on Gamma-Al2O3 Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of BaO Overlayers on Gamma-Al2O3 Surfaces . Adsorption and Formation of BaO Overlayers on Gamma-Al2O3 Surfaces . Abstract: First-principles density functional theory slab...

  15. The Effect of Water on the Adsorption of NO in Na- and Ba-Y,FAU...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water on the Adsorption of NO in Na- and Ba-Y,FAU Zeolites: A Combined FTIR and TPD Investigation. The Effect of Water on the Adsorption of NO in Na- and Ba-Y,FAU Zeolites: A...

  16. NO2 Adsorption on BaO/Al2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. Abstract: The nature of nitrate species formed in the...

  17. NOx Uptake Mechanism on Pt/BaO/Al2O3 Catalysts. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Al2O3 Catalysts. NOx Uptake Mechanism on PtBaOAl2O3 Catalysts. Abstract: The NOx adsorption mechanism on PtBaOAl2O3 catalysts was investigated by performing NOx storage...

  18. Evolution of ferroelectric domain structures embedded inside polychrystalline BaTiO3 during heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varlioglu, Mesut

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrystalline BaTiO 3 during Heating Mesut Varlioglu, 1under quasistatic heating by using polychromatic scanning X-180.47° or 0.47°. While heating the polycrystalline BaTiO 3

  19. Water-induced morphology changes in BaO/?-Al2O3 NOx storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials. Water-induced morphology changes in BaO?-Al2O3 NOx storage materials. Abstract: Exposure of NO2-saturated BaO?-Al2O3 NOx storage materials to H2O vapour...

  20. Assessment of biological communities at Rame Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) compared to the two stations located at a greater distance from the disposal site (G8 and G28) in all years 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 g8 g18 g16 g13 g19 g3 g28 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 g8 g18 g16 g13 g19 g3 g28 D E O G3A02 G8A02 G18B02 G16A01 G19B03 G13A03 G19A03 G19C03 G13B03 G13C03 G3A01 G3B02 G3A03 G3B03 G3

  1. Bioinformatics Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Interdepartmental Graduate Program GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK FALL 2006 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Interdepartmental Graduate Program GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK FALL 2006 #12;1 Welcome to the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB) program

  2. Superconductivity in gallium-substituted Ba8Si46 clathrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ning; Luo, Z. P.; Ma, Xingqiao; Cao, Guohui; Feng, Z. S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    superconductor, with an onset at T-C approximate to 3.3 K. For x=10 and higher, no superconductivity was observed down to T=1.8 K. This represents a strong suppression of superconductivity with increasing Ga content, compared to Ba8Si46 with T-C approximate to 8...

  3. Roadmap: Art History Bachelor of Arts [CA-BA-ARTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Art History ­ Bachelor of Arts [CA-BA-ARTH] College of the Arts School of Art Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 29-May-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester Elective (upper division) 3 Minor Requirements or General Electives 9 See note 2 on page 2 #12;Roadmap

  4. Roadmap: Art History Bachelor of Arts [CA-BA-ARTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Art History ­ Bachelor of Arts [CA-BA-ARTH] College of the Arts School of Art Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester Elective (upper division) 3 Minor Requirements or General Electives 9 See note 2 on page 2 #12;Roadmap

  5. Roadmap: English Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-ENG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: English ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-ENG] College of Arts and Sciences Department of English Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 4 | Last Updated: 7-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester 5 on page 3 General Electives (upper division) 6 #12;Roadmap: English ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS

  6. Superconductivity in gallium-substituted Ba8Si46 clathrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ning; Luo, Z. P.; Ma, Xingqiao; Cao, Guohui; Feng, Z. S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    superconductor, with an onset at T-C approximate to 3.3 K. For x=10 and higher, no superconductivity was observed down to T=1.8 K. This represents a strong suppression of superconductivity with increasing Ga content, compared to Ba8Si46 with T-C approximate to 8...

  7. BA in ECONOMICS (736020) MAP Sheet Department of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BA in ECONOMICS (736020) MAP Sheet Department of Economics For students entering the degree program The Economics Department requires a minimum of 21 hours in the major to be taken in residency at BYU courses: complete the following with a grade of C- or better: Econ 110* Economics Principles and Problems

  8. BA in ECONOMICS (736020) MAP Sheet Department of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BA in ECONOMICS (736020) MAP Sheet Department of Economics For students entering the degree program from approved list from approved list Econ 110* from approved list personal choice The Economics: complete the following with a grade of C- or better: Econ 110* Economics Principles and Problems Econ 378

  9. Structural phase transitions in BaPrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saines, Paul J. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Kennedy, Brendan J. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: b.kennedy@chem.usyd.edu.au; Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structures adopted by BaPrO{sub 3} at and above ambient temperature have been examined using a combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction. BaPrO{sub 3} has been established to undergo a series of phase transitions from Pbnmorthorhombic{yields}Ibmmorthorhombic{yields}R3-bar crhombohedral{yields}Pm3-barm cubic. BaPrO{sub 3} is the second A{sup 2+}B{sup 4+}O{sub 3} perovskite found to adopt rhombohedral symmetry in preference to the I4/mcm tetragonal structure. Analysis of the octahedral tilting through the rhombohedral to cubic phase transition indicates that this transformation is continuous and tricritical in nature. The tricritical behaviour of this transition is likely to be a result of the competition between tetragonal and rhombohedral structures to be the preferred phase, with the rhombohedral symmetry adopted by BaPrO{sub 3} being stabilised by the unusually large B-site cation.

  10. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Chemistry Career

  11. Measurements of Form Factors with the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Selina Z.; /SLAC

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected recent results on measurements of form factors by the BaBar Collaboration are reviewed, including e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}{gamma}, leptonic and semileptonic charm decays from data collected at or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

  12. Combined Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combined Honours BA Digital Journalism and Communication, Media, and Film Are you looking in Digital Journalism (DJ) and Communication, Media, and Film (CMF) is for you. That's because our DJ for a career combining your interests in media with a practical skill-set? If so, the Combined Honours program

  13. BaBar Note 295 May 16th, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and cooling system. Three types of hybrid will be used in BaBar SVT, di ering in the number of chips from 10 generated on the hybrid. We have realized that lateral walls of the channel help the heat exchange between of the cooling system in keeping the front-end chips into their optimal working condition. Thermo

  14. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Science and the Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics at Columbia University. Dr. PeBiological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series Dr. Itsik Pe'er Associate Professor of Computer Science Columbia University Itsik Pe'er is an associate professor in the Department of Computer

  15. Hysteretic electrical transport in BaTiO{sub 3}/Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3}/Ge heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngai, J. H.; Kumah, D. P.; Walker, F. J. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, 15 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8284 (United States); Ahn, C. H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, 15 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8284 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, 10 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8267 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present electrical transport measurements of heterostructures comprised of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} epitaxially grown on Ge. Sr alloying imparts compressive strain to the BaTiO{sub 3}, which enables the thermal expansion mismatch between BaTiO{sub 3} and Ge to be overcome to achieve c-axis oriented growth. The conduction bands of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} are nearly aligned with the conduction band of Ge, which facilitates electron transport. Electrical transport measurements through the dielectric stack exhibit rectifying behavior and hysteresis, where the latter is consistent with ferroelectric switching.

  16. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  17. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

  18. SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    derived from rangelands Link between the biophysical world and the social systems humans use Basic Fish Huntable or Catchable fish and wildlife Biofuels Fiber Biochemicals Genetic material #12 Assess biological, hydrological, atmospheric, and other physical resources (supply) Describe the market

  19. Page 1 | B.A. in Earth Sciences | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | B.A. in Earth Sciences | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Earth Sciences Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Geography & Earth Sciences geoearth. · Minimum Grades/GPA: minimum GPA is 2.0 · Teacher Licensure: YES in Earth Sciences. Students preparing

  20. Page 1 | B.A. in Earth Sciences | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.A. in Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | B.A. in Earth Sciences | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.A. in Earth Sciences Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Geography & Earth Sciences geoearth. · Minimum Grades/GPA: minimum GPA is 2.0 · Teacher Licensure: YES in Earth Sciences. Students preparing

  1. Page 1 | B.A. in Special Education General Curriculum | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2014 B.A. in Special Education (General Curriculum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | B.A. in Special Education ­ General Curriculum | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2014 B.A. in Special Education (General Curriculum) Academic Plan of Study College of Education Department of Special Education and Child Development http://spcd.uncc.edu/ PROGRAM SUMMARY · Credit Hours: 120 hours

  2. Page 1 | B.A. in Elementary Education | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Elementary Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | B.A. in Elementary Education | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.A. in Elementary Education Academic Plan of Study College of Education Department of Reading and Elementary Education education.uncc.edu/reel PROGRAM SUMMARY · Credit Hours: 120-121 · Concentrations: No · Declaring

  3. Structural and chemical characterization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagar, K.; Recnik, A.; Sturm, S. [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gajovic, A. [Molecular Physics Laboratory, Division of Materials Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-1002 Zagreb (Croatia)] [Molecular Physics Laboratory, Division of Materials Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-1002 Zagreb (Croatia); Ceh, M., E-mail: miran.ceh@ijs.si [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized with EPD into AAO templates. {yields} Nanorods are composed of crystalline, nanosized grains with pseudo-cubic structure. {yields} Integrowth of hexagonal BaTiO{sub 3} polymorph within pseudo-cubic structure was observed. -- Abstract: An electron-microscopy investigation was performed on BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods that were processed by sol-gel electrophoretic deposition (EPD) into anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods grown within the template membranes had diameters ranging from 150 to 200 nm, with an average length of 10-50 {mu}m. By using various electron-microscopy techniques we showed that the processed BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were homogeneous in their chemical composition. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were always polycrystalline and were composed of well-crystallized, defect-free, pseudo-cubic BaTiO{sub 3} grains, ranging from 10 to 30 nm. No intergranular phases were observed between the BaTiO{sub 3} grains. A low-temperature hexagonal polymorph that is coherently intergrown with the BaTiO{sub 3} perovskite matrix was also observed as a minor phase. When annealing the AAO templates containing the BaTiO{sub 3} sol in an oxygen atmosphere the presence of the hexagonal polymorph was diminished.

  4. SEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    these concerns? Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water to Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water and disinfect anyy microorganisms that may be present The majority of Recycled water produced in ArizonaSEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY

  5. Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Assessment of Park Water Resources.......................................................................25 resources........................................................................15 Biological resources

  6. 2003 Synthetic Biology study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endy, Drew

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology is a technology for processing information, materials, and energy. As a technology platform, biological systems provide access to artifacts and processes across a range of scales (e.g., the ribosome is a programmable ...

  7. Biological Systems Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    encompasses the areas of priority pathogen detection, extremophile biology and genomics, biohydrometallurgy, biomass conversion, coal bioprocessing, biodegradation...

  8. Process Manual Biological & Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    · · · · ·t t ·t ·t t t ·t . ~ t · · Process· Manual Biological & Agricultural Engineering MANUAL FOR THE BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TexasA&MUniversity Article I. NAME The name ofthis organization shall be the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (abbreviated

  9. Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale An Interdepartmental PhD Program and a Track within://www.yale.edu/graduateschool/admissions/apply_online.html 2 #12;Introduction Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) is a rapidly developing multi experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential

  10. Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale An Interdepartmental PhD Program and a Track within://www.yale.edu/graduateschool/admissions/apply_online.html #12;3 Introduction Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) is a rapidly developing multi experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential

  11. Syntheses, crystal structures and characterizations of BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Hailong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Feng Meiling [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Mao Jianggao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)]. E-mail: mjg@ms.fjirsm.ac.cn

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new barium zinc selenite and tellurite, namely, BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2}, have been synthesized by the solid state reaction. The structure of BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} features double chains of [Zn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} anions composed of four- and eight-member rings which are alternatively along a-axis. The double chains of [Zn{sub 2}(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 3}]{sup 3-} anions in BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2} are formed by Zn{sub 3}Te{sub 3} rings in which each tellurite group connects with three ZnO{sub 3}Cl tetrahedra. BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2} are wide bandgap semiconductors based on optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements. -- Graphical abstract: Two new barium zinc selenite and tellurite, namely, BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2}, have been synthesized by solid state reaction. The structure of BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} features 1D double chains of [Zn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} anions composed of four- and eight-member rings which are alternatively along a-axis. The 1D double chains of [Zn{sub 2}(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 3}]{sup 3-} anions in BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2} are formed by Zn{sub 3}Te{sub 3} rings in which each tellurite group connects with one ZnO{sub 3}Cl and two ZnO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} tetrahedra. BaZn(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaZn(TeO{sub 3})Cl{sub 2} are wide bandgap semiconductors based on optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements.

  12. Selected Topics on Hadronic B Decays From BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of branching fractions and decay-rate asymmetries in charmless hadronic B decays at the BaBar experiment are presented. The selected topics include Dalitz plot analyses of B {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi} and signal searches in B {yields} PP and PV, where isoscalar mesons are involved, and in B {yields} b{sub 1}P, P and V denote a pseudoscalar and vector meson, respectively. Several measurements in charmless hadronic B decays have indicated possible deviations from the theoretical predictions within the Standard Model. The measurements presented would contribute to searching for and resolving such puzzles.

  13. SeeBA Energiesysteme GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: WindRiegotecSeaScape Energy LtdSeeBA

  14. BA Tirunelveli Bundled Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to:AurigaPlantillas Jump to:­nculosAzurRB9 EnergyBA

  15. assessment fundamentals vol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REHABILITATION ENGINEERING, VOL. 17, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2009 595 An Assessment of Robot-Assisted Bimanual Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS...

  16. assessment raft river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were below detection limits. Overall, zones of potential biological impact 36 NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT PLAN PREPARED BY THE HUDSON RIVER TRUSTEES CiteSeer Summary:...

  17. assess consumption relative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was conducted in Simada District, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia Walter, M.Todd 8 Assessing Public Attitudes to Health Related Findings Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  18. Data:7384572d-1390-4e2b-a18d-239ed8ba37eb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a18d-239ed8ba37eb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  19. Roadmap: German Literature, Culture and Translation Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-GLCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: German Literature, Culture and Translation ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-GLCT] College of Arts Updated: 24-May12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major;Roadmap: German Literature, Culture and Translation ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-GLCT] College of Arts

  20. Roadmap: Classics Latin Concentration Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CLSS-LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Classics ­ Latin Concentration ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CLSS-LAT] College of Arts Updated: 11-Jun-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major;Roadmap: Classics ­ Latin Concentration ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CLSS-LAT] College of Arts and Sciences

  1. A facile method for the preparation of Eu{sup 2+}-doped nanocrystalline BaFCl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xianglei; Liu, Zhiqiang [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, The University of New South Wales, UNSW Canberra (ADFA), Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A. [School of Physics and Electron Microscope Unit, Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Riesen, Hans, E-mail: h.riesen@adfa.edu.au [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, The University of New South Wales, UNSW Canberra (ADFA), Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile co-precipitation method for the preparation of Eu{sup 2+}-doped BaFCl. • Reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} by zinc granular under nitrogen flow. • Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of the as-prepared BaFCl:Eu{sup 2+}. • Temperature dependent photoluminescence properties of Eu{sup 2+} ions in BaFCl. - Abstract: A facile method for the preparation of Eu{sup 2+}-doped BaFCl is reported. The method is based on the co-precipitation of aqueous solutions of BaCl{sub 2} and NH{sub 4}F to yield BaFCl. The doping by europium in the 2+ oxidation state is realized by the reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} employing granular zinc in the BaCl{sub 2} solution under nitrogen. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy have been used to confirm the BaFCl phase and photoluminescence, in the temperature range of 2.5–290 K, and room-temperature cathodoluminescence spectra have been measured to characterize the Eu{sup 2+} ions in the sample.

  2. Reactivity of a Thick BaO Film Supported on Pt(111): Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Thick BaO Film Supported on Pt(111): Adsorption and Reaction of NO2, H2O and CO2. Reactivity of a Thick BaO Film Supported on Pt(111): Adsorption and Reaction of NO2, H2O and...

  3. ECONOMICS BA DEGREE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FLOWCHART FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    ECONOMICS BA DEGREE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FLOWCHART FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013 (see http://www.catalog.sdes.ucf.edu/) All B.A. Economics majors will be required to take a minimum of seven (7) electives by choosing from the following: PREREQUISITES REQUIRED ECO 3223 Money and Banking ECO 3410 Mathematical Economics ECO 3703

  4. The Catalytic Chemistry of HCN+NO over Na- and Ba-Y, FAU: An...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Catalytic Chemistry of HCN+NO over Na- and Ba-Y, FAU: An In Situ FTIR and TPDTPR Study. The Catalytic Chemistry of HCN+NO over Na- and Ba-Y, FAU: An In Situ FTIR and TPDTPR...

  5. The effect of BaCO3 on the hydration of OPC and composite cements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    The effect of BaCO3 on the hydration of OPC and composite cements Claire A. Utton* and Neil B of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and up to 90% blast furnace slag (BFS), are used to encapsulate Intermediate. The effect of BaCO3 on the hydration properties of composite cements is being studied. This paper reports

  6. Submillimeter and microwave residual losses in epitaxial films of Y-Ba-Cu-O and Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Richards, P.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Garrison, S.M.; Newman, N. [Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Eom, C.B.; Geballe, T.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; Etemad, S.; Inam, A.; Venkatesan, T. [Bell Communications Research, Inc., Red Bank, NJ (United States); Martens, J.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, W.Y. [International Business Machines Corp., San Jose, CA (United States); Bourne, L.C. [Superconductor Technologies, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a novel bolometric technique and a resonant technique to obtain accurate submillimeter and microwave residual loss data for epitaxial thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} and Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. For all films we obtain good agreement between the submillimeter and microwave data, with the residual losses in both the Y-Ba-Cu-O and Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films scaling approximately as frequency squared below {approximately} 1 THz. We are able to fit the losses in the Y-Ba-Cu-O films to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity, in good agreement with results from a Kramers-Kronig analysis of the loss data. We observe strong phonon structure in the Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films for frequencies between 2 and 21 THz, and are unable to fit these losses to the simple weakly coupled grain model. This is in strong contrast to the case for other high {Tc} superconductors such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, where phonon structure observed in ceramic samples is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of the electronic screening due to the high conductivity of the a-b planes.

  7. Wind Resource and Feasibility Assessment Report for the Lummi Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc.; J.C. Brennan & Associates, Inc.; Hamer Environmental L.P.

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the wind resource on the Lummi Indian Reservation (Washington State) and presents the methodology, assumptions, and final results of the wind energy development feasibility assessment, which included an assessment of biological impacts and noise impacts.

  8. Phonon properties of BaFe?X? (X=S, Se) spin ladder compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Popovicq, Z. V.; Petrovic, C.; Scepanovic, M.; Lazarevic, N.; Opacic, M.; Radonjic, M. M.; Tanaskovic, D.; Lei, Hechang

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by themore »lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.« less

  9. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  10. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  11. First results about hydrogen loading by means of pulsed electrolysis of Y$_{1}$Ba$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{7}$ pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celani, F; Di Gioacchino, D; Spallone, A; Tripodi, P; Pace, S; Polichetti, M; Marini, P

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First results about hydrogen loading by means of pulsed electrolysis of Y$_{1}$Ba$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{7}$ pellets

  12. Oklahoma State University Honors Degrees (May. 1969 -May, 2013) Barber Frank A. Chemistry (B.A.) AS MAY 1969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    .A.) AS MAY 1976 McGuigan Patrick B. History (B.A.) AS MAY 1976 Holmes William J. Humanities (B.A.) AS MAY.S.) AS MAY 1969 Seebo Thomas C. II Political Science (B.A.) AS MAY 1970 Stewart Elisabeth French (B Charles E. Spanish (B.A.) AS DEC 1972 Miller Amanda K. English (B.S.) AS MAY 1973 Potts Jon R. III History

  13. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  14. Catalytic decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Weaver, Jason F.; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 formed on BaO/Pt(111) (Pt(111) surface is partially covered by BaO) in the presence of CO was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), infrared reflection absorption (IRA) and X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies. The exposure of BaO/Pt(111) to elevated NO2 pressure (1.0×10-4 Torr) at 450 K leads to the formation of Ba(NO3)2, chemisorbed O (OPt) and Pt-oxide-like domains. During TPD, the Ba(NO3)2 begins to thermally decompose near 490 K, releasing NO and NO2 with the maximum NOx desorption rate seen at 605 K. The OPt species formed following the exposure of BaO/Pt(111) to NO2 react with CO to release CO2 at 450 K. The consumption of OPt during CO oxidation initiates the migration of O from the Pt-oxide-like domains to the chemisorbed phase, where the CO oxidation reaction occurs. Therefore, the removal of OPt by CO leads to the reduction of oxidized Pt, and to the formation of metallic Pt(111) domains, where, subsequently, catalytic decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 can take place. The Pt-catalyzed decomposition of Ba(NO3)2 occurs readily at 450 K, a temperature much lower than the onset of the decomposition temperature of Ba(NO3)2 in the presence of oxidized Pt. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  15. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

  16. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Area team for Soil Metagenomics and Carbon Cycling develops and uses community genomics approaches to link the biological processes controlling belowground carbon storage...

  17. Synthesis and magnetic properties of the double layer perovskite CeBaFe2O5+w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lima, Oscar Ferreira

    Synthesis and magnetic properties of the double layer perovskite CeBaFe2O5+w R. L. de Almeida,1 O The synthesis, crystallographic structure, and magnetic properties of polycrystalline single-phase samples of CeBaFe results on the successful prepara- tion and characterization of polycrystalline CeBaFe2O5+w samples. Ideal

  18. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS or upper division) 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  19. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Suffian N. [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity. We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22–210 m Jm?2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundaries—making a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower assessed “ordered” moments from longer spatial and/or time averaging and should be considered directly.

  20. Determination of transition frequencies in a single $^{138}$Ba$^{+}$ ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dijck, E A; Grier, A T; Jungmann, K; Mohanty, A; Valappol, N; Willmann, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition frequencies between low-lying energy levels in a single trapped $^{138}$Ba$^{+}$ ion have been measured with laser spectroscopy referenced to an optical frequency comb. By extracting the frequencies of one-photon and two-photon components of the line shape using an eight-level optical Bloch model, we achieved 0.1 MHz accuracy for the 5d $^{2}$D$_{3/2}$ - 6p $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ and 6s $^{2}$S$_{1/2}$ - 5d $^{2}$D$_{3/2}$ transition frequencies, and 0.2 MHz for the 6s $^{2}$S$_{1/2}$ - 6p $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition frequency.

  1. AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Prepare... yourself for a career in integrating life and engineering for systems in agriculture, food, environment, and energy, and to contribute to the world's largest industry. COLLEGE OF ACES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

  2. Human Embryology & Developmental Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Biology is the modern synthesis of biological and medical sciences that looks at how the tissues, and is at the forefront of recent advances in modern medicine. Current research has shown that many of the molecular Web Pages for names). The Head of School of Medical Sciences is always available for advice regarding

  3. Molecular Biology DEGREE PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    to the course co-ordinator for that module (See University Catalogue of Courses or SMS World Wide Web Pages in molecular biology have a wide range of career options, including virtually all areas of biology, medicine with mastering statistics, graphics and word processing software packages. General Enquiries The Degree Programme

  4. Synthesis and crystal structure of new layered BaNaSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaNaY(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} orthoborates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seryotkin, Yurii V., E-mail: yuvs@uiggm.nsc.r [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy RAS, 3, Koptyuga avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bakakin, Vladimir V. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry RAS, 3, Lavrentieva avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kokh, Aleksandr E.; Kononova, Nadezhda G. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy RAS, 3, Koptyuga avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Svetlyakova, Tatyana N. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy RAS, 3, Koptyuga avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin A. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy RAS, 3, Koptyuga avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Drebushchak, Tatyana N. [Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry RAS, 18, Kutateladze street, 630128 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals of two new layered BaNaSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (I) and BaNaY(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (II) orthoborates are grown from the melt-solution by the spontaneous crystallization onto the platinum loop. Single crystal X-ray analysis showed that the compounds are isostructural with the space group R3-bar, a=5.23944(12) and 5.3338(2) A, and c=34.5919(11) and 35.8303(19) A for I and II, respectively, Z=6. The distinctive feature of the structure is the close-packed composite anion-cation (Ba,Na)(BO{sub 3}) layers. The layers are combined into the base building packages of two types: {l_brace}M{sup 3+}[Ba{sup 2+}(BO{sub 3}){sup 3-}]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +} and {l_brace}M{sup 3+}[Na{sup +}(BO{sub 3}){sup 3-}]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup -}, where M is Sc or Y. Neutral-charge two-package (four-layer) blocks are stacked by the rhombohedral principle into twelve layers of the cubic packing. - Graphical abstract: The distinctive feature of new orthoborate crystals BaNaSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and BaNaY(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is the combination of base building packages of two types: {l_brace}M{sup 3+}[Ba{sup 2+}(BO{sub 3}){sup 3-}]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +} and {l_brace}M{sup 3+}[Na{sup +}(BO{sub 3}){sup 3-}]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup -}, where M is Sc or Y.

  5. Thermodynamic Model for the Solubility of Ba(SeO4, SO4) Precipitates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Kitamura, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Doi, Reisuke; Yoshida, Yasushi

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The solubility of Ba(SeO4, SO4) precipitates was determined as a function of the BaSeO4 mole fractions, ranging from 0.0015 to 0.3830, and time with an equilibration period extending to as long as 302 days. Equilibrium/steady state conditions in this system are reached in ? 65 days. Pitzer’s ion interaction model was used to calculate solid and aqueous phase activity coefficients. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the data do not satisfy Gibbs-Duhem equation, thereby demonstrating that a single-solid solution phase does not control both the selenate and sulfate concentrations. Our extensive data with log 10 [Ba] ranging from ?3.6 to ?5.9 mol kg?1, log 10 [SeO4] rangingfrom?3.6 to -5.2 mol kg?1, and log 10 [SO4] ranging from?4.0 to ?5.3 mol kg?1 can be explained with the formation of an ideal BaSeO4 solid solution phase that controls the selenium concentrations and a slightly disordered/less-crystalline BaSO4(s) (log 10𝐾?sp = ?9.5 instead of ?10.05 for barite) that controls the sulfate concentrations. In these experiments the BaSO4 component of the solid solution phase never reaches thermodynamic equilibrium with the aqueous phase. Thermodynamic interpretations of the data show that both the ideal BaSeO4 solid solution phase and less-crystalline BaSO4 (s) phase are in equilibrium with each other in the entire range of BaSeO 4 mole fractions investigated in this study.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

  7. The current use of studies on promoters and cocarcinogens in quantitative risk assessment. Environ. Health Perspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Stara; D. Mukerjee; R. Mcgaughy; T P. Durkint; M. L. Dourson

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the priority pollutants discussed in EPA's Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents have been reported to have promotion or cocarcinogenic activity. For example, phenol appears to have tumor-promoting activity in mice when repeatedly applied after initiation with either 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Similarly, it has been reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent promoter of liver tumors as well as a cocarcinogen. However, in developing guidelines to derive ambient water quality criteria, it became apparent that satisfactory approaches had not been developed for using promotion/cocarcinogen data in human health risk estimation, nor were available promotion and/or cocarcinogen data on individual chemicals strong enough to permit a defensible quantitative risk estimation, if such approaches had existed. For this reason, the criteria derived for pollutants with reported promotion/cocarcinogenic activities were based on approaches for carcinogenic (e.g., TCDD), toxic (e.g., fluoranthene) or organoleptic effects (e.g., 2,4-dichlorophenol). Nonetheless, with advances in studies on both the biological mechanisms and dose/response patterns of promoters and cocarcinogens, it may be possible to develop a scientifically valid quantitative approach to use this type of data for derivation of ambient water quality criteria or other risk assessments. Some progress toward this goal and the problems associated with this effort are discussed.

  8. Nanolamellar magnetoelectric BaTiO3–CoFe2O4 bicrystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Shenqiang; Laver, Mark; Wuttig, Manfred

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanolamellar magnetoelectric BaTiO3–CoFe2O4 bicrystal Shenqiang Ren,1 Mark Laver,2 and Manfred Wuttig1,a#1; 1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2115, USA 2NIST Center for Neutron... Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6103, USA #1;Received 30 July 2009; accepted 9 September 2009; published online 13 October 2009#2; Here, we report a spontaneously formed nanolamellar BaTiO3–CoFe2O4 bicrystal. #1;11¯0#2; interfaces join the BaTiO3...

  9. Extracting information from biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chindelevitch, Leonid Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology, the study of biological systems in a holistic manner, has been catalyzed by a dramatic improvement in experimental techniques, coupled with a constantly increasing availability of biological data. The ...

  10. Master track Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    their master. Our two MSc courses "Computational Biology" and "Bioinformatics and Evolutionary GenomicsMaster track Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics Modeling and bioinformatics is an important Biology & Bioinformatics provides courses introducing you to the basic concepts of modeling

  11. Viewing biology in action | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biology in action Released: June 11, 2014 DOE-funded pilot program will create mesoscale biological imaging platform James Evans EMSL received first-year funding of almost...

  12. Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professor of Biology: Early Retirement page 44 Jarrell: ToProfessor of Biology: Early Retirement page 45 Jarrell: ToWar 33 Voluntary Early Retirement Incentive Program (VERIP)

  13. BA Political Economy Political Economy caters for students who wish to understand the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    BA Political Economy Political Economy caters for students who wish to understand the political, philosophical and social underpinnings of modern economies,andwhomayfeeluncomfortablewiththehighly mathematical to International Relations; Introduction to Political Economy; Problems of World History/End of Empire

  14. The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Introduction to Engineering Computation · STAT 310 Probability and Statistics · STAT 410 Introduction246 Statistics The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD Course engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, mathematics, political science

  15. The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Introduction to Engineering Computation · STAT 310 Probability and Statistics · STAT 410 Introduction253 Statistics The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD Course engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, mathematics, political science

  16. Reaction of NO2 with a pure, thick BaO film: the effect of temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    film: the effect of temperature on the nature of NOx species formed. Abstract: The adsorption and reaction of NO2 on a thick (>30 ML), pure BaO film deposited onto an Al2O3...

  17. BA in FAMILY HISTORY--GENEALOGY (734125) MAP Sheet Department of History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BA in FAMILY HISTORY--GENEALOGY (734125) MAP Sheet Department of History For students entering of the University Core Doctrinal Foundation and Religion requirement): Rel C 261* Intro to Family History (Genealogy

  18. BA in FAMILY HISTORY--GENEALOGY (734125) MAP Sheet Department of History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    BA in FAMILY HISTORY--GENEALOGY (734125) MAP Sheet Department of History For students entering requirement): Rel C 261* Intro to Family History (Genealogy) Rel C 293R*Specialized Studies in Family History

  19. Characteristics of Desulfation Behavior for Pre-Sulfated Pt-BaO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is negligible, in agreement with the results of H2 TPRX. These results suggest that H2S produced by the reduction of BaSO4 is readily re-adsorbed on the ceria support to form...

  20. Excellent Sulfur Resistance of Pt/BaO/CeO2 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and CHF Peden.2008."Excellent Sulfur Resistance of PtBaOCeO2 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts."Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental 84(3-4):545-551. doi:10.1016j.apcatb.2008.05.009...

  1. Water-induced morphology changes in BaO/?-Al2O3 NOx storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials: an FTIR, TPD, and time-resolved synchrotron XRD Water-induced morphology changes in BaO?-Al2O3 NOx storage materials: an FTIR, TPD, and time-resolved synchrotron...

  2. Biological Interactions and Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proactive "EMSL 2.0-style" research paradigm. Because of the rapid pace of modern genomics and systems biology research, it is necessary to respond rapidly and flexibly to...

  3. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  4. Changes in Jupiter's Great Red Spot (19792006) and Oval BA (20002006) Sushil Shetty *, Philip S. Marcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Philip S.

    the magnitude of the PV anomaly of the Oval BA changed from 2000, when its cloud cover was white, to 2006, when its cloud cover was red. The best-fit results also show that the areas of the PV anomalies of the GRS and of the Oval BA are smaller than the areas of their corresponding cloud covers at all times. Using the best

  5. Multiferroic BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh, R.

    an additional degree of freedom in the design of actuators, transducers, and storage devices. HoweverMultiferroic BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 Nanostructures H. Zheng,1 J. Wang,1 S. E. Lofland,3 Z. Ma,1 L. Mohaddes and magnetic order param- eters in a nanostructured BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 ferroelectromagnet. This facilitates

  6. Crystallography and Physical Properties of BaCo2As2, Ba0.94K0.06Co2As2, and Ba0.78K0.22Co2As2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, V K [Ames Laboratory; Quirinale, Dante G [Ames Laboratory; Lee, Yongbin [Ames Laboratory; Harmon, Bruce N [Ames Laboratory; Furukawa, Yuji [Ames Laboratory; Ogloblichev, V V [Ural Division of Russian Academy of Science; Huq, A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Abernathy, D L [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Stephens, P W [SUNY of Stony Brook; McQueeney, Robert J [Ames Laboratory; Kreyssig, Aandreas [Ames Laboratory; Goldman, Alan I [Ames Laboratory; Johnston, David C [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallographic and physical properties of polycrystalline and single crystal samples of BaCo2As2 and K-doped Ba{1-x}K{x}Co2As2 (x = 0.06, 0.22) are investigated by x-ray and neutron powder diffraction, magnetic susceptibility chi, magnetization, heat capacity Cp, {75}As NMR and electrical resistivity rho measurements versus temperature T. The crystals were grown using both Sn flux and CoAs self-flux, where the Sn-grown crystals contain 1.6-2.0 mol% Sn. All samples crystallize in the tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm). For BaCo2As2, powder neutron diffraction data show that the c-axis lattice parameter exhibits anomalous negative thermal expansion from 10 to 300 K, whereas the a-axis lattice parameter and the unit cell volume show normal positive thermal expansion over this T range. No transitions in BaCo2As2 were found in this T range from any of the measurements. Below 40-50 K, we find rho ~ T^2 indicating a Fermi liquid ground state. A large density of states at the Fermi energy D(EF) ~ 18 states/(eV f.u.) for both spin directions is found from low-T Cp(T) measurements, whereas the band structure calculations give D(EF) = 8.23 states/(eV f.u.). The {75}As NMR shift data versus T have the same T dependence as the chi(T) data, demonstrating that the derived chi(T) data are intrinsic. The observed {75}As nuclear spin dynamics are consistent with the presence of ferromagnetic and/or stripe-type antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations. The crystals of Ba{0.78}K{0.22}Co2As2 were grown in Sn flux and show properties very similar to those of undoped BaCo2As2. On the other hand, the crystals from two batches of Ba{0.94}K{0.06}Co2As2 grown in CoAs self-flux show evidence of weak ferromagnetism at T < 10 K with small ordered moments at 1.8 K of 0.007 and 0.03 muB per formula unit, respectively.

  7. Narrow Bandgap in beta-BaZn2As2 and Its Chemical Origins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Zewen; Ueda, Shigenori; Toda, Yoshitake; Ran, Fan-Yong; Guo, Jiangang; Lei, Hechang; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-BaZn2As2 is known to be a p-type semiconductor with the layered crystal structure similar to that of LaZnAsO, leading to the expectation that beta-BaZn2As2 and LaZnAsO have similar bandgaps; however, the bandgap of beta-BaZn2As2 (previously-reported value ~0.2 eV) is one order of magnitude smaller than that of LaZnAsO (1.5 eV). In this paper, the reliable bandgap value of beta-BaZn2As2 is determined to be 0.23 eV from the intrinsic region of the tem-perature dependence of electrical conductivity. The origins of this narrow bandgap are discussed based on the chemi-cal bonding nature probed by 6 keV hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, hybrid density functional calculations, and the ligand theory. One origin is the direct As-As hybridization between adjacent [ZnAs] layers, which leads to a secondary splitting of As 4p levels and raises the valence band maximum. The other is that the non-bonding Ba 5dx2-y2 orbitals form unexpectedly deep conduction band minimum (CBM) in beta-BaZn2As2 although the CBM of L...

  8. Photoluminescent BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders prepared by complex polymerization method (CPM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azevedo Marques, Ana Paula de [Laboratorio de Analise Termica e Materiais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)]. E-mail: apamarques@liec.ufscar.br; Melo, Dulce M.A. de [Laboratorio de Analise Termica e Materiais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Pizani, Paulo S. [Laboratorio de Semicondutores, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Joya, Miryam R. [Laboratorio de Semicondutores, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Leite, Edson R. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, CMDMC, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Longo, Elson [CMDMC, LIEC, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders were prepared by the Complex Polymerization Method (CPM). The structure properties of the BaMoO{sub 4} powders were characterized by FTIR transmittance spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, photoluminescence spectra (PL) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM). The XRD, FTIR and Raman data showed that BaMoO{sub 4} at 300 deg. C was disordered. At 400 deg. C and higher temperature, BaMoO{sub 4} crystalline scheelite-type phases could be identified, without the presence of additional phases, according to the XRD, FTIR and Raman data. The calculated average crystallite sizes, calculated by XRD, around 40 nm, showed the tendency to increase with the temperature. The crystallite sizes, obtained by HR-SEM, were around of 40-50 nm. The sample that presented the highest intensity of the red emission band was the one heat treated at 400 deg. C for 2 h, and the sample that displayed the highest intensity of the green emission band was the one heat treated at 700 deg. C for 2 h. The CPM was shown to be a low cost route for the production of BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders, with the advantages of lower temperature, smaller time and reduced cost. The optical properties observed for BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders suggested that this material is a highly promising candidate for photoluminescent applications.

  9. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on Si (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu; Prater, John T. [Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Punugupati, Sandhyarani; Hunte, Frank; Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report on the epitaxial integration of room temperature lead-free ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3} thin (?1050?nm) films on Si (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique through a domain matching epitaxy paradigm. We employed MgO and TiN as buffer layers to create BaTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3}/MgO/TiN/Si (100) heterostructures. C-axis oriented and cube-on-cube epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3} is formed on Si (100) as evidenced by the in-plane and out-of-plane x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray photoemission spectroscopic measurements show that Ti is in 4(+) state. Polarization hysteresis measurements together with Raman spectroscopy and temperature-dependent x-ray diffraction confirm the room temperature ferroelectric nature of BaTiO{sub 3}. Furthermore, laser irradiation of BaTiO{sub 3} thin film is found to induce ferromagnetic-like behavior but affects adversely the ferroelectric characteristics. Laser irradiation induced ferromagnetic properties seem to originate from the creation of oxygen vacancies, whereas the pristine BaTiO{sub 3} shows diamagnetic behavior, as expected. This work has opened up the route for the integration of room temperature lead-free ferroelectric functional oxides on a silicon platform.

  10. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  11. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  12. Assessing the Impacts of Wind Integration in the Western Provinces Amy Sopinka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and utilize high levels of renewable energy technology, such as wind power, depends upon the composition penetrations in the Alberta grid under various balancing protocols. We find that adding #12;iv wind capacityAssessing the Impacts of Wind Integration in the Western Provinces by Amy Sopinka B.A., Queen

  13. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan; ,

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  14. Planning Formative Assessment Workshop 2012 J.A.Nychka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    ching Go nd Cross TGI p ents/Teachin tgi/data_entr or course _ tive Asse als Inven please do so a g? o assess? e the holistic a tion, activitie erta.ca/docume tive Asse ded Learn nt clearly und and Community nkClick.aspx?file g Format y College: eticket=%2F0BA4 tive Asse 4qlDaAE%3D&ta essment abid=3938

  15. Search for compounds of the NaBaR(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} family (R = La, Nd, Gd, and Yb) and the new NaBaYb(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} orthoborate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svetlyakova, T. N., E-mail: svetlyakovatn@gmail.com; Kokh, A. E.; Kononova, N. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Fedorov, P. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Rashchenko, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Maillard, A. [University of Metz and Supelec, Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques, Photonique et Systemes (France)] [University of Metz and Supelec, Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques, Photonique et Systemes (France)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for compounds of the NaBaR(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} composition (where R = La{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, or Yb{sup 3+}) is performed by solid state synthesis and spontaneous crystallization. A new compound, NaBaYb(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, is found in this series. It crystallizes in space group R3{sup -} and belongs to the family of sublayer complex orthoborates with isolated BO{sub 3} groups NaBaR(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (R = Y, Sc, and Yb). Theoretical X-ray powder diffraction patterns of NaBaY(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NaBaSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and NaBaYb(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} are calculated based on single-crystal data.

  16. Properties of polycarbonate containing BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomax, J. F.; Lomax, E. A.; Lomax, P. Q. [Chemistry Department, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States); Fontanella, J. J., E-mail: fontanel@Comcast.net; Edmondson, C. A.; Wintersgill, M. C.; Westgate, M. A. [Physics Department, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States); Wolak, M. A. [U.S. Naval Research Lab, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Bogle, X.; Rúa, A.; Greenbaum, S. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The real part of the relative permittivity, ??, and dielectric loss, tan??, have been determined at audio frequencies at temperatures from about 5?K to 350?K for nano-composites composed of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles and polycarbonate. The room temperature breakdown strength was also measured and thermal analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance and scanning electron microscopy studies were carried out. For some films the nanoparticles were surface-treated (STNP) while for others they were not (UNP). For concentrations of UNP greater than about 3.4 vol. %, ?? is much larger than expected on the basis of laws of mixing. On the other hand, ?? for materials made using STNP is well-behaved. Correspondingly, increased loss (?? or tan??) in the vicinity of room temperature is observed for the materials made from UNP. The anomalously large values of relative permittivity and increased loss are attributed to the presence of large aggregates in the materials made using the UNP. For both UNP-and STNP-based materials, the breakdown strength is found to decrease as nanoparticle concentration increases. The breakdown strength for the materials made using STNP is found to be larger for all concentrations than for those containing UNP despite the presence of large aggregates in some of the STNP-based materials. This shows that breakdown is strongly affected by the nanoparticle surfaces and/or the interface layer. It is also found that the breakdown strength for materials made using UNP increases as particle size increases. Finally, variable temperature and pressure proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were made to assess the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on polymer motion, and the effects were found to be very minor.

  17. Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of HgBa 2Ca 2Cu 3O 8 y and HgBa 2Ca 3Cu 4O 10 y up to 30 GPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of HgBa 2Ca 2Cu 3O 8 y and HgBa 2Ca of the reported pressure- induced Tc values well above 150 K in the mercury-based high-Tc superconductors has been superconducting transition temperature Tc have been observed in HgBa2Ca2Cu3O8 y Hg-1223 samples under very high

  18. Page 1 | B.A. in Special Education Adapted Curriculum | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2014 B.A. in Special Education (Adapted Curriculum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | B.A. in Special Education ­ Adapted Curriculum | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2014 B ­ Adapted Curriculum | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2014 Special Education - Adapted Curriculum Areas.A. in Special Education (Adapted Curriculum) Academic Plan of Study College of Education Department of Special

  19. The new Hg-rich barium indium mercurides BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7?x} (x=3.1) and BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11?x} (x=0–2.8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendorff, Marco; Schwarz, Michael; Röhr, Caroline, E-mail: caroline@ruby.chemie.uni-freiburg.de

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compounds BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7?x} (x=3.1(1)) and BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11?x} (x=0–2.8) were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. Their crystal structures have been determined using single crystal X-ray data. BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7?x} (x=3.1(1)) crystallizes in a new structure type (orthorhombic, oC16, space group Cmmm: a=512.02(1), b=1227.68(3), c=668.61(2) pm, Z=2, R1=0.0311). In the structure, the atoms of the three crystallographically different mixed In/Hg positions form planar nets of four-, six- and eight-membered rings. These nets are shifted against each other such that the four-membered rings form empty distorted cubes. The cubes are connected via common edges, corners and folded ladders, which are also found in BaIn{sub 2}/BaHg{sub 2} (KHg{sub 2} structure type) and BaIn (?-NaHg type). The Ba atoms are centered in the eight-membered rings and exhibit an overall coordination number of 20. The [BaM{sub 20}] polyhedra and twice as many distorted [M{sub 8}] cubes tesselate the space. BaIn{sub 2.8}Hg{sub 8.2} (cubic, cP36, space group Pm3{sup ¯}m, a=961.83(1) pm, Z=3, R1=0.0243) is the border compound of the phase width BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11?x} of the rare BaHg{sub 11} structure type. In the structure, ideal [M{sub 8}] cubes (at the corners of the unit cell) and BaM{sub 20} polyhedra (at the edges of the unit cell) represent the building blocks comparable to the other new In mercuride. In accordance with the increased In/Hg content, additional M-pure regions appear: the center of the unit cell contains a huge [Hg(1)M(2){sub 12}M(3,4){sub 32}] polyhedron, a Hg-centered cuboctahedron of In/Hg atoms surrounded by a capped cantellated cube of 32 additional M atoms. For both structure types, the bonding situation and the ‘coloring’, i.e. the In/Hg distribution of the polyanionic network, are discussed considering the different sizes of the atoms and the charge distribution (Bader AIM charges), which have been calculated within the framework of FP-LAPW density functional theory. - Graphical abstract: BaIn{sub 2.6}Hg{sub 4.4}: distorted cubes [(In/Hg){sub 8}] (green, like in BaHg{sub 11}), folded ladders (violet, like in BaIn, BaHg{sub 2} and BaIn{sub 2}) and Ba coordination polyhedra [Ba(In/Hg){sub 20}] (blue, like in BaHg{sub 11}). - Highlights: • The Hg-rich In-mercuride BaIn{sub 3.1}Hg{sub 3.9} crystallizes with a singular structure type. • The phase width of the BaHg{sub 11} structure in BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11-x} ends at x=2.8. • The relations of both compounds with other alkaline-earth mercurides are outlined. • The Hg/In coloring of the polyanion is discussed considering the structure features. • Bonding aspects are explored using band structure calculations.

  20. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M.; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  1. Biological assessment: possible impacts of exploratory drilling in Section 18B, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and other sensitive species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed site is thought to provide habitat for the endangered an Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard, as well as the giant kangaroo rat and San Joaquin antelope ground squirrel. The objective of this study was to assess the possible impacts of the exploratory drilling on these species and their essential habitats. The proposed project will have four phases: (1) surveying; (2) site preparation; (3) drilling, logging, and testing; and (4) cleanup and restoration. During site preparation approximately 1.5 acres of vegetation and surface soils will be removed for an access road and well pad. During a 20-day drilling, logging, and testing phase, there will be increased vehicular traffic, human activities, noise and ground vibrations, and illumination during the night. Although 1.5 acres of habitat will be disturbed, there is no evidence to indicate any of the species has burrows on-site that will be lost during land clearing. Loss of habitat will be mitigated during the cleanup and restoration phases when disturbed areas will be revegetated. Increased traffic, human activities, noise and ground vibration levels, as well as illumination throughout the night, may disturb the fauna. However, these species have adapted to intensive human disturbances on Elk Hills without obvious negative effects. The most direct threat to the species is the possibility that they might be killed by vehicles. Since the project poses so few threats to individual endangered or sensitive species, and since minor habitat disturbances will be mitigated during a restoration program, it is unlikely that completion of the project jeopardizes the continued existence of any of the species or their essential habitats. (ERB)

  2. Biological assessment: possible impacts of exploratory drilling in sections 8B and 18H, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and other sensitive species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Sauls, M.L.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to drill exploratory wells on two sections, 8B and 18H, within Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 in western Kern County, California. The proposed sites are thought to provide habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard, as well as two sensitive species: the giant kangaroo rat and San Joaquin antelope ground squirrel. The objective was to assess the possible impacts of the exploratory drilling on these species and their essential habitats. Although 23 potential San Joaquin kit fox den sites were found during surveys of a total of 512 ha (1280 acres) surrounding both well sites, no burrows were closer than 30 m from proposed disturbance, and most were over 200 m away. Two blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed on private land within 8B, one was observed on private land in 18H, and two were seen on DOE portions of 18H. No evidence of blunt-nosed leopard lizards was gathered in the immediate vicinity of either proposed well site. Although 5 ha of habitat will be disturbed, there is no evidence to indicate any of the species has burrows on-site that will be lost during land clearing. Loss of habitat will be mitigated during the cleanup and restoration phases when disturbed areas will be revegetated. Increased traffic, human activities, noise and ground vibration levels, as well as illumination throughout the night, may disturb the fauna. However, these species have adapted to intensive human disturbances on Elk Hills without obvious negative effects. The short duration of the project should allow any displaced animals to return to the sites after drilling ceases.

  3. Fishery Biology Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program/degrees/index.html University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Fisheries Conservation and Management http://ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/wildlifefisheries/gradstudiesFisheries.html Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 368490001 Programs: Aquaculture, Aquatic Ecology, Fishery Management

  4. BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Microscope) Analytical Equipment · High Performance Liquid Chromatography · Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography · Gas Chromatography · GC/MS · Elemental Analyser Molecular Biology Equipment · Biorad PCR Machine reactor for scale up studies In-line Particle sizers Rheometers Separation tanks Oscillating column (4m

  5. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    and interdisciplinary areas, including biochemical solar energy research, artificial photosynthesis and bio Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree in an interdisciplinary environment with research opportunities in emerging fields, such as energy and the environment

  6. Biological and Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. After capitalize on recent technological and scientific advances. Several multidisciplinary projects of key,ecosystemmonitoringandrestoration,combiningcropresearchandmicrobial engineering to make biofuels a viable alternative to fossil fuels, and personalized medicine to improve health

  7. Biological and Environmental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recalcitrance. Using an integrated approach to solving the challenge of producing biofuel from cellulosic materials, the center will not only provide the scientific basis for affordable and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. BESC researchers have

  8. CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells David Dingli and Martin A. Nowak Cancer cells are generally infectious agents and be transmitted between individuals. The current view of cancer development is that normal cells are transformed into tumour cells by sequential mutations that activate cancer- promoting

  9. ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

  10. Significant increase of Curie temperature in nano-scale BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yueliang; Liao, Zhenyu; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Longtu [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The low Curie temperature (T{sub c}?=?130?°C) of bulk BaTiO{sub 3} greatly limits its applications. In this work, the phase structures of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 2.5?nm to 10?nm were studied at various temperatures by using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with an in-situ heating holder. The results implied that each BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticle was composed of different phases, and the ferroelectric ones were observed in the shells due to the complicated surface structure. The ferroelectric phases in BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles remained at 600?°C, suggesting a significant increase of T{sub c}. Based on the in-situ TEM results and the data reported by others, temperature-size phase diagrams for BaTiO{sub 3} particles and ceramics were proposed, showing that the phase transition became diffused and the T{sub c} obviously increased with decreasing size. The present work sheds light on the design and fabrication of advanced devices for high temperature applications.

  11. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  12. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS Geology Elective 3-4 See note 2 on page 2 General Elective 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  13. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous Symposia, we had excellent attendance of participants representing 20-30 academic or research-oriented facilities along with 25-30 private corporations from 5-10 countries. To broaden the audience for the Symposium and ensure the continued accessibility of the presentations, we made the presentation videos available afterward on the ISB’s website.

  14. Guest Editors' Introduction: Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Douglas

    + undergraduate participants from around the world. Synthetic Biology had a global market which gene- rated $233 Tufts University h SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IS trending, as evidenced by the recent achievements in biofuels

  15. Experiment design for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, Joshua Farley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

  16. Modular architecture in biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

  17. Biological Engineering integrates life sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    mitigating 40 million pounds of carbon dioxide greenhouse gases each year, and would pay for itself in les with the constantly evolving science of biology, the field of Biological Engineering tackles local, national

  18. Field-effect BaTiO{sub 3}-Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wentao; Liu, Fude, E-mail: fordliu@hku.hk; Man Lau, Chor; Wang, Lei; Yang, Guandong; Zheng, Dawei [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Li, Zhigang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional solar cells make use of the spatial variation in electronic environment due to junctions for charge separation. We investigated field-effect BaTiO{sub 3}-Si solar cells that utilize the bound surface charges of BaTiO{sub 3} to separate charge carriers in silicon. Rectifying behavior and photovoltaic effect were observed on cells with forward polarization. Theoretical simulation indicated that the induced electric field due to BaTiO{sub 3} polarization could extend into the silicon layer, which is consistent with experimental observations. In addition, adjusting relevant parameters may optimize the electric field distribution. The cells are promising in terms of material selection, device design, and fabrication.

  19. EXPLAINING THE Sr AND Ba SCATTER IN EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, W.; Suda, T.; Boyd, R. N.; Kajino, T.; Famiano, M. A., E-mail: aoki.wako@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: takuma.suda@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: richard11boyde@comcast.net, E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: michael.famiano@wmich.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Compilations of abundances of strontium and barium in extremely metal-poor stars show that an apparent cutoff is observed for [Sr/Ba] at [Fe/H] < -3.6 and large fluctuations for [Fe/H] > -3.6 with a clear upper bound depending on metallicity. We study the factors that place upper limits on the logarithmic ratio [Sr/Ba]. A model is developed in which the collapses of type II supernovae are found to reproduce many of the features seen in the data. This model is consistent with galactic chemical evolution constraints of light-element enrichment in metal-poor stars. Effects of turbulence in an explosive site have also been simulated, and are found to be important in explaining the large scatter observed in the [Sr/Ba] data.

  20. Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Wiley HS, Kaplan S. 2011. "Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

  1. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen...

  2. Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

  3. Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interdisciplinary scientists. Additional systems biology resources Research Highlights Media Mentions Publications Newsletters Biosciences Division Recent news releases 11...

  4. Information resources and the correlation of response patterns between biological end points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malling, H.V. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the analysis of information for mutagenesis, a biological end point that is important in the overall process of assessing possible adverse health effects from chemical exposure. 17 refs.

  5. Perspectives Computational Biology in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neshich, Goran

    Perspectives Computational Biology in Brazil Goran Neshich Introduction At the request of the PLoS Computational Biology Editor-in- Chief, I agreed to write about computational biology in Brazil (see author of the field itself is short); b) the current state of the field in Brazil; c) the influence of computational

  6. COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    in the burgeoning fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. A major outcome of the initial funding period was the establishment of ISU's interdepartmental graduate program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB for Research Excellence in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB). The ISU-NMSU partnership

  7. Model calculations of nuclear data for biologically-important elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Blann, M.; Reffo, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Young, P.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe calculations of neutron-induced reactions on carbon and oxygen for incident energies up to 70 MeV, the relevant clinical energy in radiation neutron therapy. Our calculations using the FKK-GNASH, GNASH, and ALICE codes are compared with experimental measurements, and their usefulness for modeling reactions on biologically-important elements is assessed.

  8. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  9. Phase relationships in the BaO-Y?O?-Cu-O system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegg, Turi

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Os ? CuO showing the solid solution region for "the other perovskite" after Roth et al. 107 59. I'he BaO ? YsOs ? Cu ? 0 base plane of the polyhedra The quaternary BaO ? YsOs ? Cu ? 0 system with the suggested primary phase fields . 61. Pseudo... become insulating svhen z::. 7. 1, this means that the 213 compound goes from an insulating to a semiconducting to a superconducting to an insulating state as oxygen is added. The 213 compound has an oxygen-deficient perovskite structure . Its unit...

  10. Energy Calibration of the BaBar EMC Using the Pi0 Invariant Mass Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, David J.; /Manchester U.

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter energy calibration method was compared with the local and global peak iteration procedures, of Crystal Barrel and CLEO-II. An investigation was made of the possibility of {Upsilon}(4S) background reduction which could lead to increased statistics over a shorter time interval, for efficient calibration runs. The BaBar software package was used with unreconstructed data to study the energy response of the calorimeter, by utilizing the {pi}{sup 0} mass constraint on pairs of photon clusters.

  11. The Radiation Dose Measurement System for the BaBar Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Meyer, W.T.; /Iowa State U.; Stelzer, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yi, Jong; /Manchester U.

    2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of 116 p-channel radiation sensitive MOSFET transistors (RadFETs) has been operational for the past 6 years at the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This system maps the integrated dose absorbed by different regions of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) during the running of the experiment. We report on the design and implementation of the system and finally, the performance of the monitoring system during the last 6 years of BaBar data-taking.

  12. Dissolved metal contamination in the East RiverLong Island sound system: potential biological effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Sönke

    in the United States. The ER­WLIS region receives treated sewage from 18 wastewater treatment plants in New YorkDissolved metal contamination in the East River­Long Island sound system: potential biological sewage, and to assess its possible biological impact on local waters. The East River­Long Island Sound

  13. College of Charleston Major Roadmap: Religious Studies, B.A. | 2014-15 Page 1 MAJOR ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    College of Charleston Major Roadmap: Religious Studies, B.A. | 2014-15 Page 1 MAJOR ROADMAP Religious Studies, B.A. Catalog Year: 2014-15 This roadmap is a suggested semester-by-semester planning availability may vary from semester to semester. Roadmaps are not meant to cover every possibility

  14. NOx uptake on alkaline earth oxides (BaO, MgO, CaO and SrO) supported...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uptake on alkaline earth oxides (BaO, MgO, CaO and SrO) supported on ?-Al2O3. NOx uptake on alkaline earth oxides (BaO, MgO, CaO and SrO) supported on ?-Al2O3....

  15. PLAN OF STUDY Digital Media & Design SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 2013-2014Catalog BA in DMD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    PLAN OF STUDY ­ Digital Media & Design SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 2013-2014Catalog BA in DMD ATTACH YOUR ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ ______ _____ __ ______ University of Connecticut DMD BA REQUIREMENTS: 51 credits DMD courses (21 credits): DMD 1000 (3) ­ Digital Foundation DMD 1030 (3) ­ Animation Lab DMD 2010 (3) ­ Digital Culture DMD 3050 (3) ­ Visible Language DMD

  16. JOB EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE (JEQ) This form is reusable. Write answers on the JEQ Answer Sheet (BA Form 803).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    JOB EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE (JEQ) This form is reusable. Write answers on the JEQ Answer Sheet (BA, they provide a more precise measure of a job's requirements than a few general questions do. 2. Use black ink or type when completing the Answer Sheet (BA Form 803) 3. Write a brief description of what the job

  17. Effect of Y-211 particle size on the growth of single grain Y–Ba–Cu–O bulk superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoma, Max; Shi, Yunhua; Dennis, Tony; Durrell, John; Cardwell, David

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering of fine Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (Y-211) inclusions of average particle size 1?2 ?m within the continuous, superconducting YBa2Cu3O7?? (Y-123) phase matrix of single-grain, bulk high temperature Y–Ba–Cu–O (YBCO) superconductors is fundamental...

  18. An, Yanming, Professor, Languages. BA, 1982, MA, 1985, Fudan University (China); PhD, University of Michigan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    253 Faculty An, Yanming, Professor, Languages. BA, 1982, MA, 1985, Fudan University (China); PhD, Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences. BME, École Polytechnique of Montréal (Canada), 2005; MS, 2007, PhD & Biomolecular Engineering. BA, Clemson University, 1973; MS, 1977, PhD, 1981, University of Massachusetts

  19. Assessment Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2015

    The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental...

  20. 7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sive, Hazel L.

    The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

  1. assess solar detoxification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment Biology and Medicine...

  2. assessing donor suitability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment Biology and Medicine Websites...

  3. antiangiogenic drug assessed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 18 novel, anti-angiogenic 17- to 20-amino acid peptides Popel, Aleksander S. 10 Assessing malaria drug resistance in US military areas of operation using microarrays. Biology...

  4. Consequence Assessment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume focuses on the process of performing timely initial assessments necessary to support critical first decisions and the continuous process of refining those initial assessments as more information and resources become available. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  5. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers...

  6. Computer Science B.A. Degree Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    Computer Science B.A. Degree Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014 http://ua.soe.ucsc.edu · advising Comparative Programming Languages CMPS 115 Software Methodology CMPS 122 Computer Security CMPS 140 Artificial Intelligence CMPS 160 Computer Graphics CMPS 180 Database Systems CMPE 110 Computer Architecture 2. Students

  7. Computer Science B.A. Degree 2014-2015 Curriculum Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    Computer Science B.A. Degree 2014-2015 Curriculum Chart CMPS 12B/M Data Structures *CMPS 13H to Prog: Java CMPS 11 Intermediate Programming *CMPE 13/L Computer Systems and C Programming OR OR *CMPE to Analysis of Algorithms CMPS 140 Artificial Intelligence CMPS 104A Compiler Design CMPS 160 Computer

  8. Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    . The balance between activities has shifted through the years with an increasing emphasis on research), and today as City of Bristol College #12;Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Bath, Bath BA2 7 vision and energy. Ted retired in 1987, and was succeeded as Director by Cliff Burrows. In 1992 Kevin

  9. Roadmap: Criminology and Justice Studies Corrections Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CRJU-CORR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Criminology and Justice Studies ­ Corrections ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CRJU-CORR] College/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses Hours] JUS 46792 Internship 0-6 Recommended but not required #12;Roadmap: Criminology and Justice

  10. Roadmap: Communication Studies Public Communication Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-PCMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Communication Studies ­ Public Communication ­ Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-PCMM] College: 23-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major 2 #12;Roadmap: Communication Studies ­ Public Communication ­ Bachelor of Arts [CI

  11. Roadmap: Criminology and Justice Studies Policing Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CRJU-POLG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Criminology and Justice Studies ­ Policing ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CRJU-POLG] College/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses Elective 3 See note 3 on page 2 General Electives (upper division) 9 #12;Roadmap: Criminology

  12. Roadmap: Theatre Studies Theatre and Society-Bachelor of Arts [CA-BA-THEA-THSO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Theatre Studies ­ Theatre and Society- Bachelor of Arts [CA-BA-THEA-THSO] College This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses Requirement 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 General Elective (upper division) 3 See note 2 on page 3 #12;Roadmap

  13. The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    211Introduction to Engineering Computation · STAT310Probability and Statistics · STAT410Introduction263 Statistics The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD Course engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, mathematics, political science

  14. Spectroscopy, polarization and nonadiabatic dynamics of electronically excited Ba(Ar)n clusters: Theory and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    Spectroscopy, polarization and nonadiabatic dynamics of electronically excited Ba(Ar)n clusters, France Received 13 September 1995; accepted 17 November 1995 Molecular Dynamics simulations using, a comprehensive picture of the excited state dynamics is given. It is found that upon excitation, energy

  15. Roadmap: Communication Studies -Applied Communication -Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-APCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-APCO] College of Communication and Information School of Communication Studies Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] COMM 15000 Introduction to Human Communication

  16. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B??a?±(1260)?? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B??a±?(1260)?? decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B??a±?(1260)??)×B(a±?(1260)??±???±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10?? and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B??a±?(1320)??)×B(a±?(1320)??±???±)more »respectively. Simultaneously, we also extract the CP-conserving parameters ?C=+0.54±0.11(stat)±0.07(syst), ?S=–0.09±0.14(stat)±0.06(syst), which, respectively, describe a rate difference and strong phase difference between the decay channels where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B??a±?(1260)?? decays with 3.1? significance. The rate where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1? level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.« less

  17. Atomic and electronic structure of the ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3}/Ge(001) interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Kurt D.; Ponath, Patrick; Posadas, Agham B.; Demkov, Alexander A., E-mail: demkov@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Aoki, Toshihiro [LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of BaTiO{sub 3} on Ge(001) by molecular beam epitaxy using a thin Zintl template buffer layer. A combination of density functional theory, atomic-resolution electron microscopy and in situ photoemission spectroscopy is used to investigate the electronic properties and atomic structure of the BaTiO{sub 3}/Ge interface. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron micrographs reveal that the Ge(001) 2?×?1 surface reconstruction remains intact during the subsequent BaTiO{sub 3} growth, thereby enabling a choice to be made between several theoretically predicted interface structures. The measured valence band offset of 2.7?eV matches well with the theoretical value of 2.5?eV based on the model structure for an in-plane-polarized interface. The agreement between the calculated and measured band offsets, which are highly sensitive to the detailed atomic arrangement, indicates that the most likely BaTiO{sub 3}/Ge(001) interface structure has been identified.

  18. Influence of Ba content on grain size and dynamics of crystallization in barium ferrite thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Influence of Ba content on grain size and dynamics of crystallization in barium ferrite thin films of the crystallization process, which ultimately determines the grain size, were studied in barium ferrite thin films. Rapid thermal annealing was used to crystallize the amorphous as-deposited barium ferrite films

  19. Internal conversion coefficients in (134)Cs, (137)Ba, and (139)La: A precise test of theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Balonek, C.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we measured the ratio of K-shell internal conversion coefficients, alpha(K), for the 127.5-keV E3 transition in (134)Cs and the 661.7-keV M4 transition in (137)Ba. We here report a measurement of the 165.9-keV M1 ...

  20. Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at BaBar and Belle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Calderini

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results on the search for new physics at BaBar and Belle B-factories are presented. The search for a light Higgs boson produced in the decay of different Y resonances is shown. In addition, recent measurements aimed to discover invisible final states produced by new physics mechanisms beyond the standard model are presented.

  1. Computer Science Major Worksheet B.A. Degree Student: _______________________ ID#___________ Catalog:_________ Advisor _____________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    10/15/2012 Computer Science Major Worksheet ­ B.A. Degree Student: _______________________ ID#___________ Catalog:_________ Advisor _____________ Computer Science Required Courses Cr. Semester Gr. CSci 160 Computer Science I 4 CSci 161 Computer Science II 4 CSci 230 Systems Programming 3 CSci 242 Algo. & Data

  2. NAME__________________________________ REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    NAME__________________________________ REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (effective entering class Fall 2013) 1) REQUIRED COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (Total of 47 CS credit hours) * COS.00 or greater as must the overall GPA. February 18, 2013 #12;Computer Science Summary Total Total CS Hrs Hrs Q

  3. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B??a?±(1260)?? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; MacNaughton, J.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohapatra, D.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B??a±?(1260)?? decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B??a±?(1260)??)×B(a±?(1260)??±???±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10?? and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B??a±?(1320)??)×B(a±?(1320)??±???±)±? does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B??a±?(1260)?? decays with 3.1? significance. The rate where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1? level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.

  4. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also go toward BYU

  5. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken for graduation. Complete the following: Chem 111* Honors Principles of Chemistry Chem 112 Principles of Chemistry

  6. Synthesis and Structure Determination of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors LaAMnSnO6 (A = Sr Ba)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T Yang; T Perkisas; J Hadermann; M Croft; A Ignatov; M Greenblatt

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    LaAMnSnO{sub 6} (A = Sr, Ba) have been synthesized by high temperature solid-state reactions under dynamic 1% H{sub 2}/Ar flow. Rietveld refinements on room temperature powder X-ray diffraction data indicate that LaSrMnSnO{sub 6} crystallizes in the GdFeO{sub 3}-structure, with space group Pnma and, combined with transmission electron microscopy, LaBaMnSnO{sub 6} in Imma. Both space groups are common in disordered double-perovskites. The Mn{sup 3+} and Sn{sup 4+} ions whose valence states were confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are completely disordered over the B-sites and the BO{sub 6} octahedra are slightly distorted. LaAMnSnO{sub 6} are ferromagnetic semiconductors with a T{sub C} = 83 K for the Sr- and 66 K for the Ba-compound. The title compounds, together with the previously reported LaCaMnSnO{sub 6} provide an interesting example of progression from Pnma to Imma as the tolerance factor increases. An analysis of the relationship between space group and tolerance factor for the series LaAMnMO{sub 6} (A = Ca, Sr, Ba; M = Sn, Ru) provides a better understanding of the symmetry determination for double perovskites.

  7. Roadmap: Communication Studies -Applied Communication -Bachelor of Arts CI-BA-COMM-APCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts CI-BA-COMM-APCO College Semester Eight [14 Credits] COMM 46092 Practicum in Applied Communication 3 C ELR COMM Concentration 39 36 2.250 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts CI

  8. NetTRUST: mixed NETworks Trust infrastRUcture baSed on Threshold cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    NetTRUST: mixed NETworks Trust infrastRUcture baSed on Threshold cryptography Mawloud Omar Re and the performance evaluation prove the adequacy of this solution to mixed networks architectures. Keywords to military applications), but the combination of ad-hoc networks with infrastructure based networks

  9. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiological and

  10. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiologicalLaboratories

  11. Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

  12. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 3 Biological Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    agricultural practices, placer and dredge mining, dam construction, and stream channelization. The ICBEMP Alteration of channel structure Loss of floodplain access alters hydrology by preventing energy dissipation of high flows, reduces organic matter input from riparian interaction Change in pool to riffle ratio

  13. California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom: UtilizingDepartment of Energy ABiological

  14. Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e pShadeHybridInstitute MissionHydride|

  15. Microsoft Word - 2008 NTS BA final.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead SAMSBIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT FOR

  16. Thermodynamic model for the solubility of BaSeO4(cr) in the aqueous Ba2+-SeO42--Na+-H+-OH--H2O system: Extending to high selenate concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Kitamura, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Doi, Reisuke; Yoshida, Yasushi

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solubility of Ba(SeO4, SO4) precipitates was determined as a function of the BaSeO4 mole fractions, ranging from 0.0015 to 0.3830, and time with an equilibration period extending to as long as 302 days. Equilibrium/steady state conditions in this system are reached in ? 65 days. Pitzer’s ion interaction model was used to calculate solid and aqueous phase activity coefficients. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the data do not satisfy Gibbs-Duhem equation, thereby demonstrating that a single-solid solution phase does not control both the selenate and sulfate concentrations. Our extensive data with log10 [Ba]) ranging from -3.6 to -5.9 mol.kg-1, log10 [SeO4]) ranging from -3.6 to -5.2 mol.kg-1, and log10 [SO4] ranging from -4.0 to -5.3 mol.kg-1 can be explained with the formation of an ideal BaSeO4 solid solution phase that controls the selenium concentrations and a slightly disordered/less-crystalline BaSO4(s) (log10 K0sp = -9.5 instead of -10.05 for barite) that controls the sulfate concentrations. In these experiments the BaSO4 component of the solid solution phase never reaches thermodynamic equilibrium with the aqueous phase. Thermodynamic interpretations of the data show that both the ideal BaSeO4 solid solution phase and less-crystalline BaSO4(s) phase are in equilibrium with each other in the entire range of BaSeO4 mole fractions investigated in this study.

  17. Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of Tl 2Ba 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10 y and Tl 2Ba 2Ca 3Cu 4O12 y up to 21 GPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of Tl 2Ba 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10 y and Tl 2 of the superconducting transition temperature Tc of Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 y Tl-2223 and Tl2Ba2Ca3Cu4O12 y Tl-2234 has been it is determined by that of the inner CuO2 layers. S0163-1829 96 07134-2 I. INTRODUCTION Superconductivity in high

  18. Quasi-zero lattice mismatch and band alignment of BaTiO{sub 3} on epitaxial (110)Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y.; Jain, N. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Maurya, D.; Zhou, Y.; Priya, S [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth, structural, and band alignment properties of pulsed laser deposited amorphous BaTiO{sub 3} on epitaxial molecular beam epitaxy grown (110)Ge layer, as well as their utilization in low power transistor are reported. High-resolution x-ray diffraction demonstrated quasi-zero lattice mismatch of BaTiO{sub 3} on (110)Ge. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy micrograph confirms the amorphous nature of BaTiO{sub 3} layer as well as shows a sharp heterointerface between BaTiO{sub 3} and Ge with no traceable interfacial layer. The valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v}, of 1.99 {+-} 0.05 eV at the BaTiO{sub 3}/(110)Ge heterointerface is measured using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c}, of 1.14 {+-} 0.1 eV is calculated using the bandgap energies of BaTiO{sub 3} of 3.8 eV and Ge of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters for carrier confinement and the interface chemical properties of the BaTiO{sub 3}/(110)Ge system are significant advancement towards designing Ge-based p-and n-channel metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors for low-power application.

  19. Risk Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A set of issues that state and local governments should carefully consider, with the goal of helping them assess and anticipate solutions for some worst case or unfortunate case scenarios as they...

  20. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface and the lower part of the atmosphere; this phenomenon is called the greenhouse effect. U.S. Department of Energy DOEEA-1728D Draft Environmental Assessment 32 June...

  1. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of the fully fluorinated compound 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Oliver, E-mail: oliverclemens@online.de [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Wright, Adrian J.; Berry, Frank J. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The compound 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F (P6{sub 3}/mmc) was synthesised by the low temperature fluorination of 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d} using polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) as a fluorination agent. Structural characterisation by XRD and NPD suggests that the local positions of the oxygen and fluorine atoms vary with no evidence for ordering on the anion sites. This compound shows antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature with antiparallel alignment of the magnetic moments along the c-axis. The use of PVDF also allows the possibility of tuning the fluorine content in materials of composition 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d}F{sub y} to any value of 0BaFeO{sub 2}F. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the hexagonal perovskite phase 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d}F{sub y} were prepared via low temperature fluorination using PVDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A structural investigation of the compounds BaFeO{sub 2}F is presented in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This analysis suggests differences for the local coordination of O{sup 2-} and F{sup -} anions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-BaFeO{sub 2}F shows antiferromagnetic ordering at 300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic moments align parallel to the a-axis.

  2. Department of Systems Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostock, Universität

    Department of Systems Biology & Bioinformatics Faculty of Computer Sciences & Electrical, comparability and fairness. Practical Aspects and Soft Skills Technical Achievement Background understanding

  3. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Welcome to the Administrative section of the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database. Please logon. Logon Name: Password: Logon CommentsEmail Us * Security...

  4. CollegeofScience Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ,populations,and even ecosystems. Our courses will help prepare you for a career in biology,be it in biodiversity

  5. COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William

    COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY, AND AUTONOMOUS William Bechtel and Adele- nomological framework and its focus on laws as the primary explanatory vehicle; for them, a scientific

  6. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of the fluorinated compound 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Oliver, E-mail: oliverclemens@online.de [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Berry, Frank J. [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bauer, Jessica [Anorganische Festkörperchemie, Universität des Saarlandes, Am Markt, Zeile 3, 66125 Saarbrücken (Germany); Wright, Adrian J. [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Knight, Kevin S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R. [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The compounds 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.27}F{sub 0.5} have been synthesised by the low temperature fluorination of 15R-BaFeO{sub 3?d}F{sub 0.2} using polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) as a fluorination agent. The materials have been structurally characterised by Rietveld analysis of the X-ray- and HRPD-powder neutron diffraction data. A detailed analysis of bond valence sums suggests that the oxide and fluoride ions order on the different anion sites. A reinvestigation of our recently published structure (Clemens et al., 2013) [34] of 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F is also reported and incorporation of fluoride in h-type layers is also confirmed in this compound. The magnetic moments for 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.25}F{sub 0.5} align in the a/b-plane with antiferromagnetic alignment of the moments between adjacent layers, and are flipped by 90° as compared to the precursor compound. 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F exhibits very robust antiferromagnetism with a Néel temperature between 300 and 400 °C. - Graphical abstract: The crystal and magnetic structure of the perovskite phase 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F. - Highlights: • 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.27}F{sub 0.5}were prepared via low temperature fluorination using PVDF. • A structural investigation of the compounds BaFeO{sub 2}F is presented in detail. • This analysis suggests ordering of O{sup 2?} and F{sup ?} anions between different layers. • 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F shows antiferromagnetic ordering at 300 K with T{sub N} ?300–400 °C. • The magnetic moments align in the a/b-plane.

  7. Molten salt synthesis of anisometric particles in the SrONb2O5BaO system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messing, Gary L.

    Molten salt synthesis of anisometric particles in the SrO­Nb2O5­BaO system Cihangir Duran* , Gary L.5Ba0.5Nb2O6, and SrNb2O6 were synthesized in the SrO­BaO­Nb2O5 system, using KCl or SrCl2Á6H2O salts the salt and Nb2O5. Large, irregularly shaped (Sr-rich) Sr2Nb2O7 particles formed with increasing reaction

  8. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  9. Contributed Paper Assessing Citizen Contributions to Butterfly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Nature Museum, 2430 N. Cannon Drive, Chicago, IL 60614, U.S.A. Abstract: Citizen science mayContributed Paper Assessing Citizen Contributions to Butterfly Monitoring in Two Large Cities K. C. MATTESON, D. J. TARON, AND E. S. MINOR Biological Sciences (M/C 066), University of Illinois at Chicago

  10. Staunton State Park Biological Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staunton State Park Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Siemers, Phyllis Pineda, and Jill. The information management staff with CNHP was responsible for integrating the data resulting from the inventory

  11. FISHERY RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY, GALVESTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stations conduct fish ry re - search in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the work of the Bureau's Gulf, St. Pet rsburg Beach, Fla. Biological Res earch Biological Laboratory, Beaufort, N. C hw Gulf of Mexico Abundance of postlarval and juv nil shrimp Pink shrimp life history . Brown

  12. Purdue extension Agricultural&Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an extended period and encourage biological treatment to minimize organic matter (BOD), nitrogenPurdue extension Don Jones Agricultural&Biological Engineering Alan Sutton AnimalSciences Purdue structures must be designed and managed to contain manure, wastewater, contaminated runoff, and ma- nure

  13. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    issues such as life cycle assessment (LCA) fosters the needlife-cycle impact assessment (LCIA) process within in LCA is

  14. The elastic and piezoelectric properties of tungsten bronze ferroelectric crystals ,,Sr0.7Ba0.3...2NaNb5O15 and ,,Sr0.3Ba0.7...2NaNb5O15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    The elastic and piezoelectric properties of tungsten bronze ferroelectric crystals ,,Sr0.7Ba0 and piezoelectric constants of tungsten bronze ferroelectric crystals Sr0.7Ba0.3 2NaNb5O15 SBNN70 and Sr0.3Ba0.7 2Na. INTRODUCTION Ferroelectric crystals with tungsten bronze structure are another attractive family beside

  15. UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan UR Undergraduate BS Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan UR Undergraduate BS Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan Students will as their physical, chemical, and biological characteristics. #12;UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

  16. Data:209b4880-04bc-4f18-9295-39ba0506f055 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f18-9295-39ba0506f055 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  17. Infrared-optical spectroscopy of transparent conducting perovskite (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Dongmin; Yu, Kwangnam; Jun Chang, Young; Choi, E. J., E-mail: echoi@uos.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Egon; Hoon Kim, Kee [Center for Novel States of Complex Materials Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed optical transmission, reflection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and Hall effect measurements on the electron-doped La{sub x}Ba{sub 1–x}SnO{sub 3} (x?=?0.04) transparent thin films. From the infrared Drude response and plasma frequency analysis we determine the effective mass of the conducting electron m*?=?0.35m{sub 0}. In the visible-UV region the optical band gap shifts to high energy in (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} by 0.18?eV compared with undoped BaSnO{sub 3} which, in the context of the Burstein-Moss analysis, is consistent with the infrared-m*. m* of BaSnO{sub 3} is compared with other existing transparent conducting oxides (TCO), and implication on search for high-mobility TCO compounds is discussed.

  18. Superconductivity at 34 K in the K/Ba/Bi/O system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, N.L.; Parise, J.B.; Flippen, R.B.; Sleight, A.W. (E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, DE (USA))

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical temperature for superconductivity in the (Ba, K)BiO{sub 3} system has been increased to 34 K. With each such increase of T{sub c} in a system containing no copper it becomes increasingly likely that the mechanisms for superconductivity in the Bi-based and the Cu-based oxide superconductors are very closely related to each other. Since the (Ba, K)BiO{sub 3} superconductors possess the cubic perovskite structure, the mechanism for high T{sub c} would then not related directly to the two-dimensional character of the copper oxide superconductors or to the magnetism in such systems. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  19. User Defined Data in the New Analysis Model of the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Nardo, G.

    2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The BaBar experiment has recently revised its Analysis Model. One of the key ingredient of BaBar new Analysis Model is the support of the capability to add to the Event Store user defined data, which can be the output of complex computations performed at an advanced stage of a physics analysis, and are associated to analysis objects. In order to provide flexibility and extensibility with respect to object types, template generic programming has been adopted. In this way the model is non-intrusive with respect to reconstruction and analysis objects it manages, not requiring changes in their interfaces and implementations. Technological details are hidden as much as possible to the user, providing a simple interface. In this paper we present some of the limitations of the old model and how they are addressed by the new Analysis Model.

  20. Optical properties of Pr-doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, Adriano B., E-mail: abandrade1@gmail.com; Mello, Ana C. S. de; Valerio, Mário E. G. [Physics Department, Federal University of Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristovão, SE (Brazil); Rezende, Marcos V. dos S. [Physics Department, Federal University of Sergipe, 49500-000 Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Baldochi, Sonia L. [IPEN-CNEN/SP, CEP 11049, 05422-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline samples of Pr-doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} (BaYF) were prepared by zone melting technique. The pure phase obtained was identified by X-ray diffraction measurement. Optical absorption result was evaluated and it showed that the formation of the absorption bands can be connected to color centers generated by radiation in the matrix. Radioluminescence emission measurements after excitation by X-ray showed that the material exhibited components responsible for long lasting phosphorescence. Short decay times were also evaluated, the measurements showed a fast component around 70?ns associated to the 4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1} ? 4f{sup 2} transition of the Pr{sup 3+} ion. The Thermoluminescence (TL) results indicate the presence of two trapping centers.

  1. Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ussery, David W.

    Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology Visualisation of Large Amounts of Data Dave Ussery 27 February, 2008 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group

  2. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbelllong version)ConfinementGeneralGenomics and

  3. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles as MRI contrast agentsw Carlos Ba rcena,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    Zinc ferrite nanoparticles as MRI contrast agentsw Carlos Ba´ rcena,a Amandeep K. Sra,a Girija S, a series of spinel-structured ferrites, MFe2O4 (M = Mn2+ , Fe2+ , Co2+ , Ni2+ ), were reported as novel MRI.e., Mn2+ occupies both A and B sites), whereas the other metal ferrites have an inverse spinel structure

  4. Lifshitz Transition and Chemical Instabilities in Ba1 xKxFe2As2 Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Suffian N. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Johnson, Duane D. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forsolid-solutionBa1 xKxFe2As2FermisurfaceevolutionismappedviaBlochspectralfunctionscalculatedusingdensityfunctionaltheoryimplementedinKorringa-Kohn-Rostokermultiplescatteringtheorywiththecoherent-potentialapproximation.Spectralfunctionsrevealelectronicdispersion,topology,orbitalcharacter,andbroadening(electron-lifetimeeffects)duetochemicaldisorder.Dissolutionofelectroncylindersoccursnearx 0.9withanonuniform,topological(Lifshitz)transition,reducingtheinterbandinteractions;yetthedispersionmaintainsitsdxzordyzcharacter.Formationenergiesindicatealloyingatx 0.35,asobserved,andatendencyforsegregationontheK-rich(x>0.6)side,explainingthedifficultyofcontrollingsamplequalityandtheconflictingresultsbetweencharacterizedelectronicstructures.OurresultsrevealFermisurfacetransitionsinalloyedsamplesthatinfluencestonodalsuperconductivityandsuggesttheoriginfordeviationsofcommontrendsinFe-basedsuperconductors,suchasBud ko-Ni-Canfieldscaling.

  5. Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

  6. Hydrostatic pressure (8 GPa) dependence of electrical resistivity of BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguli, Chandreyee; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Ohgushi, Kenya [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Uwatoko, Yoshiya, E-mail: uwatoko@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kanagaraj, Moorthi [Centre for High Pressure Research, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Arumugam, Sonachalam, E-mail: sarumugam1963@yahoo.com [Centre for High Pressure Research, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Single crystals of BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2} were grown by CoAs self-flux method. • We have studied pressure effects (8 GPa) on dc electrical resistivity of BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2}. • On applied external pressure BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2} remains a metallic state up to 8 GPa. • Superconductivity is absent in BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2} because of its proximity to ferromagnetism. - Abstract: The pressure dependence of the electrical resistivity of BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystal as a function of temperature was measured at ambient and high pressures up to 8 GPa for the first time using cubic anvil high pressure cell. It is observed that at room temperature the resistivity monotonically decreases with increasing pressure and it remains in the metallic state even at an applied pressure of 8 GPa. From the temperature dependence of the resistivity measurements under pressure, we found that superconductivity is absent up to 8 GPa. The value of the electron's scattering factor (A) is found to be large at ambient pressure and it decreases with the application of pressure, indicating that the substantial electron correlation effect of BaCo{sub 2}As{sub 2} is reduced under pressure, revealing a dramatic change of density of states at the Fermi energy.

  7. Mesangial cell biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  8. Energy from biological processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment responds to a request by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation for an evaluation of the energy potential of various sources of plant and animal matter (biomass). This report complements an earlier OTA report on the Application of Solar Technology to Today's Energy Needs in evaluating the major solar energy resources available to the United States. The findings also will serve as part of the material to be used in an upcoming OTA assessment of synthetic fuels for transportation. This volume presents analyses of prominent biomass issues, summaries of four biomass fuel cycles, a description of biomass' place in two plausible energy futures, and discussions of policy options for promoting energy from biomass. The four fuel cycles - wood, alcohol fuels, grasses and crop residues, and animal wastes - were chosen because of their near- to mid-term energy potential and because of the public interest in them. A second volume presents technical analyses of the resource base, conversion technologies, and end uses that provide a basis for the discussion in this volume. Also included in Volume II are various unconventional approaches to bioenergy production as well as the use of biomass to produce chemicals.

  9. Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological Wastewater Treatment of the microbial communities within biological wastewater treatment reactors is incomplete due to limitations microbial community composition in five biological wastewater treatment reactors in China and the United

  10. Introduction to Bioinformatics A Systems Biology Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    Introduction to Bioinformatics A Systems Biology Approach Luis M. Rocha Complex Systems Modeling Computational Biology to Bioinformatics Course Layout: March 11-15, 2002 #12;P Systems Biology P Synthetic, Multi- Disciplinary Approach

  11. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our findings and APICD Gen II subsystems for automated collection, deposition and detection of ambient particulate matter. Key findings from the APTA Program include: Ambient biological PM taxonomy; Demonstration of key subsystems needed for autonomous bioaerosol detection; System design; Efficient electrostatic collection; Automated bioagent recognition; Raman analysis performance validating Td<9 sec; Efficient collection surface regeneration; and Development of a quantitative bioaerosol defection model. The objective of the APTA program was to advance the state of our knowledge of ambient background PM composition. Operation of an automated aerosol detection system was enhanced by a more accurate assessment of background variability, especially for sensitive and specific sensing strategies like Raman detection that are background-limited in performance. Based on this improved knowledge of background, the overall threat detection performance of Raman sensors was improved.

  12. The new barium zinc mercurides Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} and BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} - Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Michael; Wendorff, Marco [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Roehr, Caroline, E-mail: caroline@ruby.chemie.uni-freiburg.de [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compounds Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} and BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. Their crystal structures, which both represent new structure types, have been determined using single crystal X-ray data. The structure of Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} (orthorhombic, oP28, space group Pmmn, a=701.2(3), b=1706.9(8), c=627.3(3)pm, Z=2, R1=0.0657) contains folded 4{sup 4} Hg nets, where the meshes form the bases of flat rectangular pyramids resembling the structure of BaAl{sub 4}. The flat pyramids are connected via Hg-Zn/Hg bonds, leaving large channels at the folds, in which Ba(1) and Hg(2) atoms alternate. Whereas the remaining Hg/Zn atoms form a covalent 3D network of three- to five-bonded atoms with short M-M distances (273-301 pm; CN 9-11), the Hg(2) atoms in the channels adopt a comparatively large coordination number of 12 and increased distances (317-348 pm) to their Zn/Hg neighbours. In the structure of BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} (cubic, cI320, space group I4{sup Macron }3d, a=2025.50(7) pm, Z=64, R1=0.0440), with a chemical composition not much different from that of Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10}, the Zn/Hg atoms of the mixed positions M(1/2) are arranged in an slightly distorted primitive cubic lattice with a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 subcell relation to the unit cell. The 24 of the originating 64 cubes contain planar cis tetramers Hg(5,6){sub 4} with Hg in a nearly trigonal planar or tetrahedral coordination. In another 24 of the small cubes, two opposing faces are decorated by Hg(3,4){sub 2} dumbbells, two by Ba(2) atoms respectively. The third type of small cubes are centered by Ba(1) atoms only. The complex 3D polyanionic Hg/Zn network thus formed is compared with the Hg partial structure in Rb{sub 3}Hg{sub 20} applying a group-subgroup relation. Despite their different overall structures, the connectivity of the negatively charged Hg atoms, the rather metallic Zn bonding characteristic (as obtained from FP-LAPW band structure calculations) and the coordination number of 16 for all Ba cations relate the two title compounds. - Graphical abstract: Six of the 64 small sub-cubes of three types (A, B, C) forming the unit cell of the Hg-rich mercuride BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new Hg-rich Ba mercurides, both synthesized from the elements in pure phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BaZn{sub 0.6}HgG{sub 3.4} and Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} with new complex structure types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure relation to other complex cubic intermetallics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussion of covalent and metallic bonding aspects, as found by the structure features and band structure calculations.

  13. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida (Photo Credit: Michael Masellis, Biology Major Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida Future Science Teachers' Club Recent Grant Successes Forthcoming Publications

  14. The sequestration efficiency of the biological pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preformed phosphate, soft tissue pump and atmospheric CO 2 ,efficiency of the biological pump Tim DeVries, 1 Francoisproduces a “biological pump” that reduces the concentration

  15. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology and High Performance Computing Manfred Zorn, TeresaBiology and High Performance Computing Presenters: Manfred99-Portland High performance computing has become one of the

  16. Synthetic biology and crop engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

  17. AGRI-SCIENCE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    photosynthetic efficiency Improve chemical agronomic and agro-ecological control measures Modelling through translation of chemical biology tools and technologies Control weeds, disease and pests Minimise a platform to steer future research and policy directions. · Encourage external outreach to engage

  18. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  19. BIOLOGICAL SAFETY POLICY PROGRAM TOPICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    research protocols involving hazardous materials, reviews construction design for safety features with or near biologically hazardous materials (infectious agents, biohazards or recombinant DNA). 1.3 "Infectious waste" or "biohazardous waste" is defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental

  20. Chemistry Division Department of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

  1. Modular design of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of my research is the development of technology for building compound biological systems from simpler pieces. I designed BioScaffold parts, a family of variable regions that can be inserted into a DNA sequence ...

  2. Biological Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdleBiological Science Biological Science The protozoan

  3. Environmental Analysis of Biologically Inspired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Questions/Hypotheses Review Life Cycle Assessment Results Contributions Future Work Cycle Assessment (LCA) Goals and objectives are set The system is described, and the boundary is set, completeness and sensitivity. Recommendations for the preferred system are given. #12;Life Cycle Assessment

  4. Potential variations around grain boundaries in impurity-doped BaSi? epitaxial films evaluated by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukahara, D.; Baba, M.; Honda, S.; Toko, K. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Imai, Y. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Hara, K. O.; Usami, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Werner, J. H. [Institute for Photovoltaics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany); Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Institute for Photovoltaics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential variations around the grain boundaries (GBs) in antimony (Sb)-doped n-type and boron (B)-doped p-type BaSi? epitaxial films on Si(111) were evaluated by Kelvin probe force microscopy. Sb-doped n-BaSi? films exhibited positively charged GBs with a downward band bending at the GBs. The average barrier height for holes was approximately 10 meV for an electron concentration n ? 10¹? cm?³. This downward band bending changed to upward band bending when n was increased to n = 1.8 × 10¹?cm?³. In the B-doped p-BaSi? films, the upward band bending was observed for a hole concentration p ? 10¹?cm?³. The average barrier height for electrons decreased from approximately 25 to 15 meV when p was increased from p = 2.7 × 10¹? to p = 4.0 × 10¹? cm?³. These results are explained under the assumption that the position of the Fermi level E{sub f} at GBs depends on the degree of occupancy of defect states at the GBs, while E{sub f} approached the bottom of the conduction band or the top of the valence band in the BaSi? grain interiors with increasing impurity concentrations. In both cases, such small barrier heights may not deteriorate the carrier transport properties. The electronic structures of impurity-doped BaSi? are also discussed using first-principles pseudopotential method to discuss the insertion sites of impurity atoms and clarify the reason for the observed n-type conduction in the Sb-doped BaSi? and p-type conduction in the B-doped BaSi?.

  5. Assessment Documents

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of theArctic Energy Summit26 Assessment

  6. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental Assessment

  7. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental Assessment 728D

  8. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental Assessment

  9. Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity ofPerformance assessment

  10. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  11. Degrees Offered: BA, BSChE, MChE, MS, PhD Thismajorgivesundergraduatesasoundscientificandtechnicalgrounding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    , including catalysis and nanotechnology, thermodynamics and phase equilibria, interfacial phenomena, colloids, cell population heterogeneity and biological pattern fermation, cellular and tissue engineering, energy

  12. Integrative Biology Keith A. Crandall, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    . The bioinformatics major is for students with interests in both the computer and the biological sciences. The degree merges these interests in the areas of bioinformatics and computational biology, giving students Programs and Degrees BS Bioinformatics BS Biology Composite Teaching BS Integrative Biology Students should

  13. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  14. BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

  15. Magnetoelastically coupled structural, magnetic, and superconducting order parameters in BaFe?(As??xPx)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuo, H.-H.; Analytis, James G.; Chu, J.-H.; Fernandes, R. M.; Schmalian, J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the transport properties of mechanically strained single crystals of BaFe?(As??xPx)? over a wide range of x. The Néel transition is extremely sensitive to stress and this sensitivity increases as optimal doping is approached (doping with the highest superconducting Tc), even though the magnetic transition itself is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, we observe significant changes in the superconducting transition temperature with applied strain, which mirror changes in the composition x. These experiments are a direct illustration of the intimate coupling between different degrees of freedom in iron-based superconductors, revealing the importance of magnetoelastic coupling to the magnetic and superconducting transition temperatures.

  16. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  17. Cation ordering transformations in Ba(Mg{sub 1/3}Ta{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-BaZrO{sub 3} perovskite solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai, L.; Akbas, M.A.; Davies, P.K. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Parise, J.B. [Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences] [Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the substitution of BaZrO{sub 3} on the cation ordering in Ba(Mg{sub 1/3}Ta{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} was studied using TEM and X-ray and neutron diffraction. Almost no solubility of Zr was found in the 1:2 ordered, trigonal structure of the Ba(Mg{sub 1/3}Ta{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} end-member (P{bar 3}m1), and a transformation to a 1:1 ordered, cubic (Fm{bar 3}m) phase with a = 2a{sub per} occurs for substitution levels between {approximately}10 and 25 mol% BaZrO{sub 3}. The structure of this Ba({beta}{prime}{sub 1/2}{beta}{double_prime}{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-type phase consists of two distinct octahedral sites, {beta}{prime} and {beta}{double_prime}. The occupancies of the two cation positions, refined using the Rietveld method, were found to be consistent with a random site model in which {beta}{double_prime} is occupied by Ta, and {beta}{prime} by a random distribution of the remaining cations. The homogeneity range of the 1:1 solid solutions predicted by this model, Ba{l_brace}[Mg{sub (2{minus}y)/3} Ta{sub (1{minus}2y)/3} Zr{sub y}]{sub 1/2}[Ta]{sub 1/2}{r_brace}O{sub 3} (0.0 < y {le} 0.5), is in excellent agreement with that observed experimentally.

  18. Flibe assessments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, D. K.; McCarthy, K.; Sawan, M.; Tillack, M.; Ying, A.; Zinkle, S.

    2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the issues on using flibe for fusion applications has been made. It is concluded that sufficient tritium breeding can be achieved for a flibe blanket, especially if a few cm of Be is include in the blanket design. A key issue is the control of the transmutation products such as TF and F{sub 2}. A REDOX (Reducing-Oxidation) reaction has to be demonstrated which is compatible to the blanket design. Also, MHD may have strong impact on heat transfer if the flow is perpendicular to the magnetic field. The issues associated with the REDOX reaction and the MHD issues have to be resolved by both experimental program and numerical solutions.

  19. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.hull@stfc.ac.uk [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Norberg, Stefan T. [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Mohn, Chris E. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  20. Bioinformatics Algorithms CS 579 (59000-BA0), 3 Credits, Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothen, Alex

    and computational biology. Students who have a working knowledge of bioinformatics concepts should find to be a first course in Bioinformatics algorithms for graduate students in computer science, computer of the proteins in an organism), making biology an information-rich science. Computational algorithms and soft

  1. Assessment 101: The Assessment Cycle, Clear and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Assessment 101: The Assessment Cycle, Clear and Simple October 1, 2014 Kellogg West Conference Center, Pomona, CA Resource Binder #12;2014-2015 WASC Senior College and University Commission is pleased expectations. Assessment 101: The Assessment Cycle, Clear and Simple October 1, 2014. Kellogg West, Pomona, CA

  2. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  3. Avoided Quantum Criticality and Magnetoelastic Coupling in BaFe2-xNixAs2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Xingye; Gretarsson, H.; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Xuerong; Luo, Huiqian; Tian, Wei; Laver, Mark; Yamani, Z.; Kim, Young-June; Nevidomskyy, A. H.; Si, Qimiao; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the structural and magnetic orders in electron-doped BaFe2?xNixAs2 by high-resolution synchrotron x-ray and neutron scatterings. Upon Ni doping x, the nearly simultaneous tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural (Ts) and antiferromagnetic (TN) phase transitions in BaFe2As2 are gradually suppressed and separated, resulting in Ts>TN with increasing x, as was previously observed. However, the temperature separation between Ts and TN decreases with increasing x for x?0.065, tending toward a quantum bicritical point near optimal superconductivity at x?0.1. The zero-temperature transition is preempted by the formation of a secondary incommensurate magnetic phase in the region 0.088?x?0.104, resulting in a finite value of TN?Tc+10??K above the superconducting dome around x?0.1. Our results imply an avoided quantum critical point, which is expected to strongly influence the properties of both the normal and superconducting states.

  4. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 CODE of the Department of Chemical of Chemical & Biological Engineering. For clarity of presentation, some passages are copied directly from shall offer an undergraduate chemical and biological engineering program of technological, scientific

  5. A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaheng

    A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants A bioinformatics postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Dr. Sue Rhee at the Carnegie Institution, Department of Plant Biology (Stanford, CA

  6. $(h_{11/2})^2$ alignments in neutron-rich $^{132}$Ba with negative-parity pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Lei; Zhengyu Xu

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shell-model collective-pair truncation with negative-parity pairs is adopted to study the $(h_{11/2})^2$ alignment in $^{132}$Ba. The proton $(h_{11/2})^2$-alignment state is predicted as an $E\\sim4.6$ MeV and $\\tau\\sim 0.5~\\mu$s isomer with relatively strong E3 decay channels. The oblately deformed neutron $(h_{11/2})^{-2}$ alignment in the yrast band and four negative-parity bands are confirmed, even although two of these negative-parity bands favor the prolate deformation, which directly manifests the $\\gamma$ unstability of $^{132}$Ba.

  7. Evidence for a phosphorylation-independent role for Ser 32 and 36 in proteasome inhibitor-resistant (PIR) InBa degradation in B cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, Shigeki

    -resistant (PIR) InBa degradation in B cells Shelby O'Connor, Stephanie Markovina, Shigeki MiyamotoT Program is maintained through proteasome inhibitor-resistant (PIR) InBa degradation in a manner that requires Ser 32 whether dual phosphorylation of Ser 32 and 36 was required for PIR degradation. Through mutagenesis

  8. Page 1 | B.A. in Special Education (General Curriculum) and Elementary Education (K-6) Dual Major | Academic Plan of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2014 B.A. in Special Education (General Curriculum) and ElementaryPage 1 | B.A. in Special Education (General Curriculum) and Elementary Education (K-6) Dual Major Education (K-6) Dual Program Academic Plan of Study College of Education Department of Special Education

  9. Studies on catalytic and structural properties of BaRuO3 type perovskite1 material for diesel soot oxidation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Studies on catalytic and structural properties of BaRuO3 type perovskite1 material for diesel by co-precipitation24 method and its catalytic activity has been tested for diesel soot oxidation processes and vehicle exhaust.33 Key words: BaRuO3, perovskite, diesel soot oxidation, vehicular exhaust

  10. Controlling internal barrier in low loss BaTiO3 supercapacitors U-C. Chung, C. Elissalde, S. Mornet and M. Maglione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Controlling internal barrier in low loss BaTiO3 supercapacitors U-C. Chung, C. Elissalde, S Supercapacitor behavior has been reported in a number of oxides including reduced BaTiO3 ferroelectric ceramics to process bulk composites having supercapacitor features with low dielectric losses and temperature

  11. TOPIC TIME LOCATION CATEGORY TITLE AUTHORS INSTITUTION Advanced Energy Systems 10:15 to 10:35 AM BA1180 CSME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :30 to 11:45 AM BA2139 CSME An Autonomous Vehicle for Navigation and Path Following in Outdoor Farms F FUEL CELL ELECTRODES S. M. R. Niya ,M. Hoorfar University of British Columbia Advanced Energy Systems 4:05 to 4:25 PM BA1180 CSME Effect of Hygrothermal Fatigue on Damage Propagation in PEM Fuel Cell Membrane R

  12. Guided wave absorption and uorescence in epitaxial Er:BaTiO3 on MgO D.M. Gilla,*, G.M. Fordb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Seng-Tiong

    . Keywords: Er:BaTiO3; Fluorescence; Luminescence 1. Introduction The development of low-cost composite waveguides fabricated in erbium-doped thin-®lm epitaxial BaTiO3. Luminescence transient measurements indicate strategies toward the realization of this type of opto-electronic circuit. Proposed designs of hybrid opto

  13. 11196. Proposed by Mohammad Hossein Mehrabi, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran. Let A and B be real n n matrices. Show that if AB -BA is invertible and A2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckman, Christopher Carl

    11196. Proposed by Mohammad Hossein Mehrabi, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran. Let A and B be real n Ã? n matrices. Show that if AB - BA is invertible and A2 + B2 = 3(AB - BA

  14. Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys the laws of physics, and the principles and methods of theoretical physics ought to find useful application observation, I will describe a few specific instances where approaches inspired by theoretical physics allow

  15. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  16. WithCarbonSequestration Biological-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass · Renewables Analysis · BiomassWithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological- and Biomass- Based Hydrogen Production RoxanneRoxanne DanzDanz #12;Barriers Hydrogen Production from Biomass

  17. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  18. Theory in Biology available light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Magazine R406 Theory in Biology Theory is available light Martin A. Nowak Many people praise Gregor the neutral theory of evolution, which assumes that the overwhelming majority of molecular mutations do assume the neutral theory is correct. In a brilliant PhD thesis submitted in 1964, Bill Hamilton

  19. Can predators assess the quality of their prey's resource? Amanda C. Williams*, Samuel M. Flaxman 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flaxman, Samuel M.

    Can predators assess the quality of their prey's resource? Amanda C. Williams*, Samuel M. Flaxman 1 by individual organisms affects patterns and processes at many levels of biological organization (e.g. Johnson

  20. Isotopic and internal CX{sub 3} (X=D,H) rotational motion effects in the Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCX{sub 3}+h{nu}{yields}BaF+CX{sub 3} intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, C. A.; Gasmi, K.; Skowronek, S.; Gonzalez Urena, A. [Unidad de Laseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Paseo Juan XXIII-1, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodepletion and action spectra of the laser-induced Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCD{sub 3} fragmentation have been measured over the 16 075-16 380 cm{sup -1} range. The observed band and peak structures allowed us to estimate the vibrational and rotational structures of the excited complex at the transition state configuration. The relative reaction probability P{sub R}(E) for the intracluster Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCD{sub 3}+h{nu}{yields}BaF+CD{sub 3} reaction has been determined over the cited energy range. P{sub R}(E) shows a peak structure with an energy spacing of 8.9 cm{sup -1} which was attributed to an internal rotation of the CD{sub 3} group in the intermediate state. A comparison with previous Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCH{sub 3} photofragmentation spectra reveals the dynamical role of the internal CX{sub 3} (X=H,D) motion which is manifested by the presence of rotational resonances in the laser-induced intracluster reaction.

  1. Topics for BA and MA Theses at the chair of Prof. Klasen The list below gives contains proposals for Bachelor (BA) and Master (MA) thesis topics. You can also

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    (mainly case study of Indonesia) BA/MA Causality between economic development, energy consumption: Trends in migration and land use change: Does reverse causality exist? Evidence from the Indonesian Filipiak, Ute: Household Finance and Consumption in Europe: Culture Clash between North and South? MA

  2. Department of Biology -Committees and Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons Biology Safety Committee Dave Omond Ed Bruggink Jim Cheetham (Chair) Mike Weber Biology Space Committee Jim Cheetham (Chair) Mike Weber Tom Sherratt Ed Bruggink Curriculum Committee (elected) Tom

  3. MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    effectively to constructive feedback. Job Prospects for Biology Graduates MS in Biology Bioremediation Biotechnology Medical Research Industry Government Education Microbiology Health Professions Research Health Food Production Pollution Control Environmental Diagnostics Forestry Agriculture #12;APPENDIX B

  4. Stochastic processes in biological systems : selected problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artomov, Maksym

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Majority of biological processes can not be described deterministically. Multple levels of regulation contribute to the noise in the observable properties of the cells: fluctuations are ubiquitous in biological networks ...

  5. Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

  6. Abiotic and Biological Transformation of Tetraalkoxysilanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    . An aerobic microbial culture from the local wastewater treatment plant that could grow and mineralizeAbiotic and Biological Transformation of Tetraalkoxysilanes and Trichloroethene/ cis-1 compounds (tetra- alkoxysilanes) by abiotic hydrolysis and biological mineralization was investigated

  7. Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    , Life Sciences Institute and Center for Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics, University of Michigan Education 2001-2005 University of Southern California, Postdoc, Molecular and Computational Biology 1998, BMC Bioinformatics 2010- Editorial Board Member, Human Biology 2010- Associate Editor, Genetics 2009

  8. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  9. advanced molecular biology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    311 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Molecular Biology Biology 311 Fall 2013 Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Deborah Lycan Class: MWF 9@lclark.edu Website: http:...

  10. EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop "Biological Interactions...

  11. Hall-Coefficient for Oriented Tl2ba2cacu2o8+delta Thin-Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WANG, PS; WILLIAMS, JC; RATHNAYAKA, KDD; HENNINGS, BD; Naugle, Donald G.; KAISER, AB.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity for highly oriented Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8+delta thin films are reported. The temperature dependence of cotTHETA(H), where THETA(H) is the normal-state Hall angle, for a single-phase (2:2:1:2) film sample...

  12. Roadmap: Pan-African Studies Pan-African Studies Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-PAS-PAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Pan-African Studies ­ Pan-African Studies ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-PAS-PAS] College: 22-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major Non-PAS Elective 3 General Elective (upper division) 9 #12;Roadmap: Pan-African Studies ­ Pan

  13. Electron irradiation of Co, Ni, and P-doped BaFe2As2type iron-based superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ± superconductivity in the multiband iron-based superconductors [1, 2], with a sign-changing order parameter betweenElectron irradiation of Co, Ni, and P-doped BaFe2As2­type iron-based superconductors Cornelis-scale point-like disorder on superconductivity in these materials [5, 6]. In particular, interband scattering

  14. Office of the Faculty of Engineering Syllabus for the Degree Project for the B.A. in Industrial Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of the Faculty of Engineering Syllabus for the Degree Project for the B.A. in Industrial Design Approved by the Board of the Faculty of Engineering on 2nd March 2009 and valid from 1 st January of compulsory courses that can be accredited to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Design. Exemption

  15. Hysteresis analysis of CoTi substituted M-type BaSr hexagonal ferrite Charanjeet Singh a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    Hysteresis analysis of Co­Ti substituted M-type Ba­Sr hexagonal ferrite Charanjeet Singh a, , S.5Sr0.5CoxTixFe(12 - 2x)O19 ferrite have been investigated by XRD, SEM and VSM. XRD and SEM confirm M ferrites are known for their strong uniaxial magne- tocrystalline anisotropy with ease of magnetization

  16. High temperature thermoelectric properties of Czochralski-pulled Ba8Ga16Ge30 M. Christensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High temperature thermoelectric properties of Czochralski-pulled Ba8Ga16Ge30 M. Christensen1 , G, Pasadena, California 91125 Abstract High temperature thermoelectric properties have been measured/m-K around 900K, and ZT reaches a maximum of 0.9 at 1000 K. Introduction The interest in thermoelectric

  17. Oval BA (and the Great Red Spot) extend down to a supersolar water cloud layer in Jupiter's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Philip S.

    Oval BA (and the Great Red Spot) extend down to a supersolar water cloud layer in Jupiter in Jupiter's troposphere, with stable layers near cloud bases [4,6,7]. We use these two results to determine horizontal band in Fig. 2 shows that vortex- model derived static stability (white bars) is consistent

  18. PETROGRAPHY AND CHEMISTRY OF IMPACT-MELT CLASTS IN APOLLO 16 BRECCIAS. B.A. , S.J. Symes2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PETROGRAPHY AND CHEMISTRY OF IMPACT-MELT CLASTS IN APOLLO 16 BRECCIAS. B.A. Cohen1 , S.J. Symes2 samples of unequivocal impact origin, from either the Apollo collection or lunar meteorites, suggest of samples, impact melts and crystalline lunar spherules (CLS) within demonstrably old Apollo breccias

  19. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  20. The carbon footprint analysis of wastewater treatment plants and nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale biological nitrogen removal processes in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprint analysis of advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ...

  1. PURPOSE: This technical note describes the development of an alternative approach to evaluate chronic toxicity and the significance of contaminant bioaccumulation in dredged material assess-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chronic toxicity and the significance of contaminant bioaccumulation in dredged material assess- ments) require that biological evaluations be conducted to determine the suitability of dredged material sediment, the biological tests are conducted to assess the toxicity and bioaccumulation of contami- nants in dredged

  2. A Biological Inventory and Conservation Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Biological Inventory and Conservation Recommendations for the Great Sand Dunes and San Luis Lakes General Services Building Ft. Collins, Colorado 80523 March 1999 i #12;A Biological Inventory PROGRAM SAGUACHE, COLORADO P.O. Box 674, Saguache, Colorado 81149 ii #12;Biological Inventory of the Great

  3. School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    School of Environmental and Biological Sciences #12;Who We are and What We do Students at the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences are part of a rich history of learning, innovation) Biological Sciences Biotechnology Animal Biotechnology Bioinformatics Bioscience Policy and Management

  4. Applications to Computational Molecular Biology Giuseppe Lancia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancia, Giuseppe

    of the first type Bioinformatics problems, and reserve the term Computational Biology for the study of problemsApplications to Computational Molecular Biology Giuseppe Lancia 1 Introduction Computational decade. The seeds for the birth of Computational Biology were sowed in the end of the Seventies, when

  5. Undergraduate Minor in Computational biology & bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, David

    Undergraduate Minor in Computational biology & bioinformatics Course Title Hours CSCE 155T Intro@unl.edu The Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) Minor is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students and for related graduate studies. The Computational Biology & Bioinformatics (CBB) Minor requires 13 credit hours

  6. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Services Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Services Introduction Jenny Barna, Department of the Biological Sciences bioinformatics and computational biology research support service, which is used it provides. There are servers with many cores and very large memory (RAM) on which you can run computing jobs

  7. Turn Scanning 133 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 168: Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Turn Scanning 133 133 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 168: Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding Edited by: K. P. Murphy © Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 7 Turn Scanning: Experimental extended structures. Here we present the use of turn scanning as an experimental method for assessing

  8. ARTHROPOD BIOLOGY Oviposition and Flight Activity of the Blue-Green Sharpshooter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ARTHROPOD BIOLOGY Oviposition and Flight Activity of the Blue-Green Sharpshooter (Hemiptera atropunctata (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), the blue-green sharpshooter, was assessed on wild grape) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Ci- cadellinae), has been a pest of California-grown grapes for nearly a century

  9. La-doped BaTiO{sub 3} heterostructures: Compensating the polarization discontinuity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumah, D. P.; Clarke, R., E-mail: royc@umich.edu [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Yacoby, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Pauli, S. A.; Willmott, P. R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a route to manipulate the polarization and internal electric field of a complex oxide heterostructure using a layering sequence based on the LaAlO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} interface. By combining sensitive atomic-level mapping of the structure using direct x-ray phase-retrieval methods with theoretical modeling of the electrostatic charge and polarization, we have devised a novel single-domain polar heterostructure. We find that ionic rearrangement results in strain and free energy minimization, and eliminates the polarization discontinuity leading to a two-fold increase of the spontaneous polarization towards the surface of an ultra-thin single-domain BaTiO{sub 3} film.

  10. Microscopic description of spherical to {gamma}-soft shape transitions in Ba and Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. P. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid transition between spherical and {gamma}-soft shapes in Ba and Xe nuclei in the mass region A>=130 is analyzed using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce the characteristic evolution of excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities, and in general, a good agreement with available data is obtained. The calculated spectra display fingerprints of a second-order shape phase transition that can approximately be described by analytic solutions corresponding to the E(5) dynamical symmetry.

  11. Roadmap: Biology Organismal Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI] College of Arts/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses General Elective 3 #12;Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS

  12. SPECIAL ISSUE ON SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, JANUARY 2008 51 Stochastic Modeling and Control of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    of modeling, abstraction, and control of a biological system, namely, the lactose regulation systemSPECIAL ISSUE ON SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, JANUARY 2008 51 Stochastic Modeling and Control of Biological for stochastic modeling, model abstraction, and controller design for a biological system. The first half

  13. ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later course other than BIOL 54200 124 Total Credits BIOLOGY: 1. BIOL 12100 Biology I: Diversity, Ecology 28600 Intro. to Ecology and Evolution (2 cr.; spring) or BIOL 29500, Intro. to Evolution & Ecology (2 cr

  14. BIOINFORMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY 2014 Molecular Biology Building, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3260

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    BIOINFORMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY 2014 Molecular Biology Building, Iowa State University of recommendation in my file at the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology program, Iowa State University. [ ] I in the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology program at Iowa State University. We would appreciate your evaluation

  15. Strategic Plan Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan Environmental Assessment 2009 Clinical Center National Institutes of Health U Institutes of Health Strategic Plan ­ Environmental Assessment 2009 Contents Executive Summary environmental assessment to determine Clinical Center strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats

  16. Precipitation method for barium metaborate (BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}) synthesis from borax solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ak?ener, Eymen; Figen, Aysel Kantürk; Pi?kin, Sabriye [Yildiz Technical University, Chem. Eng. Dept., Davutpasa Campus, 34210, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, barium metaborate (BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, BMB) synthesis from the borax solution was carried out. BMB currently is used in production of ceramic glazes, luminophors, oxide cathodes as well as additives to pigments for aqueous emulsion paints and also ??BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} single crystals are the best candidate for fabrication of solid-state UV lasers operating at a wavelength of 200 nm due to excellent nonlinear optical properties. In the present study, synthesis was carried out from the borax solution (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7?}10H{sub 2}O, BDH) and barium chloride (BaCI{sub 2?}2H{sub 2}O, Ba) in the glass-batch reactor with stirring. The effect of, times (5-15 min), molar ratio [stoich.ration (1.0:2.0), 1.25:2.0, 1.5:2.0, 2.5:2:0, 3.0:2.0, 3.5:2.0,4.0:2.0, 5.0:2.0] and also crystallization time (2-6 hour) on the BMB yield (%) was investigated at 80 °C reaction temperature. It is found that, BMB precipitation synthesis with 90 % yield can be performed from 0.50 molar ration (BDH:Ba), under 80 °C, 15 minute, and 6 hours crystallization time. The structural properties of BMB powders were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR and DTA-TG instrumental analysis technique.

  17. Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

  18. Investigations of Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1?x}TiO{sub 3} ceramics and powders prepared by direct current arc discharge technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shuangbin; Wang, Xiaohan [Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources and Chemistry, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yao, Ying, E-mail: yaoy1125@hotmail.com; Jia, Yongzhong; Xie, Shaolei; Jing, Yan [Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources and Chemistry, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Yuzyuk, Yu. I. [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, 5, Zorge str., Rostov-on-Don 344090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1?x}TiO{sub 3} ceramics with x ranging from 0 to 1 were prepared by direct current arc discharge technique and studied by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The cubic-tetragonal ferroelectric phase transition in Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1?x}TiO{sub 3} ceramics was found to occur at x???0.75. XRD investigation of as-grown BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics revealed co-existence of tetragonal and hexagonal modifications with a small amount of impurity phase BaTi{sub 4}O{sub 9}. No evidences of hexagonal phase were observed in Raman spectra of as-grown BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics, while Raman peaks related to hexagonal phase were clearly observed in the spectrum of fine-grain powders prepared from the same ceramics. A core-shell model for BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics prepared by direct current arc discharge technique is proposed. Absence of the hexagonal phase in any Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1?x}TiO{sub 3} solid solution with x?

  19. Novel kinds of down/up-conversion luminescent rare earth doped fluoride BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} microcrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn; Jia, Li-Ping

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: We achieve the liquid phase chemical synthesis of rare earth fluoride system BaMgF4: RE{sup 3+} microphosphors, which realize down/up-conversion luminescence. - Highlights: • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} microphosphors are firstly prepared by hydrothermal process. • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} nanosheets are firstly prepared by high temperature solution reaction. • The down-conversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. • The upconversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this paper, we realize the liquid-phase chemical synthesis of high-quality orthorhombic polycrystalline BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Tb, Sm, Dy, Yb–Er/Tm) compounds with hydrothermal and high-temperature solution methods, respectively. The products from hydrothermal technology show the micrometer size while the products from hydrothermal technology present nanosheet morphology. The rare earth ions doped BaMgF{sub 4} from hydrothermal synthesis are discussed in details, which can realize the downconversion luminescence for doped Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} and upconversion luminescence for Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} (Tm{sup 3+}), respectively. To our knowledge, the hydrothermal or high temperature solution synthesis and photoluminescence (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}(Tm{sup 3+})) of these fluoride systems are firstly reported.

  20. ORISE: Hazard Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assesses both chemical and radiation exposures, and conducts both internal and external radiation dose assessments. Our capabililities include: Linkage of exposure data to site...

  1. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  2. AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PURSUE A GRADUATE DEGREE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PURSUE A GRADUATE DEGREE IN AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering 338 Agricultural Engineering Sciences of Agricultural and Biological Engineering offers a limited number of graduate fellowships and assistantships

  3. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair Evan Siemann Professors of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyoffersabroadrangeofcoursesinthebiosciences:animalbehavior,animal biology, bioinformatics, conservation biology, diseases, ecology, evolutionary biology, field ecology, genetics, genomics

  4. Iosif Vaisman Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Iosif Vaisman Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Email: ivaisman@gmu.edu BINF agreed on the following definitions of bioinformatics and computational biology recognizing STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOINFORMATICS GENOMICS STRUCTURAL GENOMICS PROTEOMICS

  5. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  6. Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Letters Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi Redpath Museum, Mc the generalization that biological invasions are a leading cause of species extinctions. The authors note zebra mussel colonization has accelerated the local extinction of unionid species by a factor of 10

  7. NRCS CSREES Watershed Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .E.A.P. Conservation Effects Assessment Project #12;Measuring the Environmental Benefits of Conservation;Conservation Effects Assessment Project Please turn off the ringers on your cell phones, pagers, blackberries The Conservation EffectsThe Conservation Effects Assessment ProjectAssessment Project (CEAP)(CEAP) #12;Scope

  8. ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOUTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    SERVICE CLIMATE CHANGE & CULTURAL RESOURCE PLANNING PROGRAM 17 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS 18 CLIMATE ASSESSMENTS

  9. First Passage Problems in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chou; Maria R. D'Orsogna

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of first passage times in stochastic processes arise across a wide range of length and time scales in biological settings. After an initial technical overview, we survey representative applications and their corresponding models. Within models that are effectively Markovian, we discuss canonical examples of first passage problems spanning applications to molecular dissociation and self-assembly, molecular search, transcription and translation, neuronal spiking, cellular mutation and disease, and organismic evolution and population dynamics. In this last application, a simple model for stem-cell ageing is presented and some results derived. Various approximation methods and the physical and mathematical subtleties that arise in the chosen applications are also discussed.

  10. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  11. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt%inand FuelBiological

  12. Computational Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputational Biology SHARE Computational

  13. Systems Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(InsertAbout the GeothermalSystems Biology

  14. Green Biologics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO EthanolBiologics Jump to:

  15. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProduction PetraBiological

  16. Conservation assessment for the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander in northern California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinikour, W. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Adduci, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this conservation assessment is to summarize existing knowledge regarding the biology and ecology of the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander, identify threats to the two species, and identify conservation considerations to aid federal management for persistence of the species. The conservation assessment will serve as the basis for a conservation strategy for the species.

  17. IPCC WGII Fourth Assessment Report Summary for Policymakers April 6th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understanding of impacts of climate change on natural, managed and human systems, the capacity of these systems climate changes has increased greatly since the Third Assessment in 2001. The quality of the data sets has in temperature have had discernible impacts on many physical and biological systems". From the current Assessment

  18. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  19. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  20. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  1. Data:85ed0bec-9f0b-4c0c-b7df-7552714728ba | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b-4c0c-b7df-7552714728ba No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  2. Data:D2d5e5ec-0361-4cdb-8855-0ee359ba1f27 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5-0ee359ba1f27 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  3. Data:8e449c5c-00e4-47a0-ba6d-17eeb6c671f8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ba6d-17eeb6c671f8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  4. Structural and magnetic properties and superconductivity in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaler, Alexander

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the effects on structural and magnetic phase transitions and the emergence of superconductivity in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. We grew four series of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (TM=Ru, Mn, Co+Cr and Co+Mn) and characterized them by crystallographic, magnetic and transport measurements. We also subjected Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} to heat treatment to explore what changes might be induced.

  5. Data:5fec70a4-9a2b-44ba-9633-a56fd0275901 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fec70a4-9a2b-44ba-9633-a56fd0275901 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  6. Data:07657709-0dbd-4f7d-9ba5-16de8191e070 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    d-9ba5-16de8191e070 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  7. Is the Communicative Language Teaching Approach More Effective Than the Grammar Translation Method at Teaching the Ba-Construction in Mandarin Chinese to American Undergraduate Students?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    (CLT) with that of Grammar Translation Method (GT) at teaching Chinese as a foreign language (CFL). The present study fills this gap. The purpose of this study is to investigate quantitatively which method is more effective at teaching the ba...

  8. Temperature and composition phase diagram in the iron-based ladder compounds Ba 1 - x Cs x Fe 2 Se 3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hawai, Takafumi; Nambu, Yusuke; Ohgushi, Kenya; Du, Fei; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Avdeev, Maxim; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Sekine, Yurina; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Ma, Jie; Chi, Songxue; Ueda, Yutaka; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Sato, Taku J.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the iron-based ladder compounds (Ba,Cs)Fe?Se?. Their parent compounds BaFe?Se? and CsFe?Se? have different space groups, formal valences of Fe, and magnetic structures. Electrical resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, x-ray diffraction, and powder neutron diffraction measurements were conducted to obtain a temperature and composition phase diagram of this system. Block magnetism observed in BaFe?Se? is drastically suppressed with Cs doping. In contrast, stripe magnetism observed in CsFe?Se? is not so fragile against Ba doping. A new type of magnetic structure appears in intermediate compositions, which is similar to stripe magnetism of CsFe?Se?, but interladder spin configuration is different. Intermediate compounds show insulating behavior, nevertheless a finite T-linear contribution in specific heat was obtained at low temperatures.

  9. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colfoque Cl, supplkrnent au no 4, Tome 38, Auril 1977, page Cl-333 METAL-OXIDES COMPOSITES FOR BaFe,,Ol PERMANENT MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the possibility of producing composites of Ba ferrite with various metals such as cobalt, nickel, iron, copper of a CO deposit with preferential orientation obtained by chemical reduction and electrodeposition. 2. CO

  10. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO); Ghosh, Tushar K. (Columbia, MO); Tompson, Jr., Robert V. (Columbia, MO); Viswanath, Dabir (Columbia, MO); Loyalka, Sudarshan K. (Columbia, MO)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  11. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Neill; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Guang-Yin; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  12. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill Lambert; Yueh-Nan Chen; Yuan-Chung Cheng; Che-Ming Li; Guang-Yin Chen; Franco Nori

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  13. On Biology as an Emergent Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pierre Noyes

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology is considered here as an "emergent science" in the sense of Anderson and of Laughlin and Pines. It is demonstrated that a straightforward mathematical definition of "biological system" is useful in showing how biology differs in structure from the lower levels in Anderson's "More is Different" hierarchy. Using cells in a chemostat as a paradigmatic exemplar of a biological system, it is found that a coherent collection of metabolic pathways through a single cell in the chemostat also satisfies the proposed definition of a biological system. This provides a theoretical and mathematical underpinning for Young's fundamental model of biological organization and integration. Evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of Young's method of analysis is provided by preliminary results of clinical trials of a specific application of Young's model to the treatment of cancer cachexia.

  14. Heat capacity of the site-diluted spin dimer system Ba?(Mn1-xVx)?O?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samulon, E. C.; Shapiro, M. C.; Fisher, I. R.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat-capacity and susceptibility measurements have been performed on the diluted spin dimer compound Ba?(Mn1-xVx)?O?. The parent compound Ba?Mn?O? is a spin dimer system based on pairs of antiferromagnetically coupled S=1, 3d² Mn?? ions such that the zero-field ground state is a product of singlets. Substitution of nonmagnetic S=0, 3d? V?? ions leads to an interacting network of unpaired Mn moments, the low-temperature properties of which are explored in the limit of small concentrations 0?x?0.05. The zero-field heat capacity of this diluted system reveals a progressive removal of magnetic entropy over an extended range of temperatures, with no evidence for a phase transition. The concentration dependence does not conform to expectations for a spin-glass state. Rather, the data suggest a low-temperature random singlet phase, reflecting the hierarchy of exchange energies found in this system.

  15. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L. [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  16. Two-dimensional resonant magnetic excitation in BaFe1.84Co0.16As2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Parshall, Daniel [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL; Lokshin, Konstantin A [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Goremychkin, E. A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Osborn, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Jin, Rongying [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of superconducting BaFe1.84Co0.16As2 clearly reveal a magnetic excitation located at wavevectors (1/2 1/2 L) in tetragonal notation. The scattering is much broader in L than are spin waves observed in the parent compound BaFe2As2 indicating that the excitations in the superconducting material are more two-dimensional in nature. The excitation appears gapless for T > TC and becomes gapped on cooling below TC. The observed gap energy is approximately 9.6 meV corresponding to 5 kBTC which is remarkably similar to the canonical value for the resonance energy in the cuprates.

  17. Behavior of vortices near twin boundaries in underdoped Ba(Fe 1 ? x Co x ) 2 As 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kalisky, B.; Kirtley, J. R.; Analytis, J. G.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Moler, K. A.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy to investigate the behavior of vortices in the presence of twin boundaries in the pnictide superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)?As?. We show that the vortices avoid pinning on twin boundaries. Individual vortices move in a preferential way when manipulated with the SQUID: They tend to not cross a twin boundary, but rather to move parallel to it. This behavior can be explained by the observation of enhanced superfluid density on twin boundaries in Ba(Fe1-xCox)?As?. The observed repulsion from twin boundaries may be a mechanism for enhanced critical currents observed in twinned samples in pnictides and other superconductors.

  18. Proton diffusion pathways and rates in Y-doped BaZrO3 solid oxide electrolyte from quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Proton diffusion pathways and rates in Y-doped BaZrO3 solid oxide electrolyte from quantum barriers for intraoctahedral and interoctahedral proton transfers. We find activation energy Ea values of 0.48 and 0.49 eV for the intraoctahedral proton transfers on O­O edges 2.58 and 2.59 Å of ZrO6 and YO6

  19. OXYDATION COMPARE DU NIOBIUM ET D'UN ALLIAGE (P 353 M) A BA SE DE NIOBIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    519 OXYDATION COMPARÉE DU NIOBIUM ET D'UN ALLIAGE (P 353 M) A BA SE DE NIOBIUM E. FRIES, C. MARHIC'oxydation comparée du Niobium pur et d'un alliage à base de Niobium de composition suivante : W V Ti Zr C 10 % 1 100 h. Dans les deux cas (niobium et alliage) on a mis en évidence la présence de trois formes de l

  20. The Magnetic Sensitivity of the Ba II D1 and D2 Lines of the Fraunhofer Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Belluzzi; Javier Trujillo Bueno; Egidio Landi Degl'Innocenti

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical interpretation of the spectral line polarization produced by the joint action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects offers a unique opportunity to obtain empirical information about hidden aspects of solar and stellar magnetism. To this end, it is important to achieve a complete understanding of the sensitivity of the emergent spectral line polarization to the presence of a magnetic field. Here we present a detailed theoretical investigation on the role of resonance scattering and magnetic fields on the polarization signals of the Ba II D1 and D2 lines of the Fraunhofer spectrum, respectively at 4934 \\AA\\ and 4554 \\AA. We adopt a three-level model of Ba II, and we take into account the hyperfine structure that is shown by the $^{135}$Ba and $^{137}$Ba isotopes. Despite of their relatively small abundance (18%), the contribution coming from these two isotopes is indeed fundamental for the interpretation of the polarization signals observed in these lines. We consider an optically thin slab model, through which we can investigate in a rigorous way the essential physical mechanisms involved (resonance polarization, Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects), avoiding complications due to radiative transfer effects. We assume the slab to be illuminated from below by the photospheric solar continuum radiation field, and we investigate the radiation scattered at 90 degrees, both in the absence and in the presence of magnetic fields, deterministic and microturbulent. We show in particular the existence of a differential magnetic sensitivity of the three-peak Q/I profile that is observed in the D2 line in quiet regions close to the solar limb, which is of great interest for magnetic field diagnostics.

  1. Distributed road assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  2. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  3. Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Biological Ethanol Production June 30, 2015 - 11:43am Addthis Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photo credit:...

  4. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  5. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  6. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garitezi, T. M., E-mail: thalesmg@ifi.unicamp.br; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” UNICAMP, Campinas, SP 13083-859 (Brazil); Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, FSU, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4005 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high field {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T{sub 0}?128??K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency ?{sub Q}?2.57(1)??MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe–As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T{sub 0} in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T{sub 0} suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of the Kagome antiferromagnet YbBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huq, A. [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mitchell, J.F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: mitchell@anl.gov; Zheng, H. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Chapon, L.C. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Radaelli, P.G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Knight, K.S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Stephens, P.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY Stonybrook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixed-valent compound YbBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} is built up of Kagome sheets of CoO{sub 4} tetrahedra, linked in the third dimension by a triangular layer of CoO{sub 4} tetrahedra in an analogous fashion to that found in the known geometrically frustrated magnets such as pyrochlores and SrCr{sub 9} {sub x} Ga{sub 12-9} {sub x} O{sub 19} (SCGO). We have undertaken a study of the structural and magnetic properties of this compound using combined high-resolution powder neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. YbBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} undergoes a first-order trigonal{sup {yields}}orthorhombic phase transition at 175 K. We show that this transition occurs as a response to a markedly underbonded Ba{sup 2+} site in the high-temperature phase and does not appear to involve charge ordering of Co{sup 2+}/Co{sup 3+} ions in the tetrahedra. The symmetry lowering relieves the geometric frustration of the structure, and a long-range-ordered 3-D antiferromagnetic state develops below 80 K.

  8. High temperature superconductor step-edge Josephson junctions using Ti-Ca-Ba-Cu-O

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.; Martens, J.S.; Plut, T.A.; Tigges, C.P.; Vawter, G.A.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for formulating non-hysteretic and hysteretic Josephson junctions using HTS materials which results in junctions having the ability to operate at high temperatures while maintaining high uniformity and quality. The non-hysteretic Josephson junction is formed by step-etching a LaAlO[sub 3] crystal substrate and then depositing a thin film of TlCaBaCuO on the substrate, covering the step, and forming a grain boundary at the step and a subsequent Josephson junction. Once the non-hysteretic junction is formed the next step to form the hysteretic Josephson junction is to add capacitance to the system. In the current embodiment, this is accomplished by adding a thin dielectric layer, LaA1O[sub 3], followed by a cap layer of a normal metal where the cap layer is formed by first depositing a thin layer of titanium (Ti) followed by a layer of gold (Au). The dielectric layer and the normal metal cap are patterned to the desired geometry. 8 figs.

  9. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing and CP Violation at BaBar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulia Casarosa; for the BaBar Collaboration

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a measurement of D0-D0bar mixing and a search for CP violation in the D0->K+K-, pi+pi- and K+-pi-+ channels. We use D0's coming from D*+ decays, so that the flavour of the D0 at production is tagged by the charge of the pion that is also emitted. We also use an independent set of D0's coming directly from the hadronization of the charm quark, but in this case the flavour of the charmed meson is not known. We analyze events collected by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb-1. We measure the mixing parameter value to be yCP = [0.72 +- 0.18 (stat) +- 0.12 (syst)]%, and exclude the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3sigma significance. We find no evidence of CP violation, observing DeltaY = [0.09 +- 0.26 (stat) +- 0.06 syst)]% which is consistent with zero.

  10. Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

  11. Plant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Genetics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, JapanPlant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123­127 © 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPSBPlant Species Biology1442-1984The Society for the Study of Species

  12. Solar Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

  13. Edinburgh Motor Assessment (EMAS) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Thomas

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edinburgh Motor Assessment (EMAS) is a brief motor screening test, specifically designed for assessment of patients with dementia, aphasia and other cognitive disorders. It focuses, therefore, on those motor symptoms, ...

  14. Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor Sang-Eun Oh,1 Prabha Iyer,1,2 Mary Ann bioreactor (MBR) for biological hydrogen production. The reactor was fed glucose (10,000 mg/L) and inoculated were used. B 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Keywords: membrane bioreactor; hydrogen production

  15. Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources 2007 #12;ii #12;Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources Prepared for: Colorado Cattleman's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Department of Natural Resources Division of State Board of Land Commissioners 1313 Sherman Street Denver, CO

  16. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  17. Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis- try in Yellowstone National Park. (eds WP Inskeep of life. The legacy of chemical and biologi- cal research in geothermal regimes, while short in duration geothermal areas, including Yellowstone, are largely confined to the specialty literature of geochemical

  18. STOCHASTIC GENERATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACCURATE BRAIN NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STOCHASTIC GENERATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACCURATE BRAIN NETWORKS A Thesis by ARAVIND ALURI Submitted OF BIOLOGICALLY ACCURATE BRAIN NETWORKS A Thesis by ARAVIND ALURI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Head of Department, Valerie Taylor December 2005 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;iii ABSTRACT

  19. Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014 SECTIONS 1 ­ 3 The Function and Regulation of Sleep (3. Huang, x3446, MC 156-29 #12;Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014 SECTIONS 4-6 Physical Principles crystallography and neutron scattering; nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging; peptide and DNA

  20. Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Large-scale discovery and validation of functional elements in the human genome-mail: bbernst@fas.harvard.edu. Manolis Kellis. E-mail: manoli@mit.edu Published: 1 March 2005 Genome Biology

  1. Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritham, Ellen J.

    Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Mobile DNA: genomes under the influence Cédric Feschotte and Ellen J Pritham Feschotte. Email: cedric@uta.edu Published: 30 June 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006

  2. FINAL REPORT FOR: OPTIMIZATION OF BIOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND SUSPENDED GROWTH WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM DECEMBER, 1994 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environment#12;FINAL REPORT FOR: OPTIMIZATION OF BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS AND AMMONIA REMOVAL IN A COMBINED FIXED;Optimization of Biological Phosphorus and Ammonia Removal in a Combined Fixed & Suspended Growth System i

  3. Waste Handling and Disposal Biological Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    plumbing services, EHS personnel wastewater treatment plant personnel, and the general public canWaste Handling and Disposal Biological Safety General Biosafety Practices (GBP) Why You Should Care on the next experiment. Are you working with r/sNA, biological toxins, human materials, needles, plasticware

  4. Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Name Survey of...

  5. Writing Assessment: Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    29 Appendix A Writing Assessment: Additional Resources #12;30 Where can I find out more into the assessment process. On-campus resources give you with a "real person" to contact should you have questions Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/resource.htm Ohio

  6. Management Assessment and Independent Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The revision to this Guide reflects current assessment practices, international standards, and changes in the Department of Energy expectations. Cancels DOE G 414.1-1. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-1B.

  7. Assessing the assessments: Pharmaceuticals in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enick, O.V. [Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)], E-mail: oana.enick@gov.bc.ca; Moore, M.M. [Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)], E-mail: mmoore@sfu.ca

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The relatively new issue of pharmaceutical contamination of the environment offers the opportunity to explore the application of values to the construction, communication and management of risk. The still-developing regulatory policies regarding environmental contamination with pharmaceuticals provide fertile ground for the introduction of values into the definition and management of risk. In this report, we summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmaceutical contamination of the environment and discuss specific attributes of pharmaceuticals that require special consideration. We then present an analysis showing that if values are incorporated into assessing, characterizing and managing risk, the results of risk assessments will more accurately reflect the needs of various stakeholders. Originating from an acknowledgement of the inherent uncertainty and value-laden nature of risk assessment, the precautionary principle (and later, the multi-criteria, integrated risk assessment), provides a direction for further research and policy development.

  8. Home Energy Assessments

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dispenza, Jason

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

  9. Fluorine sites in glasses and transparent glass-ceramics of the system Na{sub 2}O/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}/BaF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocker, Christian, E-mail: christian.bocker@uni-jena.d [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Munoz, Francisco; Duran, Alicia [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ruessel, Christian [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transparent glass-ceramics obtained in the silicate system Na{sub 2}O/K{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}/BaF{sub 2} show homogeneously dispersed BaF{sub 2} nano crystals with a narrow size distribution. The X-ray diffraction and the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied to glasses and the respective glass-ceramics in order to clarify the crystallization mechanism and the role of fluorine during crystallization. With an increasing annealing time, the concentration and also the number of crystals remain approximately constant. With an increasing annealing temperature, the crystalline fraction increases until a saturation limit is reached, while the number of crystals decreases and the size of the crystals increases. Fluoride in the glassy network occurs as Al-F-Ba, Al-F-Na and also as Ba-F structures. The latter are transformed into crystalline BaF{sub 2} and fluoride is removed from the Al-F-Ba/Na bonds. However, some fluorine is still present in the glassy phase after the crystallization. -- Graphical abstract: The X-ray diffraction and the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied to glasses in the silicate system Na{sub 2}O/K{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}/BaF{sub 2} and the respective glass-ceramics with BaF{sub 2} nano crystals in order to clarify the crystallization mechanism and the role of fluorine during crystallization. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} BaF{sub 2} nano crystals are precipitated from a silicate glass system. {yields} Ostwald ripening during the late stage of crystallization does not occur. {yields} Fluorine in the glass is coordinated with Ba as well as Al together with Ba or Na.{yields} In the glass-ceramics, the residual fluorine is coordinated as Al-F-Ba/Na.

  10. First-principles study of structural, electronic, vibrational, dielectric and elastic properties of tetragonal Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeshraj, C.; Santhosh, P. N., E-mail: santhosh@physics.iitm.ac.in [Low Temperature Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report first-principles study of structural, electronic, vibrational, dielectric, and elastic properties of Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6}, a pinning material in high temperature superconductors (HTS), by using density functional theory. By using different exchange-correlation potentials, the accuracy of the calculated lattice constants of Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} has been achieved with GGA-RPBE, since many important physical quantities crucially depend on change in volume. We have calculated the electronic band structure dispersion, total and partial density of states to study the band gap origin and found that Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} is an insulator with a direct band gap of 3.50?eV. From Mulliken population and charge density studies, we conclude that Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} have a mixed ionic-covalent character. Moreover, the vibrational properties, born effective charges, and the dielectric permittivity tensor have been calculated using linear response method. Vibrational spectrum determined through our calculations agrees well with the observed Raman spectrum, and allows assignment of symmetry labels to modes. We perform a detailed analysis of the contribution of the various infrared-active modes to the static dielectric constant to explain its anisotropy, while electronic dielectric tensor of Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} is nearly isotropic, and found that static dielectric constant is in good agreement with experimental value. The six independent elastic constants were calculated and found that tetragonal Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} is mechanically stable. Other elastic properties, including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and elastic anisotropy ratios are also investigated and found that Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus of Ba{sub 2}YTaO{sub 6} are similar to that of other pinning materials in HTS.

  11. Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Energy ...................................................................................................................................4 Biomass Resource Assessment Products and Assessment Methodologies, Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources, Australia Ms. Siti Hafsah, Office of the Minister of Energy

  12. Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel

    What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

  13. ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC- ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY C H HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER

  14. Crafting life : a sensory ethnography of fabricated biologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roosth, Hannah Sophia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ethnography tracks a diverse set of practices I term "constructive biologies," by which I mean efforts in the post-genomic life sciences to understand how biology works by making new biological things. I examine five ...

  15. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  16. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  17. Correlation between upconversion photoluminescence and dielectric response in Ba-substituted (Sr{sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}){sub 4}(La{sub 0.85}Ho{sub 0.025}Yb{sub 0.125}){sub 2}Ti{sub 4}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, T., E-mail: weitong.nju@gmail.com [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China); Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, X. D. [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China); Zhao, C. Z. [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Liu, M. F.; Liu, J. M., E-mail: liujm@nju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The filled tetragonal tungsten bronze (Sr{sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}){sub 4}(La{sub 0.85}Ho{sub 0.025}Yb{sub 0.125}){sub 2}Ti{sub 4}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 30} (SBLTNx: Ho-Yb) ceramics with different Ba substitution levels (x) are prepared. The upconversion photoluminescence (UC-PL) and dielectric permittivity are investigated. The substitution of Sr{sup 2+} ions at the A{sub 2}-sites by larger Ba{sup 2+} ions results in substantial variation of the UC-PL intensity as a function of substitution level x. Furthermore, the dielectric response to the substitution of Sr{sup 2+} by Ba{sup 2+} suggests a close correlation between the UC-PL intensity and dielectric permittivity. The origin for this correlation is discussed based on the random stress field (RSF) model.

  18. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  19. Synthesis of BaTiO[subscript 3]-20wt%CoFe[subscript 2]O[subscript 4] Nanocomposites via Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Han, Hyuksu; Nino, Juan C.; Subhash, Ghatu; Jones, Jacob L. (Florida)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Barium titanate-20wt% cobalt ferrite (BaTiO{sub 3}-20wt%CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanocomposites were sintered from nanocrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders using spark plasma sintering (SPS) and pressureless sintering (PS) techniques. Using SPS, dense polycrystalline composites were obtained at a sintering temperature as low as 860 C and a time of 5 min whereas PS required a higher sintering temperature (1150 C) and time (120 min) to obtain similarly dense composites. Microstructural analysis of the composites showed that both the techniques retained nanocrystalline grain sizes after sintering. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the BaTiO{sub 3}-20wt%CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composites sintered by the SPS technique did not exhibit formation of any new phase(s) due to reaction between the BaTiO{sub 3} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases during sintering. However, the PS technique resulted in the formation of additional phases (other than the BaTiO{sub 3} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases) in the composites. While the composites synthesized by SPS were of superior phase-purity, evidence of Fe diffusion from the spinel to the perovskite phase was found from X-ray diffraction and permittivity measurements.

  20. High temperature phase stabilities and electrochemical properties of InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun [ORNL; Young Nam, Kim [University of Texas, Austin; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Manthiram, Arumugam [University of Texas, Austin; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Huq, Ashfia [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InBaCo4-xZnxO7 oxides have been synthesized and characterized as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC). The effect of Zn substitution for Co on the structure, phase stability, thermal expansion, and electrochemical properties of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 has been investigated. The increase in the Zn content from x = 1 to 1.5 improves the high temperature phase stability at 600 oC and 700 oC for 100 h, and chemical stability against a Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) values of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 (x = 1, 1.5, 2) specimens were determined to be 8.6 10-6 9.6 10-6 /oC in the range of 80 900 oC, which provides good thermal expansion compatibility with the standard SOFC electrolyte materials. The InBaCo4-xZnxO7 + GDC (50:50 wt. %) composite cathodes exhibit improved cathode performances compared to those obtained from the simple InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes due to the extended triple-phase boundary (TPB) and enhanced oxide-ion conductivity through the GDC portion in the composites.

  1. (Sr,Ba)(Si,Ge){sub 2} for thin-film solar-cell applications: First-principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Mukesh, E-mail: Kumar.Mukesh@nims.go.jp, E-mail: mkgarg79@gmail.com [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Umezawa, Naoto [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); TU-NIMS Joint Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, 92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin (China); Imai, Motoharu [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the increasing demand for electric power generation from solar energy conversion, the development of efficient light absorber materials has been awaited. To this end, the electronic and optical properties of advanced alkaline-earth-metals disilicides and digermanides (SrSi{sub 2}, BaSi{sub 2}, SrGe{sub 2}, and BaGe{sub 2}) are studied by means of the density functional theory using HSE06 exchange-correlation energy functional. Our calculations show that all these orthorhombic structured compounds have fundamental indirect band gaps in the range E{sub g} ? 0.89–1.25 eV, which is suitable for solar cell applications. The estimated lattice parameters and band gaps are in good agreement with experiments. Our calculations show that the electronic band structures of all four compounds are very similar except in the vicinity of the ?-point. The valence band of these compounds is made up by Si(Ge)-p states, whereas the conduction band is composed of Sr(Ba)-d states. Their band alignments are carefully determined by estimating the work function of each compound using slab model. The optical properties are discussed in terms of the complex dielectric function ?(?)?=??{sub 1}(?)?+?i?{sub 2}(?). The static and high-frequency dielectric constants are calculated, taking into account the ionic contribution. The absorption coefficient ?(?) demonstrates that a low energy dispersion of the conduction band, which results in a flat conduction band minimum, leads to large optical activity in these compounds. Therefore, alkaline-earth-metals disilicides and digermanides possess great potential as light absorbers for applications in thin-film solar cell technologies.

  2. Synthesis, structural characterization and properties of SrAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x}, BaAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x}, and EuAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x} (x?0.3–0.4)—Rare examples of electron-rich phases with the BaAl{sub 4} structure type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiliang; Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three solid solutions with the general formula AEAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x} (AE=Eu, Sr, Ba; 0.32(1)?x?0.41(1)) have been synthesized via the aluminum self-flux method, and their crystal structures have been established from powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They are isotypic and crystallize with the well-known BaAl{sub 4} structure type, adopted by the three AEAl{sub 4} end members. In all structures, Ge substitutes Al only at the 4e Wyckoff site. Results from X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy on EuAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x} and EuAl{sub 4} indicate that the interactions between the Eu{sup 2+} cations and the polyanionic framework are enhanced in the Ge-doped structure, despite the slightly elevated Fermi level. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the local moment magnetism, expected for the [Xe]4f{sup 7} electronic configuration of Eu{sup 2+} and suggest strong ferromagnetic interactions at cryogenic temperatures. Resistivity data from single-crystalline samples show differences between the title compounds, implying different bonding characteristics despite the close Debye temperatures. A brief discussion on the observed electron count and homogeneity ranges for AEAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x} (AE=Eu, Sr, Ba) is also presented. - Graphical abstract: AEAl{sub 4?x}Ge{sub x} (AE=Eu, Sr, Ba; 0.32(1)?x?0.41(1)), three “electron-rich” phases with BaAl{sub 4} structure type have been synthesized and characterized. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three BaAl{sub 4}-type ternary aluminum germanides have been synthesized with Eu, Sr and Ba. • Eu, Sr and Ba cations have no apparent influence on the solubility of Ge. • The Ge atoms substitute Al on one of two framework sites, thereby strengthening the interactions between the cations and the polyanionic framework.

  3. advanced biological treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patrice Ct DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY 12;BIOL 3020.03 Advanced Cell Biology Syllabus Page 2 Course description For a cell to function Adl, Sina 2 Biological Cybernetics...

  4. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. Abstract: This paper examines the types of...

  5. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009)...

  6. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of soil carbon sequestration by amendment withBiologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needson Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration, October 29,

  7. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  8. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the...

  9. Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus . Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus . Abstract: To...

  10. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  11. Zn-Doping Dependence of Stripe Order in La1.905Ba0.095CuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucker, M.; Zimmermann, M.v.; Xu, Z.J.; Wen, J.S.; Gu, G.D.; Tian, W.; Zarestky, J.; Tranquada, J.M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of Zn-doping on the stripe order in La{sub 1.905}Ba{sub 0.095}CuO{sub 4} has been studied by means of x-ray and neutron diffraction as well as magnetization measurements. While 1% Zn leads to an increase of the spin stripe order, it unexpectedly causes a wipe out of the visibility of the charge stripe order. A magnetic field of 10 Tesla applied along the c-axis has no reversing effect on the charge order. We compare this observation with the Zn-doping dependence of the crystal structure, superconductivity, and normal state magnetism.

  12. Biological and Chemical Approaches to Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morimoto, Richard

    , chaperones, heat shock response, protein folding and misfolding, unfolded protein response Abstract Many that proteostasis is influenced both by an adjustable proteostasis network capacity and protein folding energetics INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 960 PROTEIN FOLDING IN VITRO . . . 961 BIOLOGICALLY ASSISTED

  13. VEHICLE OPERATING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    VEHICLE OPERATING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE GENERAL INFORMATION Vehicles resposniblity and disciplinary action. Vehicles may be used by faculty or staff from other departments complete the vehicle usage agreement form certifying that they have a valid driver's license

  14. Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    of Forensic Science (AAFS) Annual Meeting Thursday, February 20, 2014 #12;The State of Biological Evidence Dennis Davenport, Senior Crime Scene Investigator, Commerce City PD Rock Harmon, Consultant, DNARock

  15. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CIVIL, ARCHITECTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING MECHANICAL, MATERIALS, AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING IIT ARMOUR #12;WHY ENGINEERINGAT IIT ARMOUR? Five Departments. One Distinctive Educational

  16. BIOLOGICAL & AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOLOGICAL & AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title: Assistant/Associate Professor and Extension Specialist (Water/Wastewater Engineering) Appointment: 70% Texas A&M Agri) and other environmental issues of concern to rural communities, agricultural producers, agri

  17. The Biology of Some Kansas Eumenidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isely, Dwight

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is based on field observations and collections made by the author while connected with the Biological Survey of the University of Kansas, in Northwestern Kansas, during the summer of 1912. Specimens of fully ...

  18. Stochastic modeling of biological sequence evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Keyuan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Markov models of sequence evolution are a fundamental building block for making inferences in biological research. This thesis reviews several major techniques developed to estimate parameters of Markov models of sequence ...

  19. Biological applications of weal polyelectrolyte multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Michael C., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis research focused on biological applications of ultra-thin weak polyelectrolyte multilayers with specific emphasis on cell patterning, drug delivery, and antibacterial coatings. All of these very different ...

  20. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  1. Elizabeth R. Dumont Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    collection on the biology- engineering interface" (P.I.) Direct Costs: $670,425 (includes $7,500 REU, UMass Amherst. 2007 Plenary Speaker, 14th International Bat Research Congress, Merida, Mexico 2006

  2. Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand, David

    Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels 20-24 June 2011 (All and issues Theme: Biofuel systems and issues (Chair: Nigel Burroughs) 13 (Bielefeld) Biofuels from algae- challenges for industrial levels

  3. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  4. Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ian Y.

    Historically, biomedical research has been based on two paradigms. First, measurements of biological behaviors have been based on bulk assays that average over large populations. Second, these behaviors have then been ...

  5. Statistical methods to infer biological interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, George Jay

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological systems are extremely complex, and our ability to experimentally measure interactions in these systems is limited by inherent noise. Technological advances have allowed us to collect unprecedented amounts of raw ...

  6. Size adjustable separation of biologically active molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Mauricio R. (Mauricio Roberto)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separation of biologically active molecules (BAM's) is a problem for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Current technologies addressing this problem require too many techniques, toxic additives, and time to ...

  7. ESCO PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document presents a template and example to help energy service companies (ESCOs) conduct preliminary assessments required for Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects.

  8. Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices...

  9. Sandia Energy - Assessment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    petroleum storage and refineries; and transportation systems. Assessments were an early way to help clarify the systems as they existed in the field. This knowledge has...

  10. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  12. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  13. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  14. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  15. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; Won, C. J.; Hur, N.; Llobet, A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing ?. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-?. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (?=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (?=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reducedmore »BaTiO3-? is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.« less

  16. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; Won, C. J.; Hur, N.; Llobet, A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing ?. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-?. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (?=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (?=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reduced BaTiO3-? is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.

  17. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, L.R.; D'Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  18. Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment of Sea Bottom and Marine Biology #12 Design ApS 01.03.2000 #12;Bio/consult A/S Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1........................................................................................................................................................... 36 #12;Bio/consult A/S ELSAM Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1 Page 4

  19. (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co,Zn)4O7 cathodes with superior high-temperature phase stability for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young Nam, Kim [University of Texas, Austin; Kim, Jung-Hyun [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Manthiram, Arumugam [University of Texas, Austin; Huq, Ashfia [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Y0.5In0.5)BaCo4-xZnxO7 (1.0 x 2.0) oxides crystallizing in a trigonal P31c structure have been synthesized and explored as cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). At a given Zn content, the (Y0.5In0.5)BaCo4-xZnxO7 sample with 50 % Y and 50 % In exhibits much improved phase stability at intermediate temperatures (600 - 800 oC) compared to the samples with 100 % Y or In. However, the substitution of Zn for Co in (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co4-xZnx)O7 (1.0 x 2.0) decreases the amount of oxygen loss on heating, total electrical conductivity, and cathode performance in SOFC while providing good long-term phase stability at high temperatures. Among the various chemical compositions investigated in the (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co4-xZnx)O7 system, the (Y0.5In0.5)BaCo3ZnO7 sample offers a combination of good electrochemical performance and low thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) while maintaining superior phase stability at 600 800 oC for 100 h. Fuel cell performances of the (Y0.5In0.5)Ba(Co3Zn)O7 + Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (GDC) (50 : 50 wt. %) composite cathodes collected with anode-supported single cell reveal a maximum power density value of 521 mW cm-2 at 700 oC.

  20. X-ray and neutron powder diffraction studies of Ba(Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, G. [Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huang, Q. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Naperville, IL 60563 (United States); Kaduk, J.A. [INEOS Technologies, Naperville, IL 60563 (United States); Yang, Z. [Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Lucas, C. [Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wong-Ng, W. [Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: Winnie.wong-ng@nist.gov

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ba(R,R'){sub 2}CuO{sub 5} (R,R'=lanthanides and Y) plays an important role as a flux-pinning agent in enhancing the superconducting properties of the Ba{sub 2}(R,R')Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (R,R'=lanthanides and Y) coated conductors. Using X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, we found that the Ba(Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5} solid solution adopts two structure types. In the Nd-rich region (1.8{<=}x{<=}2.0), the materials are of brown color (commonly referred to as the 'brown phase'), and the structure is tetragonal with space group I4/mbm (no. 127). In the Y-rich region (0.0{<=}x{<=}1.4), the materials are green (commonly referred to as the 'green phase') and the structure is orthorhombic with space group Pnma (no. 62). A two-phase region (1.4Ba(Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5} (isostructural to BaY{sub 2}CuO{sub 5}), are discussed in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Perspective view of the 'green phase' Ba(Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5} structure along the b-axis, showing the isolated square pyramids of [CuO{sub 5}] and the trigonal prisms, RO{sub 7}, around the lanthanide sites.