National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for azimuth angle degrees

  1. Azimuthal angle dependence of dijet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2008-08-01

    We study the azimuthal angular dependence of back-to-back dijet production in unpolarized hadron scattering H{sub A}+H{sub B}{yields}J{sub 1}+J{sub 2}+X, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that when the dijet is of two identical quarks (J{sub q}+J{sub q}) or a quark-antiquark pair (J{sub q}+J{sub q}), there is a cos{delta}{phi} angular dependence of the dijet, with {delta}{phi}={phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2}, and {phi}{sub 1} and {phi}{sub 2} are the azimuthal angles of the two individual jets. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross section, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos{delta}{phi} asymmetry of dijet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the angular dependence of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  2. Azimuthal angle dependence of di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-08-04

    We study the azimuthal asymmetry of back-to-back di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that there is a cos {delta}{phi} angular dependence of the di-jet, with {delta}{phi} the difference of the azimuthal angle of tow jets respectively. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross-section due to the multiple initial-/final-state interactions, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos {delta}{phi} asymmetry of the total di-jet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the azimuthal asymmetric cross section of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  3. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  5. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  6. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Hardin; Dan Nelson; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Alyssa Matthews; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  7. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  8. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Joseph Hardin; Dan Nelson; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Alyssa Matthews; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  9. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  10. Measurement of the azimuthal angle distribution of leptons from W boson decays as a function of the W transverse momentum in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-04-01

    We present the first measurement of the A{sub 2} and A{sub 3} angular coefficients of the W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions. We study W {yields} ev{sub e} and W {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}} candidate events produced in association with at least one jet at CDF, during Run Ia and Run Ib of the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The corresponding integrated luminosity was 110 pb{sup -1}. The jet balances the transverse momentum of the W and introduces QCD effects in W boson production. The extraction of the angular coefficients is achieved through the direct measurement of the azimuthal angle of the charged lepton in the Collins-Soper rest-frame of the W boson. The angular coefficients are measured as a function of the transverse momentum of the W boson. The electron, muon, and combined results are in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, up to order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2} in QCD.

  11. Process and apparatus for measuring degree of polarization and angle of major axis of polarized beam of light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, Derek E.; Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process are disclosed for calibrating measurements of the phase of the polarization of a polarized beam and the angle of the polarized optical beam's major axis of polarization at a diagnostic point with measurements of the same parameters at a point of interest along the polarized beam path prior to the diagnostic point. The process is carried out by measuring the phase angle of the polarization of the beam and angle of the major axis at the point of interest, using a rotatable polarizer and a detector, and then measuring these parameters again at a diagnostic point where a compensation apparatus, including a partial polarizer, which may comprise a stack of glass plates, is disposed normal to the beam path between a rotatable polarizer and a detector. The partial polarizer is then rotated both normal to the beam path and around the axis of the beam path until the detected phase of the beam polarization equals the phase measured at the point of interest. The rotatable polarizer at the diagnostic point may then be rotated manually to determine the angle of the major axis of the beam and this is compared with the measured angle of the major axis of the beam at the point of interest during calibration. Thereafter, changes in the polarization phase, and in the angle of the major axis, at the point of interest can be monitored by measuring the changes in these same parameters at the diagnostic point.

  12. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  13. Azimuthally polarized cathodoluminescence from InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenny, B. J. M.; Osorio, C. I.; Polman, A.; Dam, D. van; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2015-11-16

    We determine the angle and polarization dependent emission from 1.75 µm and 2.50 µm long InP nanowires by using cathodoluminescence polarimetry. We excite the vertical wires using a 5 keV electron beam, and find that the 880 nm bandgap emission shows azimuthally polarized rings, with the number of rings depending on the wire height. The data agree well with a model in which spontaneous emission from the wire emitted into the far field interferes with emission reflected off the substrate. From the model, the depth range from which the emission is generated is found to be up to 400 nm below the top surface of the wires, well beyond the extent of the primary electron cloud. This enables a probe of the carrier diffusion length in the InP nanowires.

  14. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam ontomore » the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.« less

  15. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  16. Azimuthal Instabilities in Annular Combustion Chambers | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Azimuthal Instabilities in Annular Combustion Chambers Authors: Wolf, P., Staffelbach, G., Balakrishnan, R., Roux, A., Poinsot, T. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of a full annular helicopter gas turbine combustor have been performed. Emphasis is placed on the azimuthal mode that often appears in real configurations. The current LES are shown to capture these self-excited modes, with limited impact of the grid resolution. The structure of the azimuthal mode is discussed and

  17. A simple Analytical Model to Study and Control Azimuthal Instabilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A simple Analytical Model to Study and Control Azimuthal Instabilities in Annular Combustion Chambers Authors: Parmentier, J-F., Salas, P., Wolf, P., Staffelbach, G., Nicoud, F., ...

  18. Massively Parallel LES of Azimuthal Thermo-Acoustic Instabilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Massively Parallel LES of Azimuthal Thermo-Acoustic Instabilities in Annular Gas Turbines Authors: Wolf, P., Staffelbach, G., Roux, A., Gicquel, L., Poinsot, T., Moureau, V. ...

  19. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  20. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  2. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  3. Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --- Inventor(s) Martin E. Griswold, C. Leland Ellison, Yevgeny Raitses and Nathaniel J. Fisch Disclosed is a new device...

  4. Azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of the surface detector signals of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-04-07

    The azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of signals in Auger surface detector stations is a source of information on shower development. The azimuthal asymmetry is due to a combination of the longitudinal evolution of the shower and geometrical effects related to the angles of incidence of the particles into the detectors. The magnitude of the effect depends upon the zenith angle and state of development of the shower and thus provides a novel observable, (secθ)max, sensitive to the mass composition of cosmic rays above 3 x 1018 eV. By comparing measurements with predictions from shower simulations, we find for bothmore » of our adopted models of hadronic physics (QGSJETII-04 and EPOS-LHC) an indication that the mean cosmic-ray mass increases slowly with energy, as has been inferred from other studies. However, the mass estimates are dependent on the shower model and on the range of distance from the shower core selected. Furthermore, the method has uncovered further deficiencies in our understanding of shower modelling that must be resolved before the mass composition can be inferred from (secθ)max.« less

  5. Simulation-guided optimization of small-angle analyzer geometry in the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuttke, Joachim; Zamponi, Michaela [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The resolution of neutron backscattering spectrometers deteriorates at small scattering angles where analyzers deviate from exact backscattering. By reducing the azimuth angle range of the analyzers, the resolution can be improved with little loss of peak intensity. Measurements at the spectrometer SPHERES are in excellent agreement with simulations, which proves the dominance of geometric effects.

  6. Azimuthal and Transverse Single Spin Asymmetries in Hadronic Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murgia, Francesco

    2010-12-22

    We give a short overview of the phenomenology of azimuthal and transverse single spin asymmetries in (un)polarized high-energy hadronic collisions. We briefly summarize a transverse momentum dependent, generalized parton model approach to these polarization phenomena, and discuss some of its applications. Finally, open points and future developments will be outlined.

  7. Massively Parallel LES of Azimuthal Thermo-Acoustic Instabilities in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annular Gas Turbines | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Massively Parallel LES of Azimuthal Thermo-Acoustic Instabilities in Annular Gas Turbines Authors: Wolf, P., Staffelbach, G., Roux, A., Gicquel, L., Poinsot, T., Moureau, V. Increasingly stringent regulations and the need to tackle rising fuel prices have placed great emphasis on the design of aeronautical gas turbines, which are unfortunately more and more prone to combustion instabilities. In the particular field of annular

  8. ANGLE Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ANGLE Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: ANGLE Plc Place: United Kingdom Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Quoted company ) References: ANGLE Plc1...

  9. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  10. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  11. Elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN})?=?2.76 TeV measured with ALICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALICE Collaboration, Denise Moreira de Godoy for the

    2014-11-11

    In this paper, we present the ALICE results on the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in 20-40% central Pb-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN})?=?2.76 TeV. Heavy quarks are produced in the early stages of the collision and they interact with the hot and dense color-deconfined medium created in heavy-ion collisions at high energies, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Measurements of the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in non-central collisions can be used to investigate the degree of thermalization and energy loss of heavy quarks within the QGP. Theoretical predictions of heavy-quark transport in the medium are compared with the measurement.

  12. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  13. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  14. Centrality dependence of dihadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements from the CMS experiment at the LHC of dihadron correlations for charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV are presented. The results are reported as a function of the particle transverse momenta (pt) and collision centrality over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity [Delta(eta)] and the full range of relative azimuthal angle [Delta(phi)]. The observed two-dimensional correlation structure in Delta(eta) and Delta(phi) is characterised by a narrow peak at (Delta(eta), Delta(phi)) approximately (0, 0) from jet-like correlations and a long-range structure that persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. An enhancement of the magnitude of the short-range jet peak is observed with increasing centrality, especially for particles of pt around 1-2 GeV/c. The long-range azimuthal dihadron correlations are extensively studied using a Fourier decomposition analysis. The extracted Fourier coefficients are found to factorise into a product of single-particle azimuthal anisotropies up to pt approximately 3-3.5 GeV/c for at least one particle from each pair, except for the second-order harmonics in the most central PbPb events. Various orders of the single-particle azimuthal anisotropy harmonics are extracted for associated particle pt of 1-3 GeV/c, as a function of the trigger particle pt up to 20 GeV/c and over the full centrality range.

  15. Measurements of bottom anti-bottom azimuthal production correlations in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2004-12-01

    The authors have measured the azimuthal angular correlation of b{bar b} production, using 86.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during 1994-1995. In high-energy p{bar p} collisions, such as at the Tevatron, b{bar b} production can be schematically categorized into three mechanisms. The leading-order (LO) process is ''flavor creation'', where both b and {bar b} quarks substantially participate in the hard scattering and result in a distinct back-to-back signal in final state. The ''flavor excitation'' and the ''gluon splitting'' processes, which appear at next-leading-order (NLO), are known to make a comparable contribution to total b{bar b} cross section, while providing very different opening angle distributions from the LO process. An azimuthal opening angle between bottom and anti-bottom, {Delta}{phi}, has been used for the correlation measurement to probe the interaction creating b{bar b} pairs. The {Delta}{phi} distribution has been obtained from two different methods. one method measures the {Delta}{phi} between bottom hadrons using events with two reconstructed secondary vertex tags. The other method uses b{bar b} {yields} (J/{psi}X)({ell}X') events, where the charged lepton ({ell}) is an electron (e) or a muon ({mu}), to measure {Delta}{phi} between bottom quarks. The b{bar b} purity is determined as a function of {Delta}{phi} by fitting the decay length of the J/{psi} and the impact parameter of the {ell}. Both methods quantify the contribution from higher-order production mechanisms by the fraction of the b{bar b} pairs produced in the same azimuthal hemisphere, f{sub toward}. The measured f{sub toward} values are consistent with both parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO QCD predictions.

  16. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. The results are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. The dijet azimuthal distributions are found to be sensitive to initial-state gluon radiation.

  17. A simple Analytical Model to Study and Control Azimuthal Instabilities in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annular Combustion Chambers | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility A simple Analytical Model to Study and Control Azimuthal Instabilities in Annular Combustion Chambers Authors: Parmentier, J-F., Salas, P., Wolf, P., Staffelbach, G., Nicoud, F., Poinsot, T. This study describes a simple analytical method to compute the azimuthal modes appearing in annular combustion chambers and help analyzing experimental, acoustic and large eddy simulation (LES) data obtained in these combustion chambers.

  18. Measurements of jet vetoes and azimuthal decorrelations in dijet events produced in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-31

    In addition jet activity in dijet events is measured using pp collisions at ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, for jets reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with radius parameter R=0.6. This is done using variables such as the fraction of dijet events without an additional jet in the rapidity interval bounded by the dijet subsystem and correlations between the azimuthal angles of the dijet s. They are presented, both with and without a veto on additional jet activity in the rapidity interval, as a function of the scalar average of the transverse momenta of the dijet s and of the rapidity interval size. The double differential dijet cross section is also measured as a function of the interval size and the azimuthal angle between the dijet s. These variables probe differences in the approach to resummation of large logarithms when performing QCD calculations. The data are compared to POWERHEG, interfaced to the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG parton shower generators, as well as to HEJ with and without interfacing it to the ARIADNE parton shower generator. None of the theoretical predictions agree with the data across the full phase-space considered; however, POWERHEG+PYTHIA 8 and HEJ+ARIADNE are found to provide the best agreement with the data. These measurements use the full data sample collected with the ATLAS detector in 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 36.1pb–1 and 4.5fb–1 for data collected during 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  19. Measurements of jet vetoes and azimuthal decorrelations in dijet events produced in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-31

    In addition jet activity in dijet events is measured using pp collisions at ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, for jets reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with radius parameter R=0.6. This is done using variables such as the fraction of dijet events without an additional jet in the rapidity interval bounded by the dijet subsystem and correlations between the azimuthal angles of the dijet s. They are presented, both with and without a veto on additional jet activity in the rapidity interval, as a function of the scalar average of the transverse momenta of the dijet s and ofmore » the rapidity interval size. The double differential dijet cross section is also measured as a function of the interval size and the azimuthal angle between the dijet s. These variables probe differences in the approach to resummation of large logarithms when performing QCD calculations. The data are compared to POWERHEG, interfaced to the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG parton shower generators, as well as to HEJ with and without interfacing it to the ARIADNE parton shower generator. None of the theoretical predictions agree with the data across the full phase-space considered; however, POWERHEG+PYTHIA 8 and HEJ+ARIADNE are found to provide the best agreement with the data. These measurements use the full data sample collected with the ATLAS detector in 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 36.1pb–1 and 4.5fb–1 for data collected during 2010 and 2011, respectively.« less

  20. Six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, L.F.X.

    1999-05-11

    A six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus is comprised of a geometry of six independent angle connectors. Each angle connector connects two fixed length rods to a pivot on one of two opposing platforms. The combination of an angle connector, at least two pivots and at least two rods having free ends connected to the pivots comprises a leg assembly. The spatial location of the upper platform is changed in relation to the lower platform by angular changes within each angle connector. This angular change results in degrees of motion within the apparatus defined as X, Y, Z, Tip, Tilt, and Rotation, or a combination of the above. This invention is known as a ROTOPOD. 9 figs.

  1. Six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F. X.

    1999-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus is comprised of a geometry of six independent angle connectors. Each angle connector connects two fixed length rods to a pivot on one of two opposing platforms. The combination of an angle connector, at least two pivots and at least two rods having free ends connected to the pivots comprises a leg assembly. The spatial location of the upper platform is changed in relation to the lower platform by angular changes within each angle connector. This angular change results in degrees of motion within the apparatus defined as X, Y, Z, Tip, Tilt, and Rotation, or a combination of the above. This invention is known as a ROTOPOD.

  2. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarthula, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  3. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. I. Local analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2014-04-15

    Results based on a local linear stability analysis of the Hall thruster discharge are presented. A one-dimensional azimuthal framework is used including three species: neutrals, singly charged ions, and electrons. A simplified linear model is developed with the aim of deriving analytical expressions to characterize the stability of the ionization region. The results from the local analysis presented here indicate the existence of an instability that gives rise to an azimuthal oscillation in the +E??B direction with a long wavelength. According to the model, the instability seems to appear only in regions where the ionization and the electric field make it possible to have positive gradients of plasma density and ion velocity at the same time. A more complex model is also solved numerically to validate the analytical results. Additionally, parametric variations are carried out with respect to the main parameters of the model to identify the trends of the instability. As the temperature increases and the neutral-to-plasma density ratio decreases, the growth rate of the instability decreases down to a limit where azimuthal perturbations are no longer unstable.

  4. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  5. Azimuthal decorrelations and multiple parton interactions in photon+2 jet and photon+3 jet events in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2011-01-01

    Samples of inclusive {gamma} + 2 jet and {gamma} + 3 jet events collected by the D0 experiment with an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are used to measure cross sections as a function of the angle in the plane transverse to the beam direction between the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) of the {gamma} + leading jet system (jets are ordered in p{sub T}) and p{sub T} of the other jet for {gamma} + 2 jet, or p{sub T} sum of the two other jets for {gamma} + 3 jet events. The results are compared to different models of multiple parton interactions (MPI) in the pythia and sherpa Monte Carlo (MC) generators. The data indicate a contribution from events with double parton (DP) interactions and are well described by predictions provided by the pythia MPI models with p{sub T}-ordered showers and by sherpa with the default MPI model. The {gamma} + 2 jet data are also used to determine the fraction of events with DP interactions as a function of the azimuthal angle and as a function of the second jet p{sub T}.

  6. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  7. Influence of the Torsion Angle ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... rings, usually reported as the N C C N angle, obtained from solid-state crystal structures. ... Synthesis and Physical Properties. The preparation o f C p*2Y b(3,3'-M b ip y ) ...

  8. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation in grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Gangadhar Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.; Ghosh, Haranath

    2015-06-24

    The Compton and elastic scattering radiations are the major contributor to the spectral background of an x-ray fluorescence spectrum, which eventually limits the element detection sensitivities of the technique to µg/g (ppm) range. In the present work, we provide a detail mathematical descriptions and show that how polarization properties of the synchrotron radiation influence the spectral background in the x-ray fluorescence technique. We demonstrate our theoretical understandings through experimental observations using total x-ray fluorescence measurements on standard reference materials. Interestingly, the azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation is shown to have a vital role on the significance of the x-ray fluorescence detection sensitivities.

  10. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries of the unpolarized cross section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, Francesca [INFN and Universita degli studi di Ferrara (Italy); Lamb, Rebecca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-08-04

    A multi-dimensional (x, y, z, P{sub hperpendicular}) extraction of cos {phi}{sub h} and cos 2{phi}{sub h} azimuthal asymmetries of unpolarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERMES is discussed. The use of data taken with hydrogen and deuterium targets and the separation of positive and negative hadrons allow to access flavor-dependent information about quark intrinsic transverse momenta and spin-orbit correlations. This flavor sensitivity allows for a discrimination between theoretical models in the HERMES kinematic regime.

  11. Azimuthal asymmetries for hadron distributions inside a jet in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Pisano, Cristian; Murgia, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    Using a generalized parton model approach including spin and intrinsic parton motion effects, and assuming the validity of factorization for large-p{sub T} jet production in hadronic collisions, we study the azimuthal distribution around the jet axis of leading unpolarized or (pseudo)scalar hadrons, namely pions, produced in the jet fragmentation process. We identify the observable leading-twist azimuthal asymmetries for the unpolarized and single-polarized case related to quark and gluon-originated jets. We account for all physically allowed combinations of the transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) parton distribution and fragmentation functions, with special attention to the Sivers, Boer-Mulders, and transversity quark distributions, and to the Collins fragmentation function for quarks (and to the analogous functions for gluons). For each of these effects we evaluate, at central and forward rapidities and for kinematical configurations accessible at BNL-RHIC, the corresponding potentially maximized asymmetry (for {pi}{sup +} production), obtained by saturating natural positivity bounds (and the Soffer bound for transversity) for the distribution and fragmentation functions involved and summing additively all partonic contributions. We then estimate, for both neutral and charged pions, the asymmetries involving TMD functions for which parametrizations are available. We also study the role of the different mechanisms, and the corresponding transverse single-spin asymmetries, for large-p{sub T} inclusive-jet production.

  12. Measurement of long-range pseudorapidity correlations and azimuthal harmonics in sNN=5.02  TeV proton-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-09

    We present measurements of two-particle correlation functions and the first five azimuthal harmonics, v1 to v5, using 28 nb₋1 of p+Pb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of √sNN =5.02 TeV measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Significant long-range “ridgelike” correlations are observed for pairs with small relative azimuthal angle (|ΔΦ|<π/3) and back-to-back pairs (|ΔΦ|>2π/3) over the transverse momentum range 0.4T<12 GeV and in different intervals of event activity. The event activity is defined by either the number of reconstructed tracks or the total transverse energy on the Pb-fragmentation side. The azimuthal structure of such long-range correlations ismore » Fourier decomposed to obtain the harmonics vn as a function of pT and event activity. The extracted vn values for n = 2 to 5 decrease with n. The v2 and v3 values are found to be positive in the measured pT range. The v1 is also measured as a function of pT and is observed to change sign around pT ≈ 1.5–2.0 GeV and then increase to about 0.1 for pT>4 GeV. The v2(pT), v3(pT), and v4(pT) are compared to the vn coefficients in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with similar event multiplicities. Reasonable agreement is observed after accounting for the difference in the average pT of particles produced in the two collision systems.« less

  13. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  14. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of negative pions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chkhaidze, L. V. Djobava, T. D.; Kharkhelauri, L. L.; Kladnitskaya, E. N.

    2012-07-15

    Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of {pi}{sup -} mesons have been studied in dC, HeC, CC, CNe, MgMg, (d, He)Ta, CCu, CTa, and OPb collisions at momentum of 4.2, 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon within the standard transverse momentum analysis method of P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec. The data were obtained by SKM-200-GIBS and Propane Bubble Chamber Collaborations of JINR. The axis has been selected in the phase space and with respect to this axis {pi}{sup -} meson correlations were observed. The values of the coefficient of the correlations linearly depend on the mass numbers of projectile (A{sub P}) and target (A{sub T}) nuclei. The Quark-Gluon String Model satisfactorily describes the experimental results.

  15. Sputter deposition of Al-doped ZnO films with various incident angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Kei; Oka, Nobuto; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2009-09-15

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were sputter deposited on glass substrates heated at 200 degree sign C under incident angles of sputtered particles at 0 degree sign (incidence normal to substrate), 20 deg., 40 deg., 60 deg., and 80 deg. In the case of normal incidence, x-ray diffraction pole figures show a strong [001] preferred orientation normal to the film surface. In contrast, in the case wherein the incident angles were higher than 60 degree sign , the [001] orientation inclined by 25 deg. - 35 deg. toward the direction of sputtered particles. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the tilt angle of the [001] orientation increased with increasing angle of the incident sputtered particles, whereas the columnar structure did not show any sign of inclination with respect to the substrate plane.

  16. Mira, another angle | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mira, another angle Download original image « Back to galleryItem 2

  17. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  18. Long-range azimuthal correlations in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ? = 1.5 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. 3-D moveout inversion in azimuthally anisotropic media with lateral velocity variation: Theory and a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.

    1999-08-01

    Reflection moveout recorded over an azimuthally anisotropic medium (e.g., caused by vertical or dipping fractures) varies with the azimuth of the source-receiver line. Normal-moveout (NMO) velocity, responsible for the reflection traveltimes on conventional-length spreads, forms an elliptical curve in the horizontal plane. While this result remains valid in the presence of arbitrary anisotropy and heterogeneity, the inversion of the NMO ellipse for the medium parameters has been discussed so far only for horizontally homogeneous models above a horizontal or dipping reflector. Here, the authors develop an analytic moveout correction for weak lateral velocity variation in horizontally layered azimuthally anisotropic media. The correction term is proportional to the curvature of the zero-offset travel-time surface at the common midpoint and, therefore, can be estimated from surface seismic data. After the influence of lateral velocity variation on the effective NMO ellipses has been stripped, the generalized Dix equation can be used to compute the interval ellipses and evaluate the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy (measured by P-wave NMO velocity) within the layer of interest. This methodology was applied to a 3-D wide-azimuth data set acquired over a fractured reservoir in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. The processing sequence included 3-D semblance analysis (based on the elliptical NMO equation) for a grid of common-midpoint supergathers, spatial smoothing of the effective NMO ellipses and zero-offset traveltimes, correction for lateral velocity variation, and generalized Dix differentiation. The estimates of depth-varying fracture trends in the survey area, based on the interval P-wave NMO ellipses, are in good agreement with the results of outcrop and borehole measurements and the rotational analysis of four component S-wave data.

  20. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  1. Spatial potential ripples of azimuthal surface modes in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Zhang, Yingjie; Manzano, Cristina V.; Alvaro, Raquel; Gooth, Johannes; Salmeron, Miquel; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-11

    Topological insulators (TI) nanowires (NW) are an emerging class of structures, promising both novel quantum effects and potential applications in low-power electronics, thermoelectrics and spintronics. However, investigating the electronic states of TI NWs is complicated, due to their small lateral size, especially at room temperature. Here, we perform scanning probe based nanoscale imaging to resolve the local surface potential landscapes of Bi2Te3 nanowires (NWs) at 300 K. We found equipotential rings around the NWs perimeter that we attribute to azimuthal 1D modes. Along the NW axis, these modes are altered, forming potential ripples in the local density of states, duemore » to intrinsic disturbances. Potential mapping of electrically biased NWs enabled us to accurately determine their conductivity which was found to increase with the decrease of NW diameter, consistent with surface dominated transport. Finally, our results demonstrate that TI NWs can pave the way to both exotic quantum states and novel electronic devices.« less

  2. An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-Based Axial SN Solver for the 2D...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences and ... With these fundamentals in hand, Chapter 3 covers the 2D1D framework and provides a ...

  3. Large-angle elastic and inelastic scattering of Pi(+) and Pi(-) from (28)Si and (40)Ca. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snell, M.P.

    1989-05-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for Pi(+) and Pi(-) elastic scattering of Calcium 40 and Silicon 28 at incident pion energies ranging from 100 to 260 MeV at a scattering angle of 175 degs. Differential cross sections were also measured for Pi(+) and Pi(-) inelastic scattering to the 2(+), 1.78 MeV, 4(+), 4.62 MeV, and 3(-) 6.88 MeV states of 28Si at incident pion energies of 130, 180, and 226 MeV and scattering angles between 115 and 175{degrees} in 6{degrees} increments. The data are compared to previously obtained forward angle data through 120{degrees} and agree quite well. The data show a generally flat angular dependence for angles greater than 100{degrees}. Several theoretical codes are reviewed for their ability to predict large angle scattering. Coordinate-space and momentum-space models generally thought to be sufficient for predicting forward angle scattering have proved to be inappropriate for use at large angles. A new phenomenological delta-hole model, currently under modification, shows a greatly enhanced ability to predict scattering at back angles.

  4. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of σ = 1.5 – 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ?=1.53 mb?=1.53 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  7. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Majors, Paul D.

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  8. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  9. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  10. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, Arthur; Ivanov, Kostadin; Arramova, Maria; Hales, Jason

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  11. Propulsive performance of a finite-temperature plasma flow in a magnetic nozzle with applied azimuthal current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrario, Lorenzo; Little, Justin M. Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2014-11-15

    The plasma flow in a finite-electron-temperature magnetic nozzle, under the influence of an applied azimuthal current at the throat, is modeled analytically to assess its propulsive performance. A correction to the nozzle throat boundary conditions is derived by modifying the radial equilibrium of a magnetized infinite two-population cylindrical plasma column with the insertion of an external azimuthal body force for the electrons. Inclusion of finite-temperature effects, which leads to a modification of the radial density profile, is necessary for calculating the propulsive performance, which is represented by nozzle divergence efficiency and thrust coefficient. The solutions show that the application of the azimuthal current enhances all the calculated performance parameters through the narrowing of the radial density profile at the throat, and that investing power in this beam focusing effect is more effective than using the same power to pre-heat the electrons. The results open the possibility for the design of a focusing stage between the plasma source and the nozzle that can significantly enhance the propulsive performance of electron-driven magnetic nozzles.

  12. Observation of long-range elliptic azimuthal anisotropies in √s = 13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2016-04-27

    In this study, ATLAS has measured two-particle correlations as a function of the relative azimuthal angle, ΔΦ, and pseudorapidity, Δη, in √s = 13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions at the LHC using charged particles measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η|<2.5. The correlation functions evaluated in different intervals of measured charged-particle multiplicity show a multiplicity-dependent enhancement at ΔΦ~0 that extends over a wide range of Δη, which has been referred to as the “ridge.” Per-trigger-particle yields, Y(ΔΦ), are measured over 2<|Δη|<5. For both collision energies, the Y(ΔΦ) distribution in all multiplicity intervals is found to be consistent with a linearmore » combination of the per-trigger-particle yields measured in collisions with less than 20 reconstructed tracks, and a constant combinatoric contribution modulated by cos(2ΔΦ). The fitted Fourier coefficient, v2,2, exhibits factorization, suggesting that the ridge results from per-event cos(2Φ) modulation of the single-particle distribution with Fourier coefficients v2. The v2 values are presented as a function of multiplicity and transverse momentum. They are found to be approximately constant as a function of multiplicity and to have a pT dependence similar to that measured in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions. The v2 values in the 13 and 2.76 TeV data are consistent within uncertainties. These results suggest that the ridge in pp collisions arises from the same or similar underlying physics as observed in p+Pb collisions, and that the dynamics responsible for the ridge has no strong √s dependence.« less

  13. Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of transuranic materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated experimental setup for...

  14. Transient stability enhancement of electric power generating systems by 120-degree phase rotation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cresap, Richard L.; Taylor, Carson W.; Kreipe, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A method and system for enhancing the transient stability of an intertied three-phase electric power generating system. A set of power exporting generators (10) is connected to a set of power importing generators (20). When a transient cannot be controlled by conventional stability controls, and imminent loss of synchronism is detected (such as when the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets exceeds a predetermined value, such as 150 degrees), the intertie is disconnected by circuit breakers. Then a switch (30) having a 120-degree phase rotation, or a circuit breaker having a 120-degree phase rotation is placed in the intertie. The intertie is then reconnected. This results in a 120-degree reduction in the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets, making the system more stable and allowing more time for the conventional controls to stabilize the transient.

  15. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  16. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  17. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  18. A segmented multi-loop antenna for selective excitation of azimuthal mode number in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Motomura, T.

    2014-09-15

    A flat type, segmented multi-loop antenna was developed in the Tokai Helicon Device, built for producing high-density helicon plasma, with a diameter of 20 cm and an axial length of 100 cm. This antenna, composed of azimuthally splitting segments located on four different radial positions, i.e., r = 2.8, 4.8, 6.8, and 8.8 cm, can excite the azimuthal mode number m of 0, 1, and 2 by a proper choice of antenna feeder parts just on the rear side of the antenna. Power dependencies of the electron density n{sub e} were investigated with a radio frequency (rf) power less than 3 kW (excitation frequency ranged from 8 to 20 MHz) by the use of various types of antenna segments, and n{sub e} up to ?5 10{sup 12} cm{sup ?3} was obtained after the density jump from inductively coupled plasma to helicon discharges. Radial density profiles of m = 0 and 1 modes with low and high rf powers were measured. For the cases of these modes after the density jump, the excited mode structures derived from the magnetic probe measurements were consistent with those expected from theory on helicon waves excited in the plasma.

  19. Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy in hydrodynamics with statistical hadronization from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisiel, Adam; Broniowski, Wojciech; Florkowski, Wojciech; Chojnacki, Mikolaj

    2009-01-15

    Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy for heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is explored within the approach consisting of the hydrodynamics of perfect fluid followed by statistical hadronization. It is found that for the RHIC initial conditions, employing the Gaussian shape of the initial energy density, the very same framework that reproduces the standard soft observables [including the transverse-momentum spectra, the elliptic flow, and the azimuthally averaged Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii] leads to a proper description of the azimuthally sensitive femtoscopic observables; we find that the azimuthal variation of the side and out HBT radii as well as out-side cross term are very well reproduced for all centralities. Concerning the dependence of the femtoscopic parameters on k{sub T} we find that it is very well reproduced. The model is then extrapolated to the LHC energy. We predict the overall moderate growth of the HBT radii and the decrease of their azimuthal oscillations. Such effects are naturally caused by longer evolution times. In addition, we discuss in detail the space-time patterns of particle emission. We show that they are quite complex and argue that the overall shape seen by the femtoscopic methods cannot be easily disentangled on the basis of simple-minded arguments.

  20. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees, 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major. Twenty-four academic programs reported having health physics programs during 2011. The data for two health physics options within nuclear engineering programs are also included in the enrollments and degrees that are reported in the nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees data. Degree Trends. Bachelor degrees increased slightly between 2010 and 2011, but were 15% less than during 2005 through 2009 and 30% less than in the

  1. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in the $E\\gt 8$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$, that has a chance probability $P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.

  2. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in themore » $$E\\gt 8$$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $$r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$$, that has a chance probability $$P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.« less

  3. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  4. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  5. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c the dielectron v? measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from ??,?,?, and ? decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c, the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc contributions.

  6. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  7. Azimuthal correlations of projectile and target fragments in collisions between gold nuclei of energy 10.6 GeV per nucleon and emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdurakhmanov, U. U.; Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. Sh. Chudakov, V. M.

    2008-03-15

    Intra-and intergroup azimuthal correlations of projectile and target fragments are found in collisions between gold and emulsion nuclei. The statistical significance of these correlations is high. The methodological distortions associated with the measurement errors are investigated in detail and are taken into account.

  8. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Wind, Robert A.

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  9. Mira, an angle shot | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an angle shot Download original image « Back to galleryItem 1 of 9Next

  10. Lens positioner with five degrees of freedom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobierecki, Marian W.; Rienecker, Jr., Frederick

    1978-01-01

    A device for positioning lenses precisely with five degrees of freedom (three translations and two angular rotations). The unique features of the device are its compact design, large clear aperture, and high degree of positioning accuracy combined with five degrees of freedom in axis motion. Thus, the device provides precision and flexibility in positioning of optical components. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, Contract No. AT(29-1)-1183, with the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.

  11. Solar concentrator with restricted exit angles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabl, Arnulf; Winston, Roland

    1978-12-19

    A device is provided for the collection and concentration of radiant energy and includes at least one reflective side wall. The wall directs incident radiant energy to the exit aperture thereof or onto the surface of energy absorber positioned at the exit aperture so that the angle of incidence of radiant energy at the exit aperture or on the surface of the energy absorber is restricted to desired values.

  12. Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera Instrument Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera Instrument Handbook July 2016 M Stuefer J Bailey DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

  13. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  14. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  15. EM Leaders Earn National Defense Degrees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Two EM employees were recently awarded Master of Science degrees from the National Defense University (NDU) as part of a DOE-sponsored professional development program.

  16. Pair Creation at Large Inherent Angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T.; Schroeder, D.V.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    In the next-generation linear colliders, the low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs created during the collision of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} beams would cause potential deleterious background problems to the detectors. At low collider energies, the pairs are made essentially by the incoherent process, where the pair is created by the interaction of beamstrahlung photons on the individual particles in the oncoming beam. This problem was first identified by Zolotarev, et al[1]. At energies where the beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon} lies approximately in the range 0.6 {approx}< {Upsilon} {approx}< 100, pair creation from the beamstrahlung photons is dominated by a coherent process, first noted by Chen[2]. The seriousness of this pair creation problem lies in the transverse momenta that the pair particles carry when leaving the interaction point (IP) with large angles. One source of transverse momentum is from the kick by the field of the oncoming beam which results in an outcoming angle {theta} {proportional_to} 1/{radical}x, where x is the fractional energy of the particle relative to the initial beam particle energy[2,3]. As was shown in Ref. 131, there in fact exists an energy threshold for the coherent pairs, where x{sub th} {approx}> 1/2{Upsilon}. Thus within a tolerable exiting angle, there exists an upper limit for {Upsilon} where all coherent pairs would leave the detector through the exhaust port[4]. A somewhat different analysis has been done by Schroeder[5]. In the next generation of linear colliders, as it occurs, the coherent pairs can be exponentially suppressed[2] by properly choosing the {Upsilon}({approx}< 0.6). When this is achieved, the incoherent pairs becomes dominant. Since the central issue is the transverse momentum for particles with large angles, we notice that there is another source for it. Namely, when the pair particles are created at low energies, the intrinsic angles of these pairs when produced may already be large. This issue was

  17. Azimuthally sensitive hanbury brown-twiss interferometry in Au + Au collisions sqrt S sub NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, L.S.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

    2004-06-30

    We present the results of a systematic study of the shape of the pion distribution in coordinate space at freeze-out in Au+Au collisions at RHIC using two-pion Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry. Oscillations of the extracted HBT radii vs. emission angle indicate sources elongated perpendicular to the reaction plane. The results indicate that the pressure and expansion time of the collision system are not sufficient to completely quench its initial shape.

  18. Angle stations in or for endless conveyor belts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steel, Alan

    1987-04-07

    In an angle station for an endless conveyor belt, there are presented to each incoming run of the belt stationary curved guide members (18, 19) of the shape of a major segment of a right-circular cylinder and having in the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) thereof rectangular openings (15) arranged in parallel and helical paths and through which project small freely-rotatable rollers (14), the continuously-changing segments of the curved surfaces of which projecting through said openings (15) are in attitude to change the direction of travel of the belt (13) through 90.degree. during passage of the belt about the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) of the guide member (18 or 19). The rectangular openings (15) are arranged with their longer edges lengthwise of the diagonals representing the mean of the helix but with those of a plurality of the rows nearest to each end of the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) slightly out of axial symmetry with said diagonals, being slightly inclined in a direction about the intersections (40) of the diagonals of the main portion of the openings, to provide a "toe-in" attitude in relation to the line of run of the endless conveyor belt.

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION OF QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FIELDS AT DIFFERENT HELIOCENTRIC ANGLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Katsukawa, Y.

    2012-02-20

    This paper presents results from the analysis of high signal-to-noise ratio spectropolarimetric data taken at four heliocentric angles in quiet-Sun internetwork regions with the Hinode satellite. First, we find that the total circular and total linear polarization signals vary with heliocentric angle, at least for fields with large polarization signals. We also report changes on the Stokes V amplitude asymmetry histograms with viewing angle for fields weaker than 200 G. Then, we subject the data to a Milne-Eddington inversion and analyze the variation of the field vector probability density functions with heliocentric angle. Weak, highly inclined fields permeate the internetwork at all heliocentric distances. For fields weaker than 200 G, the distributions of field inclinations peak at 90 Degree-Sign and do not vary with viewing angle. The inclination distributions change for fields stronger than 200 G. We argue that the shape of the inclination distribution for weak fields partly results from the presence of coherent, loop-like magnetic features at all heliocentric distances and not from tangled fields within the field of view. We also find that the average magnetic field strength is about 180 G (for 75% of the pixels) and is constant with heliocentric angle. The average vertical and horizontal magnetic field components are 70 and 150 G. The latter (former) is slightly greater (smaller) near the limb. Finally, the ratio between the horizontal and vertical components of the fields ranges from {approx}1 for strong fields to {approx}3.5 for weak fields, suggesting that the magnetic field vector is not isotropically distributed within the field of view.

  20. Long range correlations and folding angle with applications to ?-helical proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krokhotin, Andrey, E-mail: Andrei.Krokhotine@cern.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden); Nicolis, Stam, E-mail: Stam.Nicolis@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)] [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-03-07

    The conformational complexity of chain-like macromolecules such as proteins and other linear polymers is much larger than that of point-like atoms and molecules. Unlike particles, chains can bend, twist, and even become knotted. Thus chains might also display a much richer phase structure. Unfortunately, it is not very easy to characterize the phase of a long chain. Essentially, the only known attribute is the radius of gyration. The way how it changes when the degree of polymerization becomes different, and how it evolves when the ambient temperature and solvent properties change, is commonly used to disclose the phase. But in any finite length chain there are corrections to scaling that complicate the detailed analysis of the phase structure. Here we introduce a quantity that we call the folding angle to identify and scrutinize the phase structure, as a complement to the radius of gyration. We argue for a mean-field level relationship between the folding angle and the scaling exponent in the radius of gyration. We then estimate the value of the folding angle in the case of crystallographic ?-helical protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. We also show how the experimental value of the folding angle can be obtained computationally, using a semiclassical Born-Oppenheimer description of ?-helical chiral chains.

  1. SU-E-T-589: Optimization of Patient Head Angle Position to Spare Hippocampus During the Brain Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheon, G; Kang, Y; Kang, S; Kim, T; Kim, D; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Hippocampus is one of the important organs which controls emotions, behaviors, movements the memorizing and learning ability. In the conventional head & neck therapy position, it is difficult to perform the hippocampal-sparing brain radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate optimal head angle which can save the hippocampal-sparing and organ at risk (OAR) in conformal radiation therapy (CRT), Intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods: Three types of radiation treatment plans, CRT, IMRT and Tomotherapy plans, were performed for 10 brain tumor patients. The image fusion between CT and MRI data were used in the contour due to the limited delineation of the target and OAR in the CT scan. The optimal condition plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the each plan with the use of various parameters which include three different techniques (CRT, IMRT, HT) and 4 angle (0, 15, 30, 40 degree). The each treatment plans of three different techniques were compared with the following parameters: conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage, dose in the OARs, monitor units (MU), beam on time and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: HI, CI and target coverage was most excellent in head angle 30 degree among all angle. When compared by modality, target coverage and CI showed good results in IMRT and TOMO than compared to the CRT. HI at the head angle 0 degrees is 1.137±0.17 (CRT), 1.085±0.09 (IMRT) and 1.077±0.06 (HT). HI at the head angle 30 degrees is 1.056±0.08 (CRT), 1.020±0.05 (IMRT) and 1.022±0.07 (HT). Conclusion: The results of our study show that when head angle tilted at 30 degree, target coverage, HI, CI were improved, and the dose delivered to OAR was reduced compared with conventional supine position in brain radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid

  2. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  3. Moderate positive spin Hall angle in uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Simranjeet; Anguera, Marta; Barco, Enrique del E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu; Springell, Ross; Miller, Casey W. E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu

    2015-12-07

    We report measurements of spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/uranium bilayers designed to study the efficiency of spin-charge interconversion in a super-heavy element. We employ broad-band ferromagnetic resonance on extended films to inject a spin current from the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} (permalloy) into the uranium layer, which is then converted into an electric field by the inverse spin Hall effect. Surprisingly, our results suggest a spin mixing conductance of order 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} and a positive spin Hall angle of 0.004, which are both merely comparable with those of several transition metals. These results thus support the idea that the electronic configuration may be at least as important as the atomic number in governing spin pumping across interfaces and subsequent spin Hall effects. In fact, given that both the magnitude and the sign are unexpected based on trends in d-electron systems, materials with unfilled f-electron orbitals may hold additional exploration avenues for spin physics.

  4. Measurement of J/ψ Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/ψ azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at √sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/ψ elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/ψ particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  5. Measurement of J/ψ Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/ψ azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at √sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/ψ elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/ψ particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  6. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Asia...

  7. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric ...

  8. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive...

  9. Channeling Doping Profiles Studies for Small Incident Angle Implantation into Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, B.N.; Variam, N.; Jeong, U.; Mehta, S.; Posselt, M.; Lebedev, A.

    2003-08-26

    Traditional de-channeling dopant profiles in the silicon crystal wafers have been achieved by tilting the wafer away from the incident beam. As feature sizes of device shrink, the advantages for channeled doping profiles for implants with small or near zero degree incident angles are being recognized. For example, high-energy CMOS well spacing limitations caused by shadowing and encroachment of the ion beam by photoresist mask can be avoided for near zero degree incident implants. Accurate models of channeled profiles are essential to predict the device performance. This paper mainly discusses the damage effect on channeled dopant profiles. Especially, damage effects on channeled dopant profiles are correlated to ThermaWave (TW) measurements. It is demonstrated that there is a critical dose at which the damage effects have to be considered for channeled dopant profile evolvements.

  10. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum ...

  11. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption ...

  12. Ligand Bridging-Angle-Driven Assembly of Molecular Architectures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    angles of 0, 60, 90, and 120 while incorporating a variety of nonbridging functional groups, and these ligands were used as linkers. These dicarboxylate linkers assemble with...

  13. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials Citation ... Cond. Mat. Phys. 3, 129, 2012 Research Org: SLAC National ...

  14. Flux control and one-hundred and eighty degree core systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S

    2012-11-27

    A two-phase or four-phase electric machine includes a first stator part and a second stator part disposed about ninety electrical degrees apart. Stator pole parts are positioned near the first stator part and the second stator part. An injector injects a third-harmonic frequency current that is separate from and not produced by the fundamental current driving the first stator part and the second stator part. The electric angular speed of the third-harmonic rotating field comprises .theta. ##EQU00001## where p comprises the number of pole pairs, .theta. comprises a mechanical angle and t comprise time in seconds.

  15. Measurement of higher-order harmonic azimuthal anisotropy in PbPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-04-01

    Measurements are presented by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the higher-order harmonic coefficients that describe the azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles emitted in sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions. Expressed in terms of the Fourier components of the azimuthal distribution, the n = 3-6 harmonic coefficients are presented for charged particles as a function of their transverse momentum (0.3 < pt < 8.0 GeV), collision centrality (0-70%), and pseudorapidity (abs(eta) < 2.0). The data are analyzed using the event plane, multiparticle cumulant, and Lee-Yang zeros methods, which provide different sensitivities to initial-state fluctuations. Taken together with earlier LHC measurements of elliptic flow (n = 2), the results on higher-order harmonic coefficients develop a more complete picture of the collective motion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and shed light on the properties of the produced medium.

  16. Development and testing of FIDELE: a computer code for finite-difference solution to harmonic magnetic-dipole excitation of an azimuthally symmetric horizontally and radially layered earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1981-04-01

    The FORTRAN IV computer code FIDELE simulates the high-frequency electrical logging of a well in which induction and receiving coils are mounted in an instrument sonde immersed in a drilling fluid. The fluid invades layers of surrounding rock in an azimuthally symmetric pattern, superimposing radial layering upon the horizonally layered earth. Maxwell's equations are reduced to a second-order elliptic differential equation for the azimuthal electric-field intensity. The equation is solved at each spatial position where the complex dielectric constant, magnetic permeability, and electrical conductivity have been assigned. Receiver response is given as the complex open-circuit voltage on receiver coils. The logging operation is simulated by a succession of such solutions as the sonde traverses the borehole. Test problems verify consistency with available results for simple geometries. The code's main advantage is its treatment of a two-dimensional earth; its chief disadvantage is the large computer time required for typical problems. Possible code improvements are noted. Use of the computer code is outlined, and tests of most code features are presented.

  17. Calculation of variable-base degree-days and degree-nights from monthly average temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.; Cleary, P.; Dickinson, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit (CIRA), a micro-computer building energy analysis program developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, uses a monthly variable-base degree-day method to calculate heating and cooling loads. The method's unique feature is its ability to model thermostat setbacks and storage of solar gain. The program accomplishes this by dividing each day into two periods, ''average day'' (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.) and ''average night'' (8 p.m. to 8 a.m.), with different base temperatures. For each mode (heating or cooling) and for each period (day or night), the program reconstructs degree-days as a function of average monthly day or night temperature using three empirical coefficients specific to the location. A comparison is made between degree-days computed from hourly weather tapes and those predicted using this method. The root mean square error between predicted and actual degree days is typically between 3 and 12 degree-days per month. Tables of the coefficients are given for over 150 locations in the United States, computed from hourly dry-bulb temperatures on TRY and TMY tapes. Seasonal predictions of heating and cooling energy budgets using this method show good correspondence to the DOE-2 hourly simulation method.

  18. 1/2 l angle 100 r angle l brace 100 r brace dislocation loops in a zinc blende structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, S.N.G.; Nakahara, S. )

    1990-01-29

    We report, for the first time, the identification of extrinsic dislocation loops lying on the {l brace}100{r brace} planes with {1/2}{l angle}100{r angle} types of Burgers vectors in a zinc blende structure in InGaAsP lattice matched to InP. These dislocation loops generated only in nonradiative recombination assisted point-defect motion process under intensed laser light, and form the {l angle}100{r angle} type dark line defects in degraded 1.3 {mu}m wavelength laser diodes.

  19. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  20. Interdiffusion and Reaction between Zr and Al Alloys from 425 degrees to 625 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Dickson; L. Zhou; A. Ewh; M. Fu; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn; A. Paz y Puente

    2014-06-01

    Zirconium has recently garnered attention for use as a diffusion barrier between UMo nuclear fuels and Al cladding alloys. Interdiffusion and reactions between Zr and Al, Al-2 wt.% Si, Al-5 wt.% Si or AA6061 were investigated using solid-to-solid diffusion couples annealed in the temperature range of 425 degrees to 625 degrees C. In the binary Al and Zr system, the Al3Zr and Al2Zr phases were identified, and the activation energy for the growth of the Al3Zr phase was determined to be 347 kJ/mol. Negligible diffusional interactions were observed for diffusion couples between Zr vs. Al-2 wt.% Si, Al-5 wt.% Si and AA6061 annealed at or below 475 degrees C. In diffusion couples with the binary AlSi alloys at 560 degrees C, a significant variation in the development of the phase constituents was observed including the thick t1 (Al5SiZr2) with Si content up to 12 at.%, and thin layers of (Si,Al)2Zr, (Al,Si)3Zr, Al3SiZr2 and Al2Zr phases. The use of AA6061 as a terminal alloy resulted in the development of both T1 (Al5SiZr2) and (Al,Si)3Zr phases with a very thin layer of (Al,Si)2Zr. At 560 degrees C, with increasing Si content in the AlSi alloy, an increase in the overall rate of diffusional interaction was observed; however, the diffusional interaction of Zr in contact with multicomponent AA6061 with 0.40.8 wt.% Si was most rapid.

  1. Multiple-degree-of-freedom vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    1995-01-01

    A multi-degree-of-freedom vehicle employs a compliant linkage to accommodate the need for a variation in the distance between drive wheels or drive systems which are independently steerable and drivable. The subject vehicle is provided with rotary encodes to provide signals representative of the orientation of the steering pivot associated with each such drive wheel or system, and a linear encoder which issues a signal representative of the fluctuations in the distance between the drive elements. The wheels of the vehicle are steered and driven in response to the linear encoder signal, there being provided a controller system for minimizing the fluctuations in the distance. The controller system is a software implementation of a plurality of controllers, operating at the chassis level and at the vehicle level. A trajectory interpolator receives x-displacement, y-displacement, and .theta.-displacement signals and produces to the vehicle level controller trajectory signals corresponding to interpolated control signals. The x-displacement, y-displacement, and .theta.-displacement signals are received from a human operator, via a manipulable joy stick.

  2. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclearmodification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman,R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll,J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay,S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Drosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; et al.

    2003-06-18

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v{sub 2} and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R{sub CP} for kaons and lambdas ({Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}}) at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. In combination, the v{sub 2} and R{sub CP} particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p{sub T} {approx} 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}} v{sub 2} values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination.

  3. Recent Measurements of the cos(n{phi}{sub h}) Azimuthal Modulations of the Unpolarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross-section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Giordano, Francesca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-12-17

    The cross section for hadron production in deep-inelastic lepton scattering contains azimuthal modulations which can be related to transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions. The former provide a picture of how the quarks are moving within nucleons. Specifically, the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} modulations of the unpolarized cross section relate quark spin and quark transverse momentum. These moments have been carefully measured at the HERMES experiment in a fully differential way, as a function of x, y, z, and P{sub hperpendicular} for positive and negative hadrons produced from hydrogen and deuterium targets. These measurements give new access to the flavor dependent TMDs via their charge and target dependence. These data must be compared to comprehensive models to determine which terms contribute significantly to the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} moments and allow access to the underlying structure functions.

  4. Studies of azimuthal dihadron correlations in ultra-central PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    Azimuthal dihadron correlations of charged particles have been measured in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV by the CMS collaboration, using data from the 2011 LHC heavy-ion run. The data set includes a sample of ultra-central (0-0.2% centrality) PbPb events collected using a trigger based on total transverse energy in the hadron forward calorimeters and the total multiplicity of pixel clusters in the silicon pixel tracker. A total of about 1.8 million ultra-central events were recorded, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 120 inverse microbarns. The observed correlations in ultra-central PbPb events are expected to be particularly sensitive to initial-state fluctuations. The single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics, from $v_2$ to $v_6$, are extracted as a function of particle transverse momentum. At higher transverse momentum, the $v_2$ harmonic becomes significantly smaller than the higher-order $v_n$ (n greater than or equal to 3). The pt-averaged $v_2$ and $v_3$ are found to be equal within 2%, while higher-order $v_n$ decrease as n increases. The breakdown of factorization of dihadron correlations into single-particle azimuthal anisotropies is observed. This effect is found to be most prominent in the ultra-central PbPb collisions, where the initial-state fluctuations play a dominant role. As a result, a comparison of the factorization data to hydrodynamic predictions with event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions is also presented.

  5. Studies of azimuthal dihadron correlations in ultra-central PbPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$$ 2.76 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    Azimuthal dihadron correlations of charged particles have been measured in PbPb collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$ = 2.76 TeV by the CMS collaboration, using data from the 2011 LHC heavy-ion run. The data set includes a sample of ultra-central (0-0.2% centrality) PbPb events collected using a trigger based on total transverse energy in the hadron forward calorimeters and the total multiplicity of pixel clusters in the silicon pixel tracker. A total of about 1.8 million ultra-central events were recorded, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 120 inverse microbarns. The observed correlations in ultra-central PbPb events are expected to be particularly sensitive to initial-state fluctuations. The single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics, from $v_2$ to $v_6$, are extracted as a function of particle transverse momentum. At higher transverse momentum, the $v_2$ harmonic becomes significantly smaller than the higher-order $v_n$ (n greater than or equal to 3). The pt-averaged $v_2$ and $v_3$ are found to be equal within 2%, while higher-order $v_n$ decrease as n increases. The breakdown of factorization of dihadron correlations into single-particle azimuthal anisotropies is observed. This effect is found to be most prominent in the ultra-central PbPb collisions, where the initial-state fluctuations play a dominant role. As a result, a comparison of the factorization data to hydrodynamic predictions with event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions is also presented.« less

  6. ORISE: Report shows number of health physics degrees for 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report shows number of health physics degrees increased for graduates, decreased for undergraduates in 2010 Decreased number of B.S. degrees remains higher than levels in the early 2000 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 20, 2011 FY12-09 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of health physics graduate degrees increased for both master's and doctoral candidates in 2010, but decreased for bachelor's degrees, says a report released this year by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The ORISE report,

  7. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ., Nuruzzaman

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system

  8. General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle February 3, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week, we told you about a new company

  9. Detachment faults: Evidence for a low-angle origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, R.J.; Lister, G.S. )

    1992-09-01

    The origin of low-angle normal faults or detachment faults mantling metamorphic core complexes in the southwestern United States remains controversial. If [sigma][sub 1] is vertical during extension, the formation of, or even slip along, such low-angle normal faults is mechanically implausible. No records exist of earthquakes on low-angle normal faults in areas currently undergoing continental extension, except from an area of actively forming core complexes in the Solomon Sea, Papua New Guinea. In light of such geophysical and mechanical arguments, W.R. Buck and B. Wernicke and G.J. Axen proposed models in which detachment faults originate as high-angle normal faults, but rotate to low angles and become inactive as extension proceeds. These models are inconsistent with critical field relations in several core complexes. The Rawhide fault, an areally extensive detachment fault in western Arizona, propagated at close to its present subhorizontal orientation late in the Tertiary extension of the region. Neither the Wernicke and Axen nor Buck models predict such behavior; in fact, both models preclude the operation of low-angle normal faults. The authors recommend that alternative explanations or modifications of existing models are needed to explain the evidence that detachment faults form and operate with gentle dips.

  10. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Quarterly report, Apr 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-08-31

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near-horizontal well has been drilled and completion operations are in progress. Upon initial review of log data, two hydraulic fracture treatments were planned. However, the probability of the lower frac growing into thick sands previously swept by waterflood has called for additional information to be obtained prior to proceeding with hydraulic fracture treatments. Should permeabilities prove to be as favorable as some data indicate, produced water volumes could be excessively high. Prior to pumping the first frac, the well will be perforated and produced from lower pay intervals. These perfs will not impact future frac work. Rate data and pressure transient analysis will dictate the need for the lower frac.

  11. AN ANGLE-DEPENDENT SYNCHROTRON SELF-COMPTON MODEL FOR RELATIVISTIC JET SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, O.; Boettcher, M.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the development of a numerical code to calculate the angle-dependent synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton radiation from relativistic jet sources with partially ordered magnetic fields and anisotropic particle distributions. Using a multi-zone radiation transfer approach, we can simulate magnetic-field configurations ranging from perfectly ordered (unidirectional) to randomly oriented (tangled). We demonstrate that synchrotron self-Compton model fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of extragalactic jet sources may be possible with a wide range of magnetic-field values, depending on their orientation with respect to the jet axis and the observer. This is illustrated with the example of a spectral fit to the SED of Mrk 421 from multiwavelength observations in 2006, where acceptable fits are possible with magnetic-field values varying within a range of an order of magnitude for different degrees of B-field alignment and orientation.

  12. Discriminating electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John D.

    2015-06-16

    The present invention provides systems, articles, and methods for discriminating electromagnetic radiation based upon the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the materials and systems described herein can be capable of inhibiting reflection of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., the materials and systems can be capable of transmitting and/or absorbing electromagnetic radiation) within a given range of angles of incidence at a first incident surface, while substantially reflecting electromagnetic radiation outside the range of angles of incidence at a second incident surface (which can be the same as or different from the first incident surface). A photonic material comprising a plurality of periodically occurring separate domains can be used, in some cases, to selectively transmit and/or selectively absorb one portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation while reflecting another portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation, based upon the angle of incidence. In some embodiments, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic dielectric function, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic dielectric function. In some instances, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic magnetic permeability, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic magnetic permeability. In some embodiments, non-photonic materials (e.g., materials with relatively large scale features) can be used to selectively absorb incoming electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence.

  13. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: application to the study of quantum dot lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja Radi?, Nikola; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Drai?, Goran; Bogdanovi?-Radovi?, Iva; Hol, Vclav

    2012-01-01

    The modelling of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) from three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is described. The ordering of quantum dots in three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions for three general classes of lattices of quantum dots are proposed. The classes differ in the type of disorder of the positions of the quantum dots. The models enable full structure determination, including lattice type, lattice parameters, the type and degree of disorder in the quantum dot positions and the distributions of the quantum dot sizes. Applications of the developed models are demonstrated using experimentally measured data from several types of quantum dot lattices formed by a self-assembly process.

  14. Wide angle x-ray scattering of proteins : effect of beam exposure on protein integrity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischetti, R. F.; Rodi, D. J.; Mirza, A.; Makowski, L.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2003-01-01

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns from proteins in solution contain information relevant to the determination of protein fold. At relevant scattering angles, however, these data are weak, and the degree to which they might be used to categorize the fold of a protein is unknown. Preliminary work has been performed at the BioCAT insertion-device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source which demonstrates that one can collect X-ray scattering data from proteins in solution to spacings of at least 2.2 {angstrom} (q = 2.8 {angstrom}-1). These data are sensitive to protein conformational states, and are in good agreement with the scattering predicted by the program CRYSOL using the known three-dimensional atomic coordinates of the protein. An important issue in the exploitation of this technique as a tool for structural genomics is the extent to which the high intensity of X-rays available at third-generation synchrotron sources chemically or structurally damage proteins. Various data-collection protocols have been investigated demonstrating conditions under which structural degradation of even sensitive proteins can be minimized, making this technique a viable tool for protein fold categorization, the study of protein folding, unfolding, protein-ligand interactions and domain movement.

  15. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with ...

  16. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2015 Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SURVEY UNIVERSE The 2015 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey reports degrees granted between September 1, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2015. The enrollments and degrees data comprises students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-five academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2015, and data was received from all thirty-five programs. The report includes

  17. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    having nuclear engineering programs during 2014, and data were provided by all thirty-five. The enrollments and degrees data include students majoring in nuclear engineering ...

  18. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and astrophysical capture processes R.E. Tribble A.M. Mukhamedzhanov Graduate Teaching Assistant Pursuing degree at Department of Statistics, Texas A&M University Jim...

  19. Brief 74 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2015-03-15

    The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014, and enrollments for fall 2014. There are three academic programs new to this year's survey. Thirty-five academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2014, and data were provided by all thirty-five. The enrollments and degrees data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Two nuclear engineering programs have indicated that health physics option enrollments and degrees are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees survey.

  20. Brief 70 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 2011 Summary Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Don Johnson

    2012-10-31

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2011. The enrollment and degree data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2011, and data was received from all thirty-two programs. The data for two nuclear engineering programs include enrollments and degrees in health physics options that are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees data.

  1. ORISE: Report by ORISE shows health physics degrees declined...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics degrees declined in 2014, enrollment trends reverse Enrollment data ... graduating with majors in health physics has declined across undergraduate, ...

  2. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Zach...

  3. Biography U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study:...

  4. On the Euler angles for SU(N)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerchiai, Bianca L; Bertini, S.; Cacciatori, Sergio L.

    2005-10-20

    In this paper we reconsider the problem of the Euler parametrization for the unitary groups. After constructing the generic group element in terms of generalized angles, we compute the invariant measure on SU(N) and then we determine the full range of the parameters, using both topological and geometrical methods. In particular, we show that the given parametrization realizes the group SU(N+1) as a fibration of U(N) over the complex projective space CP{sup n}. This justifies the interpretation of the parameters as generalized Euler angles.

  5. Evidence for fast positronium formation in glancing angle positron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidley, D.W.; Frieze, W.E.; Mayer, R.; Lynn, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    We have evidence for fast (10-100 eV) positronium formation when 30 to 300 eV positrons scatter off an Al(110) surface at glancing angles as low as 6/sup 0/ with respect to the surface. A doubly remoderated, brightness enhanced positron beam of 1 mm diameter and 1/sup 0/ opening angle is used. A position sensitive CEMA is biased to detect only neutral particles. As evidence of fast Ps formation, we will present incident beam energy scans of the neutral particle counting rate as well as position sensitive plots of the angular formation probability.

  6. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  7. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Feder, R.; Ko, Jinseok; Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.

    2008-10-15

    The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a well-known imaging error of spherical mirrors. In addition to x rays, the scheme should be applicable to a very broad spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation, including microwaves, infrared and visible light, as well as UV and extreme UV radiation, if the crystals are replaced with appropriate spherical reflectors. The scheme may also be applicable to the imaging with ultrasound.

  8. Multi-angle nuclear imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-04-08

    Nuclear imaging apparatus for obtaining multi-plane readouts of radioactive material in a human or animal subject. A probe disposed in the vicinity of the subject is provided for receiving radiation from radiating sources in the subject and for forming a probe radiation image. The probe has a collimator with different portions thereof having holes disposed at different angles. A single scintillation crystal overlies the collimator for receiving radiation passing through the collimator and producing scintillations to provide the probe image. An array of photomultiplier tubes overlie the single crystal for observing the probe image and providing electrical outputs. Conversion apparatus is provided for converting the electrical outputs representing the probe image into optical images displayed on the screen of a cathode ray tube. Divider apparatus is provided for dividing the probe radiation image into a plurality of areas with the areas corresponding to different portions of the collimator having holes disposed at different angles. A light sensitive medium is provided for receiving optical images. Apparatus is provided for causing relative movement between the probe and the subject. Apparatus is also provided for causing relative movement between the optical image on the screen and the light sensitive medium which corresponds to the relative movement between the probe and the subject whereby there is produced on the light sensitive medium a plurality of images that portray the subject as seen from different angles corresponding to the portions of the collimator having holes at different angles.

  9. Multi-angle nuclear imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.

    1980-04-08

    A nuclear imaging apparatus is described for obtaining multi-plane readouts of radioactive material in a human or animal subject. A probe disposed in the vicinity of the subject is provided for receiving radiation from radiating sources in the subject and for forming a probe radiation image. The probe has a collimator with different portions having holes disposed at different angles. A single scintillation crystal overlies the collimator for receiving radiation passing through the collimator and producing scintillations to provide the probe image. An array of photomultiplier tubes overlie the single crystal for observing the probe image and providing electrical outputs. Conversion apparatus is provided for converting the electrical outputs representing the probe image into optical images displayed on the screen of a cathode ray tube. Divider apparatus is provided for dividing the probe radiation image into a plurality of areas with the areas corresponding to different portions of the collimator having holes disposed at different angles. A light sensitive medium is provided for receiving optical images. Apparatus is provided for causing relative movement between the probe and the subject. Apparatus is also provided for causing relative movement between the optical image on the screen and the light sensitive medium which corresponds to the relative movement between the probe and the subject whereby there is produced on the light sensitive medium a plurality of images that portray the subject as seen from different angles corresponding to the portions of the collimator having holes at different angles. 11 figs.

  10. Identification of high angle structures controlling the geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with dips between 80 and 90 degrees. Original drilling targets focused on the subsurface projection of a surface structure, mapped as the Rye Patch fault, with an erroneously low...

  11. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. , Martin; Grant D. , Holzrichter; Michael W.

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  12. Angle-resolved environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A new laboratory setup for photoemission studies at pressures up to 0.4 Torr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangolini, F.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Egberts, P.; Ahlund, J.; Backlund, K.; Karlsson, P. G.; Adiga, V. P.; Streller, F.; Wannberg, B.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-09-15

    The paper presents the development and demonstrates the capabilities of a new laboratory-based environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system incorporating an electrostatic lens and able to acquire spectra up to 0.4 Torr. The incorporation of a two-dimensional detector provides imaging capabilities and allows the acquisition of angle-resolved data in parallel mode over an angular range of 14 Degree-Sign without tilting the sample. The sensitivity and energy resolution of the spectrometer have been investigated by analyzing a standard Ag foil both under high vacuum (10{sup -8} Torr) conditions and at elevated pressures of N{sub 2} (0.4 Torr). The possibility of acquiring angle-resolved data at different pressures has been demonstrated by analyzing a silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO{sub 2}) sample. The collected angle-resolved spectra could be effectively used for the determination of the thickness of the native silicon oxide layer.

  13. Mode I and mixed I/III crack initiation and propagation behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at 25{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture behavior of the production-scale heat (No. 832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated at 25{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens for a mode I crack and modified CT specimens for a mixed-mode I/III crack. The mode III to mode I load ratio was 0.47. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h after final machining. Both mode I and mixed-mode I/III specimens were fatigue cracked prior to J-integral testing. It was noticed that the mixed-mode I/III crack angle decreased from an initial 25 degrees to approximately 23 degrees due to crack plane rotation during fatigue cracking. No crack plane rotation occurred in the mode I specimen. The crack initiation and propagation behavior was evaluated by generating J-R curves. Due to the high ductility of this alloy and the limited specimen thickness (6.35 mm), plane strain requirements were not met so valid critical J-integral values were not obtained. However, it was found that the crack initiation and propagation behavior was significantly different between the mode I and the mixed-mode I/III specimens. In the mode I specimen crack initiation did not occur, only extensive crack tip blunting due to plastic deformation. During J-integral testing the mixed-mode crack rotated to an increased crack angle (in contrast to fatigue precracking) by crack blunting. When the crack initiated, the crack angle was about 30 degrees. After crack initiation the crack plane remained at 30 degrees until the test was completed. Mixed-mode crack initiation was difficult, but propagation was easy. The fracture surface of the mixed-mode specimen was characterized by microvoid coalescence.

  14. EXOPLANETS FROM THE ARCTIC: THE FIRST WIDE-FIELD SURVEY AT 80 Degree-Sign N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard

    2013-03-15

    Located within 10 Degree-Sign of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80 Degree-Sign N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg{sup 2}, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (m{sub V} < 9.5) stars.

  15. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore » number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  16. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.

  17. Guidance system for low angle silicon ribbon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jewett, David N.; Bates, Herbert E.; Milstein, Joseph B.

    1986-07-08

    In a low angle silicon sheet growth process, a puller mechanism advances a seed crystal and solidified ribbon from a cooled growth zone in a melt at a low angle with respect to the horizontal. The ribbon is supported on a ramp adjacent the puller mechanism. Variations in the vertical position of the ribbon with respect to the ramp are isolated from the growth end of the ribbon by (1) growing the ribbon so that it is extremely thin, preferably less than 0.7 mm, (2) maintaining a large growth zone, preferably one whose length is at least 5.0 cm, and (3) spacing the ramp from the growth zone by at least 15 cm.

  18. A SMALL-ANGLE DRILL-HOLE WHIPSTOCK

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielsen, D.E.; Olsen, J.L.; Bennett, W.P.

    1963-01-29

    A small angle whipstock is described for accurately correcting or deviating a drill hole by a very small angle. The whipstock is primarily utilized when drilling extremely accurate, line-of-slight test holes as required for diagnostic studies related to underground nuclear test shots. The invention is constructed of a length of cylindrical pipe or casing, with a whipstock seating spike extending from the lower end. A wedge-shaped segment is secured to the outer circumference of the upper end of the cylinder at a position diametrically opposite the circumferential position of the spike. Pin means are provided for affixing the whipstock to a directional drill bit and stem to alloy orienting and setting the whipstock properly in the drill hole. (AEC)

  19. Angle amplifying optics using plane and ellipsoidal reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system for providing a wide angle input beam into ellipsoidal laser fusion target illumination systems. The optical system comprises one or more pairs of centrally apertured plane and ellipsoidal mirrors disposed to accept the light input from a conventional lens of modest focal length and thickness, to increase the angular divergence thereof to a value equivalent to that of fast lenses, and to direct the light into the ellipsoidal target illumination system.

  20. The 2mrad Crossing Angle Interaction Region and Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, R.; U., Manchester; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Dadoun, O.; Bambade, P.; Parker, B.; Keller, L.; Moffeit, K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Carter, J.; Royal Holloway, U.of London; Napoly, O.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-12

    A complete optics design for the 2mrad crossing angle interaction region and extraction line was presented at Snowmass 2005. Since this time, the design task force has been working on developing and improving the performance of the extraction line. The work has focused on optimizing the final doublet parameters and on reducing the power losses resulting from the disrupted beam transport. In this paper, the most recent status of the 2mrad layout and the corresponding performance are presented.

  1. Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6:14:01 PM Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days MonthYear... Table 26 Created on: 4262016 6:14:07 PM Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted ...

  2. Microsoft Word - VI_12_Degrees Awarded 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear systems A. Bonasera Post Doc. at INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM NON-THESIS April 1, 2014 - March 31, 2015 ...

  3. Charm degrees of freedom in the quark gluon plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mukherjee, Swagato; Petreczky, Peter; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-11

    The lattice QCD studies on fluctuations and correlations of charm quantum number have established that deconfinement of charm degrees of freedom sets in around the chiral crossover temperature, Tc; i.e., charm degrees of freedom carrying fractional baryonic charge start to appear. When we reexamine those same lattice QCD data we show that, in addition to the contributions from quarklike excitations, the partial pressure of charm degrees of freedom may still contain significant contributions from open-charm-meson- and baryonlike excitations associated with integral baryonic charges for temperatures up to 1.2Tc. Finally, charm-quark quasiparticles become the dominant degrees of freedom for temperatures T>1.2Tc.

  4. Brief 66 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2009 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Larry M. Blair, Analysis and Evaluation, Science Education Programs

    2010-03-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2008 and August 31, 2009, and fall 2009 enrollments. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2009, and data was obtained from all thirty-two.

  5. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. H. Youngblood Continue to Ph. D. degree Guangyao Chen 2013 Initial Conditions from Color Glass Condensate R. J. Fries Post. Doc. at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University...

  6. Applications of Trajectory Solid Angle for Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Po Kee; Wong, Adam E.; Wong, Anita

    2002-07-01

    In 1974, a well-known research problem in Statistical Mechanics entitled 'To determine and define the probability function P.sub.2 of a particle hitting a predetermined area, given all its parameters of generation and ejection' was openly solicited for its solution from research and development organizations in U.S.A. One of many proposed solutions of the problem, initiated at that time, is by means of the Trajectory Solid Angle (TSA). TSA is defined as the integral of the dot product of the unit tangent of the particle's trajectory to the vector area divided by the square of the position vector connecting between the point of ejection and that of the surface to be hit. The invention provides: (1) The precise and the unique solution of a previously unsolved P.sub.2 problem: (2) Impacts to the governmental NRC safety standards and DOD weapon systems and many activities in the Department of Energy; (3) Impacts to update the contents of text books of physics and mathematics of all levels; (4) Impacts to the scientific instruments with applications in high technologies. The importance of Trajectory Solid Angle can be quoted from a letter by the late Institute Professor P. M. Morse of MIT who reviewed the DOE proposal P7900450 (reference No. 7) in 1979 and addressed to the inventor. 'If the Trajectory Solid Angle is correct it will provide a revolutionary concept in physics'. (authors)

  7. Comparison of 180-degree and 90-degree needle rotation to reduce wound size in PIT-injected juvenile Chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, Amanda J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Karls, Rhonda K.; Hall, Kathleen D.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2013-04-30

    Animal telemetry, which requires the implantation of passive transponders or active transmitters, is used to monitor and assess fish stock and conservation to gain an understanding of fish movement and behavior. As new telemetry technologies become available, studies of their effects on species of interest are imperative as is development of implantation techniques. In this study, we investigated the effects of bevel rotation (0-, 90-, 180-degree axis rotation) on wound extent, tag loss, and wound healing rates in juvenile Chinook salmon injected with an 8-gauge needle, which is required for implantation of the novel injectable Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry Systems (JSATS) acoustic transmitter or large passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. Although the injection sites were not closed after injection (e.g., with sutures or glue), there were no mortalities, dropped tags, or indications of fungus, ulceration, and/or redness around the wound. On Day 0 and post-implantation Day 7, the 90-degree bevel rotation produced smaller wound extent than the 180-degree bevel rotation. No axis rotation (0-degrees) resulted in the PIT tag frequently misleading or falling out upon injection. The results of this study indicated the 90-degree bevel rotation was the more efficient technique, produced less wound extent. Given the wound extent compared to size of fish, we recommend researchers should consider a 90-degree rotation over the 180-degree rotation in telemetry studies. Highlights •Three degrees of needle rotation were examined for effects in Chinook salmon. •Mortality, tag loss, wound extent, healing, and infection indicators were measured. •There were no mortalities, tag loss, or indications of infection. •The 90-degree needle rotation through Day 7 produced the smallest wound extent.

  8. Brief 75 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2015-03-05

    The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2014. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.

  9. Brief 73 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-02-15

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.taoi_na

  10. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SURVEY UNIVERSE The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program

  11. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2014. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program

  12. Welding consumable selection for cryogenic (4{degrees}K) application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, S.F.; Siewert, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has begun construction of a large (3.8 kilometer circumference) heavy ion collider for the Department of Energy. The collider uses superconducting magnets, operating at 4{degrees}K in supercritical helium, which meets the definition of a pressure vessel. The ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code grants an exemption from impact testing to certain metals, but only for operating temperatures down to 20{degrees}K. Research and the latest change to ASTM Standard E23 have invalidated Charpy testing at 4{degrees}K, thus compliance with the Code is not possible. This effort was undertaken to identify the weld process and weld material necessary to comply with the intent of the Code (impact test) requirements, that is, to design a weld joint that will assure adequate fracture toughness. We will report the results of this development and testing, and conclude that nitrogen and maganese enhanced 385L provides a superior weld metal for 4{degrees}K cryogenic applications without the exaggerated purity concerns normally associated with superaustenitic weld materials. This development has been so successful that BNL has procured 15,000 pounds of this material for magnet production. Oxygen content, manifested as inclusion density, has the single most significant effect upon fracture toughness and impact strength. Finally, we report that GMAW is a viable welding process, using off-the-shelf equipment, for 4{degrees}K cryogenic applications.

  13. Higher-degree linear approximations of nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karahan, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, the author develops a new method for obtaining higher degree linear approximations of nonlinear control systems. The standard approach in the analysis and synthesis of nonlinear systems is a first order approximation by a linear model. This is usually performed by obtaining a series expansion of the system at some nominal operating point and retaining only the first degree terms in the series. The accuracy of this approximation depends on how far the system moves away from the normal point, and on the relative magnitudes of the higher degree terms in the series expansion. The approximation is achieved by finding an appropriate nonlinear coordinate transformation-feedback pair to perform the higher degree linearization. With the proposed method, one can improve the accuracy of the approximation up to arbitrarily higher degrees, provided certain solvability conditions are satisfied. The Hunt-Su linearizability theorem makes these conditions precise. This approach is similar to Poincare's Normal Form Theorem in formulation, but different in its solution method. After some mathematical background the author derives a set of equations (called the Homological Equations). A solution to this system of linear equations is equivalent to the solution to the problem of approximate linearization. However, it is generally not possible to solve the system of equations exactly. He outlines a method for systematically finding approximate solutions to these equations using singular value decomposition, while minimizing an error with respect to some defined norm.

  14. B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and BELLE B-Factories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and ...

  15. Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal ...

  16. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein ...

  17. HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak This report describes how the HOPE ...

  18. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures Prev Next Title: Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge ...

  19. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  20. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  1. Solar Eclipse Monitoring for Solar Energy Applications Using the Solar and Moon Position Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2010-03-01

    This report includes a procedure for implementing an algorithm (described by Jean Meeus) to calculate the moon's zenith angle with uncertainty of +/-0.001 degrees and azimuth angle with uncertainty of +/-0.003 degrees. The step-by-step format presented here simplifies the complicated steps Meeus describes to calculate the Moon's position, and focuses on the Moon instead of the planets and stars. It also introduces some changes to accommodate for solar radiation applications.

  2. Scattering of particles with internal degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipushenko, S. V.; Tur, A. V.; Yanovsky, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    The scattering of particles with a small number of internal degrees of freedom is considered. Billiard formalism is used to study the scattering of two such structurally complex particles. The main scattering characteristics are found. Various types of scattering modes are revealed. In particular, a mode is detected when the velocity of motion of such particles away from each other is higher than their approach velocity before the collision. The scattering of such particles is shown to occur after a finite number of collisions. A generalized Newton law is proposed for the collision of particles with a small number of degrees of freedom, and the form of the effective coefficient of restitution is found.

  3. An acceleration of the characteristics by a space-angle two-level method using surface discontinuity factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, G.

    2006-07-01

    We present a non-linear space-angle two-level acceleration scheme for the method of the characteristics (MOC). To the fine level on which the MOC transport calculation is performed, we associate a more coarsely discretized phase space in which a low-order problem is solved as an acceleration step. Cross sections on the coarse level are obtained by a flux-volume homogenisation technique, which entails the non-linearity of the acceleration. Discontinuity factors per surface are introduced as additional degrees of freedom on the coarse level in order to ensure the equivalence of the heterogeneous and the homogenised problem. After each fine transport iteration, a low-order transport problem is iteratively solved on the homogenised grid. The solution of this problem is then used to correct the angular moments of the flux resulting from the previous free transport sweep. Numerical tests for a given benchmark have been performed. Results are discussed. (authors)

  4. Microsoft Word - VI_13_Degrees Awarded 2016.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE April 1, 2015 - March 31, 2016 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Paul Cammarata 2015 Ternary breaking of the reaction systems in heavy- ion collisions below the Fermi energy S.J. Yennello Senior Analyzer Sytem Engineer, Dow Chemical, Houston Texas Michael Simon Mehlman 2015 Development of TAMUTRAP beam line, RFQ, and ion traps for precision β-decay studies D. Melconian Scientist, Exponent

  5. ORISE: Nuclear engineering degrees at highest ranges since 1980s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows graduation, enrollment rates for nuclear engineering candidates are still at highest ranges reported since 1980s Report also shows shifts in career opportunities beyond graduation in nuclear utilities FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 2, 2011 FY12-04 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-After a one-year decline, the number of graduate and undergraduate nuclear engineering degrees earned in the United States bounced back in 2010. A recent report from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

  6. Grain boundary energy in 5 degrees of freedom space

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-21

    GB5DOF is a program written in MatLab for computing excess energy of an arbitrary grain boundary defined by its 5 geometrical degrees of freedom. The program is written in the form of a single self-contained function callable from within commercially available MatLab software package. The function takes a geometric description of the boundary and material identity as input parameters and returns the predicted boundary energy.

  7. Finite ballooning angle effects on ion temperature gradient driven mode in gyrokinetic flux tube simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar, E-mail: rameswar.singh@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Brunner, S. [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents effects of finite ballooning angles on linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode and associated heat and momentum flux in Gyrokinetic flux tube simulation GENE. It is found that zero ballooning angle is not always the one at which the linear growth rate is maximum. The ITG mode acquires a short wavelength (SW) branch (k{sub ?}?{sub i}?>?1) when growth rates maximized over all ballooning angles are considered. However, the SW branch disappears on reducing temperature gradient showing characteristics of zero ballooning angle SWITG in case of extremely high temperature gradient. Associated heat flux is even with respect to ballooning angle and maximizes at nonzero ballooning angle while the parallel momentum flux is odd with respect to the ballooning angle.

  8. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  9. Effect of MLC leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Sen; Li, Guangjun; Wang, Maojie; Jiang, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To compare dosimetric differences between the simulating plans and the clinical plans with evaluation parameters, 6 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected for simulation of systematic and random MLC leaf position errors, collimator rotation angle errors, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for systematic MLC leaf position errors in response to field size. When the systematic MLC position errors were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm, respectively, the maximum values of the mean dose deviation, observed in parotid glands, were 4.63%, 8.69%, and 18.32%, respectively. The dosimetric effect was comparatively small for systematic MLC shift errors. For random MLC errors up to 2 mm and collimator and gantry rotation angle errors up to 0.5°, the dosimetric effect was negligible. We suggest that quality control be regularly conducted for MLC leaves, so as to ensure that systematic MLC leaf position errors are within 0.5 mm. Because the dosimetric effect of 0.5° collimator and gantry rotation angle errors is negligible, it can be concluded that setting a proper threshold for allowed errors of collimator and gantry rotation angle may increase treatment efficacy and reduce treatment time.

  10. Open Heavy Flavor Production at Forward Angles in PHENIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Read Jr, Kenneth F; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the production of heavy quarks in heavy ion collisions can be used to probe the early stages of the created medium, study hot and cold nuclear matter effects, and test theoretical predictions concerning quark energy loss and initial-state effects. This is a current area of active research in the field and it is important to extend such measurements to the forward region. PHENIX can measure the production of open heavy flavor at forward angles with subsequent semi-leptonic decay of heavy flavor mesons into muons. We report the nuclear modification factor for the production of muon from heavy flavor decay in Cu+Cu collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV for three centrality intervals and compare to theoretical predictions concerning the suppression of heavy quark production which incorporate heavy quark energy loss and in-medium heavy meson disassociation. Additionally, we report the charm production cross section for p+p collisions at s = 200 GeV and compare results to Fixed Order plus Next-to-Leading Log predictions Research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  12. Ultrasonic estimation of the contact angle of a sessile droplet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintero, R.; Simonetti, F.

    2014-02-18

    Radiation of energy by large amplitude leaky Rayleigh waves is regarded as one of the key physical mechanisms regulating the actuation and manipulation of droplets in surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic devices. The interaction between a SAW and a droplet is highly complex and is presently the subject of extensive research. This paper investigates the existence of an additional interaction mechanism based on the propagation of quasi-Stoneley waves inside sessile droplets deposited on a solid substrate. In contrast with the leaky Rayleigh wave, the energy of the Stoneley wave is confined within a thin fluid layer in contact with the substrate. The hypothesis is confirmed by three-dimensional finite element simulations and ultrasonic scattering experiments measuring the reflection of Rayleigh waves from droplets of different diameters. Moreover, real-time monitoring of the droplet evaporation process reveals a clear correlation between the droplet contact angle and the spectral information of the reflected Rayleigh signal, thus paving the way for ultrasonic measurements of surface tension.

  13. Electron-impact excitation of the 6p7s {sup 3}P{sub 1} state of Pb atom at small scattering angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milisavljevic, S.; Rabasovic, M. S.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Pejcev, V.; Filipovic, D. M.; Sharma, Lalita; Srivastava, Rajesh; Stauffer, A. D.

    2007-05-15

    Electron-impact excitation of the 6p7s {sup 3}P{sub 1} state of Pb atom has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Differential cross sections (DCSs) were measured at incident electron energies of E{sub 0}=10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 eV and small scattering angles up to 10 degree sign using a crossed electron-atom beam technique. The forward scattering function method has been used for determination of the absolute generalized oscillator strengths and DCS values. Corresponding relativistic distorted wave calculations have been performed and compared with experimental results.

  14. Six Degrees-of-Freedom Prostate and Lung Tumor Motion Measurements Using Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy; Keall, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Tumor positional uncertainty has been identified as a major issue that deteriorates the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor rotational movement, which is not well understood, can result in significant geometric and dosimetric inaccuracies. The objective of this study was to measure 6 degrees-of-freedom (6 DoF) prostate and lung tumor motion, focusing on the more novel rotation, using kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM). Methods and Materials: Continuous kilovoltage (kV) projections of tumors with gold fiducial markers were acquired during radiation therapy for 267 fractions from 10 prostate cancer patients and immediately before or after radiation therapy for 50 fractions from 3 lung cancer patients. The 6 DoF motion measurements were determined from the individual 3-dimensional (3D) marker positions, after using methods to reject spurious and smooth noisy data, using an iterative closest point algorithm. Results: There were large variations in the magnitude of the tumor rotation among different fractions and patients. Various rotational patterns were observed. The average prostate rotation angles around the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were 1.0 ± 5.0°, 0.6 ± 3.3°, and 0.3 ± 2.0°, respectively. For 35% of the time, the prostate rotated more than 5° about the LR axis, indicating the need for intrafractional adaptation during radiation delivery. For lung patients, the average LR, SI, and AP rotation angles were 0.8 ± 4.2°, −0.8 ± 4.5°, and 1.7 ± 3.1°, respectively. For about 30% of the time, the lung tumors rotated more than 5° around the SI axis. Respiration-induced rotation was detected in 2 of the 3 lung patients. Conclusions: The prostate and lung tumors were found to undergo rotations of more than 5° for about a third of the time. The lung tumor data represent the first 6 DoF tumor motion measured by kV images. The 6 DoF KIM method can enable rotational and translational

  15. Elf well turns 90/degree/- and stays there

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astier, B.; Jourdan, A.; Baron, G.

    1981-01-01

    As part of an intensive research program, the French association IFP (Institut Francais du Petrole) and Elf-Aquitaine have drilled the first European horizontal hole. The well was spudded conventionally and then deviated so that its final path was horizontal, 2,198 ft (670 m) below the surface. More than 330 ft (100 m) were drilled between 89/degree/ and 92/degree/ of inclination. The project started with reservoir engineering studies aimed at demonstrating, on mathematical models, the effectiveness of a horizontal drain hole in areas where hydrocarbon recovery is poor or unsatisfactory, due to gas or water coning, poor flooding patterns, intersection of fractures in tight but fractured producing formations, or other causes. This technique has a number of potential applications both in and out of the oil industry. The well was drilled in 44 days. Horizontal displacement was 2,192 ft (668 m) with a total vertical depth of 2,198 ft (670 m). To accomplish this, it was necessary to drill 3,563 ft (1,086 m) of hole. In the 17/one-half/-in. hole, 73/4-in. drill collars and 5-in. heavy weight drill pipe were run above the bent sub and the monel collar. While reaming the hole, the drill string was rotated conventionally, one near bit and one stabilizer (30 ft above) being included in the string.

  16. Method and apparatus for controlling pitch and flap angles of a wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deering, Kenneth J.; Wohlwend, Keith P.

    2009-05-12

    A wind turbine with improved response to wind conditions is provided. Blade flap angle motion is accompanied by a change in pitch angle by an amount defining a pitch/flap coupling ratio. The coupling ratio is non-constant as a function of a flap angle and is preferably a substantially continuous, non-linear function of flap angle. The non-constant coupling ratio can be provided by mechanical systems such as a series of linkages or by configuring electronic or other control systems and/or angle sensors. A link with a movable proximal end advantageously is part of the mechanical system. The system can provide relatively large coupling ratios and relatively large rates of coupling ratio changes especially for near-feather pitches and low flap angles.

  17. Heavy metals in the near-surface aerosol over the Atlantic Ocean from 60 degree south to 54 degree north

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voelkening, J.; Heumann, K.G. )

    1990-11-20

    The particulate heavy metal concentrations of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Tl, and Pb were determined in the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean from 60{degree}S to 54{degree}N with the definitive method of isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Fe was used as a reference element for the influence of crustal material calculating the corresponding enrichment factors EF(Fe) for the other metal traces. Tl showed the lowest abundance of all heavy metals with concentrations of less than 20 pg m{sup {minus}3} for all samples except those from the area around the English Channel. The concentration ranges for the other elements were Cr = <0.08-9 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Fe = <2.6-7,500 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Ni = <0.05-10 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Cu = <0.02-20 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Zn = <0.09-450 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Cd = <0.003-3.5 ng m{sup {minus}3}, and Pb = <0.05-200 ng m{sup {minus}3}. The lowest element concentrations were usually measured in the remote areas of the South Atlantic, whereas the highest ones were detected around the English Channel. Due to high Fe concentrations, a substantial influence of crustal material was observed in the atmosphere southeast of the South American continent, in the South Atlantic area of the southeast trades, and over the North Atlantic west of North Africa. EF(Fe) values for the most part less than 10 for Cr and Ni and less than 50 for Cu indicate that the influence of crustal material for these metals is much higher than for Zn, Cd, and Pb where EF(Fe) values between 500 and 5,000 had often been determined. This is due to anthropogenic and biological influences.

  18. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  19. Structural analysis of flexible proteins in solution by SmallAngle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Structural analysis of flexible proteins in solution by SmallAngle X-ray ... Combining SAXS results with atomic resolution structures enables detailed ...

  20. SU-E-T-618: Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, X; Sun, T; Liu, T; Zhang, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plan with beam angle optimization. Methods: Ten post-operation patients with cervical cancer were included in this analysis. Two IMRT plans using seven beams were designed in each patient. A standard coplanar equi-space beam angles were used in the first plan (plan 1), whereas the selection of beam angle was optimized by beam angle optimization algorithm in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for the same number of beams in the second plan (plan 2). Two plans were designed for each patient with the same dose-volume constraints and prescription dose. All plans were normalized to the mean dose to PTV. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk and total MU were compared. Results: For conformity and homogeneity in PTV, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. For the mean dose in bladder, plan 2 were significantly lower than plan 1(p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between two plans for the mean doses in rectum, left and right femur heads. Compared with plan1, the average monitor units reduced 16% in plan 2. Conclusion: The IMRT plan based on beam angle optimization for cervical cancer could reduce the dose delivered to bladder and also reduce MU. Therefore there were some dosimetric advantages in the IMRT plan with beam angle optimization for cervical cancer.

  1. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  2. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  3. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  4. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  5. Raman spectroscopy measurement of bilayer graphene's twist angle to boron nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Bin; Wang, Peng; Pan, Cheng; Miao, Tengfei; Wu, Yong; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2015-07-20

    When graphene is placed on hexagonal boron nitride with a twist angle, new properties develop due to the resulting moiré superlattice. Here, we report a method using Raman spectroscopy to make rapid, non-destructive measurements of the twist angle between bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. The lattice orientation is determined by using flakes with both bilayer and monolayer regions, and using the known Raman signature for the monolayer to measure the twist angle of the entire flake. The widths of the second order Raman peaks are found to vary linearly in the superlattice period and are used to determine the twist angle. The results are confirmed by using transport measurements to infer the superlattice period by the charge density required to reach the secondary resistance peaks. Small twist angles are also found to produce a significant modification of the first order Raman G band peak.

  6. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  7. IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

    2008-09-02

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 15004500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera arrays sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

  8. PRECISE ANGLE MONITOR BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF PENCIL-BEAM INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    QIAN,S.; TAKACS,P.

    2000-07-30

    The precise angle monitoring is a very important metrology task for research, development and industrial applications. Autocollimator is one of the most powerful and widely applied instruments for small angle monitoring, which is based on the principle of geometric optics. In this paper the authors introduce a new precise angle monitoring system, Pencil-beam Angle Monitor (PAM), base on pencil beam interferometry. Its principle of operation is a combination of physical and geometrical optics. The angle calculation method is similar to the autocollimator. However, the autocollimator creates a cross image but the precise pencil-beam angle monitoring system produces an interference fringe on the focal plane. The advantages of the PAM are: high angular sensitivity, long-term stability character making angle monitoring over long time periods possible, high measurement accuracy in the order of sub-microradian, simultaneous measurement ability in two perpendicular directions or on two different objects, dynamic measurement possibility, insensitive to the vibration and air turbulence, automatic display, storage and analysis by use of the computer, small beam diameter making the alignment extremely easy and longer test distance. Some test examples are presented.

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Filter Photometer for Measuring the Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, S. M. Pirogov, and G. S. Golitsyn A. M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Science Moscow, Russia Description The operating prototype of an instrument has been developed and built up for measuring the scattered solar radiation and its polarization in the solar almucantar for azimuth angles A ranged from 0 to 170 degrees at different zenith angles Z. At A = 0 the direct

  10. Brief 71 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees, 2011 Summary (11-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Don Johnson

    2012-11-07

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2011. The enrollment and degree data include students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major. Twenty-four academic programs reported having health physics programs during 2011. The data for two health physics options within nuclear engineering programs are also included in the enrollments and degrees that are reported in the nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees data.

  11. ORISE: Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    undergraduates, declined for graduates Number of undergraduate health physics degrees dropped in 2015 to lowest level in more than a decade Despite number of bachelor's degrees decreasing, number of master's and doctorate degrees increased* FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 3, 2016 FY16-33.1 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of undergraduate students who graduated in 2015 with bachelor's degrees in health physics dropped to the lowest level in more than a decade, while the number of master's and

  12. ORISE: Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    undergraduates, declined for graduates Number of undergraduate health physics degrees dropped in 2015 to lowest level in more than a decade Despite number of bachelor's degrees decreasing, number of master's and doctorate degrees increased* FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 3, 2016 FY16-33.1 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of undergraduate students who graduated in 2015 with bachelor's degrees in health physics dropped to the lowest level in more than a decade, while the number of master's and

  13. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pumpXUV probe time- and angle-resolved ... from insulators (UOsub 2) and ultrafast pumpprobe processes in semiconductors (GaAs). ...

  14. Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System: The Effect of a Strong ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ...

  15. CORPES 11: International Workshop on Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoemission Spectroscopy CORPES 11: International Workshop on Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy July 18-22, 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California More information Attendees participated in a poster session Thursday on the ALS patio, engaging in conversations over lunch and at the posters. An international workshop entitled "Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy", or CORPES11 , was held at Berkeley Lab

  16. Tidal evolution of the spin-orbit angle in exoplanetary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Yuxin; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Fujii, Yuka; Masuda, Kento

    2014-03-20

    The angle between the stellar spin and the planetary orbit axes (the spin-orbit angle) is supposed to carry valuable information concerning the initial condition of planetary formation and subsequent migration history. Indeed, current observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect have revealed a wide range of spin-orbit misalignments for transiting exoplanets. We examine in detail the tidal evolution of a simple system comprising a Sun-like star and a hot Jupiter adopting the equilibrium tide and the inertial wave dissipation effects simultaneously. We find that the combined tidal model works as a very efficient realignment mechanism; it predicts three distinct states of the spin-orbit angle (i.e., parallel, polar, and antiparallel orbits) for a while, but the latter two states eventually approach the parallel spin-orbit configuration. The intermediate spin-orbit angles as measured in recent observations are difficult to obtain. Therefore the current model cannot reproduce the observed broad distribution of the spin-orbit angles, at least in its simple form. This indicates that the observed diversity of the spin-orbit angles may emerge from more complicated interactions with outer planets and/or may be the consequence of the primordial misalignment between the protoplanetary disk and the stellar spin, which requires future detailed studies.

  17. Berry phase and Hannays angle in the BornOppenheimer hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.D. [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)] [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yi, X.X. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Fu, L.B., E-mail: lbfu.iapcm@gmail.com [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the Berry phase and Hannays angle in the BornOppenheimer (BO) hybrid systems and obtain their algebraic expressions in terms of one form connection. The semiclassical relation of Berry phase and Hannays angle is discussed. We find that, besides the usual connection term, the Berry phase of quantum BO composite system also contains a novel term brought forth by the coupling induced effective gauge potential. This quantum modification can be viewed as an effective AharonovBohm effect. Moreover, the similar phenomenon is founded in Hannays angle of classical BO composite system, which indicates that the Berry phase and Hannays angle possess the same relation as the usual one. An example is used to illustrate our theory. This scheme can be used to generate artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms. Besides, the quantumclassical hybrid BO system is also studied to compare with the results in full quantum and full classical composite systems. -- Highlights: We have derived the Berry phase and Hannays angle in BO hybrid systems. The Berry phase contains a novel term brought by the effective gauge potential. This mechanism can be used to generate artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms. The relation between Hannays angles and Berry phases is established.

  18. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  19. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  20. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  1. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  2. Solar and Moon Position Algorithm (SAMPA) - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search Solar and Moon Position Algorithm (SAMPA) National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary This algorithm calculates the solar and lunar zenith and azimuth angles in the period from the year -2000 to 6000, with uncertainties of +/- 0.0003 degrees for the Sun and +/- 0.003 degrees for the Moon, based on the date, time, and location on Earth. Description The algorithm can be

  3. RE-EXAMINING SUNSPOT TILT ANGLE TO INCLUDE ANTI-HALE STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClintock, B. H.; Norton, A. A.; Li, J. E-mail: aanorton@stanford.edu

    2014-12-20

    Sunspot groups and bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) serve as an observational diagnostic of the solar cycle. We use Debrecen Photohelographic Data (DPD) from 1974-2014 that determined sunspot tilt angles from daily white light observations, and data provided by Li and Ulrich that determined sunspot magnetic tilt angle using Mount Wilson magnetograms from 1974-2012. The magnetograms allowed for BMR tilt angles that were anti-Hale in configuration, so tilt values ranged from 0 to 360° rather than the more common ±90°. We explore the visual representation of magnetic tilt angles on a traditional butterfly diagram by plotting the mean area-weighted latitude of umbral activity in each bipolar sunspot group, including tilt information. The large scatter of tilt angles over the course of a single cycle and hemisphere prevents Joy's law from being visually identified in the tilt-butterfly diagram without further binning. The average latitude of anti-Hale regions does not differ from the average latitude of all regions in both hemispheres. The distribution of anti-Hale sunspot tilt angles are broadly distributed between 0 and 360° with a weak preference for east-west alignment 180° from their expected Joy's law angle. The anti-Hale sunspots display a log-normal size distribution similar to that of all sunspots, indicating no preferred size for anti-Hale sunspots. We report that 8.4% ± 0.8% of all bipolar sunspot regions are misclassified as Hale in traditional catalogs. This percentage is slightly higher for groups within 5° of the equator due to the misalignment of the magnetic and heliographic equators.

  4. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  5. Multiaxial deformation of polyethylene and polyethylene/clay nanocomposites: In situ synchrotron small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurun, Bilge; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S.; Teoh, Chin Ching; Harkin-Jones, Eileen

    2013-01-10

    A unique in situ multiaxial deformation device has been designed and built specifically for simultaneous synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements. SAXS and WAXS patterns of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and HDPE/clay nanocomposites were measured in real time during in situ multiaxial deformation at room temperature and at 55 C. It was observed that the morphological evolution of polyethylene is affected by the existence of clay platelets as well as the deformation temperature and strain rate. Martensitic transformation of orthorhombic into monoclinic crystal phases was observed under strain in HDPE, which is delayed and hindered in the presence of clay nanoplatelets. From the SAXS measurements, it was observed that the thickness of the interlamellar amorphous region increased with increasing strain, which is due to elongation of the amorphous chains. The increase in amorphous layer thickness is slightly higher for the nanocomposites compared to the neat polymer.

  6. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°–85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  7. Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to radiation: Scalings of conversion efficiencies and propagation angles with temperature and magnetic field orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schleyer, F.; Cairns, Iver H.; Kim, E.-H.

    2013-03-15

    Linear mode conversion (LMC) is the linear transfer of energy from one wave mode to another in an inhomogeneous plasma. It is relevant to laboratory plasmas and multiple solar system radio emissions, such as continuum radiation from planetary magnetospheres and type II and III radio bursts from the solar corona and solar wind. This paper simulates LMC of waves defined by warm, magnetized fluid theory, specifically the conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to electromagnetic (EM) radiation. The primary focus is the calculation of the energy and power conversion efficiencies for LMC as functions of the angle of incidence {theta} of the Langmuir/z-mode wave, temperature {beta}=T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2}, adiabatic index {gamma}, and orientation angle {phi} between the ambient density gradient {nabla}N{sub 0} and ambient magnetic field B{sub 0} in a warm, unmagnetized plasma. The ratio of these efficiencies is found to agree well as a function of {theta}, {gamma}, and {beta} with an analytical relation that depends on the group speeds of the Langmuir/z and EM wave modes. The results demonstrate that the energy conversion efficiency {epsilon} is strongly dependent on {gamma}{beta}, {phi} and {theta}, with {epsilon}{proportional_to}({gamma}{beta}){sup 1/2} and {theta}{proportional_to}({gamma}{beta}){sup 1/2}. The power conversion efficiency {epsilon}{sub p}, on the other hand, is independent of {gamma}{beta} but does vary significantly with {theta} and {phi}. The efficiencies are shown to be maximum for approximately perpendicular density gradients ({phi} Almost-Equal-To 90 Degree-Sign ) and minimal for parallel orientation ({phi}=0 Degree-Sign ) and both the energy and power conversion efficiencies peak at the same {theta}.

  8. Movement of Fall Chinook Salmon Fry Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Approach Angles for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Blanton, S.L.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Daly, D.S.

    1996-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed tests to determine whether a significant difference in fish passage existed between a 6-ft screening facility built perpendicularly to canal flow and an identical screening facility with the screen mounted at a 45-degree angle to the approach channel. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fall chinook salmon fry were introduced into the test system, and their movements were monitored. A total of 14 tests (400 fish per test) that lasted 20 hours were completed during April and May, 1996. There was no significant difference in fish passage rate through the two approach configurations. Attraction flow to the bypass across the face of the screen was more evident for the angled approach, although this did not appear to play a significant role in attracting fish to the bypass. Approach velocities at the face of the screen did not exceed the 0.4 fps criteria for either approach configuration and posed not threat to fish. No fish passed over, around, or through the drum screen during any test.

  9. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  10. ORISE: Report by ORISE shows health physics degrees declined on all levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2014 Health physics degrees declined in 2014, enrollment trends reverse Enrollment data suggests slowly declining trends FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 25, 2015 FY15-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The total number of degrees awarded to students graduating with majors in health physics has declined across undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs for the first time in four years. The report conducted by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, titled Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees

  11. CHANGES IN POLARIZATION POSITION ANGLE ACROSS THE ECLIPSE IN THE DOUBLE PULSAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, R.; Manchester, R. N.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; Kramer, M.; Melrose, D. B.; Stairs, I. H.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the changes in polarization position angle in radiation from pulsar A around the eclipse in the Double Pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B at the 20 cm and 50 cm wavelengths using the Parkes 64 m telescope. The changes are {approx}2{sigma} during and shortly after the eclipse at 20 cm but less significant at 50 cm. We show that the changes in position angle during the eclipse can be modeled by differential synchrotron absorption in the eclipse regions. Position angle changes after the eclipse are interpreted as Faraday rotation in the magnetotail of pulsar B. Implied charge densities are consistent with the Goldreich-Julian density, suggesting that the particle energies in the magnetotail are mildly relativistic.

  12. Self-consistent inclusion of classical large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasma Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E. Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2015-10-15

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions allow for the exchange of a significant proportion of the energy of a particle in a single collision, but are not included in models of plasmas based on fluids, the Vlasov–Fokker–Planck equation, or currently available plasma Monte Carlo techniques. Their unique effects include the creation of fast ‘knock-on’ ions, which may be more likely to undergo certain reactions, and distortions to ion distribution functions relative to what is predicted by small-angle collision only theories. We present a computational method which uses Monte Carlo techniques to include the effects of large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas and which self-consistently evolves distribution functions according to the creation of knock-on ions of any generation. The method is used to demonstrate ion distribution function distortions in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) relevant scenario of the slowing of fusion products.

  13. LHC luminosity upgrade with large Piwinski angle scheme: a recent look

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; Zimmermann, f.; /CERN

    2011-09-01

    Luminosity upgrade at the LHC collider using longitudinally flat bunches in combination with the large crossing angle (large Piwinski angle scheme) is being studied with renewed interest in recent years. By design, the total beam-beam tune shift at the LHC is less than 0.015 for two interaction points together. But the 2010-11 3.5 TeV collider operation and dedicated studies indicated that the beam-beam tune shift is >0.015 per interaction point. In view of this development we have revisited the requirements for the Large Piwinski Angle scheme at the LHC. In this paper we present a new set of parameters and luminosity calculations for the desired upgrade by investigating: (1) current performance of the LHC injectors, (2) e-cloud issues on nearly flat bunches and (3) realistic beam particle distributions from longitudinal beam dynamics simulations. We also make some remarks on the needed upgrades on the LHC injector accelerators.

  14. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  15. Brief 72 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data (2-14)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-02-15

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. The enrollments and degrees data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2013, and data was received from all thirty-two programs. The data for two nuclear engineering programs include enrollments and degrees in health physics options that are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees data.

  16. ORISE: Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased for undergraduates, ... OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in health physics ...

  17. The solubility of hydrogen in plutonium in the temperature range 475 to 825 degrees centigrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen (H) in plutonium metal (Pu) was measured in the temperature range of 475 to 825{degree}C for unalloyed Pu (UA) and in the temperature range of 475 to 625{degree}C for Pu containing two-weight-percent gallium (TWP). For TWP metal, in the temperature range 475 to 600{degree}C, the saturated solution has a maximum hydrogen to plutonium ration (H/Pu) of 0.00998 and the standard enthalpy of formation ({Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)}) is (-0.128 {plus minus} 0.0123) kcal/mol. The phase boundary of the solid solution in equilibrium with plutonium dihydride (PuH{sub 2}) is temperature independent. In the temperature range 475 to 625{degree}C, UA metal has a maximum solubility at H/Pu = 0.011. The phase boundary between the solid solution region and the metal+PuH{sub 2} two-phase region is temperature dependent. The solubility of hydrogen in UA metal was also measured in the temperature range 650 to 825{degree}C with {Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)} = (-0.104 {plus minus} 0.0143) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{degree}{sub f(s)} = 0. The phase boundary is temperature dependent and the maximum hydrogen solubility has H/Pu = 0.0674 at 825{degree}C. 52 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. 10a- Azimuthal modesNEW.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and not in lab expts. ILLUSTRATION IN LAB EXPERIMENTS * DAWSON Experiment (Cambridge 2011) 3 Fluctuating heat release 4 5 Ecole Centrale Experiment 20132014...

  19. Relativistic kinetic theory of pitch angle scattering, slowing down, and energy deposition in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.M.

    2004-10-01

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron population in a Lorentzian plasma are investigated and analyzed within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing both slowing down and pitch angle scattering is derived, analyzed, and solved. The analytical Green function is used to express the electron range, the range straggling, and the mean radial dispersion as a function of the plasma parameters. Compared to standard slowing down theories, the inclusion of the pitch angle scattering without any Gaussian approximation appears to be essential to calculate these quantities.

  20. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  1. Ni.sub.3 Al-based intermetallic alloys having improved strength above 850.degree. C.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.

    2000-01-01

    Intermetallic alloys composed essentially of: 15.5% to 17.0% Al, 3.5% to 5.5% Mo, 4% to 8% Cr, 0.04% to 0.2% Zr, 0.04% to 1.5% B, balance Ni, are characterized by melting points above 1200.degree. C. and superior strengths at temperatures above 1000.degree. C.

  2. Method for determination of the degree of compensation for electrically active impurities in multivalley semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranskii, P. I.; Gaidar, G. P.

    2013-06-15

    A method for determination of the degree of compensation k = N{sub a}/N{sub d} for shallow impurities in n-Si crystals with a nondegenerate electron gas is suggested. Data facilitating practical determination of the degree of compensation are given.

  3. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  4. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of a-Si:H and a-Si:D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, D. L.; Marr, D. W. M.; Nelson, B. P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Yang, J.; Yan, B.; Guha, S.

    2000-01-01

    The heterogeneity of hydrogen and deuterium on the nanometer scale has been probed by samll-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a-Si:H and a-Si:D films. Films were depsoited by two techniques, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) using conditions that yield high quality films and devices.

  5. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  6. Stochastic Inversion of Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Angle Data (Stinv-AVA)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-03

    The software was developed to invert seismic amplitude-versus-angle (AVA) data using a Bayesian framework. The posterior probability distribution function is sampled by effective Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. The software could provide not only estimates of unknown variables but also varieties of information about uncertainty, such as the mean, mode, median, variance, and even probability density of each unknown.

  7. Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine on the Intermediate Valence of Yb in (C5Me5)2 Yb(3,3'-Me2-bipy) The synthesis and X-ray crystal structures of ...

  8. Small-Angle and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS/USANS) Study of New Albany Shale: A Treatise on Microporosity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Radlinski, Andrzej P.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2014-12-17

    We applied small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques to study the microstructure of several New Albany shales of different maturity. It has been established that the total porosity decreases with maturity and increases somewhat for post-mature samples. A new method of SANS data analysis was developed, which allows the extraction of information about the size range and number density of micropores from the relatively flat scattering intensity observed in the limit of the large scattering vector Q. Macropores and significant number of mesopores are surface fractals, and their structure can be described in terms of themore » polydisperse spheres (PDSP) model. The model-independent Porod invariant method was employed to estimate total porosity, and the results were compared with the PDSP model results. It has been demonstrated that independent evaluation of incoherent background is crucial for accurate interpretation of the scattering data in the limit of large Q-values. Moreover, pore volumes estimated by the N2 and CO2 adsorption, as well as via the mercury intrusion technique, have been compared with those measured by SANS/USANS, and possible reasons for the observed discrepancies are discussed.« less

  9. Multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical interface to a computer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  10. Effect of deacetylation degree in chitosan composite membranes on pervaporation performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.M.; Park, H.B.; Nam, S.Y.; Won, J.M.; Kim, H.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of the degree of deacetylation in chitosan composite membranes on their pervaporation performance for ethanol dehydration was investigated. The degree of deacetylation of chitosans was measured by using an infrared spectroscopic method and elemental analysis. The chitosan composite membranes were prepared by coating a chitosan solution onto a microporous polyethersulfone membrane with 3--7 nm pore sizes. Then the surface of the top layer (chitosan) of well-dried membranes was crosslinked with sulfuric acid, and pervaporation experiments for binary mixtures (water-ethanol) were carried out at various conditions. In the case of a chitosan membrane with a high degree of deacetylation, the flux increases while the separation factor decreases compared with membranes with a low degree of deacetylation.