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Sample records for b3 census region

  1. Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","North- east","Midwest ","South","West","All Buildings","North- east","Midwest","South","West" "All Buildings ................",4657,686,1188,1762,1021,67338,12360,16761,23485,14731 "Building

  2. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Region > Detailed Tables-Census Region Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables-Census Region Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...

  3. " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,,,,,"Census Division",,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,,,,,,"Middle","East North","West

  4. Table C12. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Electricity Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per kWh",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  5. " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",," ",,,,,,," "," "," " ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One

  6. " Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type of Supplier," " Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,," (million kWh)",," (billion Btu)" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group

  7. " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,," (kWh)",," (million Btu)" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row"

  8. Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic

  9. Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-08-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

  10. " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,," ","Computer Control","or

  11. " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Billion Btu)" ,,,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,,,"Biomass" " "," ",," "," "," ","Wood Residues","Wood-Related"," " " ","

  12. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," ","

  13. "Table HC14.8 Water Heating Characteristics by West Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pac...

  14. Figure 1. Census Regions and Divisions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    US Federal Regions> Region 1 Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont Region 2 New Jersey, New York Region 3 ...

  15. "Table HC10.8 Water Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Northeas...

  16. "Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" "

  17. Table 2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions Table 2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions Table 2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions (10.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 Before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Power - Committee on Energy and Commerce

  18. "Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","

  19. b3.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Revised June 2006 31 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 All Buildings* North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 726 1,266 1,775 878 64,783 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Elevators and Escalators (more than one may apply) Any

  20. b3.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 All Buildings* North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 726 1,266 1,775 878 64,783 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Elevators and Escalators (more than one may apply) Any Elevators

  1. "Table HC11.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between

  2. "Table HC11.2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.4

  3. "Table HC11.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S.",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an

  4. "Table HC12.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On"

  5. "Table HC12.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S.",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an

  6. "Table HC13.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights

  7. "Table HC13.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total U.S.",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use

  8. "Table HC14.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per

  9. "Table HC14.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total U.S.",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,23.7,7.5,16.2

  10. " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, Presence of"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, Presence of" " General Technologies, and Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected" " Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row"

  11. "Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC","

  12. "Table A36. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  13. "Table A37. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," ","

  14. Table A28. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Cens

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Renewables" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" " "," "," ","and"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration(b)","Other

  15. "Table A27. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  16. "Table HC10.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,20.6,"N","N","N" "New England",5.5,5.5,"N","N","N" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,15.1,"N","N","N" ...

  17. Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5

  18. "Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC","

  19. "Table A24. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groupsc and

  20. Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic

  1. Table A20. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,,"RSE" " "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column

  2. "Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ," U.S. Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A

  3. "Table HC11.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q"

  4. "Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A

  5. "Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N"

  6. "Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked"

  7. "Table HC13.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Do Not Have Heating

  8. "Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.6,0.7,1.9 "2

  9. "Table HC14.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.7,"Q",0.7 "Have Space Heating

  10. "Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total

  11. "Table A17. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","Row"

  12. "Table A28. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke","

  13. "Table HC10.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.2,1.4,3,2.6 "2 Times A

  14. "Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per

  15. "Table HC10.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.7 "Have Space Heating

  16. "Table HC10.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S.",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,20.3,25.3,40.2,23.7

  17. Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

  18. " of Supplier, Census Region, Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",20816,165,2514,1952,17.7 " 20-49"," W "," W ",1630,4453,12.6 " 50-99",14937," W "," W ",5411,11.3 " ...

  19. "Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel Purposes by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonfuel Purposes by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","

  20. Table 2.4 Household Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household 1 Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted) Census Region 2 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 United States Total (does not include wood) 10.56 9.74 9.32 9.29 8.58 9.04 9.13 9.22 10.01 10.25 9.86 10.55 10.18 Natural Gas 5.58 5.31 4.97 5.27 4.74 4.98 4.83 4.86 5.27 5.28 4.84 4.79 4.69 Electricity 3 2.47 2.42 2.48 2.42 2.35 2.48 2.76 3.03 3.28 3.54 3.89 4.35 4.39 Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene 2.19

  1. "Table HC13.8 Water Heating Characteristics by South Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"South ...

  2. "Table HC11.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Northeast Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Middle ...

  3. "Table HC12.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"East North ...

  4. National Solar Jobs Census 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census 2014 is the fifth annual update of current employment, trends, and projected growth in the U.S. solar industry. Data for Census 2014 is derived...

  5. http://www.census.gov/

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People & Households American Community Survey * Estimates * Projections Income | State Median Income * Poverty * Health Insurance International * Genealogy * Census 2000 * More ...

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.2 Existing Regulations B3.2: Aviation activities Aviation activities for survey, monitoring, or security purposes that comply with Federal Aviation Administration regulations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 25, 2016 CX-100511 Categorical Exclusion Determination Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems in the Great Basin Region: An Integrated Geologic and Geophysical Approach for Establishing Geothermal Play Fairways Award Number: DE-EE0006731

  7. 2015 National Solar Jobs Census

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solar Foundation's National Solar Jobs Census 2015 is the sixth annual edition of current employment, trends, and projected growth in the U.S. solar industry. Given this industry's rapid...

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.16

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    B3.16: Research activities in aquatic environmentsSmall-scale, temporary surveying, site characterization, and research activities in aquatic environments, limited to: (a) Acquisition of rights-of...

  9. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Census Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Top Return to: "1999 CBECS-Commercial Buildings Characteristics" Specific questions...

  10. National Solar Schools Census 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With support from the SunShot Initiative, TSF’s national solar schools census, “Brighter Future: A Study on Solar in U.S. Schools” serves as a starting point for sharing ideas and best practices between schools experienced with solar energy and those seeking to join their ranks. Each solar school has its own unique story to tell on how their systems were financed and installed and how (and whether) solar has been integrated into class curricula.

  11. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Existing Regulations B3.4: Transport packaging tests for radioactive or hazardous material Drop, puncture, water-immersion, thermal, and fire tests of transport packaging for ...

  13. Microsoft Word - B3 article for web _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSANSO Dedicates "Green" Building The National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSANSO) has recently completed construction of the B3 administration office. ...

  14. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.5 Existing Regulations B3.5: Tank car tests Tank car tests under 49 CFR part 179 (including, but not limited to, tests of safety relief devices, pressure regulators, and thermal protection systems). DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 16, 2011 CX-006343: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey-City-Hamilton, Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B3.5, B5.1 Date: 06/16/2011 Location(s): Hamilton, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 Existing Regulations B3.1: Site characterization and environmental monitoring Site characterization and environmental monitoring (including, but not limited to, siting, construction, modification, operation, and dismantlement and removal or otherwise proper closure (such as of a well) of characterization and monitoring devices, and siting, construction, and associated operation of a small-scale laboratory building or renovation of a room in an existing

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.10 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.10 Existing Regulations B3.10: Particle accelerators Siting, construction, modification, operation, and decommissioning of particle accelerators, including electron beam accelerators, with primary beam energy less than approximately 100 million electron volts (MeV) and average beam power less than approximately 250 kilowatts (kW), and associated beamlines, storage rings, colliders, and detectors, for research and medical purposes (such as proton

  17. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.11 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.11 Existing Regulations B3.11: Outdoor tests and experiments on materials and equipment components Outdoor tests and experiments for the development, quality assurance, or reliability of materials and equipment (including, but not limited to, weapon system components) under controlled conditions. Covered actions include, but are not limited to, burn tests (such as tests of electric cable fire resistance or the combustion characteristics of fuels),

  18. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.12 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.12 Existing Regulations B3.12: Microbiological and biomedical facilities Siting, construction, modification, operation, and decommissioning of microbiological and biomedical diagnostic, treatment and research facilities (excluding Biosafety Level-3 and Biosafety Level-4), in accordance with applicable requirements and best practices (such as Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th Edition, Dec. 2009, U.S. Department of Health and

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.13 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.13 Existing Regulations B3.13: Magnetic fusion experiments Performing magnetic fusion experiments that do not use tritium as fuel, within existing facilities (including, but not limited to, necessary modifications). Previous Regulations Categorical Exclusion Determinations dated before November 14th, 2011 were issued under previous DOE NEPA regulations. See the Notice of Final Rulemaking (76 FR 63763, 10/13/2011) for information changes to this

  20. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.15 Existing Regulations B3.15: Small-scale indoor research and development projects using nanoscale materials Siting, construction, modification, operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor small-scale research and development projects and small-scale pilot projects using nanoscale materials in accordance with applicable requirements (such as engineering, worker safety, procedural, and administrative regulations) necessary to ensure the

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.3 Existing Regulations B3.3: Research related to conservation of fish, wildlife, and cultural resources Field and laboratory research, inventory, and information collection activities that are directly related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources or to the protection of cultural resources, provided that such activities would not have the potential to cause significant impacts on fish and wildlife habitat or populations or to cultural

  2. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 Existing Regulations B3.6: Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Siting, construction, modification, operation, and decommissioning of facilities for small-scale research and development projects; conventional laboratory operations (such as preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis); and small-scale pilot projects (generally less than 2 years) frequently conducted to verify a concept before

  3. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 Existing Regulations B3.7: New terrestrial infill exploratory and experimental wells Siting, construction, and operation of new terrestrial infill exploratory and experimental (test) wells, for either extraction or injection use, in a locally characterized geological formation in a field that contains existing operating wells, properly abandoned wells, or unminable coal seams containing natural gas, provided that the site characterization has verified

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.8 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.8 Existing Regulations B3.8: Outdoor terrestrial ecological and environmental research Outdoor terrestrial ecological and environmental research in a small area (generally less than 5 acres), including, but not limited to, siting, construction, and operation of a small-scale laboratory building or renovation of a room in an existing building for associated analysis. Such activities would be designed in conformance with applicable requirements and use

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.9 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.9 Existing Regulations B3.9: Projects to reduce emissions and waste generation Projects to reduce emissions and waste generation at existing fossil or alternative fuel combustion or utilization facilities, provided that these projects would not have the potential to cause a significant increase in the quantity or rate of air emissions. For this category of actions, "fuel" includes, but is not limited to, coal, oil, natural gas, hydrogen,

  6. Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 62.1458336, -162.8919191 Show Map Loading map......

  7. "Table A25. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Unit)" ,,,,," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel

  8. "Table A40. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Dollars per Million Btu)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural

  9. Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Census Division June 30, 2014 March 31, 2014 June 30, 2013 Percent Change (June 30) 2014 versus 2013 Middle Atlantic 547 544 857 -36.2 East North Central 1,130 963 1,313 -13.9 South

  10. "Table A25 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Dollars per Million Btu)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel

  11. "Table A40. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,,,,," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(1000","LPG","Coal","Row"

  12. "Table A7. Shell Storage Capacity of Selected Petroleum Products by Census"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shell Storage Capacity of Selected Petroleum Products by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" " "," "," "," "," ","Other","RSE" "SIC"," ","Motor","Residual"," ","Distillate","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Gasoline","Fuel

  13. Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel

  14. Statement from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz on the 2014 Solar Job Census |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz on the 2014 Solar Job Census Statement from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz on the 2014 Solar Job Census January 15, 2015 - 9:50am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Statement from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz on the 2014 Solar Job Census WASHINGTON, D.C. - Secretary Ernest Moniz issued the following statement today on the 2014 National Solar Jobs Census: "Solar power is a key component of our all-of-the-above approach to American

  15. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Caux, E.

    2014-08-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (≳30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of ≳100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in ≲20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (≲30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10{sup –10}. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  16. A GSC Global Genome Census (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [DOE JGI

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Nikos Kyrpides of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses the notion of a global genome census at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  17. 1992 National census for district heating, cooling and cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    District energy systems are a major part of the energy use and delivery infrastructure of the United States. With nearly 6,000 operating systems currently in place, district energy represents approximately 800 billion BTU per hour of installed thermal production capacity, and provides over 1.1 quadrillion BTU of energy annually -- about 1.3% of all energy used in the US each year. Delivered through more that 20,000 miles of pipe, this energy is used to heat and cool almost 12 billion square feet of enclosed space in buildings that serve a diverse range of office, education, health care, military, industrial and residential needs. This Census is intended to provide a better understanding of the character and extent of district heating, cooling and cogeneration in the United States. It defines a district energy system as: Any system that provides thermal energy (steam, hot water, or chilled water) for space heating, space cooling, or process uses from a central plant, and that distributes the energy to two or more buildings through a network of pipes. If electricity is produced, the system is a cogenerating facility. The Census was conducted through surveys administered to the memberships of eleven national associations and agencies that collectively represent the great majority of the nation`s district energy system operators. Responses received from these surveys account for about 11% of all district systems in the United States. Data in this report is organized and presented within six user sectors selected to illustrate the significance of district energy in institutional, community and utility settings. Projections estimate the full extent of district energy systems in each sector.

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  20. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r){sub 0} < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  1. Solar Census - Perfecting the Art of Automated, Remote Solar Shading Assessments (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    To validate the work completed by Solar Census as part of the Department of Energy SunShot Incubator 8 award, NREL validated the performanec of the Solar Census Surveyor tool against the industry standard Solmetric SunEye measurements for 4 residential sites in California who experienced light to heavy shading. Using the a two one-sided test (TOST) of statistical equivalence, NREL found that the mean differences between the Solar Census and SunEye mean solar access values for Annual, Summer, and Winter readings fall within the 95% confidence intervals and the confidence intervals themselves fall within the tolerances of +/- 5 SAVs, the Solar Census calculations are statistically equivalent to the SunEye measurements.

  2. A stellar census of the Tucana-Horologium moving group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Liu, Michael C.

    2014-06-01

    We report the selection and spectroscopic confirmation of 129 new late-type (SpT = K3-M6) members of the Tucana-Horologium moving group, a nearby (d ∼ 40 pc), young (τ ∼ 40 Myr) population of comoving stars. We also report observations for 13 of the 17 known Tuc-Hor members in this spectral type range, and that 62 additional candidates are likely to be unassociated field stars; the confirmation frequency for new candidates is therefore 129/191 = 67%. We have used radial velocities, Hα emission, and Li{sub 6708} absorption to distinguish between contaminants and bona fide members. Our expanded census of Tuc-Hor increases the known population by a factor of ∼3 in total and by a factor of ∼8 for members with SpT ≥ K3, but even so, the K-M dwarf population of Tuc-Hor is still markedly incomplete. Our expanded census allows for a much more detailed study of Tuc-Hor than was previously feasible. The spatial distribution of members appears to trace a two-dimensional sheet, with a broad distribution in X and Y, but a very narrow distribution (±5 pc) in Z. The corresponding velocity distribution is very small, with a scatter of ±1.1 km s{sup –1} about the mean UVW velocity for stars spanning the entire 50 pc extent of Tuc-Hor. We also show that the isochronal age (τ ∼ 20-30 Myr) and the lithium depletion boundary age (τ ∼ 40 Myr) disagree, following the trend in other pre-main-sequence populations for isochrones to yield systematically younger ages. The Hα emission line strength follows a trend of increasing equivalent width with later spectral type, as is seen for young clusters. We find that moving group members have been depleted of measurable lithium for spectral types of K7.0-M4.5. None of our targets have significant infrared excesses in the WISE W3 band, yielding an upper limit on warm debris disks of F < 0.7%. Finally, our purely kinematic and color-magnitude selection procedure allows us to test the efficiency and completeness for activity

  3. "Table HC14.2 Living Space Characteristics by West Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Basements" "Basement in Single-Family Homes" "and Apartments in 2-4 Unit ... "Attics" "Attic in Single-Family Homes and" "Apartments in 2-4 Unit ...

  4. "Table HC10.2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Basements" "Basement in Single-Family Homes" "and Apartments in 2-4 Unit ... "Attics" "Attic in Single-Family Homes and" "Apartments in 2-4 Unit ...

  5. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC","

  6. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","

  7. "Table A42. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Noncombustible Energy Sources",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Combustible Energy Sources" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Solids",,,,,,,,,,"Gases",,,,,,,,,"Liquids" " "," ",," "," ",,,,," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",,,"Wood","Wood Residues",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," " "

  8. "Table A42. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Dollars per Million Btu)" ,,,,,"Noncombustible Energy Sources",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Combustible Energy Sources" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Solids",,,,,,,,,,"Gases",,,,,,,,,"Liquids" " "," ",," "," ",,,,," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",,,"Wood","Wood Residues",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," " "

  9. Table HC1-12a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... For this report, the heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of one year, relative to a base temperature of 65 degrees ...

  10. "Table HC14.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Homes",1.2,0.3,"Q",0.2 "Year of Construction" "1939 or Before",14.7,2.2,0.5,1.7 ... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  11. "Table HC13.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Homes",1.2,0.7,0.4,"Q","Q" "Year of Construction" "1939 or Before",14.7,2.8,1.4,0.7,0.6 ... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  12. "Table HC10.4 Space Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    One Housing Unit",15.2,0.2,1.3,10.5,3.2 "For Two Housing Units",0.9,"Q","Q",0.6,"Q" "Heat Pump",9.2,"Q",0.8,7.2,1 "Portable Electric Heater",1.6,"Q","Q",0.9,0.5 "Other ...

  13. "Table HC14.4 Space Heating Characteristics by West Census Region...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "For One Housing Unit",15.2,3.2,0.9,2.3 "For Two Housing Units",0.9,"Q","Q","Q" "Heat Pump",9.2,1,0.5,0.5 "Portable Electric Heater",1.6,0.5,"Q",0.4 "Other ...

  14. U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map for Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    on these products may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager URL: http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecscensusmaps.html...

  15. Interfacing 1990 US Census TIGER map files with New S graphics software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzardi, M.; Mohr, M.S.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. |

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, the United States Bureau of the Census released detailed geographic base files known as TIGER/Line (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing) which contain detail on the physical features and census tract boundaries of every county in the United States. The TIGER database is attractive for two reasons. First, it is publicly available through the Bureau of the Census on tape or cd-rom for a minimal fee. Second, it contains 24 billion characters of data which describe geographic features of interest to the Census Bureau such as coastlines, hydrography, transportation networks, political boundaries, etc. Unfortunately, the large TIGER database only provides raw alphanumeric data; no utility software, graphical or otherwise, is included. On the other hand New S, a popular statistical software package by AT&T, has easily operated functions that permit advanced graphics in conjunction with data analysis. New S has the ability to plot contours, lines, segments, and points. However, of special interest is the New S function map and its options. Using the map function, which requires polygons as input, census tracts can be quickly selected, plotted, shaded, etc. New S graphics combined with the TIGER database has obvious potential. This paper reports on our efforts to use the TIGER map files with New S, especially to construct census tract maps of counties. While census tract boundaries are inherently polygonal, they are not organized as such in the TIGER database. This conversion of the TIGER ``line`` format into New S ``polygon/polyline`` format is one facet of the work reported here. Also we discuss the selection and extraction of auxiliary geographic information from TIGER files for graphical display using New S.

  16. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring.

  17. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2000-11-28

    The 216-B-3 Pond was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In 1990, groundwater monitoring at B Pond was elevated from "detection" to assessment status because total organic halides and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Groundwater quality assessment, which ended in 1996, failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the isolated occurrences of elevated total organic halides and total organic carbon. Hence, the facility was subsequently returned to detection-level monitoring in 1998. Exhaustive groundwater analyses during the assessment period indicated that only two contaminants, tritium and nitrate, could be positively attributed to the B Pond System, with two others (arsenic and I-129) possibly originating from B Pond. Chemical and radiological analyses of soil at the main pond and 216-B-3-3 ditch has not revealed significant contamination. Based on the observed, minor contamination in groundwater and in the soil column, three parameters were selected for site-specific, semiannual monitoring; gross alpha, gross beta, and specific conductance. Total organic halides and total organic carbon are included as constituents because of regulatory requirements. Nitrate, tritium, arsenic, and iodine-129 will be monitored under the aegis of Hanford site-wide monitoring. Although the B Pond System is not scheduled to advance from RCRA interim status to final status until the year 2003, a contingency plan for an improved monitoring strategy, which will partially emulate final status requirements, will be contemplated before the official change to final status. This modification will allow a more sensible and effective screening of groundwater for the facility.

  18. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

    2005-11-01

    The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for

  19. Report for Development of a Census Array and Evaluation of the Array to Detect Biothreat Agents and Environmental Samples for DHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaing, C; Jackson, P

    2011-04-14

    The objective of this project is to provide DHS a comprehensive evaluation of the current genomic technologies including genotyping, Taqman PCR, multiple locus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing in the analysis of biothreat agents from complex environmental samples. This report focuses on the design, testing and results of samples on the Census Array. We designed a Census/Detection Array to detect all sequenced viruses (including phage), bacteria (eubacteria), and plasmids. Family-specific probes were selected for all sequenced viral and bacterial complete genomes, segments, and plasmids. Probes were designed to tolerate some sequence variation to enable detection of divergent species with homology to sequenced organisms, and to be unique relative to the human genome. A combination of 'detection' probes with high levels of conservation within a family plus 'census' probes targeting strain/isolate specific regions enabled detection and taxonomic classification from the level of family down to the strain. The array has wider coverage of bacterial and viral targets based on more recent sequence data and more probes per target than other microbial detection/discovery arrays in the literature. We tested the array with purified bacterial and viral DNA/RNA samples, artificial mixes of known bacterial/viral samples, spiked DNA against complex background including BW aerosol samples and soil samples, and environmental samples to evaluate the array's sensitivity and forensic capability. The data were analyzed using our novel maximum likelihood software. For most of the organisms tested, we have achieved at least species level discrimination.

  20. TOWARD A SPECTROSCOPIC CENSUS OF WHITE DWARFS WITHIN 40 pc OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limoges, M.-M.; Bergeron, P.; Lepine, S. E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2013-05-15

    We present the preliminary results of a survey aimed at significantly increasing the range and completeness of the local census of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs. The current census of nearby white dwarfs is reasonably complete only to about 20 pc of the Sun, a volume that includes around 130 white dwarfs, a sample too small for detailed statistical analyses. This census is largely based on follow-up investigations of stars with very large proper motions. We describe here the basis of a method that will lead to a catalog of white dwarfs within 40 pc of the Sun and north of the celestial equator, thus increasing by a factor of eight the extent of the northern sky census. White dwarf candidates are identified from the SUPERBLINK proper motion database, allowing us to investigate stars down to a proper motion limit {mu} > 40 mas yr{sup -1}, while minimizing the kinematic bias for nearby objects. The selection criteria and distance estimates are based on a combination of color-magnitude and reduced proper motion diagrams. Our follow-up spectroscopic observation campaign has so far uncovered 193 new white dwarfs, among which we identify 127 DA (including 9 DA+dM and 4 magnetic), 1 DB, 56 DC, 3 DQ, and 6 DZ stars. We perform a spectroscopic analysis on a subsample of 84 DAs, and provide their atmospheric parameters. In particular, we identify 11 new white dwarfs with spectroscopic distances within 25 pc of the Sun, including five candidates to the D < 20 pc subset.

  1. Interfacing 1990 US Census TIGER map files with New S graphics software. [Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzardi, M.; Mohr, M.S.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . School of Public Health)

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, the United States Bureau of the Census released detailed geographic base files known as TIGER/Line (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing) which contain detail on the physical features and census tract boundaries of every county in the United States. The TIGER database is attractive for two reasons. First, it is publicly available through the Bureau of the Census on tape or cd-rom for a minimal fee. Second, it contains 24 billion characters of data which describe geographic features of interest to the Census Bureau such as coastlines, hydrography, transportation networks, political boundaries, etc. Unfortunately, the large TIGER database only provides raw alphanumeric data; no utility software, graphical or otherwise, is included. On the other hand New S, a popular statistical software package by AT T, has easily operated functions that permit advanced graphics in conjunction with data analysis. New S has the ability to plot contours, lines, segments, and points. However, of special interest is the New S function map and its options. Using the map function, which requires polygons as input, census tracts can be quickly selected, plotted, shaded, etc. New S graphics combined with the TIGER database has obvious potential. This paper reports on our efforts to use the TIGER map files with New S, especially to construct census tract maps of counties. While census tract boundaries are inherently polygonal, they are not organized as such in the TIGER database. This conversion of the TIGER line'' format into New S polygon/polyline'' format is one facet of the work reported here. Also we discuss the selection and extraction of auxiliary geographic information from TIGER files for graphical display using New S.

  2. Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogrio; Pereira, Douglas Henrique; Departamento de Cincias Exatas e Biotecnolgicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins

    2013-11-14

    G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between 2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between 4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and 4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

  3. b3.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

  4. Appendix B-3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR FIXED-PRICE OR FIXED UNIT-PRICE SUBCONTRACTS FOR (1) SUPPLIES, AND (2) SERVICES (WHERE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT APPLIES) JULY 11, 2014 Subcontractor is hereby on notice that the contracting party to this subcontract is the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, in its capacity as the Managing and Operating Contractor for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. All references to "NREL" in this

  5. Data:6f7cda2e-3572-486a-b3aa-4129977e9ead | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cda2e-3572-486a-b3aa-4129977e9ead No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1....

  6. A HERSCHEL AND APEX CENSUS OF THE REDDEST SOURCES IN ORION: SEARCHING FOR THE YOUNGEST PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Krause, Oliver; Tobin, John J.; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Furlan, Elise; Hartmann, Lee; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, Thomas L.; Allen, Lori; Manoj, P.

    2013-04-10

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using data obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory and the LABOCA and SABOCA instruments on APEX as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). A total of 55 new protostar candidates are detected at 70 {mu}m and 160 {mu}m that are either too faint (m{sub 24} > 7 mag) to be reliably classified as protostars or undetected in the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m band. We find that the 11 reddest protostar candidates with log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65 are free of contamination and can thus be reliably explained as protostars. The remaining 44 sources have less extreme 70/24 colors, fainter 70 {mu}m fluxes, and higher levels of contamination. Taking the previously known sample of Spitzer protostars and the new sample together, we find 18 sources that have log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65; we name these sources 'PACS Bright Red sources', or PBRs. Our analysis reveals that the PBR sample is composed of Class 0 like sources characterized by very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; T{sub bol} < 45 K) and large values of sub-millimeter fluxes (L{sub smm}/L{sub bol} > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2-2 M{sub Sun} and luminosities of 0.7-10 L{sub Sun }. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and hence, high mass infall rates.

  7. Solar Census„Perfecting the Art of Automated, Remote Solar Shading Assessments (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Census Surveyor is an online tool that performs remote shading analysis and creates a fully articulated three-dimensional (3-D) model of the site. Surveyor uses state-of-the-art software and patented algorithms to provide a solar access value (SAV) for every one-foot- by-one-foot section of the roof. The 3-D data, high-resolution imagery, and shade data are all preprocessed and stored in a database that can be instantly accessed by the solar community given the address of the property. Figure 1

  8. Consumption trend analysis in the industrial sector: Regional historical trends. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Data on the use of natural gas, electricity, distillate and residual fuel oil, coal, and purchased coke were collected from the United States Bureau of the Census and aggregated nationally and by Census Region. Trend profiles for each fuel and industry were developed and economic, regulatory, and regional factors contributing to these trends were examined. The recession that followed the OPEC embargo in 1973 affected the industrial sector and the heavily industrialized regions of the country most severely. Both industrial production and fuel consumption fell significantly in 1975. As production recovered, spiraling fuel prices promoted conservation efforts, and overall fuel consumption remained at pre-recession levels. From 1975 to 1977 natural gas consumption decreased in almost all the industries examined with curtailments of gas supplies contributing to this trend.

  9. Regional Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Partnerships Regional Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent

  10. An adaptive optics multiplicity census of young stars in Upper Scorpius

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafrenière, David; Jayawardhana, Ray; Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.; Brandeker, Alexis; Janson, Markus

    2014-04-10

    We present the results of a multiplicity survey of 91 stars spanning masses of ∼0.2-10 M {sub ☉} in the Upper Scorpius star-forming region, based on adaptive optics imaging with the Gemini North telescope. Our observations identified 29 binaries, 5 triples, and no higher order multiples. The corresponding raw multiplicity frequency is 0.37 ± 0.05. In the regime where our observations are complete—companion separations of 0.''1-5'' (∼15-800 AU) with magnitude limits ranging from K < 9.3 at 0.''1 to K < 15.8 at 5''—the multiplicity frequency is 0.27{sub −0.04}{sup +0.05}. For similar separations, the multiplicity frequency in Upper Scorpius is comparable to that in other dispersed star-forming regions, but is a factor of two to three higher than in denser star-forming regions or in the field. Our sample displays a constant multiplicity frequency as a function of stellar mass. Among our sample of binaries, we find that both wider (>100 AU) and higher-mass systems tend to have companions with lower companion-to-primary mass ratios. Three of the companions identified in our survey are unambiguously substellar and have estimated masses below 0.04 M {sub ☉} (two of them are new discoveries from this survey—1RXS J160929.1–210524b and HIP 78530B—although we have reported them separately in earlier papers). These three companions have projected orbital separations of 300-900 AU. Based on a statistical analysis factoring in sensitivity limits, we calculate an occurrence rate of 5-40 M {sub Jup} companions of ∼4.0% for orbital separations of 250-1000 AU, compared to <1.8% at smaller separations, suggesting that such companions are more frequent on wider orbits.

  11. Consumer Attitudes About Renewable Energy. Trends and Regional Differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Sumner, Jenny

    2011-04-01

    The data in this report are taken from Natural Marketing Institute's (NMI's) Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability Consumer Trends Database. Created in 2002, the syndicated consumer database contains responses from 2,000 to 4,000 nationally representative U.S. adults (meaning the demographics of the sample are consistent with U.S. Census findings) each year. NMI used the database to analyze consumer attitudes and behavior related to renewable energy and to update previously conducted related research. Specifically, this report will explore consumer awareness, concerns, perceived benefits, knowledge of purchase options, and usage of renewable energy as well as provide regional comparisons and trends over time.

  12. Consumer Attitudes About Renewable Energy: Trends and Regional Differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natural Marketing Institute, Harleysville, Pennsylvania

    2011-04-01

    The data in this report are taken from Natural Marketing Institute's (NMI's) Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability Consumer Trends Database. Created in 2002, the syndicated consumer database contains responses from 2,000 to 4,000 nationally representative U.S. adults (meaning the demographics of the sample are consistent with U.S. Census findings) each year. NMI used the database to analyze consumer attitudes and behavior related to renewable energy and to update previously conducted related research. Specifically, this report will explore consumer awareness, concerns, perceived benefits, knowledge of purchase options, and usage of renewable energy as well as provide regional comparisons and trends over time.

  13. A MULTIPLICITY CENSUS OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janson, Markus; Lafreniere, David; Jayawardhana, Ray; Bonavita, Mariangela; Girard, Julien H.; Brandeker, Alexis; Gizis, John E.

    2013-08-20

    Stellar multiplicity properties have been studied for the lowest and the highest stellar masses, but intermediate-mass stars from F-type to late A-type have received relatively little attention. Here, we report on a Gemini/NICI snapshot imaging survey of 138 such stars in the young Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen) region, for the purpose of studying multiplicity with sensitivity down to planetary masses at wide separations. In addition to two brown dwarfs and a companion straddling the hydrogen-burning limit which we reported previously, here we present 26 new stellar companions and determine a multiplicity fraction within 0.''1-5.''0 of 21% {+-} 4%. Depending on the adopted semimajor axis distribution, our results imply a total multiplicity in the range of {approx}60%-80%, which further supports the known trend of a smooth continuous increase in the multiplicity fraction as a function of primary stellar mass. A surprising feature in the sample is a distinct lack of nearly equal-mass binaries, for which we discuss possible reasons. The survey yielded no additional companions below or near the deuterium-burning limit, implying that their frequency at >200 AU separations is not quite as high as might be inferred from previous detections of such objects within the Sco-Cen region.

  14. A wide-field near- and mid-infrared Census of young stars in NGC 6334

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, S.; Marengo, M.; Allen, L.; Fazio, G. G.; Smith, H. A.; Carey, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study of the rate and efficiency of star formation in the NGC 6334 star-forming region. We obtained observations at J, H, and K{sub s} taken with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager and combined them with observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope at wavelengths = 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm. We also analyzed previous observations taken at 24 μm using the Spitzer MIPS camera as part of the MIPSGAL survey. We have produced a point source catalog with >700, 000 entries. We have identified 2283 young stellar object (YSO) candidates, 375 Class I YSOs, and 1908 Class II YSOs using a combination of existing IRAC-based color classification schemes that we have extended and validated to the near-IR for use with warm Spitzer data. We have identified multiple new sites of ongoing star formation activity along filamentary structures extending tens of parsecs beyond the central molecular ridge of NGC 6334. By mapping the extinction, we derived an estimate for the gas mass, 2.2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. The heavy concentration of protostars along the dense filamentary structures indicates that NGC 6334 may be undergoing a 'mini-starburst' event with Σ{sub SFR} > 8.2 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –2} and SFE > 0.10. We have used these estimates to place NGC 6334 in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram to help bridge the gap between observations of local low-mass star-forming regions and star formation in other galaxies.

  15. The galactic census of high- and medium-mass protostars. II. Luminosities and evolutionary states of a complete sample of dense gas clumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Bo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Barnes, Peter J.

    2013-12-10

    The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is the first large-scale (280° < l < 300°, –4° < b < 2°), unbiased, subparsec resolution survey of Galactic molecular clumps and their embedded stars. Barnes et al. presented the source catalog of ∼300 clumps based on HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission, used to estimate masses M. Here we use archival midinfrared-to-millimeter continuum data to construct spectral energy distributions. Fitting two-temperature gray-body models, we derive bolometric luminosities, L. We find that the clumps have 10 ≲ L/L {sub ☉} ≲ 10{sup 6.5} and 0.1 ≲ L/M/[L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}] ≲ 10{sup 3}, consistent with a clump population spanning a range of instantaneous star-formation efficiencies from 0 to ∼50%. We thus expect L/M to be a useful, strongly varying indicator of clump evolution during the star cluster formation process. We find correlations of the ratio of warm-to-cold component fluxes and of cold component temperature with L/M. We also find a near-linear relation between L/M and Spitzer-IRAC specific intensity (surface brightness); thus, this relation may also be useful as a star-formation efficiency indicator. The lower bound of the clump L/M distribution suggests that the star-formation efficiency per free-fall time is ε{sub ff} < 0.2. We do not find strong correlations of L/M with mass surface density, velocity dispersion, or virial parameter. We find a linear relation between L and L{sub HCO{sup +}(1--0)}, although with large scatter for any given individual clump. Fitting together with extragalactic systems, the linear relation still holds, extending over 10 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The complete nature of the CHaMP survey over a several kiloparsec-scale region allows us to derive a measurement at an intermediate scale, bridging those of individual clumps and whole galaxies.

  16. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESAEuropean Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Caada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (2.7 ? [Fe/H] ? 1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5?m post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC10, NGC185, and NGC147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = 1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  17. Regional Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  18. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Power Plants: 1,858 (30% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 167 (30% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the East Coast Region from ...

  19. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Plants: 666 (11% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 46 (8% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: 39 ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the Gulf Coast Region from ...

  20. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Plants: 429 (8% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 46 (8% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: 26 ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the Rocky Mountain Region ...

  1. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Power Plants: 2,006 (30% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 274 (49% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the Midwest region from ...

  2. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Plants: 1,407 (24% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 24 (4% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: 131 ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the West Coast Region's ...

  3. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3 Prime -UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  4. Longwall census '82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprouls, M.W.

    1982-12-01

    Surveys the number of operating longwall systems in the US in 1982. Active longwall systems totalled 112, with 22 companies operating faces in 11 states. Tables list the number of longwalls for each of the top 12 longwall mining companies, and the number of longwalls in each state. The most sophisticated type of longwall roof supports, shields, now comprise 93 of US longwall installations. The most sophisticated type of cutting machines, the double-ended-rangingdrum shearer (DERS) dominates. The survey also shows a trend for operators to purchase stage loaders with crusher/breakers. The crushers eliminate problems with chunks of material at conveyor transfer points. Concludes that the longwall's future in the US looks bright.

  5. Regional Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Information There is plenty to do and see in the cities of Golden and Denver, Colorado. Here you'll find links to general information about these areas, plus hospitals, local universities and colleges, entertainment, sports, amusement parks, and more. Golden City of Golden Golden's 2-Hour Vacation Denver www.denver.com www.denver.org Denver Public Library Colorado State of Colorado Colorado tourism Transportation (Bus and Light Rail) RTD Hospitals Largest Hospitals in Metro Denver

  6. ECOWAS … GBEP REGIONAL BIOMASS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Census of Agriculture data - National Agricultural Statistics Service data - 10-year ... model - Secondary processing residues and wastes are estimated using published information ...

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File 2: Building Activity (cb86f02.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. B-3 Any residential use RESUSE3 28- 28 $YESNO. B-4 Percent residential RESPC3 30- 30 $RESPC. Principal building activity PBA3 32-

  8. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  9. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico...

  10. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  11. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest.

  12. US prep plant census 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-10-15

    Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  13. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico and the Laboratory through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director Kathy Keith Community Partnerships Office (505) 665-4400 Email Regional Partners Charlie McMillan talking with Rick Ulibarri and Dr. Fries, President of

  14. NASEO Midwest Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) is hosting its Midwest Regional Meeting in Des Moines, Iowa.

  15. A CENSUS OF MID-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczak, Adam R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Saintonge, Amelie

    2011-09-01

    We conduct a deep mid-infrared (mid-IR) census of nine massive galaxy clusters at (0 < z < 1.3) with a total of {approx}1500 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies using Spitzer/IRAC photometry and established mid-IR color selection techniques. Of the 949 cluster galaxies that are detected in at least three of the four IRAC channels at the {>=}3{sigma} level, we identify 12 that host mid-IR-selected active galactic nuclei (IR-AGNs). To compare the IR-AGNs across our redshift range, we define two complete samples of cluster galaxies: (1) optically selected members with rest-frame V{sub AB} magnitude < - 21.5 and (2) mid-IR-selected members brighter than (M*{sub 3.6} + 0.5), i.e., essentially a stellar mass cut. In both samples, we measure f{sub IR-AGN} {approx} 1% with a strong upper limit of {approx}3% at z < 1. This uniformly low IR-AGN fraction at z < 1 is surprising given that the fraction of 24 {mu}m sources in the same galaxy clusters is observed to increase by about a factor of four from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1; this indicates that most of the detected 24 {mu}m flux is due to star formation. Only in our single galaxy cluster at z = 1.24 is the IR-AGN fraction measurably higher at {approx}15% (all members; {approx}70% for late-types only). In agreement with recent studies, we find that the cluster IR-AGNs are predominantly hosted by late-type galaxies with blue optical colors, i.e., members with recent/ongoing star formation. The four brightest IR-AGNs are also X-ray sources; these IR+X-ray AGNs all lie outside the cluster core (R{sub proj} {approx}> 0.5 Mpc) and are hosted by highly morphologically disturbed members. Although our sample is limited, our results suggest that f{sub IR-AGN} in massive galaxy clusters is not strongly correlated with star formation at z < 1 and that IR-AGNs have a more prominent role at z {approx}> 1.

  16. CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

    2003-06-01

    Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned

  17. Regional Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Economic Development Regional Economic Development Supporting companies in every stage of development through access to technology, technical assistance or investment Questions Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Regional Programs (505) 665-9090 New Mexico Small Business Assistance Email Venture Acceleration Fund Email DisrupTECH Email SBIR/STTR Email FCI facilitates commercialization in New Mexico to accelerate and enhance our efforts to convert federal and state research

  18. ERHIC INTERACTION REGION DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.PARKER,B.PTITSYN,V.TEPIKIAN,S.WANG,D.WANG,F.

    2003-10-13

    This paper presents the current interaction region design status of the ring-ring version of the electron-ion collider eRHIC (release 2.0).

  19. Regional Energy Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydroelectric Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine Fossil Fuel Turbines Alaska Energy Statistics, 2011 4 Energy Costs Vary 5 Regional Energy Planning * Energy Pathways led to ...

  20. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  1. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  2. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. II. THE SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, Robert T.

    2011-06-01

    The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) H II Region Discovery Survey has doubled the number of known H II regions in the Galactic zone 343{sup 0} {<=} l {<=} 67{sup 0} with | b | {<=} 1{sup 0}. We detected 603 discrete hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) components at 9 GHz (3 cm) from 448 targets. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident mid-infrared and 20 cm radio continuum emission. Such sources are almost invariably H II regions; we detected hydrogen RRL emission from 95% of our target sample. The sensitivity of the GBT and the power of its spectrometer together made this survey possible. Here, we provide a catalog of the measured properties of the RRL and continuum emission from the survey nebulae. The derived survey completeness limit, 180 mJy at 9 GHz, is sufficient to detect all H II regions ionized by single O-stars to a distance of 12 kpc. These recently discovered nebulae share the same distribution on the sky as does the previously known census of Galactic H II regions. On average, however, the new nebulae have fainter continuum fluxes, smaller continuum angular sizes, fainter RRL intensities, and smaller RRL line widths. Though small in angular size, many of our new nebulae show little spatial correlation with tracers associated with extremely young H II regions, implying that our sample spans a range of evolutionary states. We discovered 34 first quadrant negative-velocity H II regions, which lie at extreme distances from the Sun and appear to be part of the Outer Arm. We found RRL emission from 208 Spitzer GLIMPSE 8.0 {mu}m 'bubble' sources, 65 of which have been cataloged previously. It thus appears that nearly all GLIMPSE bubbles are H II regions and that {approx}50% of all Galactic H II regions have a bubble morphology at 8.0 {mu}m.

  3. Regional Workforce Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Workforce Study Regional employers will need to fill more than 30,000 job openings over the next five years in the five-county region of South Carolina and Georgia represented by the SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO). That is a key finding of a new study released on April 22, 2015. TIP Strategies, an Austin, Texas-based economic consulting firm, performed the study for the SRSCRO by examining workforce trends in the five counties the SRSCRO represents - Aiken, Allendale and

  4. Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January » Regional Science Bowl Regional Science Bowl WHEN: Jan 23, 2016 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal SE, Albuquerque, NM CONTACT: Janelle Vigil-Maestas (505) 665-4329 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Five teams from Northern New Mexico area schools are among 16 participating in the middle school Regional Science Bowl competition. Northern area teams participating are from Los Alamos, Española, Cuba and Santa Fe. The winning team at this

  5. Regional Standards Enforcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central air conditioners are now subject to a base national standard in the North and different, regional standards in the Southeast and Southwest. This page provides information about those standards and how DOE enforces them.

  6. Delineating coal market regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, B.D.; Pyrdol, J.J.

    1986-04-01

    This study addresses the delineation of US coal market regions and their evolution since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Dichotomizing into compliance (low sulfur) and high sulfur coal deliveries, market regions are generated for 1973, 1977, and 1983. Focus is restricted to steam coal shipments to electric utilities, which currently account for over 80% of the total domestic market. A two-stage method is used. First, cluster analyses are performed on the origin-destination shipments data to generate baseline regions. This is followed by multiple regression analyses on CIF delivered price data for 1983. Sensitivity analysis on the configuration of the regions is also conducted, and some thoughts on the behavior of coal markets conclude the paper. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  8. CEMI Southeast Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizes regional summits around the country to expand its partnerships, share resources and...

  9. 1995 CECS C&E Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels, 1995 Table 11. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1995 Table 22....

  10. Microsoft Word - Instructions for Sample Monthly Report Forms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions Census Region 1: Northeast Area Division I: New England Division 2: Middle Atlantic Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode...

  11. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  12. NV PFA Regional Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Faulds

    2015-10-28

    This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hot springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area.

  13. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  14. h:prjq496 ext intext.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0a. Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ____________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | Midwest Census Region | | |___________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_______________________| | | | | | | Total | | East North| West North| Usage Indicators | U.S. | Total | Central | Central | |___________|___________|___________|___________| RSE | | | | | Row RSE Column Factor: | 0.5 |

  15. file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-10a

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0a. Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ____________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | Midwest Census Region | | |___________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_______________________| | | | | | | Total | | East North| West North| Usage Indicators | U.S. | Total | Central | Central | |___________|___________|___________|___________| RSE | | | | | Row RSE Column Factor: | 0.5 |

  16. file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-11a

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1a. Usage Indicators by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | South Census Region | | |_______________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_____________________________| | | | | | | | | | | East | West | | Total | | South | South | South | Usage Indicators | U.S. | Total | Atlantic| Central | Central | |_________|_________|_________|_________|_________|

  17. file://C:\MyFiles\TeamWorks%20Website\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0a. Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ____________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | Midwest Census Region | | |___________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_______________________| | | | | | | Total | | East North| West North| Usage Indicators | U.S. | Total | Central | Central | |___________|___________|___________|___________| RSE | | | | | Row RSE Column Factor: | 0.5 |

  18. Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CTC Team 1 Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Presentation by: The Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Team January 6, 2004 The CTC Team 2 Presentation Outline Introduction of CTC Team CTC Background Technical Approach - CTC Team Member Presentations Conclusions The CTC Team 3 The CTC Project Team Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program

  19. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are used to represent the following regions: Region Gas Point Used Power Point Used New England Algonquin Citygate Massachusetts Hub (ISONE) New York City Transco Zone 6-NY...

  20. Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates October 17, 2007 1. Summary * BPA invites comments on the first draft of the Regional Dialogue Master Template by Friday,...

  1. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an ... August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National ...

  2. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Michael B.; Dennison, Deborah; Kane, Jave; Walker, Hoyt; Miller, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The fallout from a nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill 100,000 or more people through exposure to external gamma (fallout) radiation. Existing buildings can reduce radiation exposure by placing material between fallout particles and exposed people. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was tasked with developing an operationally feasible methodology that could improve fallout casualty estimates. The methodology, called a Regional Shelter Analysis, combines the fallout protection that existing buildings provide civilian populations with the distribution of people in various locations. The Regional Shelter Analysis method allows the consideration of (a) multiple building types and locations within buildings, (b) country specific estimates, (c) population posture (e.g., unwarned vs. minimally warned), and (d) the time of day (e.g., night vs. day). The protection estimates can be combined with fallout predictions (or measurements) to (a) provide a more accurate assessment of exposure and injury and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of various casualty mitigation strategies. This report describes the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology, highlights key operational aspects (including demonstrating that the methodology is compatible with current tools), illustrates how to implement the methodology, and provides suggestions for future work.

  3. Colorado Regional Faults

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Coal-Producing Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Coal Production by State (thousand short tons) Year to Date Coal-Producing Region and State January - March 2016 October - December 2015 January - March 2015 2016 2015 Percent Change Alabama 2,446 2,298 4,022 2,446 4,022 -39.2 Alaska 310 328 265 310 265 16.7 Arizona 1,335 1,376 1,755 1,335 1,755 -23.9 Arkansas 11 18 21 11 21 -48.0 Colorado 2,482 3,258 5,263 2,482 5,263 -52.8 Illinois 11,312 11,886 16,779 11,312 16,779 -32.6 Indiana 7,224 7,264 9,463 7,224 9,463 -23.7 Kansas 27 55 53 27 53

  5. Strengthening regional safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palhares, L.; Almeida, G.; Mafra, O.

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear cooperation between Argentina and Brazil has been growing since the early 1980`s and as it grew, so did cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) was formed in December 1991 to operate the Common System of Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (SCCC). In April 1994, ABACC and the DOE signed an Agreement of Cooperation in nuclear material safeguards. This cooperation has included training safeguards inspectors, exchanging nuclear material measurement and containment and surveillance technology, characterizing reference materials, and studying enrichment plant safeguards. The goal of the collaboration is to exchange technology, evaluate new technology in Latin American nuclear facilities, and strengthen regional safeguards. This paper describes the history of the cooperation, its recent activities, and future projects. The cooperation is strongly supported by all three governments: the Republics of Argentina and Brazil and the United States.

  6. Mr. W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II 4th Floor 26 Federal Plaza New York, ... S. Lichtman, EPA R. Guimond, EPA C. Goddard, NYS bee: wo encls. V. De Carlo, PE-243 C. ...

  7. REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPSThe Pioneer Regional Partnerships are early-stage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPSThe Pioneer Regional Partnerships are early-stage public/private collaborative projects that address specific near-term grid modernization issues important to the identified region and its stakeholders. The Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) has initiated 11 proposed partnerships to accomplish the following:Address a key state/regional grid modernization challenge that is visible and important to local industry and government stakeholders.Engage collaboration

  8. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  9. Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency, call slides and discussion summary, December 6, 2012.

  10. USDA Regional Conservation Partnership Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program to identify and address natural resource objectives in balance with operational goals in order to benefit soil, water, wildlife, and related natural resources locally, regionally, and nationally.

  11. EWONAP Training and Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center is pleased to announce the 2016 Eastern Woodlands ONAP Training and Regional Meeting taking place in our newly renovated training facility in Hollywood, FL. This three-day interactive training is designed to address Tribal Housing needs identified throughout the Eastern Woodlands region.

  12. Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Finn & Morgan, 2002) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,...

  13. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation More Documents & Publications Regional Climate Change Webinar...

  14. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Webinar Presentation Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar ...

  15. Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groundwater flow), and other relevant factors. The 21 regions can be seen outlined in red and overlain on the 2008 USGS Geothermal Favorability Map in Figure 1.1 Add a new...

  16. 2015 NHA Alaska Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register today and join industry professionals for interactive discussions covering a variety of regional topics and a tour of the Eklutna lake Project.

  17. More Regional Science Bowl Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By March 25, 2011, thousands of students will have competed in more than 100 regional science bowl contests throughout the country, and then the winning schools will compete in DC this spring for the national championship.

  18. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  19. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No

  20. WINDExchange: About Regional Resource Centers

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers About Economic Development Siting About Regional Resource Centers Significant expansion of wind energy deployment will be required to achieve the President's goal of doubling renewable energy production in the United States by 2020. Wind energy currently provides more than 4% of the nation's electricity but has the potential to provide much more. Increasing the country's percentage from wind power will mean

  1. DOE_CX-00068-B3.6.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  2. DOE_CX-00072-B3.1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  3. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.14 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operation may include, but is not limited to, purchase, installation, and operation of equipment (such as audiovisual and laboratory equipment) commensurate with the educational ...

  4. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association

  5. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasingam, Pirahas; Park, Jinyong; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W.

    2005-03-01

    A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty

  6. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-15-069 General Electric EC B3-6 B3.10...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... storage rings, colliders, and detectors, for research and medical purposes (such as proton therapy), and isotope production, within or contiguous to a previously disturbed or ...

  7. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-15-066 MIT EC B3-6 B3.10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... storage rings, colliders, and detectors, for research and medical purposes (such as proton therapy), and isotope production, within or contiguous to a previously disturbed or ...

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-15-065 MIT EC B3-6 B3.10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... storage rings, colliders, and detectors, for research and medical purposes (such as proton therapy), and isotope production, within or contiguous to a previously disturbed or ...

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-15-064 Nebraska EC B3-6 B3.10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... storage rings, colliders, and detectors, for research and medical purposes (such as proton therapy), and isotope production, within or contiguous to a previously disturbed or ...

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-033 Nebraska EC B3-6 B3-10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiation tolerance and mechanical properties of nanostructured ceramic/metal composites - University of Nebraska SECTION B. Project Description This project will consist of studying the ion irradiation and mechanical response of amorphous Si-C-O and Si-Al-C-O alloys, understanding the role of amorphous-ceramic/metal interface on irradiation and mechanical properties, and evaluating structural integrity and overall mechanical performance of the composite under extreme

  11. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-035 BNL EC B3-6 B3-10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiation-induced ductility enhancement in amorphous Fe and Al2O3+TiO2 nanostructured coatings in fast neutron and high temperature environments of next generation reactors - Brookhaven National Laboratory SECTION B. Project Description The effects of fast neutrons on the nanostructured coatings deposited on steel alloy and titanium alloy substrates will be studied with particular focus on ductility restoration and the influence of temperature. Irradiated specimens

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-037 LANL EC B3-6 B3-10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 SECTION A. Project Title: Nanoscale Stable Precipitation-Strengthened Steels for Nuclear Reactor Applications - Los Alamos National Laboratory SECTION B. Project Description The objective of this investigation is to used cutting-edge alloy development strategies to produce thermally stable precipitation hardened steels manufactured by conventional methods for nuclear reactor structural applications. The team from Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Colorado

  13. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-038 NC State EC B3-6 B3-10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 SECTION A. Project Title: Nanostructured Fe-Cr Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Energy Applications - North Carolina State University SECTION B. Project Description This project will optimize alloy design and microstructure engineering of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) to increase their irradiation damage tolerance. The synthesis method will use mechanical alloying (MA) as is used for Y-Ti-O alloys. The research plan components are based on MA synthesis using high energy Spex ball mills,

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-039 ORNL EC B3-6 B3-10.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 SECTION A. Project Title: Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation FM steels for advanced nuclear reactors - Oak Ridge National Laboratory SECTION B. Project Description The objective of this project is to develop a new generation of Zr-containing FM steels with enhanced high-temperature performance comparable to those of the ODS ferritic steels but still fit within the scope of conventional economic steel production methods. This is accomplished primarily by designing and

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-034 MIT EC B3-6 B3-16.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SECTION A. Project Title: Extraction of Uranium from Seawater: Design and Testing of a Symbiotic System - Massachusetts Institute of Technology SECTION B. Project Description The Massachusetts Institute of Technology proposes to investigate the design details of a symbiotic system in which a uranium harvesting system for mining uranium from seawater is attached to the base of an offshore wind power tower or other offshore structure. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of

  16. Microsoft Word - 1DOE-ID-12-046 AREVA EC B3-6 B3-15.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Title: Development of LWR Fuels with Enhanced Accident Tolerance - AREVA Federal Services ... of the concepts for commercially deploying enhanced accident tolerant fuel. ...

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Definitions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Definitions Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Definitions The regions defined in the above map are based upon the 10 Federal Regions of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The State groupings are as follows: Northeast Region - Federal Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region 2: New Jersey, and New York. Federal Region 3:Delaware, District of

  18. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/9827580556_473a91fd78_t.jpg Enlarge http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2856/9804364405_b25f74cbb2_t.jpg En

  19. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8: Consumption of Electricity by End Use Variable Name Variable Description Position Format PUBID8 Building identifier 1- 5 REGION8 Census region 7- 7 REGION. CENDIV8 Census...

  20. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  1. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  2. Form:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of a Geothermal Region below. If the region already exists, you will be able to edit its information. AddEdit a Geothermal Region Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Regional Feedstock Partnership Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Feedstock Partnership Report Regional Feedstock Partnership Report Regional Feedstock Partnership Report regional_feedstock_partnership_summary_report.pdf (17.45 MB) regional_feedstocks_partnership_report_appendix_a_draft.pdf (2.11 MB) regional_feedstocks_partnership_report_appendix_b_draft.pdf (625.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Biomass Econ 101: Measuring the Technological Improvements on Feedstocks Costs A Summary of the Results of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Advancing

  4. China Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home China Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References...

  5. Category:Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Regions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geothermal Regions page? For detailed information on Geothermal...

  6. Germany Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Germany Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Germany Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

  7. Thailand Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thailand Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Thailand Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (1) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

  8. Indonesia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Indonesia Geothermal Region Details Areas (5) Power Plants (4) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

  9. Philippines Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Philippines Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Philippines Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques...

  10. Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service...

  11. Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please ...

  12. Austria Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Austria Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  13. Australia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Australia Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  14. New Zealand Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home New Zealand Geothermal Region Details Areas (2) Power Plants (2) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  15. Russia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Russia Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  16. Iceland Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Iceland Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  17. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit July 9, 2015 8:30AM to 6:00PM EDT Renaissance...

  18. Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Planned Capacity 1 Geothermal Areas within the Transition Zone Geothermal Region Energy Generation Facilities within the Transition Zone Geothermal Region Geothermal Power...

  19. Italy Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region Larderello Geothermal Area Mount Amiata Geothermal Area Travale-Radicondoli Geothermal Area Energy Generation Facilities within the Italy Geothermal Region Bagnore 3...

  20. Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cascades Geothermal Region (Redirected from Cascades) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (2) Power Plants (0)...

  1. Mexico Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Mexico Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References...

  2. Turkey Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Turkey Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References...

  3. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  4. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  5. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin

  6. http://2010.census.gov/2010census/data/apportionment-dens-text...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Density Rank 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 Oklahoma Population 1,657,155 2,028,283 2,396,040 2,336,434 2,233,351 2,328,284 2,559,229 3,025,290 3,145,585 3,450,654 3,751,351 ...

  7. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania. Objectives: Capture data pertinent to H2 delivery in PA

  8. WINDExchange: Wind Energy Regional Resource Centers

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers About Economic Development Siting Wind Energy Regional Resource Centers The U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Resource Centers provide unbiased wind energy information to communities and decision makers to help them evaluate wind energy potential and learn about wind power's benefits and impacts in their regions. During their first year of operations, the Regional Resource Centers impacted more than 12,000

  9. Regional solid waste management study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    In 1990, the Lower Savannah Council of Governments (LSCOG) began dialogue with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding possibilities for cooperation and coordination of solid waste management practices among the local governments and the Savannah River Site. The Department of Energy eventually awarded a grant to the Lower Savannah Council of Governments for the development of a study, which was initiated on March 5, 1992. After careful analysis of the region`s solid waste needs, this study indicates a network approach to solid waste management to be the most viable. The network involves the following major components: (1) Rural Collection Centers, designed to provide convenience to rural citizens, while allowing some degree of participation in recycling; (2) Rural Drop-Off Centers, designed to give a greater level of education and recycling activity; (3) Inert landfills and composting centers, designed to reduce volumes going into municipal (Subtitle D) landfills and produce useable products from yard waste; (4) Transfer Stations, ultimate landfill disposal; (5) Materials Recovery Facilities, designed to separate recyclables into useable and sellable units, and (6) Subtitle D landfill for burial of all solid waste not treated through previous means.

  10. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within