National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for azimuth angle degrees

  1. Azimuthal angle dependence of dijet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2008-08-01

    We study the azimuthal angular dependence of back-to-back dijet production in unpolarized hadron scattering H{sub A}+H{sub B}{yields}J{sub 1}+J{sub 2}+X, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that when the dijet is of two identical quarks (J{sub q}+J{sub q}) or a quark-antiquark pair (J{sub q}+J{sub q}), there is a cos{delta}{phi} angular dependence of the dijet, with {delta}{phi}={phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2}, and {phi}{sub 1} and {phi}{sub 2} are the azimuthal angles of the two individual jets. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross section, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos{delta}{phi} asymmetry of dijet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the angular dependence of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  2. Azimuthal angle dependence of di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-08-04

    We study the azimuthal asymmetry of back-to-back di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that there is a cos {delta}{phi} angular dependence of the di-jet, with {delta}{phi} the difference of the azimuthal angle of tow jets respectively. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross-section due to the multiple initial-/final-state interactions, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos {delta}{phi} asymmetry of the total di-jet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the azimuthal asymmetric cross section of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  3. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  5. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  6. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  7. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  8. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  9. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  10. Measurement of the azimuthal angle distribution of leptons from W boson decays as a function of the W transverse momentum in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-04-01

    We present the first measurement of the A{sub 2} and A{sub 3} angular coefficients of the W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions. We study W {yields} ev{sub e} and W {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}} candidate events produced in association with at least one jet at CDF, during Run Ia and Run Ib of the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The corresponding integrated luminosity was 110 pb{sup -1}. The jet balances the transverse momentum of the W and introduces QCD effects in W boson production. The extraction of the angular coefficients is achieved through the direct measurement of the azimuthal angle of the charged lepton in the Collins-Soper rest-frame of the W boson. The angular coefficients are measured as a function of the transverse momentum of the W boson. The electron, muon, and combined results are in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, up to order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2} in QCD.

  11. Process and apparatus for measuring degree of polarization and angle of major axis of polarized beam of light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, Derek E.; Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process are disclosed for calibrating measurements of the phase of the polarization of a polarized beam and the angle of the polarized optical beam's major axis of polarization at a diagnostic point with measurements of the same parameters at a point of interest along the polarized beam path prior to the diagnostic point. The process is carried out by measuring the phase angle of the polarization of the beam and angle of the major axis at the point of interest, using a rotatable polarizer and a detector, and then measuring these parameters again at a diagnostic point where a compensation apparatus, including a partial polarizer, which may comprise a stack of glass plates, is disposed normal to the beam path between a rotatable polarizer and a detector. The partial polarizer is then rotated both normal to the beam path and around the axis of the beam path until the detected phase of the beam polarization equals the phase measured at the point of interest. The rotatable polarizer at the diagnostic point may then be rotated manually to determine the angle of the major axis of the beam and this is compared with the measured angle of the major axis of the beam at the point of interest during calibration. Thereafter, changes in the polarization phase, and in the angle of the major axis, at the point of interest can be monitored by measuring the changes in these same parameters at the diagnostic point.

  12. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  13. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  14. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam ontomore » the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.« less

  15. Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using azimuthal angular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using azimuthal angular dependence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using ...

  16. Survival rate of initial azimuthal anisotropy in a multiphase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Survival rate of initial azimuthal anisotropy in a multiphase transport model Authors: Zhang, Liang ; Liu, Feng ; Wang, Fuqiang Publication Date: 2015-11-16 OSTI Identifier: ...

  17. Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant source of azimuthal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant source of azimuthal anisotropy in transport models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant ...

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  19. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  1. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  2. Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using azimuthal angular

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dependence (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using azimuthal angular dependence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Randall-Sundrum graviton spin determination using azimuthal angular dependence Authors: Murayama, Hitoshi ; Rentala, Vikram Publication Date: 2012-05-09 OSTI Identifier: 1098902 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 9; Journal

  3. Azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of the surface detector signals of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-04-07

    The azimuthal asymmetry in the risetime of signals in Auger surface detector stations is a source of information on shower development. The azimuthal asymmetry is due to a combination of the longitudinal evolution of the shower and geometrical effects related to the angles of incidence of the particles into the detectors. The magnitude of the effect depends upon the zenith angle and state of development of the shower and thus provides a novel observable, (secθ)max, sensitive to the mass composition of cosmic rays above 3 x 1018 eV. By comparing measurements with predictions from shower simulations, we find for bothmore » of our adopted models of hadronic physics (QGSJETII-04 and EPOS-LHC) an indication that the mean cosmic-ray mass increases slowly with energy, as has been inferred from other studies. However, the mass estimates are dependent on the shower model and on the range of distance from the shower core selected. Furthermore, the method has uncovered further deficiencies in our understanding of shower modelling that must be resolved before the mass composition can be inferred from (secθ)max.« less

  4. Simulation-guided optimization of small-angle analyzer geometry in the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuttke, Joachim; Zamponi, Michaela [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The resolution of neutron backscattering spectrometers deteriorates at small scattering angles where analyzers deviate from exact backscattering. By reducing the azimuth angle range of the analyzers, the resolution can be improved with little loss of peak intensity. Measurements at the spectrometer SPHERES are in excellent agreement with simulations, which proves the dominance of geometric effects.

  5. ANGLE Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ANGLE Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: ANGLE Plc Place: United Kingdom Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Quoted company ) References: ANGLE Plc1...

  6. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  7. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  8. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  9. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  10. Elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN})?=?2.76 TeV measured with ALICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALICE Collaboration, Denise Moreira de Godoy for the

    2014-11-11

    In this paper, we present the ALICE results on the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in 20-40% central Pb-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN})?=?2.76 TeV. Heavy quarks are produced in the early stages of the collision and they interact with the hot and dense color-deconfined medium created in heavy-ion collisions at high energies, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Measurements of the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavour decay electrons in non-central collisions can be used to investigate the degree of thermalization and energy loss of heavy quarks within the QGP. Theoretical predictions of heavy-quark transport in the medium are compared with the measurement.

  11. Centrality dependence of dihadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements from the CMS experiment at the LHC of dihadron correlations for charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV are presented. The results are reported as a function of the particle transverse momenta (pt) and collision centrality over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity [Delta(eta)] and the full range of relative azimuthal angle [Delta(phi)]. The observed two-dimensional correlation structure in Delta(eta) and Delta(phi) is characterised by a narrow peak at (Delta(eta), Delta(phi)) approximately (0, 0) from jet-like correlations and a long-range structure that persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. An enhancement of the magnitude of the short-range jet peak is observed with increasing centrality, especially for particles of pt around 1-2 GeV/c. The long-range azimuthal dihadron correlations are extensively studied using a Fourier decomposition analysis. The extracted Fourier coefficients are found to factorise into a product of single-particle azimuthal anisotropies up to pt approximately 3-3.5 GeV/c for at least one particle from each pair, except for the second-order harmonics in the most central PbPb events. Various orders of the single-particle azimuthal anisotropy harmonics are extracted for associated particle pt of 1-3 GeV/c, as a function of the trigger particle pt up to 20 GeV/c and over the full centrality range.

  12. Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --- Inventor(s)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Martin E. Griswold, C. Leland Ellison, Yevgeny Raitses and Nathaniel J. Fisch | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Feedback Control of Azimuthal Oscillations in ExB Devices --- Inventor(s) Martin E. Griswold, C. Leland Ellison, Yevgeny Raitses and Nathaniel J. Fisch Disclosed is a new device and process for controlling azimuthal oscillations in Hall thrusters and other ExB devices. This allows for control over electron transport across the magnetic field including improving Hall thruster

  13. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. The results are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. The dijet azimuthal distributions are found to be sensitive to initial-state gluon radiation.

  14. Measurements of bottom anti-bottom azimuthal production correlations in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2004-12-01

    The authors have measured the azimuthal angular correlation of b{bar b} production, using 86.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during 1994-1995. In high-energy p{bar p} collisions, such as at the Tevatron, b{bar b} production can be schematically categorized into three mechanisms. The leading-order (LO) process is ''flavor creation'', where both b and {bar b} quarks substantially participate in the hard scattering and result in a distinct back-to-back signal in final state. The ''flavor excitation'' and the ''gluon splitting'' processes, which appear at next-leading-order (NLO), are known to make a comparable contribution to total b{bar b} cross section, while providing very different opening angle distributions from the LO process. An azimuthal opening angle between bottom and anti-bottom, {Delta}{phi}, has been used for the correlation measurement to probe the interaction creating b{bar b} pairs. The {Delta}{phi} distribution has been obtained from two different methods. one method measures the {Delta}{phi} between bottom hadrons using events with two reconstructed secondary vertex tags. The other method uses b{bar b} {yields} (J/{psi}X)({ell}X') events, where the charged lepton ({ell}) is an electron (e) or a muon ({mu}), to measure {Delta}{phi} between bottom quarks. The b{bar b} purity is determined as a function of {Delta}{phi} by fitting the decay length of the J/{psi} and the impact parameter of the {ell}. Both methods quantify the contribution from higher-order production mechanisms by the fraction of the b{bar b} pairs produced in the same azimuthal hemisphere, f{sub toward}. The measured f{sub toward} values are consistent with both parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO QCD predictions.

  15. Measurements of jet vetoes and azimuthal decorrelations in dijet events produced in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-31

    In addition jet activity in dijet events is measured using pp collisions at ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, for jets reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with radius parameter R=0.6. This is done using variables such as the fraction of dijet events without an additional jet in the rapidity interval bounded by the dijet subsystem and correlations between the azimuthal angles of the dijet s. They are presented, both with and without a veto on additional jet activity in the rapidity interval, as a function of the scalar average of the transverse momenta of the dijet s and of the rapidity interval size. The double differential dijet cross section is also measured as a function of the interval size and the azimuthal angle between the dijet s. These variables probe differences in the approach to resummation of large logarithms when performing QCD calculations. The data are compared to POWERHEG, interfaced to the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG parton shower generators, as well as to HEJ with and without interfacing it to the ARIADNE parton shower generator. None of the theoretical predictions agree with the data across the full phase-space considered; however, POWERHEG+PYTHIA 8 and HEJ+ARIADNE are found to provide the best agreement with the data. These measurements use the full data sample collected with the ATLAS detector in 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 36.1pb–1 and 4.5fb–1 for data collected during 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  16. Measurements of jet vetoes and azimuthal decorrelations in dijet events produced in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-31

    In addition jet activity in dijet events is measured using pp collisions at ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, for jets reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with radius parameter R=0.6. This is done using variables such as the fraction of dijet events without an additional jet in the rapidity interval bounded by the dijet subsystem and correlations between the azimuthal angles of the dijet s. They are presented, both with and without a veto on additional jet activity in the rapidity interval, as a function of the scalar average of the transverse momenta of the dijet s and ofmore » the rapidity interval size. The double differential dijet cross section is also measured as a function of the interval size and the azimuthal angle between the dijet s. These variables probe differences in the approach to resummation of large logarithms when performing QCD calculations. The data are compared to POWERHEG, interfaced to the PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG parton shower generators, as well as to HEJ with and without interfacing it to the ARIADNE parton shower generator. None of the theoretical predictions agree with the data across the full phase-space considered; however, POWERHEG+PYTHIA 8 and HEJ+ARIADNE are found to provide the best agreement with the data. These measurements use the full data sample collected with the ATLAS detector in 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 36.1pb–1 and 4.5fb–1 for data collected during 2010 and 2011, respectively.« less

  17. Six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, L.F.X.

    1999-05-11

    A six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus is comprised of a geometry of six independent angle connectors. Each angle connector connects two fixed length rods to a pivot on one of two opposing platforms. The combination of an angle connector, at least two pivots and at least two rods having free ends connected to the pivots comprises a leg assembly. The spatial location of the upper platform is changed in relation to the lower platform by angular changes within each angle connector. This angular change results in degrees of motion within the apparatus defined as X, Y, Z, Tip, Tilt, and Rotation, or a combination of the above. This invention is known as a ROTOPOD. 9 figs.

  18. Six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F. X.

    1999-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom multi-axes positioning apparatus is comprised of a geometry of six independent angle connectors. Each angle connector connects two fixed length rods to a pivot on one of two opposing platforms. The combination of an angle connector, at least two pivots and at least two rods having free ends connected to the pivots comprises a leg assembly. The spatial location of the upper platform is changed in relation to the lower platform by angular changes within each angle connector. This angular change results in degrees of motion within the apparatus defined as X, Y, Z, Tip, Tilt, and Rotation, or a combination of the above. This invention is known as a ROTOPOD.

  19. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. I. Local analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2014-04-15

    Results based on a local linear stability analysis of the Hall thruster discharge are presented. A one-dimensional azimuthal framework is used including three species: neutrals, singly charged ions, and electrons. A simplified linear model is developed with the aim of deriving analytical expressions to characterize the stability of the ionization region. The results from the local analysis presented here indicate the existence of an instability that gives rise to an azimuthal oscillation in the +E??B direction with a long wavelength. According to the model, the instability seems to appear only in regions where the ionization and the electric field make it possible to have positive gradients of plasma density and ion velocity at the same time. A more complex model is also solved numerically to validate the analytical results. Additionally, parametric variations are carried out with respect to the main parameters of the model to identify the trends of the instability. As the temperature increases and the neutral-to-plasma density ratio decreases, the growth rate of the instability decreases down to a limit where azimuthal perturbations are no longer unstable.

  20. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  1. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  2. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries of the unpolarized cross section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, Francesca [INFN and Universita degli studi di Ferrara (Italy); Lamb, Rebecca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-08-04

    A multi-dimensional (x, y, z, P{sub hperpendicular}) extraction of cos {phi}{sub h} and cos 2{phi}{sub h} azimuthal asymmetries of unpolarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERMES is discussed. The use of data taken with hydrogen and deuterium targets and the separation of positive and negative hadrons allow to access flavor-dependent information about quark intrinsic transverse momenta and spin-orbit correlations. This flavor sensitivity allows for a discrimination between theoretical models in the HERMES kinematic regime.

  3. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  4. Measurement of long-range pseudorapidity correlations and azimuthal harmonics in sNN=5.02  TeV proton-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-09

    We present measurements of two-particle correlation functions and the first five azimuthal harmonics, v1 to v5, using 28 nb₋1 of p+Pb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of √sNN =5.02 TeV measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Significant long-range “ridgelike” correlations are observed for pairs with small relative azimuthal angle (|ΔΦ|<π/3) and back-to-back pairs (|ΔΦ|>2π/3) over the transverse momentum range 0.4T<12 GeV and in different intervals of event activity. The event activity is defined by either the number of reconstructed tracks or the total transverse energy on the Pb-fragmentation side. The azimuthal structure of such long-range correlations ismore » Fourier decomposed to obtain the harmonics vn as a function of pT and event activity. The extracted vn values for n = 2 to 5 decrease with n. The v2 and v3 values are found to be positive in the measured pT range. The v1 is also measured as a function of pT and is observed to change sign around pT ≈ 1.5–2.0 GeV and then increase to about 0.1 for pT>4 GeV. The v2(pT), v3(pT), and v4(pT) are compared to the vn coefficients in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with similar event multiplicities. Reasonable agreement is observed after accounting for the difference in the average pT of particles produced in the two collision systems.« less

  5. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of negative pions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chkhaidze, L. V. Djobava, T. D.; Kharkhelauri, L. L.; Kladnitskaya, E. N.

    2012-07-15

    Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of {pi}{sup -} mesons have been studied in dC, HeC, CC, CNe, MgMg, (d, He)Ta, CCu, CTa, and OPb collisions at momentum of 4.2, 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon within the standard transverse momentum analysis method of P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec. The data were obtained by SKM-200-GIBS and Propane Bubble Chamber Collaborations of JINR. The axis has been selected in the phase space and with respect to this axis {pi}{sup -} meson correlations were observed. The values of the coefficient of the correlations linearly depend on the mass numbers of projectile (A{sub P}) and target (A{sub T}) nuclei. The Quark-Gluon String Model satisfactorily describes the experimental results.

  6. Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor Figure 3: Ratio of MWR TCWV to radiosonde derived TCWV, and the solar zenith angle at the radiosonde launch time (black dots). The dry bias observed in sonde TCWV values is mainly attributable to a dry RH bias near the surface The red dots show the 1000 hPa RH correction factors suggested by Voemel et al for sondes launched near noon (10-30 degree solar zenith angle), and at night time (90 degree zenith

  7. Mira, another angle | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mira, another angle Download original image « Back to galleryItem 2

  8. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  9. Long-range azimuthal correlations in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ? = 1.5 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. 3-D moveout inversion in azimuthally anisotropic media with lateral velocity variation: Theory and a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.

    1999-08-01

    Reflection moveout recorded over an azimuthally anisotropic medium (e.g., caused by vertical or dipping fractures) varies with the azimuth of the source-receiver line. Normal-moveout (NMO) velocity, responsible for the reflection traveltimes on conventional-length spreads, forms an elliptical curve in the horizontal plane. While this result remains valid in the presence of arbitrary anisotropy and heterogeneity, the inversion of the NMO ellipse for the medium parameters has been discussed so far only for horizontally homogeneous models above a horizontal or dipping reflector. Here, the authors develop an analytic moveout correction for weak lateral velocity variation in horizontally layered azimuthally anisotropic media. The correction term is proportional to the curvature of the zero-offset travel-time surface at the common midpoint and, therefore, can be estimated from surface seismic data. After the influence of lateral velocity variation on the effective NMO ellipses has been stripped, the generalized Dix equation can be used to compute the interval ellipses and evaluate the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy (measured by P-wave NMO velocity) within the layer of interest. This methodology was applied to a 3-D wide-azimuth data set acquired over a fractured reservoir in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. The processing sequence included 3-D semblance analysis (based on the elliptical NMO equation) for a grid of common-midpoint supergathers, spatial smoothing of the effective NMO ellipses and zero-offset traveltimes, correction for lateral velocity variation, and generalized Dix differentiation. The estimates of depth-varying fracture trends in the survey area, based on the interval P-wave NMO ellipses, are in good agreement with the results of outcrop and borehole measurements and the rotational analysis of four component S-wave data.

  11. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  12. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of σ = 1.5 – 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ?=1.53 mb?=1.53 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  15. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  16. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, Arthur; Ivanov, Kostadin; Arramova, Maria; Hales, Jason

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  17. Propulsive performance of a finite-temperature plasma flow in a magnetic nozzle with applied azimuthal current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrario, Lorenzo; Little, Justin M. Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2014-11-15

    The plasma flow in a finite-electron-temperature magnetic nozzle, under the influence of an applied azimuthal current at the throat, is modeled analytically to assess its propulsive performance. A correction to the nozzle throat boundary conditions is derived by modifying the radial equilibrium of a magnetized infinite two-population cylindrical plasma column with the insertion of an external azimuthal body force for the electrons. Inclusion of finite-temperature effects, which leads to a modification of the radial density profile, is necessary for calculating the propulsive performance, which is represented by nozzle divergence efficiency and thrust coefficient. The solutions show that the application of the azimuthal current enhances all the calculated performance parameters through the narrowing of the radial density profile at the throat, and that investing power in this beam focusing effect is more effective than using the same power to pre-heat the electrons. The results open the possibility for the design of a focusing stage between the plasma source and the nozzle that can significantly enhance the propulsive performance of electron-driven magnetic nozzles.

  18. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Majors, Paul D.

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  19. Large-angle elastic and inelastic scattering of Pi(+) and Pi(-) from (28)Si and (40)Ca. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snell, M.P.

    1989-05-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for Pi(+) and Pi(-) elastic scattering of Calcium 40 and Silicon 28 at incident pion energies ranging from 100 to 260 MeV at a scattering angle of 175 degs. Differential cross sections were also measured for Pi(+) and Pi(-) inelastic scattering to the 2(+), 1.78 MeV, 4(+), 4.62 MeV, and 3(-) 6.88 MeV states of 28Si at incident pion energies of 130, 180, and 226 MeV and scattering angles between 115 and 175{degrees} in 6{degrees} increments. The data are compared to previously obtained forward angle data through 120{degrees} and agree quite well. The data show a generally flat angular dependence for angles greater than 100{degrees}. Several theoretical codes are reviewed for their ability to predict large angle scattering. Coordinate-space and momentum-space models generally thought to be sufficient for predicting forward angle scattering have proved to be inappropriate for use at large angles. A new phenomenological delta-hole model, currently under modification, shows a greatly enhanced ability to predict scattering at back angles.

  20. Observation of long-range elliptic azimuthal anisotropies in √s = 13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2016-04-27

    In this study, ATLAS has measured two-particle correlations as a function of the relative azimuthal angle, ΔΦ, and pseudorapidity, Δη, in √s = 13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions at the LHC using charged particles measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η|<2.5. The correlation functions evaluated in different intervals of measured charged-particle multiplicity show a multiplicity-dependent enhancement at ΔΦ~0 that extends over a wide range of Δη, which has been referred to as the “ridge.” Per-trigger-particle yields, Y(ΔΦ), are measured over 2<|Δη|<5. For both collision energies, the Y(ΔΦ) distribution in all multiplicity intervals is found to be consistent with a linearmore » combination of the per-trigger-particle yields measured in collisions with less than 20 reconstructed tracks, and a constant combinatoric contribution modulated by cos(2ΔΦ). The fitted Fourier coefficient, v2,2, exhibits factorization, suggesting that the ridge results from per-event cos(2Φ) modulation of the single-particle distribution with Fourier coefficients v2. The v2 values are presented as a function of multiplicity and transverse momentum. They are found to be approximately constant as a function of multiplicity and to have a pT dependence similar to that measured in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions. The v2 values in the 13 and 2.76 TeV data are consistent within uncertainties. These results suggest that the ridge in pp collisions arises from the same or similar underlying physics as observed in p+Pb collisions, and that the dynamics responsible for the ridge has no strong √s dependence.« less

  1. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  2. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  3. Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of transuranic materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated experimental setup for...

  4. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  5. Transient stability enhancement of electric power generating systems by 120-degree phase rotation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cresap, Richard L.; Taylor, Carson W.; Kreipe, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A method and system for enhancing the transient stability of an intertied three-phase electric power generating system. A set of power exporting generators (10) is connected to a set of power importing generators (20). When a transient cannot be controlled by conventional stability controls, and imminent loss of synchronism is detected (such as when the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets exceeds a predetermined value, such as 150 degrees), the intertie is disconnected by circuit breakers. Then a switch (30) having a 120-degree phase rotation, or a circuit breaker having a 120-degree phase rotation is placed in the intertie. The intertie is then reconnected. This results in a 120-degree reduction in the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets, making the system more stable and allowing more time for the conventional controls to stabilize the transient.

  6. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  7. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  8. A segmented multi-loop antenna for selective excitation of azimuthal mode number in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Motomura, T.

    2014-09-15

    A flat type, segmented multi-loop antenna was developed in the Tokai Helicon Device, built for producing high-density helicon plasma, with a diameter of 20 cm and an axial length of 100 cm. This antenna, composed of azimuthally splitting segments located on four different radial positions, i.e., r = 2.8, 4.8, 6.8, and 8.8 cm, can excite the azimuthal mode number m of 0, 1, and 2 by a proper choice of antenna feeder parts just on the rear side of the antenna. Power dependencies of the electron density n{sub e} were investigated with a radio frequency (rf) power less than 3 kW (excitation frequency ranged from 8 to 20 MHz) by the use of various types of antenna segments, and n{sub e} up to ?5 10{sup 12} cm{sup ?3} was obtained after the density jump from inductively coupled plasma to helicon discharges. Radial density profiles of m = 0 and 1 modes with low and high rf powers were measured. For the cases of these modes after the density jump, the excited mode structures derived from the magnetic probe measurements were consistent with those expected from theory on helicon waves excited in the plasma.

  9. Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy in hydrodynamics with statistical hadronization from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisiel, Adam; Broniowski, Wojciech; Florkowski, Wojciech; Chojnacki, Mikolaj

    2009-01-15

    Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy for heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is explored within the approach consisting of the hydrodynamics of perfect fluid followed by statistical hadronization. It is found that for the RHIC initial conditions, employing the Gaussian shape of the initial energy density, the very same framework that reproduces the standard soft observables [including the transverse-momentum spectra, the elliptic flow, and the azimuthally averaged Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii] leads to a proper description of the azimuthally sensitive femtoscopic observables; we find that the azimuthal variation of the side and out HBT radii as well as out-side cross term are very well reproduced for all centralities. Concerning the dependence of the femtoscopic parameters on k{sub T} we find that it is very well reproduced. The model is then extrapolated to the LHC energy. We predict the overall moderate growth of the HBT radii and the decrease of their azimuthal oscillations. Such effects are naturally caused by longer evolution times. In addition, we discuss in detail the space-time patterns of particle emission. We show that they are quite complex and argue that the overall shape seen by the femtoscopic methods cannot be easily disentangled on the basis of simple-minded arguments.

  10. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c the dielectron v? measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from ??,?,?, and ? decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c, the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc contributions.

  11. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  12. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  13. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in themore » $$E\\gt 8$$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $$r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$$, that has a chance probability $$P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.« less

  14. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in the $E\\gt 8$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$, that has a chance probability $P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.

  15. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  16. Azimuthal correlations of projectile and target fragments in collisions between gold nuclei of energy 10.6 GeV per nucleon and emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdurakhmanov, U. U.; Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. Sh. Chudakov, V. M.

    2008-03-15

    Intra-and intergroup azimuthal correlations of projectile and target fragments are found in collisions between gold and emulsion nuclei. The statistical significance of these correlations is high. The methodological distortions associated with the measurement errors are investigated in detail and are taken into account.

  17. Mira, an angle shot | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an angle shot Download original image « Back to galleryItem 1 of 9Next

  18. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Wind, Robert A.

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  19. Solar concentrator with restricted exit angles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabl, Arnulf; Winston, Roland

    1978-12-19

    A device is provided for the collection and concentration of radiant energy and includes at least one reflective side wall. The wall directs incident radiant energy to the exit aperture thereof or onto the surface of energy absorber positioned at the exit aperture so that the angle of incidence of radiant energy at the exit aperture or on the surface of the energy absorber is restricted to desired values.

  20. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  1. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  2. Pair Creation at Large Inherent Angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T.; Schroeder, D.V.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    In the next-generation linear colliders, the low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs created during the collision of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} beams would cause potential deleterious background problems to the detectors. At low collider energies, the pairs are made essentially by the incoherent process, where the pair is created by the interaction of beamstrahlung photons on the individual particles in the oncoming beam. This problem was first identified by Zolotarev, et al[1]. At energies where the beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon} lies approximately in the range 0.6 {approx}< {Upsilon} {approx}< 100, pair creation from the beamstrahlung photons is dominated by a coherent process, first noted by Chen[2]. The seriousness of this pair creation problem lies in the transverse momenta that the pair particles carry when leaving the interaction point (IP) with large angles. One source of transverse momentum is from the kick by the field of the oncoming beam which results in an outcoming angle {theta} {proportional_to} 1/{radical}x, where x is the fractional energy of the particle relative to the initial beam particle energy[2,3]. As was shown in Ref. 131, there in fact exists an energy threshold for the coherent pairs, where x{sub th} {approx}> 1/2{Upsilon}. Thus within a tolerable exiting angle, there exists an upper limit for {Upsilon} where all coherent pairs would leave the detector through the exhaust port[4]. A somewhat different analysis has been done by Schroeder[5]. In the next generation of linear colliders, as it occurs, the coherent pairs can be exponentially suppressed[2] by properly choosing the {Upsilon}({approx}< 0.6). When this is achieved, the incoherent pairs becomes dominant. Since the central issue is the transverse momentum for particles with large angles, we notice that there is another source for it. Namely, when the pair particles are created at low energies, the intrinsic angles of these pairs when produced may already be large. This issue was first studied in Ref. [1]. In this paper we reinvestigate the problem, following essentially the same equivalent photon approach, but with changes in specific details including the virtual photon spectrum. In addition, various assumptions are made more explicit. The formulas derived are then applied to the collider parameters designed by Palmer[6].

  3. Lens positioner with five degrees of freedom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobierecki, Marian W.; Rienecker, Jr., Frederick

    1978-01-01

    A device for positioning lenses precisely with five degrees of freedom (three translations and two angular rotations). The unique features of the device are its compact design, large clear aperture, and high degree of positioning accuracy combined with five degrees of freedom in axis motion. Thus, the device provides precision and flexibility in positioning of optical components. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, Contract No. AT(29-1)-1183, with the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.

  4. TUNL Ph.D. Degrees Theses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Link to M.S. and M.A. Degrees Theses Link to Associated Degrees Theses TUNL Ph.D. Degrees Theses Browse by year 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974 1973 1972 1971 1970 1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958 1957 1956 1955 1954 1949 2015 Sean W. Finch, Double-Beta Decay of 96Zr and Double-Electron Capture

  5. Angle stations in or for endless conveyor belts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steel, Alan

    1987-04-07

    In an angle station for an endless conveyor belt, there are presented to each incoming run of the belt stationary curved guide members (18, 19) of the shape of a major segment of a right-circular cylinder and having in the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) thereof rectangular openings (15) arranged in parallel and helical paths and through which project small freely-rotatable rollers (14), the continuously-changing segments of the curved surfaces of which projecting through said openings (15) are in attitude to change the direction of travel of the belt (13) through 90.degree. during passage of the belt about the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) of the guide member (18 or 19). The rectangular openings (15) are arranged with their longer edges lengthwise of the diagonals representing the mean of the helix but with those of a plurality of the rows nearest to each end of the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) slightly out of axial symmetry with said diagonals, being slightly inclined in a direction about the intersections (40) of the diagonals of the main portion of the openings, to provide a "toe-in" attitude in relation to the line of run of the endless conveyor belt.

  6. THE DISTRIBUTION OF QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FIELDS AT DIFFERENT HELIOCENTRIC ANGLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Katsukawa, Y.

    2012-02-20

    This paper presents results from the analysis of high signal-to-noise ratio spectropolarimetric data taken at four heliocentric angles in quiet-Sun internetwork regions with the Hinode satellite. First, we find that the total circular and total linear polarization signals vary with heliocentric angle, at least for fields with large polarization signals. We also report changes on the Stokes V amplitude asymmetry histograms with viewing angle for fields weaker than 200 G. Then, we subject the data to a Milne-Eddington inversion and analyze the variation of the field vector probability density functions with heliocentric angle. Weak, highly inclined fields permeate the internetwork at all heliocentric distances. For fields weaker than 200 G, the distributions of field inclinations peak at 90 Degree-Sign and do not vary with viewing angle. The inclination distributions change for fields stronger than 200 G. We argue that the shape of the inclination distribution for weak fields partly results from the presence of coherent, loop-like magnetic features at all heliocentric distances and not from tangled fields within the field of view. We also find that the average magnetic field strength is about 180 G (for 75% of the pixels) and is constant with heliocentric angle. The average vertical and horizontal magnetic field components are 70 and 150 G. The latter (former) is slightly greater (smaller) near the limb. Finally, the ratio between the horizontal and vertical components of the fields ranges from {approx}1 for strong fields to {approx}3.5 for weak fields, suggesting that the magnetic field vector is not isotropically distributed within the field of view.

  7. Long range correlations and folding angle with applications to ?-helical proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krokhotin, Andrey, E-mail: Andrei.Krokhotine@cern.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden); Nicolis, Stam, E-mail: Stam.Nicolis@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)] [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-03-07

    The conformational complexity of chain-like macromolecules such as proteins and other linear polymers is much larger than that of point-like atoms and molecules. Unlike particles, chains can bend, twist, and even become knotted. Thus chains might also display a much richer phase structure. Unfortunately, it is not very easy to characterize the phase of a long chain. Essentially, the only known attribute is the radius of gyration. The way how it changes when the degree of polymerization becomes different, and how it evolves when the ambient temperature and solvent properties change, is commonly used to disclose the phase. But in any finite length chain there are corrections to scaling that complicate the detailed analysis of the phase structure. Here we introduce a quantity that we call the folding angle to identify and scrutinize the phase structure, as a complement to the radius of gyration. We argue for a mean-field level relationship between the folding angle and the scaling exponent in the radius of gyration. We then estimate the value of the folding angle in the case of crystallographic ?-helical protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. We also show how the experimental value of the folding angle can be obtained computationally, using a semiclassical Born-Oppenheimer description of ?-helical chiral chains.

  8. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  9. Measurement of J/ψ Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/ψ azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at √sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/ψ elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/ψ particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  10. Channeling Doping Profiles Studies for Small Incident Angle Implantation into Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, B.N.; Variam, N.; Jeong, U.; Mehta, S.; Posselt, M.; Lebedev, A.

    2003-08-26

    Traditional de-channeling dopant profiles in the silicon crystal wafers have been achieved by tilting the wafer away from the incident beam. As feature sizes of device shrink, the advantages for channeled doping profiles for implants with small or near zero degree incident angles are being recognized. For example, high-energy CMOS well spacing limitations caused by shadowing and encroachment of the ion beam by photoresist mask can be avoided for near zero degree incident implants. Accurate models of channeled profiles are essential to predict the device performance. This paper mainly discusses the damage effect on channeled dopant profiles. Especially, damage effects on channeled dopant profiles are correlated to ThermaWave (TW) measurements. It is demonstrated that there is a critical dose at which the damage effects have to be considered for channeled dopant profile evolvements.

  11. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption ...

  12. Ligand Bridging-Angle-Driven Assembly of Molecular Architectures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    angles of 0, 60, 90, and 120 while incorporating a variety of nonbridging functional groups, and these ligands were used as linkers. These dicarboxylate linkers assemble with...

  13. Development and testing of FIDELE: a computer code for finite-difference solution to harmonic magnetic-dipole excitation of an azimuthally symmetric horizontally and radially layered earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1981-04-01

    The FORTRAN IV computer code FIDELE simulates the high-frequency electrical logging of a well in which induction and receiving coils are mounted in an instrument sonde immersed in a drilling fluid. The fluid invades layers of surrounding rock in an azimuthally symmetric pattern, superimposing radial layering upon the horizonally layered earth. Maxwell's equations are reduced to a second-order elliptic differential equation for the azimuthal electric-field intensity. The equation is solved at each spatial position where the complex dielectric constant, magnetic permeability, and electrical conductivity have been assigned. Receiver response is given as the complex open-circuit voltage on receiver coils. The logging operation is simulated by a succession of such solutions as the sonde traverses the borehole. Test problems verify consistency with available results for simple geometries. The code's main advantage is its treatment of a two-dimensional earth; its chief disadvantage is the large computer time required for typical problems. Possible code improvements are noted. Use of the computer code is outlined, and tests of most code features are presented.

  14. Measurement of higher-order harmonic azimuthal anisotropy in PbPb collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-04-01

    Measurements are presented by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the higher-order harmonic coefficients that describe the azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles emitted in sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions. Expressed in terms of the Fourier components of the azimuthal distribution, the n = 3-6 harmonic coefficients are presented for charged particles as a function of their transverse momentum (0.3 < pt < 8.0 GeV), collision centrality (0-70%), and pseudorapidity (abs(eta) < 2.0). The data are analyzed using the event plane, multiparticle cumulant, and Lee-Yang zeros methods, which provide different sensitivities to initial-state fluctuations. Taken together with earlier LHC measurements of elliptic flow (n = 2), the results on higher-order harmonic coefficients develop a more complete picture of the collective motion in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and shed light on the properties of the produced medium.

  15. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive...

  16. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Asia...

  17. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric ...

  18. Flux control and one-hundred and eighty degree core systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S

    2012-11-27

    A two-phase or four-phase electric machine includes a first stator part and a second stator part disposed about ninety electrical degrees apart. Stator pole parts are positioned near the first stator part and the second stator part. An injector injects a third-harmonic frequency current that is separate from and not produced by the fundamental current driving the first stator part and the second stator part. The electric angular speed of the third-harmonic rotating field comprises .theta. ##EQU00001## where p comprises the number of pole pairs, .theta. comprises a mechanical angle and t comprise time in seconds.

  19. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  20. Calculation of variable-base degree-days and degree-nights from monthly average temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.; Cleary, P.; Dickinson, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit (CIRA), a micro-computer building energy analysis program developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, uses a monthly variable-base degree-day method to calculate heating and cooling loads. The method's unique feature is its ability to model thermostat setbacks and storage of solar gain. The program accomplishes this by dividing each day into two periods, ''average day'' (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.) and ''average night'' (8 p.m. to 8 a.m.), with different base temperatures. For each mode (heating or cooling) and for each period (day or night), the program reconstructs degree-days as a function of average monthly day or night temperature using three empirical coefficients specific to the location. A comparison is made between degree-days computed from hourly weather tapes and those predicted using this method. The root mean square error between predicted and actual degree days is typically between 3 and 12 degree-days per month. Tables of the coefficients are given for over 150 locations in the United States, computed from hourly dry-bulb temperatures on TRY and TMY tapes. Seasonal predictions of heating and cooling energy budgets using this method show good correspondence to the DOE-2 hourly simulation method.

  1. Recent Measurements of the cos(n{phi}{sub h}) Azimuthal Modulations of the Unpolarized Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross-section at HERMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Giordano, Francesca [University of Illinois (United States)

    2009-12-17

    The cross section for hadron production in deep-inelastic lepton scattering contains azimuthal modulations which can be related to transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions. The former provide a picture of how the quarks are moving within nucleons. Specifically, the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} modulations of the unpolarized cross section relate quark spin and quark transverse momentum. These moments have been carefully measured at the HERMES experiment in a fully differential way, as a function of x, y, z, and P{sub hperpendicular} for positive and negative hadrons produced from hydrogen and deuterium targets. These measurements give new access to the flavor dependent TMDs via their charge and target dependence. These data must be compared to comprehensive models to determine which terms contribute significantly to the cos{phi}{sub h} and cos2{phi}{sub h} moments and allow access to the underlying structure functions.

  2. Studies of azimuthal dihadron correlations in ultra-central PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    Azimuthal dihadron correlations of charged particles have been measured in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV by the CMS collaboration, using data from the 2011 LHC heavy-ion run. The data set includes a sample of ultra-central (0-0.2% centrality) PbPb events collected using a trigger based on total transverse energy in the hadron forward calorimeters and the total multiplicity of pixel clusters in the silicon pixel tracker. A total of about 1.8 million ultra-central events were recorded, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 120 inverse microbarns. The observed correlations in ultra-central PbPb events are expected to be particularly sensitive to initial-state fluctuations. The single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics, from $v_2$ to $v_6$, are extracted as a function of particle transverse momentum. At higher transverse momentum, the $v_2$ harmonic becomes significantly smaller than the higher-order $v_n$ (n greater than or equal to 3). The pt-averaged $v_2$ and $v_3$ are found to be equal within 2%, while higher-order $v_n$ decrease as n increases. The breakdown of factorization of dihadron correlations into single-particle azimuthal anisotropies is observed. This effect is found to be most prominent in the ultra-central PbPb collisions, where the initial-state fluctuations play a dominant role. As a result, a comparison of the factorization data to hydrodynamic predictions with event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions is also presented.

  3. Studies of azimuthal dihadron correlations in ultra-central PbPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$$ 2.76 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    Azimuthal dihadron correlations of charged particles have been measured in PbPb collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$ = 2.76 TeV by the CMS collaboration, using data from the 2011 LHC heavy-ion run. The data set includes a sample of ultra-central (0-0.2% centrality) PbPb events collected using a trigger based on total transverse energy in the hadron forward calorimeters and the total multiplicity of pixel clusters in the silicon pixel tracker. A total of about 1.8 million ultra-central events were recorded, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 120 inverse microbarns. The observed correlations in ultra-central PbPb events are expected to be particularly sensitive to initial-state fluctuations. The single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics, from $v_2$ to $v_6$, are extracted as a function of particle transverse momentum. At higher transverse momentum, the $v_2$ harmonic becomes significantly smaller than the higher-order $v_n$ (n greater than or equal to 3). The pt-averaged $v_2$ and $v_3$ are found to be equal within 2%, while higher-order $v_n$ decrease as n increases. The breakdown of factorization of dihadron correlations into single-particle azimuthal anisotropies is observed. This effect is found to be most prominent in the ultra-central PbPb collisions, where the initial-state fluctuations play a dominant role. As a result, a comparison of the factorization data to hydrodynamic predictions with event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions is also presented.« less

  4. Interdiffusion and Reaction between Zr and Al Alloys from 425 degrees to 625 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Dickson; L. Zhou; A. Ewh; M. Fu; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn; A. Paz y Puente

    2014-06-01

    Zirconium has recently garnered attention for use as a diffusion barrier between UMo nuclear fuels and Al cladding alloys. Interdiffusion and reactions between Zr and Al, Al-2 wt.% Si, Al-5 wt.% Si or AA6061 were investigated using solid-to-solid diffusion couples annealed in the temperature range of 425 degrees to 625 degrees C. In the binary Al and Zr system, the Al3Zr and Al2Zr phases were identified, and the activation energy for the growth of the Al3Zr phase was determined to be 347 kJ/mol. Negligible diffusional interactions were observed for diffusion couples between Zr vs. Al-2 wt.% Si, Al-5 wt.% Si and AA6061 annealed at or below 475 degrees C. In diffusion couples with the binary AlSi alloys at 560 degrees C, a significant variation in the development of the phase constituents was observed including the thick t1 (Al5SiZr2) with Si content up to 12 at.%, and thin layers of (Si,Al)2Zr, (Al,Si)3Zr, Al3SiZr2 and Al2Zr phases. The use of AA6061 as a terminal alloy resulted in the development of both T1 (Al5SiZr2) and (Al,Si)3Zr phases with a very thin layer of (Al,Si)2Zr. At 560 degrees C, with increasing Si content in the AlSi alloy, an increase in the overall rate of diffusional interaction was observed; however, the diffusional interaction of Zr in contact with multicomponent AA6061 with 0.40.8 wt.% Si was most rapid.

  5. Multiple-degree-of-freedom vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    1995-01-01

    A multi-degree-of-freedom vehicle employs a compliant linkage to accommodate the need for a variation in the distance between drive wheels or drive systems which are independently steerable and drivable. The subject vehicle is provided with rotary encodes to provide signals representative of the orientation of the steering pivot associated with each such drive wheel or system, and a linear encoder which issues a signal representative of the fluctuations in the distance between the drive elements. The wheels of the vehicle are steered and driven in response to the linear encoder signal, there being provided a controller system for minimizing the fluctuations in the distance. The controller system is a software implementation of a plurality of controllers, operating at the chassis level and at the vehicle level. A trajectory interpolator receives x-displacement, y-displacement, and .theta.-displacement signals and produces to the vehicle level controller trajectory signals corresponding to interpolated control signals. The x-displacement, y-displacement, and .theta.-displacement signals are received from a human operator, via a manipulable joy stick.

  6. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    11 eV laser (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This

  7. General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle February 3, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week, we told you about a new company

  8. Angle-Insensitive Structural Colours based on metallic nanocavities and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coloured Pixels beyond the Diffraction Limit. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Angle-Insensitive Structural Colours based on metallic nanocavities and Coloured Pixels beyond the Diffraction Limit. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle-Insensitive Structural Colours based on metallic nanocavities and Coloured Pixels beyond the Diffraction Limit. Authors: Hollowell, Andrew E. ; Wu, Yi-Kuei ; Zhang, Cheng ; Guo, L. Jay Publication Date: 2012-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 1063506 Report

  9. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tungsten films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured tungsten films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured tungsten films Authors: Ungaro, Craig [1] ; Shah, Ankit [1] ; Kravchenko, Ivan I [2] ; Hensley, Dale K [2] ; Gray, Stephen K. [3] ; Gupta, Mool C. [1] + Show Author Affiliations University of Virginia, Charlottesville ORNL Argonne

  10. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuruzzaman, nfn

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system has also proven valuable for tracking changes in the beamline optics, such as dispersion at the target.

  11. ORISE: Report shows number of health physics degrees for 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report shows number of health physics degrees increased for graduates, decreased for undergraduates in 2010 Decreased number of B.S. degrees remains higher than levels in the early 2000 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 20, 2011 FY12-09 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of health physics graduate degrees increased for both master's and doctoral candidates in 2010, but decreased for bachelor's degrees, says a report released this year by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The ORISE report,

  12. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Quarterly report, Apr 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-08-31

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near-horizontal well has been drilled and completion operations are in progress. Upon initial review of log data, two hydraulic fracture treatments were planned. However, the probability of the lower frac growing into thick sands previously swept by waterflood has called for additional information to be obtained prior to proceeding with hydraulic fracture treatments. Should permeabilities prove to be as favorable as some data indicate, produced water volumes could be excessively high. Prior to pumping the first frac, the well will be perforated and produced from lower pay intervals. These perfs will not impact future frac work. Rate data and pressure transient analysis will dictate the need for the lower frac.

  13. Discriminating electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John D.

    2015-06-16

    The present invention provides systems, articles, and methods for discriminating electromagnetic radiation based upon the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the materials and systems described herein can be capable of inhibiting reflection of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., the materials and systems can be capable of transmitting and/or absorbing electromagnetic radiation) within a given range of angles of incidence at a first incident surface, while substantially reflecting electromagnetic radiation outside the range of angles of incidence at a second incident surface (which can be the same as or different from the first incident surface). A photonic material comprising a plurality of periodically occurring separate domains can be used, in some cases, to selectively transmit and/or selectively absorb one portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation while reflecting another portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation, based upon the angle of incidence. In some embodiments, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic dielectric function, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic dielectric function. In some instances, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic magnetic permeability, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic magnetic permeability. In some embodiments, non-photonic materials (e.g., materials with relatively large scale features) can be used to selectively absorb incoming electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence.

  14. Wide angle x-ray scattering of proteins : effect of beam exposure on protein integrity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischetti, R. F.; Rodi, D. J.; Mirza, A.; Makowski, L.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2003-01-01

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns from proteins in solution contain information relevant to the determination of protein fold. At relevant scattering angles, however, these data are weak, and the degree to which they might be used to categorize the fold of a protein is unknown. Preliminary work has been performed at the BioCAT insertion-device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source which demonstrates that one can collect X-ray scattering data from proteins in solution to spacings of at least 2.2 {angstrom} (q = 2.8 {angstrom}-1). These data are sensitive to protein conformational states, and are in good agreement with the scattering predicted by the program CRYSOL using the known three-dimensional atomic coordinates of the protein. An important issue in the exploitation of this technique as a tool for structural genomics is the extent to which the high intensity of X-rays available at third-generation synchrotron sources chemically or structurally damage proteins. Various data-collection protocols have been investigated demonstrating conditions under which structural degradation of even sensitive proteins can be minimized, making this technique a viable tool for protein fold categorization, the study of protein folding, unfolding, protein-ligand interactions and domain movement.

  15. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: application to the study of quantum dot lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja Radi?, Nikola; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Drai?, Goran; Bogdanovi?-Radovi?, Iva; Hol, Vclav

    2012-01-01

    The modelling of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) from three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is described. The ordering of quantum dots in three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions for three general classes of lattices of quantum dots are proposed. The classes differ in the type of disorder of the positions of the quantum dots. The models enable full structure determination, including lattice type, lattice parameters, the type and degree of disorder in the quantum dot positions and the distributions of the quantum dot sizes. Applications of the developed models are demonstrated using experimentally measured data from several types of quantum dot lattices formed by a self-assembly process.

  16. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with ...

  17. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials Authors: Lu, Donghui ; Vishik, Inna M. ; Yi, Ming ; Chen, Yulin ; Moore, Rob G. ; Shen, Zhi-Xun Publication Date: 2014-10-02 OSTI Identifier: 1179562 Report Number(s): SLAC-REPRINT-2015-010 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource

  18. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  19. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Feder, R.; Ko, Jinseok; Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.

    2008-10-15

    The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a well-known imaging error of spherical mirrors. In addition to x rays, the scheme should be applicable to a very broad spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation, including microwaves, infrared and visible light, as well as UV and extreme UV radiation, if the crystals are replaced with appropriate spherical reflectors. The scheme may also be applicable to the imaging with ultrasound.

  20. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are ... The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an ...

  1. ORISE: Report by ORISE shows health physics degrees declined...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics degrees declined in 2014, enrollment trends reverse Enrollment data ... graduating with majors in health physics has declined across undergraduate, ...

  2. EM Leaders Earn National Defense Degrees | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Leaders Earn National Defense Degrees EM Leaders Earn National Defense Degrees August 31, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Stephen Casey of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office receives his degree from NDU President Maj. Gen. Frederick M. Padilla, U.S. Marine Corps, during the main campus graduation earlier this year at Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, D.C. Stephen Casey of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office receives his degree from NDU President Maj. Gen. Frederick M. Padilla, U.S. Marine Corps,

  3. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    having nuclear engineering programs during 2014, and data were provided by all thirty-five. The enrollments and degrees data include students majoring in nuclear engineering ...

  4. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Zach...

  5. Brief 70 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 2011 Summary Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Don Johnson

    2012-10-31

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2011. The enrollment and degree data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2011, and data was received from all thirty-two programs. The data for two nuclear engineering programs include enrollments and degrees in health physics options that are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees data.

  6. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and astrophysical capture processes R.E. Tribble A.M. Mukhamedzhanov Graduate Teaching Assistant Pursuing degree at Department of Statistics, Texas A&M University Jim...

  7. Biography U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study:...

  8. Multi-angle nuclear imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.

    1980-04-08

    A nuclear imaging apparatus is described for obtaining multi-plane readouts of radioactive material in a human or animal subject. A probe disposed in the vicinity of the subject is provided for receiving radiation from radiating sources in the subject and for forming a probe radiation image. The probe has a collimator with different portions having holes disposed at different angles. A single scintillation crystal overlies the collimator for receiving radiation passing through the collimator and producing scintillations to provide the probe image. An array of photomultiplier tubes overlie the single crystal for observing the probe image and providing electrical outputs. Conversion apparatus is provided for converting the electrical outputs representing the probe image into optical images displayed on the screen of a cathode ray tube. Divider apparatus is provided for dividing the probe radiation image into a plurality of areas with the areas corresponding to different portions of the collimator having holes disposed at different angles. A light sensitive medium is provided for receiving optical images. Apparatus is provided for causing relative movement between the probe and the subject. Apparatus is also provided for causing relative movement between the optical image on the screen and the light sensitive medium which corresponds to the relative movement between the probe and the subject whereby there is produced on the light sensitive medium a plurality of images that portray the subject as seen from different angles corresponding to the portions of the collimator having holes at different angles. 11 figs.

  9. Multi-angle nuclear imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-04-08

    Nuclear imaging apparatus for obtaining multi-plane readouts of radioactive material in a human or animal subject. A probe disposed in the vicinity of the subject is provided for receiving radiation from radiating sources in the subject and for forming a probe radiation image. The probe has a collimator with different portions thereof having holes disposed at different angles. A single scintillation crystal overlies the collimator for receiving radiation passing through the collimator and producing scintillations to provide the probe image. An array of photomultiplier tubes overlie the single crystal for observing the probe image and providing electrical outputs. Conversion apparatus is provided for converting the electrical outputs representing the probe image into optical images displayed on the screen of a cathode ray tube. Divider apparatus is provided for dividing the probe radiation image into a plurality of areas with the areas corresponding to different portions of the collimator having holes disposed at different angles. A light sensitive medium is provided for receiving optical images. Apparatus is provided for causing relative movement between the probe and the subject. Apparatus is also provided for causing relative movement between the optical image on the screen and the light sensitive medium which corresponds to the relative movement between the probe and the subject whereby there is produced on the light sensitive medium a plurality of images that portray the subject as seen from different angles corresponding to the portions of the collimator having holes at different angles.

  10. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. , Martin; Grant D. , Holzrichter; Michael W.

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  11. Identification of high angle structures controlling the geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with dips between 80 and 90 degrees. Original drilling targets focused on the subsurface projection of a surface structure, mapped as the Rye Patch fault, with an erroneously low...

  12. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt035_ti_ng_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Asia/ITS

  13. Angle-resolved environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A new laboratory setup for photoemission studies at pressures up to 0.4 Torr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangolini, F.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Egberts, P.; Ahlund, J.; Backlund, K.; Karlsson, P. G.; Adiga, V. P.; Streller, F.; Wannberg, B.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-09-15

    The paper presents the development and demonstrates the capabilities of a new laboratory-based environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system incorporating an electrostatic lens and able to acquire spectra up to 0.4 Torr. The incorporation of a two-dimensional detector provides imaging capabilities and allows the acquisition of angle-resolved data in parallel mode over an angular range of 14 Degree-Sign without tilting the sample. The sensitivity and energy resolution of the spectrometer have been investigated by analyzing a standard Ag foil both under high vacuum (10{sup -8} Torr) conditions and at elevated pressures of N{sub 2} (0.4 Torr). The possibility of acquiring angle-resolved data at different pressures has been demonstrated by analyzing a silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO{sub 2}) sample. The collected angle-resolved spectra could be effectively used for the determination of the thickness of the native silicon oxide layer.

  14. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore » number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  15. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.

  16. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    angles of incidence (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a

  17. A SMALL-ANGLE DRILL-HOLE WHIPSTOCK

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielsen, D.E.; Olsen, J.L.; Bennett, W.P.

    1963-01-29

    A small angle whipstock is described for accurately correcting or deviating a drill hole by a very small angle. The whipstock is primarily utilized when drilling extremely accurate, line-of-slight test holes as required for diagnostic studies related to underground nuclear test shots. The invention is constructed of a length of cylindrical pipe or casing, with a whipstock seating spike extending from the lower end. A wedge-shaped segment is secured to the outer circumference of the upper end of the cylinder at a position diametrically opposite the circumferential position of the spike. Pin means are provided for affixing the whipstock to a directional drill bit and stem to alloy orienting and setting the whipstock properly in the drill hole. (AEC)

  18. Guidance system for low angle silicon ribbon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jewett, David N.; Bates, Herbert E.; Milstein, Joseph B.

    1986-07-08

    In a low angle silicon sheet growth process, a puller mechanism advances a seed crystal and solidified ribbon from a cooled growth zone in a melt at a low angle with respect to the horizontal. The ribbon is supported on a ramp adjacent the puller mechanism. Variations in the vertical position of the ribbon with respect to the ramp are isolated from the growth end of the ribbon by (1) growing the ribbon so that it is extremely thin, preferably less than 0.7 mm, (2) maintaining a large growth zone, preferably one whose length is at least 5.0 cm, and (3) spacing the ramp from the growth zone by at least 15 cm.

  19. Angle amplifying optics using plane and ellipsoidal reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system for providing a wide angle input beam into ellipsoidal laser fusion target illumination systems. The optical system comprises one or more pairs of centrally apertured plane and ellipsoidal mirrors disposed to accept the light input from a conventional lens of modest focal length and thickness, to increase the angular divergence thereof to a value equivalent to that of fast lenses, and to direct the light into the ellipsoidal target illumination system.

  20. The 2mrad Crossing Angle Interaction Region and Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, R.; U., Manchester; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Dadoun, O.; Bambade, P.; Parker, B.; Keller, L.; Moffeit, K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Carter, J.; Royal Holloway, U.of London; Napoly, O.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-12

    A complete optics design for the 2mrad crossing angle interaction region and extraction line was presented at Snowmass 2005. Since this time, the design task force has been working on developing and improving the performance of the extraction line. The work has focused on optimizing the final doublet parameters and on reducing the power losses resulting from the disrupted beam transport. In this paper, the most recent status of the 2mrad layout and the corresponding performance are presented.

  1. EXOPLANETS FROM THE ARCTIC: THE FIRST WIDE-FIELD SURVEY AT 80 Degree-Sign N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard

    2013-03-15

    Located within 10 Degree-Sign of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80 Degree-Sign N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg{sup 2}, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (m{sub V} < 9.5) stars.

  2. Applications of Trajectory Solid Angle for Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Po Kee; Wong, Adam E.; Wong, Anita

    2002-07-01

    In 1974, a well-known research problem in Statistical Mechanics entitled 'To determine and define the probability function P.sub.2 of a particle hitting a predetermined area, given all its parameters of generation and ejection' was openly solicited for its solution from research and development organizations in U.S.A. One of many proposed solutions of the problem, initiated at that time, is by means of the Trajectory Solid Angle (TSA). TSA is defined as the integral of the dot product of the unit tangent of the particle's trajectory to the vector area divided by the square of the position vector connecting between the point of ejection and that of the surface to be hit. The invention provides: (1) The precise and the unique solution of a previously unsolved P.sub.2 problem: (2) Impacts to the governmental NRC safety standards and DOD weapon systems and many activities in the Department of Energy; (3) Impacts to update the contents of text books of physics and mathematics of all levels; (4) Impacts to the scientific instruments with applications in high technologies. The importance of Trajectory Solid Angle can be quoted from a letter by the late Institute Professor P. M. Morse of MIT who reviewed the DOE proposal P7900450 (reference No. 7) in 1979 and addressed to the inventor. 'If the Trajectory Solid Angle is correct it will provide a revolutionary concept in physics'. (authors)

  3. Brief 66 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2009 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Larry M. Blair, Analysis and Evaluation, Science Education Programs

    2010-03-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2008 and August 31, 2009, and fall 2009 enrollments. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2009, and data was obtained from all thirty-two.

  4. Microsoft Word - VI_12_Degrees Awarded 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear systems A. Bonasera Post Doc. at INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM NON-THESIS April 1, 2014 - March 31, 2015 ...

  5. Comparison of 180-degree and 90-degree needle rotation to reduce wound size in PIT-injected juvenile Chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, Amanda J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Karls, Rhonda K.; Hall, Kathleen D.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2013-04-30

    Animal telemetry, which requires the implantation of passive transponders or active transmitters, is used to monitor and assess fish stock and conservation to gain an understanding of fish movement and behavior. As new telemetry technologies become available, studies of their effects on species of interest are imperative as is development of implantation techniques. In this study, we investigated the effects of bevel rotation (0-, 90-, 180-degree axis rotation) on wound extent, tag loss, and wound healing rates in juvenile Chinook salmon injected with an 8-gauge needle, which is required for implantation of the novel injectable Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry Systems (JSATS) acoustic transmitter or large passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. Although the injection sites were not closed after injection (e.g., with sutures or glue), there were no mortalities, dropped tags, or indications of fungus, ulceration, and/or redness around the wound. On Day 0 and post-implantation Day 7, the 90-degree bevel rotation produced smaller wound extent than the 180-degree bevel rotation. No axis rotation (0-degrees) resulted in the PIT tag frequently misleading or falling out upon injection. The results of this study indicated the 90-degree bevel rotation was the more efficient technique, produced less wound extent. Given the wound extent compared to size of fish, we recommend researchers should consider a 90-degree rotation over the 180-degree rotation in telemetry studies. Highlights •Three degrees of needle rotation were examined for effects in Chinook salmon. •Mortality, tag loss, wound extent, healing, and infection indicators were measured. •There were no mortalities, tag loss, or indications of infection. •The 90-degree needle rotation through Day 7 produced the smallest wound extent.

  6. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt035_ti_ng_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility

  7. Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'- bipyridine on the Intermediate Valence of Yb in (C5Me5)2Yb(3,3'-Me2-bipy) Gregory N octon,*^ Corwin H. B ooth,§ Laurent M aron,1- and Richard A. A ndersen*^ 'Laboratoirc Heteroelements et Coordination, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France. ^Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, 94720, USA. ^Chemical Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720, U SA.

  8. Higher-degree linear approximations of nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karahan, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, the author develops a new method for obtaining higher degree linear approximations of nonlinear control systems. The standard approach in the analysis and synthesis of nonlinear systems is a first order approximation by a linear model. This is usually performed by obtaining a series expansion of the system at some nominal operating point and retaining only the first degree terms in the series. The accuracy of this approximation depends on how far the system moves away from the normal point, and on the relative magnitudes of the higher degree terms in the series expansion. The approximation is achieved by finding an appropriate nonlinear coordinate transformation-feedback pair to perform the higher degree linearization. With the proposed method, one can improve the accuracy of the approximation up to arbitrarily higher degrees, provided certain solvability conditions are satisfied. The Hunt-Su linearizability theorem makes these conditions precise. This approach is similar to Poincare's Normal Form Theorem in formulation, but different in its solution method. After some mathematical background the author derives a set of equations (called the Homological Equations). A solution to this system of linear equations is equivalent to the solution to the problem of approximate linearization. However, it is generally not possible to solve the system of equations exactly. He outlines a method for systematically finding approximate solutions to these equations using singular value decomposition, while minimizing an error with respect to some defined norm.

  9. Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal ...

  10. B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and BELLE B-Factories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and ...

  11. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein ...

  12. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  13. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  14. An acceleration of the characteristics by a space-angle two-level method using surface discontinuity factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, G.

    2006-07-01

    We present a non-linear space-angle two-level acceleration scheme for the method of the characteristics (MOC). To the fine level on which the MOC transport calculation is performed, we associate a more coarsely discretized phase space in which a low-order problem is solved as an acceleration step. Cross sections on the coarse level are obtained by a flux-volume homogenisation technique, which entails the non-linearity of the acceleration. Discontinuity factors per surface are introduced as additional degrees of freedom on the coarse level in order to ensure the equivalence of the heterogeneous and the homogenised problem. After each fine transport iteration, a low-order transport problem is iteratively solved on the homogenised grid. The solution of this problem is then used to correct the angular moments of the flux resulting from the previous free transport sweep. Numerical tests for a given benchmark have been performed. Results are discussed. (authors)

  15. Solar Eclipse Monitoring for Solar Energy Applications Using the Solar and Moon Position Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2010-03-01

    This report includes a procedure for implementing an algorithm (described by Jean Meeus) to calculate the moon's zenith angle with uncertainty of +/-0.001 degrees and azimuth angle with uncertainty of +/-0.003 degrees. The step-by-step format presented here simplifies the complicated steps Meeus describes to calculate the Moon's position, and focuses on the Moon instead of the planets and stars. It also introduces some changes to accommodate for solar radiation applications.

  16. Finite ballooning angle effects on ion temperature gradient driven mode in gyrokinetic flux tube simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar, E-mail: rameswar.singh@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Brunner, S. [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents effects of finite ballooning angles on linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode and associated heat and momentum flux in Gyrokinetic flux tube simulation GENE. It is found that zero ballooning angle is not always the one at which the linear growth rate is maximum. The ITG mode acquires a short wavelength (SW) branch (k{sub ?}?{sub i}?>?1) when growth rates maximized over all ballooning angles are considered. However, the SW branch disappears on reducing temperature gradient showing characteristics of zero ballooning angle SWITG in case of extremely high temperature gradient. Associated heat flux is even with respect to ballooning angle and maximizes at nonzero ballooning angle while the parallel momentum flux is odd with respect to the ballooning angle.

  17. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  18. Scattering of particles with internal degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipushenko, S. V.; Tur, A. V.; Yanovsky, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    The scattering of particles with a small number of internal degrees of freedom is considered. Billiard formalism is used to study the scattering of two such structurally complex particles. The main scattering characteristics are found. Various types of scattering modes are revealed. In particular, a mode is detected when the velocity of motion of such particles away from each other is higher than their approach velocity before the collision. The scattering of such particles is shown to occur after a finite number of collisions. A generalized Newton law is proposed for the collision of particles with a small number of degrees of freedom, and the form of the effective coefficient of restitution is found.

  19. Grain boundary energy in 5 degrees of freedom space

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-21

    GB5DOF is a program written in MatLab for computing excess energy of an arbitrary grain boundary defined by its 5 geometrical degrees of freedom. The program is written in the form of a single self-contained function callable from within commercially available MatLab software package. The function takes a geometric description of the boundary and material identity as input parameters and returns the predicted boundary energy.

  20. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  1. Effect of MLC leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Sen; Li, Guangjun; Wang, Maojie; Jiang, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To compare dosimetric differences between the simulating plans and the clinical plans with evaluation parameters, 6 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected for simulation of systematic and random MLC leaf position errors, collimator rotation angle errors, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for systematic MLC leaf position errors in response to field size. When the systematic MLC position errors were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm, respectively, the maximum values of the mean dose deviation, observed in parotid glands, were 4.63%, 8.69%, and 18.32%, respectively. The dosimetric effect was comparatively small for systematic MLC shift errors. For random MLC errors up to 2 mm and collimator and gantry rotation angle errors up to 0.5°, the dosimetric effect was negligible. We suggest that quality control be regularly conducted for MLC leaves, so as to ensure that systematic MLC leaf position errors are within 0.5 mm. Because the dosimetric effect of 0.5° collimator and gantry rotation angle errors is negligible, it can be concluded that setting a proper threshold for allowed errors of collimator and gantry rotation angle may increase treatment efficacy and reduce treatment time.

  2. Electron-impact excitation of the 6p7s {sup 3}P{sub 1} state of Pb atom at small scattering angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milisavljevic, S.; Rabasovic, M. S.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Pejcev, V.; Filipovic, D. M.; Sharma, Lalita; Srivastava, Rajesh; Stauffer, A. D.

    2007-05-15

    Electron-impact excitation of the 6p7s {sup 3}P{sub 1} state of Pb atom has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Differential cross sections (DCSs) were measured at incident electron energies of E{sub 0}=10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 eV and small scattering angles up to 10 degree sign using a crossed electron-atom beam technique. The forward scattering function method has been used for determination of the absolute generalized oscillator strengths and DCS values. Corresponding relativistic distorted wave calculations have been performed and compared with experimental results.

  3. Method and apparatus for controlling pitch and flap angles of a wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deering, Kenneth J.; Wohlwend, Keith P.

    2009-05-12

    A wind turbine with improved response to wind conditions is provided. Blade flap angle motion is accompanied by a change in pitch angle by an amount defining a pitch/flap coupling ratio. The coupling ratio is non-constant as a function of a flap angle and is preferably a substantially continuous, non-linear function of flap angle. The non-constant coupling ratio can be provided by mechanical systems such as a series of linkages or by configuring electronic or other control systems and/or angle sensors. A link with a movable proximal end advantageously is part of the mechanical system. The system can provide relatively large coupling ratios and relatively large rates of coupling ratio changes especially for near-feather pitches and low flap angles.

  4. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    beamstrahlung (Conference) | SciTech Connect Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung The final electron energy spectrum under multi-photon beamstrahlung process is derived analytically in the classical and the intermediate regimes. The maximum disruption angle from the low energy tail of the spectrum is also

  5. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectroscopy (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic

  6. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by Brillouin light scattering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin

  7. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  8. SU-E-T-618: Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, X; Sun, T; Liu, T; Zhang, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plan with beam angle optimization. Methods: Ten post-operation patients with cervical cancer were included in this analysis. Two IMRT plans using seven beams were designed in each patient. A standard coplanar equi-space beam angles were used in the first plan (plan 1), whereas the selection of beam angle was optimized by beam angle optimization algorithm in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for the same number of beams in the second plan (plan 2). Two plans were designed for each patient with the same dose-volume constraints and prescription dose. All plans were normalized to the mean dose to PTV. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk and total MU were compared. Results: For conformity and homogeneity in PTV, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. For the mean dose in bladder, plan 2 were significantly lower than plan 1(p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between two plans for the mean doses in rectum, left and right femur heads. Compared with plan1, the average monitor units reduced 16% in plan 2. Conclusion: The IMRT plan based on beam angle optimization for cervical cancer could reduce the dose delivered to bladder and also reduce MU. Therefore there were some dosimetric advantages in the IMRT plan with beam angle optimization for cervical cancer.

  9. Elf well turns 90/degree/- and stays there

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astier, B.; Jourdan, A.; Baron, G.

    1981-01-01

    As part of an intensive research program, the French association IFP (Institut Francais du Petrole) and Elf-Aquitaine have drilled the first European horizontal hole. The well was spudded conventionally and then deviated so that its final path was horizontal, 2,198 ft (670 m) below the surface. More than 330 ft (100 m) were drilled between 89/degree/ and 92/degree/ of inclination. The project started with reservoir engineering studies aimed at demonstrating, on mathematical models, the effectiveness of a horizontal drain hole in areas where hydrocarbon recovery is poor or unsatisfactory, due to gas or water coning, poor flooding patterns, intersection of fractures in tight but fractured producing formations, or other causes. This technique has a number of potential applications both in and out of the oil industry. The well was drilled in 44 days. Horizontal displacement was 2,192 ft (668 m) with a total vertical depth of 2,198 ft (670 m). To accomplish this, it was necessary to drill 3,563 ft (1,086 m) of hole. In the 17/one-half/-in. hole, 73/4-in. drill collars and 5-in. heavy weight drill pipe were run above the bent sub and the monel collar. While reaming the hole, the drill string was rotated conventionally, one near bit and one stabilizer (30 ft above) being included in the string.

  10. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  11. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  12. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  13. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  14. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  15. PRECISE ANGLE MONITOR BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF PENCIL-BEAM INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    QIAN,S.; TAKACS,P.

    2000-07-30

    The precise angle monitoring is a very important metrology task for research, development and industrial applications. Autocollimator is one of the most powerful and widely applied instruments for small angle monitoring, which is based on the principle of geometric optics. In this paper the authors introduce a new precise angle monitoring system, Pencil-beam Angle Monitor (PAM), base on pencil beam interferometry. Its principle of operation is a combination of physical and geometrical optics. The angle calculation method is similar to the autocollimator. However, the autocollimator creates a cross image but the precise pencil-beam angle monitoring system produces an interference fringe on the focal plane. The advantages of the PAM are: high angular sensitivity, long-term stability character making angle monitoring over long time periods possible, high measurement accuracy in the order of sub-microradian, simultaneous measurement ability in two perpendicular directions or on two different objects, dynamic measurement possibility, insensitive to the vibration and air turbulence, automatic display, storage and analysis by use of the computer, small beam diameter making the alignment extremely easy and longer test distance. Some test examples are presented.

  16. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. Although still a low-resolution technique, the advent of high-flux synchrotron sources and the development of

  17. Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System: The

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of a Strong In-Plane Magnetic Field (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System: The Effect of a Strong In-Plane Magnetic Field Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System: The Effect of a Strong In-Plane Magnetic Field Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the

  18. IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

    2008-09-02

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 15004500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera arrays sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

  19. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pumpXUV probe time- and angle-resolved ... from insulators (UOsub 2) and ultrafast pumpprobe processes in semiconductors (GaAs). ...

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Filter Photometer for Measuring the Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, S. M. Pirogov, and G. S. Golitsyn A. M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Science Moscow, Russia Description The operating prototype of an instrument has been developed and built up for measuring the scattered solar radiation and its polarization in the solar almucantar for azimuth angles A ranged from 0 to 170 degrees at different zenith angles Z. At A = 0 the direct

  1. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    beamstrahlung (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI

  2. Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction Authors: Movshovich, Roman [1] ; Kim, Duk Young [1] ; Lin, Shizeng [1] ; Weickert, Franziska [2] ; Bauer, Eric Dietzgen [1] ; Ronning, Filip [1] ; Thompson, Joe David [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory MPA-CMMS: CONDENSED MATTER & MAGNET SCIENCE

  3. Aspects of Electron-Phonon Self-Energy Revealed From Angle-Resolved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoemission Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Aspects of Electron-Phonon Self-Energy Revealed From Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aspects of Electron-Phonon Self-Energy Revealed From Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy No abstract prepared. Authors: Lee, W.S. ; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL ; Johnston, S. ; Devereaux, T.P. ; /Waterloo U. ; Shen, Z.X. ; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

  4. Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using the concept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of tidal and ancillary domains (Conference) | SciTech Connect Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using the concept of tidal and ancillary domains Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using the concept of tidal and ancillary domains In a parallel publication (Finkelstein, 1996), a new analysis of the ideal loss-less Stirling Cycle Machine was presented based upon the concept of overlapping Tidal and

  5. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and

  6. CORPES 11: International Workshop on Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoemission Spectroscopy CORPES 11: International Workshop on Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy July 18-22, 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California More information Attendees participated in a poster session Thursday on the ALS patio, engaging in conversations over lunch and at the posters. An international workshop entitled "Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy", or CORPES11 , was held at Berkeley Lab

  7. Survey Universe. The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major. Twenty-four academic programs reported having health physics programs during 2011. The data for two health physics options within nuclear engineering programs are also included in the enrollments and degrees that are reported in the nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees data. Degree Trends. Bachelor degrees increased slightly between 2010 and 2011, but were 15% less than during 2005 through 2009 and 30% less than in the

  8. Brief 71 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees, 2011 Summary (11-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Don Johnson

    2012-11-07

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2011. The enrollment and degree data include students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major. Twenty-four academic programs reported having health physics programs during 2011. The data for two health physics options within nuclear engineering programs are also included in the enrollments and degrees that are reported in the nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees data.

  9. Berry phase and Hannays angle in the BornOppenheimer hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.D. [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)] [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yi, X.X. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Fu, L.B., E-mail: lbfu.iapcm@gmail.com [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the Berry phase and Hannays angle in the BornOppenheimer (BO) hybrid systems and obtain their algebraic expressions in terms of one form connection. The semiclassical relation of Berry phase and Hannays angle is discussed. We find that, besides the usual connection term, the Berry phase of quantum BO composite system also contains a novel term brought forth by the coupling induced effective gauge potential. This quantum modification can be viewed as an effective AharonovBohm effect. Moreover, the similar phenomenon is founded in Hannays angle of classical BO composite system, which indicates that the Berry phase and Hannays angle possess the same relation as the usual one. An example is used to illustrate our theory. This scheme can be used to generate artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms. Besides, the quantumclassical hybrid BO system is also studied to compare with the results in full quantum and full classical composite systems. -- Highlights: We have derived the Berry phase and Hannays angle in BO hybrid systems. The Berry phase contains a novel term brought by the effective gauge potential. This mechanism can be used to generate artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms. The relation between Hannays angles and Berry phases is established.

  10. Tidal evolution of the spin-orbit angle in exoplanetary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Yuxin; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Fujii, Yuka; Masuda, Kento

    2014-03-20

    The angle between the stellar spin and the planetary orbit axes (the spin-orbit angle) is supposed to carry valuable information concerning the initial condition of planetary formation and subsequent migration history. Indeed, current observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect have revealed a wide range of spin-orbit misalignments for transiting exoplanets. We examine in detail the tidal evolution of a simple system comprising a Sun-like star and a hot Jupiter adopting the equilibrium tide and the inertial wave dissipation effects simultaneously. We find that the combined tidal model works as a very efficient realignment mechanism; it predicts three distinct states of the spin-orbit angle (i.e., parallel, polar, and antiparallel orbits) for a while, but the latter two states eventually approach the parallel spin-orbit configuration. The intermediate spin-orbit angles as measured in recent observations are difficult to obtain. Therefore the current model cannot reproduce the observed broad distribution of the spin-orbit angles, at least in its simple form. This indicates that the observed diversity of the spin-orbit angles may emerge from more complicated interactions with outer planets and/or may be the consequence of the primordial misalignment between the protoplanetary disk and the stellar spin, which requires future detailed studies.

  11. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  12. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  13. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  14. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  15. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  16. Multiaxial deformation of polyethylene and polyethylene/clay nanocomposites: In situ synchrotron small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurun, Bilge; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S.; Teoh, Chin Ching; Harkin-Jones, Eileen

    2013-01-10

    A unique in situ multiaxial deformation device has been designed and built specifically for simultaneous synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements. SAXS and WAXS patterns of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and HDPE/clay nanocomposites were measured in real time during in situ multiaxial deformation at room temperature and at 55 C. It was observed that the morphological evolution of polyethylene is affected by the existence of clay platelets as well as the deformation temperature and strain rate. Martensitic transformation of orthorhombic into monoclinic crystal phases was observed under strain in HDPE, which is delayed and hindered in the presence of clay nanoplatelets. From the SAXS measurements, it was observed that the thickness of the interlamellar amorphous region increased with increasing strain, which is due to elongation of the amorphous chains. The increase in amorphous layer thickness is slightly higher for the nanocomposites compared to the neat polymer.

  17. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°–85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  18. 10a- Azimuthal modesNEW.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and not in lab expts. ILLUSTRATION IN LAB EXPERIMENTS * DAWSON Experiment (Cambridge 2011) 3 Fluctuating heat release 4 5 Ecole Centrale Experiment 20132014...

  19. Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to radiation: Scalings of conversion efficiencies and propagation angles with temperature and magnetic field orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schleyer, F.; Cairns, Iver H.; Kim, E.-H.

    2013-03-15

    Linear mode conversion (LMC) is the linear transfer of energy from one wave mode to another in an inhomogeneous plasma. It is relevant to laboratory plasmas and multiple solar system radio emissions, such as continuum radiation from planetary magnetospheres and type II and III radio bursts from the solar corona and solar wind. This paper simulates LMC of waves defined by warm, magnetized fluid theory, specifically the conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to electromagnetic (EM) radiation. The primary focus is the calculation of the energy and power conversion efficiencies for LMC as functions of the angle of incidence {theta} of the Langmuir/z-mode wave, temperature {beta}=T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2}, adiabatic index {gamma}, and orientation angle {phi} between the ambient density gradient {nabla}N{sub 0} and ambient magnetic field B{sub 0} in a warm, unmagnetized plasma. The ratio of these efficiencies is found to agree well as a function of {theta}, {gamma}, and {beta} with an analytical relation that depends on the group speeds of the Langmuir/z and EM wave modes. The results demonstrate that the energy conversion efficiency {epsilon} is strongly dependent on {gamma}{beta}, {phi} and {theta}, with {epsilon}{proportional_to}({gamma}{beta}){sup 1/2} and {theta}{proportional_to}({gamma}{beta}){sup 1/2}. The power conversion efficiency {epsilon}{sub p}, on the other hand, is independent of {gamma}{beta} but does vary significantly with {theta} and {phi}. The efficiencies are shown to be maximum for approximately perpendicular density gradients ({phi} Almost-Equal-To 90 Degree-Sign ) and minimal for parallel orientation ({phi}=0 Degree-Sign ) and both the energy and power conversion efficiencies peak at the same {theta}.

  20. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  1. Self-consistent inclusion of classical large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasma Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E. Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2015-10-15

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions allow for the exchange of a significant proportion of the energy of a particle in a single collision, but are not included in models of plasmas based on fluids, the Vlasov–Fokker–Planck equation, or currently available plasma Monte Carlo techniques. Their unique effects include the creation of fast ‘knock-on’ ions, which may be more likely to undergo certain reactions, and distortions to ion distribution functions relative to what is predicted by small-angle collision only theories. We present a computational method which uses Monte Carlo techniques to include the effects of large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas and which self-consistently evolves distribution functions according to the creation of knock-on ions of any generation. The method is used to demonstrate ion distribution function distortions in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) relevant scenario of the slowing of fusion products.

  2. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  3. LHC luminosity upgrade with large Piwinski angle scheme: a recent look

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; Zimmermann, f.; /CERN

    2011-09-01

    Luminosity upgrade at the LHC collider using longitudinally flat bunches in combination with the large crossing angle (large Piwinski angle scheme) is being studied with renewed interest in recent years. By design, the total beam-beam tune shift at the LHC is less than 0.015 for two interaction points together. But the 2010-11 3.5 TeV collider operation and dedicated studies indicated that the beam-beam tune shift is >0.015 per interaction point. In view of this development we have revisited the requirements for the Large Piwinski Angle scheme at the LHC. In this paper we present a new set of parameters and luminosity calculations for the desired upgrade by investigating: (1) current performance of the LHC injectors, (2) e-cloud issues on nearly flat bunches and (3) realistic beam particle distributions from longitudinal beam dynamics simulations. We also make some remarks on the needed upgrades on the LHC injector accelerators.

  4. Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of PrFeAsO0.7: Comparison

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with LaFePO (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of PrFeAsO0.7: Comparison with LaFePO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of PrFeAsO0.7: Comparison with LaFePO Authors: Nishi, I. ; Ishikado, M. ; Ideta, S. ; Malaeb, W. ; Yoshida, T. ; Fujimori, A. ; Kotani, Y. ; Kubota, M. ; Ono, K. ; Yi, M. ; Lu, D. H. ; Moore, R. ; Shen, Z.-X. ; Iyo, A. ; Kihou, K. ; Kito, H. ; Eisaki, H. ; Shamoto, S. ;

  6. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  7. ORISE: Report by ORISE shows health physics degrees declined on all levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2014 Health physics degrees declined in 2014, enrollment trends reverse Enrollment data suggests slowly declining trends FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 25, 2015 FY15-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The total number of degrees awarded to students graduating with majors in health physics has declined across undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs for the first time in four years. The report conducted by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, titled Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees

  8. ORISE: Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased for undergraduates, ... OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in health physics ...

  9. The solubility of hydrogen in plutonium in the temperature range 475 to 825 degrees centigrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen (H) in plutonium metal (Pu) was measured in the temperature range of 475 to 825{degree}C for unalloyed Pu (UA) and in the temperature range of 475 to 625{degree}C for Pu containing two-weight-percent gallium (TWP). For TWP metal, in the temperature range 475 to 600{degree}C, the saturated solution has a maximum hydrogen to plutonium ration (H/Pu) of 0.00998 and the standard enthalpy of formation ({Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)}) is (-0.128 {plus minus} 0.0123) kcal/mol. The phase boundary of the solid solution in equilibrium with plutonium dihydride (PuH{sub 2}) is temperature independent. In the temperature range 475 to 625{degree}C, UA metal has a maximum solubility at H/Pu = 0.011. The phase boundary between the solid solution region and the metal+PuH{sub 2} two-phase region is temperature dependent. The solubility of hydrogen in UA metal was also measured in the temperature range 650 to 825{degree}C with {Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)} = (-0.104 {plus minus} 0.0143) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{degree}{sub f(s)} = 0. The phase boundary is temperature dependent and the maximum hydrogen solubility has H/Pu = 0.0674 at 825{degree}C. 52 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of a-Si:H and a-Si:D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, D. L.; Marr, D. W. M.; Nelson, B. P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Yang, J.; Yan, B.; Guha, S.

    2000-01-01

    The heterogeneity of hydrogen and deuterium on the nanometer scale has been probed by samll-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a-Si:H and a-Si:D films. Films were depsoited by two techniques, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) using conditions that yield high quality films and devices.

  11. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  12. Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine on the Intermediate Valence of Yb in (C5Me5)2 Yb(3,3'-Me2-bipy) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence ...

  13. Stochastic Inversion of Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Angle Data (Stinv-AVA)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-03

    The software was developed to invert seismic amplitude-versus-angle (AVA) data using a Bayesian framework. The posterior probability distribution function is sampled by effective Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. The software could provide not only estimates of unknown variables but also varieties of information about uncertainty, such as the mean, mode, median, variance, and even probability density of each unknown.

  14. Ni.sub.3 Al-based intermetallic alloys having improved strength above 850.degree. C.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.

    2000-01-01

    Intermetallic alloys composed essentially of: 15.5% to 17.0% Al, 3.5% to 5.5% Mo, 4% to 8% Cr, 0.04% to 0.2% Zr, 0.04% to 1.5% B, balance Ni, are characterized by melting points above 1200.degree. C. and superior strengths at temperatures above 1000.degree. C.

  15. Method for determination of the degree of compensation for electrically active impurities in multivalley semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranskii, P. I.; Gaidar, G. P.

    2013-06-15

    A method for determination of the degree of compensation k = N{sub a}/N{sub d} for shallow impurities in n-Si crystals with a nondegenerate electron gas is suggested. Data facilitating practical determination of the degree of compensation are given.

  16. Multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical interface to a computer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  17. Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine on the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Intermediate Valence of Yb in (C5Me5)2 Yb(3,3'-Me2-bipy) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine on the Intermediate Valence of Yb in (C5Me5)2 Yb(3,3'-Me2-bipy) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of the Torsion Angle in 3,3'-Dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine on the Intermediate Valence of Yb in (C5Me5)2 Yb(3,3'-Me2-bipy) The synthesis and X-ray crystal structures of Cp-2*Yb(3,3'-Me(2)bipy) and [Cp-2 Yb(3,3'-Me(2)bipy)][Cp-2

  18. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN)

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  19. Trailing edge cooling using angled impingement on surface enhanced with cast chevron arrangements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Heneveld, Benjamin E.; Brown, Glenn E.; Klinger, Jill

    2015-05-26

    A gas turbine engine component, including: a pressure side (12) having an interior surface (34); a suction side (14) having an interior surface (36); a trailing edge portion (30); and a plurality of suction side and pressure side impingement orifices (24) disposed in the trailing edge portion (30). Each suction side impingement orifice is configured to direct an impingement jet (48) at an acute angle (52) onto a target area (60) that encompasses a tip (140) of a chevron (122) within a chevron arrangement (120) formed in the suction side interior surface. Each pressure side impingement orifice is configured to direct an impingement jet at an acute angle onto an elongated target area that encompasses a tip of a chevron within a chevron arrangement formed in the pressure side interior surface.

  20. A new hydrocarbon empirical potential in angle bending calculation for the molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping, Tan Ai; Hoe, Yeak Su

    2014-07-10

    Typically, short range potential only depends on neighbouring atoms and its parameters function can be categorized into bond stretching, angle bending and bond rotation potential. In this paper, we present our work called Angle Bending (AB) potential, whereas AB potential is the extension of our previous work namely Bond Stretching (BS) potential. Basically, potential will tend to zero after truncated region, potential in specific region can be represented by different piecewise polynomial. We proposed the AB piecewise potential which is possible to solve a system involving three atoms. AB potential able to handle the potential of covalent bonds for three atoms as well as two atoms cases due to its degeneracy properties. Continuity for the piecewise polynomial has been enforced by coupling with penalty methods. There are still plenty of improvement spaces for this AB potential. The improvement for three atoms AB potential will be studied and further modified into torsional potential which are the ongoing current research.

  1. Geometric phase for collinear conical intersections. I. Geometric phase angle and vector potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xuan; Brue, Daniel A.; Blandon, Juan D.; Parker, Gregory A.; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2011-02-14

    We present a method for properly treating collinear conical intersections in triatomic systems. The general vector potential (gauge theory) approach for including the geometric phase effects associated with collinear conical intersections in hyperspherical coordinates is presented. The current study develops an introductory method in the treatment of collinear conical intersections by using the phase angle method. The geometric phase angle, {eta}, in terms of purely internal coordinates is derived using the example of a spin-aligned quartet lithium triatomic system. A numerical fit and thus an analytical form for the associated vector potentials are explicitly derived for this triatomic A{sub 3} system. The application of this methodology to AB{sub 2} and ABC systems is also discussed.

  2. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  3. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  4. Analog quadrature signal to phase angle data conversion by a quadrature digitizer and quadrature counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchenauer, C. Jerald

    1984-01-01

    The quadrature phase angle .phi.(t) of a pair of quadrature signals S.sub.1 (t) and S.sub.2 (t) is digitally encoded on a real time basis by a quadrature digitizer for fractional .phi.(t) rotational excursions and by a quadrature up/down counter for full .phi.(t) rotations. The pair of quadrature signals are of the form S.sub.1 (t)=k(t) sin .phi.(t) and S.sub.2 (t)=k(t) cos .phi.(t) where k(t) is a signal common to both. The quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter may be used together or singularly as desired or required. Optionally, a digital-to-analog converter may follow the outputs of the quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter to provide an analog signal output of the quadrature phase angle .phi.(t).

  5. Visible wide angle view imaging system of KTM tokamak based on multielement image fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chektybayev, B. Shapovalov, G.; Kolodeshnikov, A.

    2015-05-15

    In the paper, new visible wide angle view imaging system of KTM tokamak is described. The system has been designed to observe processes inside of plasma and the processes occurring due to plasma-wall interactions through the long equatorial port. Imaging system is designed based on special image fiber bundle and entrance wide angle lens, which provide image of large section of the vacuum chamber, both poloidal half-section and divertor through the sufficiently long equatorial port. The system also consists of two video cameras: slow and fast with image intensifier. Commercial equipment had been used in design of the system that allowed reducing the cost and time for research and development. The paper also discusses advantages and disadvantages of the system in comparison with conventional endoscopes based on a lens system and considers its promising utilization in future tokamaks and future steady state fusion reactors.

  6. Analog quadrature signal to phase angle data conversion by a quadrature digitizer and quadrature counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchenauer, C.J.

    1981-09-23

    The quadrature phase angle phi (t) of a pair of quadrature signals S/sub 1/(t) and S/sub 2/(t) is digitally encoded on a real time basis by a quadrature digitizer for fractional phi (t) rotational excursions and by a quadrature up/down counter for full phi (t) rotations. The pair of quadrature signals are of the form S/sub 1/(t) = k(t) sin phi (t) and S/sub 2/(t) = k(t) cos phi (t) where k(t) is a signal common to both. The quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter may be used together or singularly as desired or required. Optionally, a digital-to-analog converter may follow the outputs of the quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter to provide an analog signal output of the quadrature phase angle phi (t).

  7. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  8. Identification of sub-grains and low angle boundaries beyond the angular resolution of EBSD maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, L.; Kratsch, D.; Salib, M.; Gey, N.

    2014-12-15

    A new method called ALGrId (Anti-Leak GRain IDentification) is proposed for the detection of sub-grains beyond the relative angular resolution of Electron Backscatter Diffraction maps. It does not use any additional information such as Kikuchi Pattern Quality map nor need data filtering. It uses a modified Dijkstra algorithm which seeks the continuous set of boundaries having the highest average disorientation angle. - Highlights: ALGrId is a new method to identify sub-grains and low angle boundaries in EBSD maps. Unlike classical methods, ALGrId works even beyond the relative angular resolution. If the orientation noise peaks at 0.7, ALGrid detects 0.4-boundaries correctly. In the same example, the classical algorithm identifies 1.1-boundaries only.

  9. BIOISIS: Biological Macromolecules by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tainer, John [Scripps Research Institute; Hura, Greg [LBNL; Rambo, Robert P. [LBNL

    BIOISIS is an open access database dedicated to the study of biological macromolecules by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). BIOISIS aims to become the complete source for the deposition, distribution and maintenance of small angle X-ray scattering data and technologies. The database is designed around the concept of an experiment and relates a specific experiment to a set of genes, organisms, computational models and experimental data. As of May 2012, BIOSIS contains 7,118 genes covering four different organisms. Forty-two modeled structures are available. Clicking on a structures reveals scattering curves, experimental conditions, and experimental values. The data are collected at Beamline 12.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS).[Copied with editing from http://www.bioisis.net/about

  10. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  11. Mass and mixing angle patterns in the Standard Model and its material Supersymmetric Extension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramond, P.

    1992-01-01

    Using renormalization group techniques, we examine several interesting relations among masses and mixing angles of quarks and lepton in the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Interactions as a functionof scale. We extend the analysis to the minimal Supersymmetric Extension to determine its effect on these mass relations. For a heavy to quark, and minimal supersymmetry, most of these relations, can be made to agree at one unification scale.

  12. Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies Revealed Three Kinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stages of a T=4 Virus Maturation June 2010 Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies Revealed Three Kinetic Stages of a T=4 Virus Maturation Most eukaryotic viruses, including HIV, influenza and herpes viruses, undergo maturation when transitioning from the noninfectious provirion to the infectious virion. Maturation processes involve reorganization of viral quaternary structure to defend viral gene from the cellular defense mechanism and lead to effective transfection. Nudaurelia

  13. Two-lens, anamorphic, Brewster-angle, Fourier-transform relay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A two-lens system provides a simple and versatile means to relay a laser beam. The pair of lenses can provide true volume imaging, reproducing both amplitude and phase of the input beam. By using cylindrical lenses it is possible to change the aspect ratio of the beam. By adjusting the cylindrical curvatures, it is possible to minimize reflections by tilting the lenses at the Brewster angle.

  14. Small-angle X-ray Scattering from Magnetic Clusters and Structural Grains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Magnetic Recording Media | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Small-angle X-ray Scattering from Magnetic Clusters and Structural Grains in Magnetic Recording Media Friday, July 31, 2015 Historically, areal density increases in longitudinal hard disk drive media technology have been driven by reduction of grain size. However, since its introduction in 2006, the perpendicular magnetic recording media grain size has remained more or less constant at around 9 nm. Perpendicular

  15. X-ray small-angle scattering from sputtered CeO{sub 2}/C bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haviar, S.; Dubau, M.; Khalakhan, I.; Vorokhta, M.; Matolinova, I.; Matolin, V.; Vales, V.; Endres, J.; Holy, V.; Buljan, M.; Bernstorff, S.

    2013-01-14

    Surface and interface morphology of cerium oxide/carbon bilayers used as thin-film catalysts is studied by grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy, and the dependence of the structural parameters on the thicknesses of the constituting layers is investigated. The applicability of x-ray scattering and its advantages over standard analytical methods are discussed.

  16. Near IR Scanning Angle Total Internal Reflection Raman Spectroscopy at Smooth Gold Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, Kristopher; Meyer, Matthew; Smith, Emily

    2012-04-13

    Total internal reflection (TIR) Raman and reflectivity spectra were collected for nonresonant analytes as a function of incident angle at sapphire or sapphire/smooth 50 nm gold interfaces using 785 nm excitation. For both interfaces, the Raman signal as a function of incident angle is well-modeled by the calculated interfacial mean square electric field (MSEF) relative to the incident field times the thickness of the layer being probed in the Raman measurement (D{sub RS}). The Raman scatter was reproducibly enhanced at the interface containing a gold film relative to the sapphire interface by a factor of 4.34.6 for aqueous pyridine or 2.23.7 for neat nitrobenzene, depending on the analyzed vibrational mode. The mechanism for the increased Raman signal is the enhanced MSEF at incident angles where propagating surface plasmons are excited in the metal film. The background from the TIR prism was reduced by 8995% with the addition of the gold film, and the percent relative uncertainty in peak area was reduced from 15 to 1.7% for the 1347 cm1 mode of nitrobenzene. Single monolayers of benzenethiol (S/N = 6.8) and 4-mercaptopyridine (S/N = 16.5) on gold films were measured by TIR Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation (210 mW) without resonant enhancement in 1 min.

  17. Broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements: Instrumental setup, alignment, and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhang, A.; Abasahl, B.; Dutta-Gupta, S.; Lovera, A.; Martin, O. J. F.; Mandracci, P.; Descrovi, E.

    2013-03-15

    The construction, alignment, and performance of a setup for broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements, with emphasis on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, are presented in comprehensive detail. In contrast with most SPR instruments working with a monochromatic source, this setup takes advantage of a broadband/white light source and has full capability for automated angle vs. wavelength dispersion measurements for any arbitrary nanostructure array. A cylindrical prism is used rather than a triangular one in order to mitigate refraction induced effects and allow for such measurements. Although seemingly simple, this instrument requires use of many non-trivial methods in order to achieve proper alignment over all angles of incidence. Here we describe the alignment procedure for such a setup, the pitfalls introduced from the finite beam width incident onto the cylindrical prism, and deviations in the reflected/transmitted beam resulting from the finite thickness of the sample substrate. We address every one of these issues and provide experimental evidences on the success of this instrument and the alignment procedure used.

  18. EM Contractors’ Donations Support 4-Year Engineering Degree at USC Aiken

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM contractors URS and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) pledged to contribute $400,000 over several years to help fund a proposed four-year engineering degree at the University of South Carolina Aiken (USC Aiken).

  19. Calculation of contact angles at triple phase boundary in solid oxide fuel cell anode using the level set method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaojun; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Kohno, Haruhiko; Jiao, Zhenjun; Hayakawa, Koji; Okita, Kohei; Shikazono, Naoki

    2014-10-15

    A level set method is applied to characterize the three dimensional structures of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases in solid oxide fuel cell anode reconstructed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the triple phase boundary based on interfacial normal vectors which can be calculated from the signed distance functions defined for each of the three phases. Furthermore, surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles by assuming the interfacial force balance at the triple phase boundary. The average contact angle values of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore are found to be 143156, 83138 and 82123, respectively. The mean contact angles remained nearly unchanged after 100 hour operation. However, the contact angles just after reduction are different for the cells with different sintering temperatures. In addition, standard deviations of the contact angles are very large especially for yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases. The calculated surface tension forces from mean contact angles were close to the experimental values found in the literature. Slight increase of surface tensions of nickel/pore and nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia were observed after operation. Present data are expected to be used not only for the understanding of the degradation mechanism, but also for the quantitative prediction of the microstructural temporal evolution of solid oxide fuel cell anode. - Highlights: A level set method is applied to characterize the 3D structures of SOFC anode. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the TPB. Surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles. The average contact angle values are found to be 143o-156o, 83o-138o and 82o-123o. Present data are expected to understand degradation and predict evolution of SOFC.

  20. ORISE: Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    undergraduates, declined for graduates Number of health physics degrees granted in 2013 has increased for undergraduates, declined for graduates Enrollment data suggests current trend likely to continue in 2014 and 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 1, 2014 FY14-18 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in health physics has increased slightly for bachelor's degrees, but decreased for both master's and doctoral candidates. The report, titled Health Physics

  1. Degree of dispersion of latex particles in cement paste, as assessed by electrical resistivity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1996-12-31

    The degree of dispersion of latex particles in latex-modified cement paste was assessed by measurement of the volume electrical resistivity and modeling this resistivity in terms of latex and cement phases that are partly in series and partly in parallel. The assessment was best at low values of the latex-cement ratio; it underestimated the degree of latex dispersion when the latex/cement ratio was high, especially > 0.2.

  2. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  3. Crystal Structures and Small-angle X-ray Scattering Analysis of UDP-galactopyranose Mutase from the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Karr, Dale B.; Nix, Jay C.; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J.

    2015-10-15

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose, which is a central reaction in galactofuranose biosynthesis. Galactofuranose has never been found in humans but is an essential building block of the cell wall and extracellular matrix of many bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. The importance of UGM for the viability of many pathogens and its absence in humans make UGM a potential drug target. Here we report the first crystal structures and small-angle x-ray scattering data for UGM from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of aspergillosis. The structures reveal that Aspergillus UGM has several extra secondary and tertiary structural elements that are not found in bacterial UGMs yet are important for substrate recognition and oligomerization. Small-angle x-ray scattering data show that Aspergillus UGM forms a tetramer in solution, which is unprecedented for UGMs. The binding of UDP or the substrate induces profound conformational changes in the enzyme. Two loops on opposite sides of the active site move toward each other by over 10 {angstrom} to cover the substrate and create a closed active site. The degree of substrate-induced conformational change exceeds that of bacterial UGMs and is a direct consequence of the unique quaternary structure of Aspergillus UGM. Galactopyranose binds at the re face of the FAD isoalloxazine with the anomeric carbon atom poised for nucleophilic attack by the FAD N5 atom. The structural data provide new insight into substrate recognition and the catalytic mechanism and thus will aid inhibitor design.

  4. Enhancement of the photocatalytic property of TiO{sub 2} columnar nanostructured films by changing deposition angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhengcao Teng, Yi; Xing, Liping; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Isolated and inclined columnar TiO{sub 2} nanostructures were obtained by sputtering Ti, and subsequently annealing. • The film performed photocatalytic decolorization effectively under UV irradiation. • The photocatalytic efficiency increased with deposition angle, which results in a more porous micro structure of the films. - Abstract: Isolated and inclined columnar nanostructured TiO{sub 2} films were obtained by sputtering titanium with glancing angle deposition method and subsequently annealing in air. Compared with flat film, TiO{sub 2} film fabricated with this method has higher porosity; compared with TiO{sub 2} powder, it overcomes the obstacles of immobilization and recycling. The TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis was evaluated by the degradation of methyl orange under UV light. It was indicated that the photocatalytic performance increased with deposition angle, which changed the porosity of the films. The relationship between deposition angle (the angle between the target and substrate surface) and the TiO{sub 2} columnar inclination angle (the angle between TiO{sub 2} columnar and substrate normal) was discussed.

  5. Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vejling Andersen, Søren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2013-12-02

    Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

  6. Imaging method based on attenuation, refraction and ultra-small-angle-scattering of x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wernick, Miles N.; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Oltulu, Oral; Zhong, Zhong

    2005-09-20

    A method for detecting an image of an object by measuring the intensity at a plurality of positions of a transmitted beam of x-ray radiation emitted from the object as a function of angle within the transmitted beam. The intensity measurements of the transmitted beam are obtained by a crystal analyzer positioned at a plurality of angular positions. The plurality of intensity measurements are used to determine the angular intensity spectrum of the transmitted beam. One or more parameters, such as an attenuation property, a refraction property and a scatter property, can be obtained from the angular intensity spectrum and used to display an image of the object.

  7. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-03-14

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  8. SANS (small angle neutron scattering) measurement of deuterium-dislocation correlation in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuser, B.J.; Summerfield, G.C.; King, J.S. ); Epperson, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements have been made on deformed polycrystal palladium samples with and without deuterium dissolved in the solution phase ({alpha}) at room temperature. Concentrations were held constant during SANS experiments by an equilibrium gas pressure cell. The difference scattering cross section for the same sample with and without deuterium loading has a 1/Q behavior (Q=4{pi}/{lambda} sin{theta}/2) at intermediate values of Q. At very low values of Q the dependence is much stronger than 1/Q. The 1/Q behavior is attributed to deuterium trapping close to long dislocation cores forming rod-like scattering structures.

  9. Enhancing Condensers for Geothermal Systems: the Effect of High Contact Angles on Dropwise Condensation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, John M.; Kim, Sunwoo; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-10-06

    Phase change heat transfer is notorious for increasing the irreversibility of, and therefore decreasing the efficiency of, geothermal power plants. Its significant contribution to the overall irreversibility of the plant makes it the most important source of inefficiency in the process. Recent studies here have shown the promotion of drop wise condensation in the lab by means of increasing the surface energy density of a tube with nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology has allowed the creation of surface treatments which discourage water from wetting a tube surface during a static test. These surface treatments are unique in that they create high- contact angles on the condensing tube surfaces to promote drop wise condensation.

  10. Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, L.; Tate, M. W.; Finnefrock, A. C.; Kalidas, C.; Trotter, S.; Darnton, N. C.; Lurio, L.; Austin, R. H.; Batt, C. A.; Gruner, S. M. (and others)

    2001-05-21

    High-intensity, ''pink'' beam from an undulator was used in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding with time resolved small angle x-ray scattering. This Letter describes recent work on the protein bovine {beta} -lactoglobulin where collapse from an expanded to a compact set of states was directly observed on the millisecond time scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently understood. The characterization of transient, compact states is vital in assessing the validity of theories and models of the folding process.

  11. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H.F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  12. Combined in-situ dilatometer and contact angle studies of interfacial reaction kinetics in brazing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dave, V. R.; Javernick, D. A.; Thoma, D. J.; Cola, M. J.; Hollis, K. J.; Smith, F. M.; Dauelsberg, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-component dissimilar material braze joints as shown in Figure 1 consisting of dissimilar base materials, filler materials and wetting agents are of tantamount importance in a wide variely of applications. This work combines dilatometry and contact angle measurements to characterize in-situ the multiple interfacial reaction pathways that occur in such systems. Whereas both of these methods are commonly used tools in metallurgical investigation, their combined use within the context of brazing studies is new and offers considerable additional insight. Applications are discussed to joints made between Beryllium and Monel with TiH{sub 2} as the wetting agent and Cu-28%Ag as the filler material.

  13. Surface density of spacetime degrees of freedom from equipartition law in theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-06-15

    I show that the principle of equipartition, applied to area elements of a surface {partial_derivative}V which are in equilibrium at the local Davies-Unruh temperature, allows one to determine the surface number density of the microscopic spacetime degrees of freedom in any diffeomorphism invariant theory of gravity. The entropy associated with these degrees of freedom matches with the Wald entropy for the theory. This result also allows one to attribute an entropy density to the spacetime in a natural manner. The field equations of the theory can then be obtained by extremizing this entropy. Moreover, when the microscopic degrees of freedom are in local thermal equilibrium, the spacetime entropy of a bulk region resides on its boundary.

  14. Glassy carbon as an absolute intensity calibration standard for small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, F.; Ilavsky, J.; Long, G.; Allen, A.; Quintana, J.; Jemian, P.; NIST

    2010-05-01

    Absolute calibration of small-angle scattering (SAS) intensity data (measured in terms of the differential scattering cross section per unit sample volume per unit solid angle) is essential for many important aspects of quantitative SAS analysis, such as obtaining the number density, volume fraction, and specific surface area of the scatterers. It also enables scattering data from different instruments (light, X-ray, or neutron scattering) to be combined, and it can even be useful to detect the existence of artifacts in the experimental data. Different primary or secondary calibration methods are available. In the latter case, absolute intensity calibration requires a stable artifact with the necessary scattering profile. Glassy carbon has sometimes been selected as this intensity calibration standard. Here we review the spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of one type of commercially available glassy carbon that is being used as an intensity calibration standard at a number of SAS facilities. We demonstrate that glassy carbon is sufficiently homogeneous and stable during routine use to be relied upon as a suitable standard for absolute intensity calibration of SAS data.

  15. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of DNP enhancements in a rotor spinning at the magic angle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2016-02-23

    Simulations performed on model, static, samples have shown that the microwave power is non-uniformly distributed in the magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor when using conventional dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation. Here, we applied the stray-field magic angle spinning imaging (STRAFI–MAS) experiment to generate a spatial map of the DNP enhancements in a full rotor, which is spun at a low rate in a commercial DNP–MAS NMR system. Notably, we observed that the enhancement factors produced in the center of the rotor can be twice as large as those produced at the top of the rotor. Surprisingly, we observed that themore » largest enhancement factors are observed along the axis of the rotor as opposed to against its walls, which are most directly irradiated by the microwave beam. We lastly observed that the distribution of enhancement factors can be moderately improved by degassing the sample and increasing the microwave power. The inclusion of dielectric particles greatly amplifies the enhancement factors throughout the rotor. Furthermore, the STRAFI–MAS approach can provide useful guidance for optimizing the access of microwave power to the sample, and thereby lead to further increases in sensitivity of DNP–MAS NMR.« less

  17. Sensitivity of fenestration solar gain to source spectrum and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCluney, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    The solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) is the fraction of solar radiant flux incident on a fenestration system entering a building as heat gain. In general it depends on both the angle of incidence and the spectral distribution of the incident solar radiation. In attempts to improve energy performance and user acceptance of high-performance glazing systems, manufacturers are producing glazing systems with increasing spectral selectivity. This poses potential difficulties for calculations of solar heat gain through windows based upon the use of a single solar spectral weighting function. The sensitivity of modern high-performance glazing systems to both the angle of incidence and the shape of the incident solar spectrum is examined using a glazing performance simulation program. It is found that as the spectral selectivity of the glazing system increases, the SHGC can vary as the incident spectral distribution varies. The variations can be as great as 50% when using several different representative direct-beam spectra. These include spectra having low and high air masses and a standard spectrum having an air mass of 1.5. The variations can be even greater if clear blue diffuse skylight is considered. It is recommended that the current broad-band shading coefficient method of calculating solar gain be replaced by one that is spectral based.

  18. Active probing of cloud thickness and optical depth using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60{sup o} full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Section 2 covers the up-to-date evolution of the nighttime WAIL instrument at LANL. Section 3 reports our progress towards daytime capability for WAIL, an important extension to full diurnal cycle monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter. Section 4 describes briefly how the important cloud properties can be inferred from WAIL signals.

  19. Real Time Selective Harmonic Minimization for Multilevel Inverters Connected to Solar Panels Using Artificial Neural Network Angle Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Filho, Faete; Cao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    This work approximates the selective harmonic elimination problem using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to generate the switching angles in an 11-level full-bridge cascade inverter powered by five varying dc input sources. Each of the five full bridges of the cascade inverter was connected to a separate 195-W solar panel. The angles were chosen such that the fundamental was kept constant and the low-order harmonics were minimized or eliminated. A nondeterministic method is used to solve the system for the angles and to obtain the data set for the ANN training. The method also provides a set of acceptable solutions in the space where solutions do not exist by analytical methods. The trained ANN is a suitable tool that brings a small generalization effect on the angles' precision and is able to perform in real time (50-/60-Hz time window).

  20. Effects of the scatter in sunspot group tilt angles on the large-scale magnetic field at the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schssler, M.

    2014-08-10

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  1. Array of Cu{sub 2}O nano-columns fabricated by oblique angle sputter deposition and their application in photo-assisted proton reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Chaudhary, Y. S.; Thakur, I.; Kulkarni, N. A.; Ayyub, P.

    2015-01-14

    Nano-columnar arrays of Cu{sub 2}O were grown by the oblique angle sputter deposition technique based on the self-shadowing principle. The as-grown nano-columnar samples are oriented along (111) direction, and they are highly transmitting in the visible range with a low reflectance. In this work, we show the photo-electrochemical activity of nano-columnar array of Cu{sub 2}O, which shows a higher (?25%) photocurrent density and a two-fold enhancement in the incident-to-photon conversion efficiency as compared to continuous thin film of Cu{sub 2}O in photo-assisted proton reduction type reaction. The improvement in electrochemical activity of nano-columnar Cu{sub 2}O photocathode can be attributed to the change in morphology, crystal structure, as well as electrical property, which shows a higher degree of band bending, increased donor carrier (e?) density and lower width of space charge region as revealed by capacitance measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis.

  2. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as replacing, but as complimentary to conventional CT, to be used in specific applications.

  3. DEGREE-SCALE GeV 'JETS' FROM ACTIVE AND DEAD TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Elyiv, A.

    2010-08-20

    We show that images of TeV blazars in the GeV energy band should contain, along with point-like sources, degree-scale jet-like extensions. These GeV extensions are the result of electromagnetic cascades initiated by TeV {gamma}-rays interacting with extragalactic background light and the deflection of the cascade electrons/positrons in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs). Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the spectral and timing properties of the degree-scale extensions in simulated GeV band images of TeV blazars. We show that the brightness profile of such degree-scale extensions can be used to infer the light curve of the primary TeV {gamma}-ray source over the past 10{sup 7} yr, i.e., over a time scale comparable to the lifetime of the parent active galactic nucleus. This implies that the degree-scale jet-like GeV emission could be detected not only near known active TeV blazars, but also from 'TeV blazar remnants', whose central engines were switched off up to 10 million years ago. Since the brightness profile of the GeV 'jets' depends on the strength and the structure of the EGMF, their observation provides additional information about the EGMF.

  4. Ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering analysis of photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramova, V. V.; Sinitskii, A. S.; Grigor'eva, N. A.; Grigor'ev, S. V.; Belov, D. V.; Petukhov, A. V.; Mistonov, A. A.; Vasil'eva, A. V.; Tret'yakov, Yu. D.

    2009-07-15

    The results of an ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering study of iron(III) oxide inverse opal thin films are presented. The photonic crystals examined are shown to have fcc structure with amount of stacking faults varying among the samples. The method used in this study makes it possible to easily distinguish between samples with predominantly twinned fcc structure and nearly perfect fcc stacking. The difference observed between samples fabricated under identical conditions is attributed to random layer stacking in the self-assembled colloidal crystals used as templates for fabricating the inverse opals. The present method provides a versatile tool for analyzing photonic crystal structure in studies of inverse opals made of various materials, colloidal crystals, and three-dimensional photonic crystals of other types.

  5. Boundary layer modeling of reactive flow over a porous surface with angled injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shiling; Fotache, Catalin G.; Hautman, Donald J.; Ochs, Stuart S. [United Technologies Research Center, MS 129-29, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Chao, Beei-Huan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    An analytical model was developed to investigate the dynamics of nonpremixed flames in a shear layer established between a mainstream flow of fuel-rich combustion products and a porous surface with an angled injection of air. In the model, a one-step overall chemical reaction was employed, together with boundary layer conservation equations solved using similarity solutions. Parametric studies were performed to understand the effects of equivalence ratio, temperature, and mass flow rate of the fuel and air streams on the flame standoff distance, surface temperature, and heat flux at the surface. The analytical model predictions were compared with computational fluid dynamics results obtained using the FLUENT commercial code for both the laminar and the turbulent flow models. Qualitative agreement in surface temperature was observed. Finally, the flame stability limits predicted by the model were compared with available experimental data and found to agree qualitatively, as well. (author)

  6. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R.; Hinuma, Yoyo; Pennycook, Stephen

    2014-11-26

    To completely understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us tomore » measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation.« less

  7. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-11-15

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to {approx}7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10{sup 12} ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  8. Toward a Taxonomy of the Denatured State: Small Angle Scattering Studies of Unfolded Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millett, I.S.; Doniach, S.; Plaxco, K.W. (Stanford); (UCSB)

    2005-02-15

    Despite the critical role the unfolded state plays in defining protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics (Berg et al., 2002; Dunker, 2002; Shortle, 2002; Wright and Dyson, 2002), our understanding of its detailed structure remains rather rudimentary; the heterogeneity of the unfolded ensemble renders difficult or impossible its study by traditional, atomic-level structural methods. Consequently, recent years have seen a significant expansion of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS, respectively) techniques that provide direct, albeit rotationally and time-averaged, measures of the geometric properties of the unfolded ensemble. These studies have reached a critical mass, allowing us for the first time to define general observations regarding the nature of the geometry - and possibly the chemistry and physics - of unfolded proteins.

  9. Tunable and angle-insensitive plasmon resonances in graphene ribbon arrays with multispectral diffraction response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kangwen; Ma, Xunpeng; Zhang, Zuyin; Xu, Yun, E-mail: xuyun@semi.ac.cn; Song, Guofeng [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-14

    Plasmon resonances in graphene ribbon arrays are investigated numerically by means of the Finite Element Method. Numerical analysis shows that a series of multipolar resonances take place when graphene ribbon arrays are illuminated by a TM polarized electromagnetic wave. Moreover, these resonances are angle-independent, and can be tuned greatly by the width and the doping level of the graphene ribbons. Specifically, we demonstrate that for graphene arrays with several sets of graphene ribbons, which have different widths or doping levels, each of these multipolar resonances will be split into several ones. In addition, as plasmon resonances can confine electromagnetic field at the ribbon edges, graphene ribbons with different widths or doping levels offer intriguing application for electrically tunable spectral imaging.

  10. Ultrathin metal-semiconductor-metal resonator for angle invariant visible band transmission filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Yong Lee, Jae; Jay Guo, L.

    2014-06-09

    We present transmission visible wavelength filters based on strong interference behaviors in an ultrathin semiconductor material between two metal layers. The proposed devices were fabricated on 2?cm??2?cm glass substrate, and the transmission characteristics show good agreement with the design. Due to a significantly reduced light propagation phase change associated with the ultrathin semiconductor layer and the compensation in phase shift of light reflecting from the metal surface, the filters show an angle insensitive performance up to 70, thus, addressing one of the key challenges facing the previously reported photonic and plasmonic color filters. This principle, described in this paper, can have potential for diverse applications ranging from color display devices to the image sensors.

  11. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  12. Small angle neutron scattering as fingerprinting of ancient potteries from Sicily (Southern Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.; Venuti, V.; Teixeira, J.

    2009-09-01

    Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in order to investigate, in microdestructive way, the mesoscopic structure of a variety of potteries of relevance to cultural heritage coming from different Sicilian (Southern Italy) archeological sites belonging to the 'Strait of Messina' area and dated back to 7th-3rd century B.C. Data have been compared with the mesoscopic parameters extracted for two series of clayey sediments typical of the Strait of Messina area and fired under controlled conditions. The observed agreement between the features of reference and archeological samples allowed us to estimate the maximum firing temperature of the latter. Information on the pore sizes was obtained by the use of the concept of fractal surface, and compared with porosimetry results.

  13. Forward-angle neutron-proton scattering at 96 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, C.; Blomgren, J.; Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Pomp, S.; Oesterlund, M.; Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U.; Elmgren, K.; Jonsson, O.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nilsson, L.; Olsson, N.

    2005-02-01

    The differential np scattering cross section has been measured at 96 MeV in the angular range {theta}{sub c.m.}=20 deg. -76 deg. Together with an earlier data set at the same energy, covering the angles {theta}{sub c.m.}=74 deg. -180 deg., a new data set has been formed in the angular range {theta}{sub c.m.}=20 deg. - 180 deg. This extended data set has been normalized to the experimental total np cross section, resulting in a renormalization of the earlier data of 0.7%, which is well within the reported normalization uncertainty for that experiment. A novel normalization technique has been investigated. The results on forward np scattering are in reasonable agreement with theory models and partial wave analyses and have been compared with data from the literature.

  14. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  15. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  16. Anastomosing grabens, low-angle faults, and Tertiary thrust( ) faults, western Markagunt Plateau, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, F.; Sable, E.G. )

    1993-04-01

    A structurally complex terrane composed of grabens and horsts, low-angle faults, Tertiary thrust( ) faults, gravity-slide blocks, and debris deposits has been mapped along the western Markagunt Plateau, east of Parowan and Summit, southwestern Utah. This terrane, structurally situated within the transition between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau provinces, contains Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The structures are mostly Miocene to Oligocene but some are Pleistocene. The oldest structure is the Red Hills low-angle shear zone, interpreted as a shallow structure that decoupled an upper plate composed of a Miocene-Oligocene volcanic ash-flow tuff and volcaniclastic succession from a lower plate of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The period of deformation on the shear zone is bracketed from field relationships between 22.5 and 20 Ma. The graben-horst system trends northeast and formed after about 20 Ma (and probably much later) based on displacement of dated dikes and a laccolith. The central part of the system contains many grabens that merge toward its southerly end to become a single graben. Within these grabens, (1) older structures are preserved, (2) debris eroded from horst walls forms lobe-shaped deposits, (3) Pleistocene basaltic cinder cones have localized along graben-bounding faults, and (4) rock units are locally folded suggesting some component of lateral translation along graben-bounding faults. Megabreccia deposits and landslide debris are common. Megabreccia deposits are interpreted as gravity-slide blocks of Miocene-Oligocene( ) age resulting from formation of the Red Hills shear zone, although some may be related to volcanism, and still others to later deformation. The debris deposits are landslides of Pleistocene-Pliocene( ) age possibly caused by continued uplift of the Markagunt Plateau.

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 GLOBAL INVENTORY FOR SO(X) AND NO(X) ON A 1(DEGREE) X 1(DEGREE) LATITUDE-LONGITUDE GRID.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN HEYST,B.J.

    1999-10-01

    Sulfur and nitrogen oxides emitted to the atmosphere have been linked to the acidification of water bodies and soils and perturbations in the earth's radiation balance. In order to model the global transport and transformation of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x}, detailed spatial and temporal emission inventories are required. Benkovitz et al. (1996) published the development of an inventory of 1985 global emissions of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from anthropogenic sources. The inventory was gridded to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} latitude-longitude grid and has served as input to several global modeling studies. There is now a need to provide modelers with an update of this inventory to a more recent year, with a split of the emissions into elevated and low level sources. This paper describes the development of a 1990 update of the SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} global inventories that also includes a breakdown of sources into 17 sector groups. The inventory development starts with a gridded global default EDGAR inventory (Olivier et al, 1996). In countries where more detailed national inventories are available, these are used to replace the emissions for those countries in the global default. The gridded emissions are distributed into two height levels (0-100m and >100m) based on the final plume heights that are estimated to be typical for the various sectors considered. The sources of data as well as some of the methodologies employed to compile and develop the 1990 global inventory for SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} are discussed. The results reported should be considered to be interim since the work is still in progress and additional data sets are expected to become available.

  18. High degree of molecular orientation by a combination of THz and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitano, Kenta; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Itatani, Jiro [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan) and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    We propose a method for achieving molecular orientation by two-step excitation with intense femtosecond laser and terahertz (THz) pulses. First, the femtosecond laser pulse induces off-resonant impulsive Raman excitation to create rotational wave packets. Next, a delayed intense THz pulse effectively induces resonant dipole transition between neighboring rotational states. By controlling the intensities of both the pulses and the time delay, we can create rotational wave packets consisting of states with different parities in order to achieve a high degree of molecular orientation under a field-free condition. We numerically demonstrate that the highest degree of orientation of >0.8 in HBr molecules is feasible under experimentally available conditions.

  19. Biography U. Düsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Düsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study: mining engineer 1989- 1993 PhD work - geomechanical investigations on the stability of salt caverns for waste disposal. 2009 Habilitation - proof of stability and integrity of underground excavations in saliniferous formations with special regard to lab tests. 1989 - 2012 chief engineer at Clausthal University of

  20. Statistical behavior in deterministic quantum systems with few degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.V.; Shankar, R.

    1985-04-29

    Numerical studies of the dynamics of finite quantum spin chains are presented which show that quantum systems with few degrees of freedom (N = 7) can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics. The success of the statistical description is seen to depend on the interplay between the initial state, the observable, and the Hamiltonian. This work clarifies the impact of integrability and conservation laws on statistical behavior. The relation to quantum chaos is also discussed.

  1. Structural stability of 1100{degree}C heated Pd/k during absorption cycling in protium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.A.

    1993-03-12

    Pd/k is a hydride forming packing material which is used in the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP). Palladium is supported on kieselguhr to create a packing material which will provide adequate void space to prevent excessive pressure drops and flow restrictions. The use of unsupported palladium would result in blockage of columns and clogging of filters due to the small particle size of unsupported palladium hydride powder. During pilot scale demonstrations, it was noted that the Pd/k packing material had degraded causing severe flow restrictions within the TCAP column. A solution to the problem involved the heating of Pd/k at 1,110{degree}C to strengthen the packing material, and render it more resistant to breakdown. The 1, 100{degree}C heated Pd/k has been shown to be more resistant to mechanical breakdown than the Pd/k prior to heat treatment. Two primary modes of Pd/k particle degradation have been identified: mechanical breakdown caused by particle fluidization and degradation caused by absorption/desorption cycling. Absorption/desorption cycling causes the palladium particles within the packing to expanded and contract upon formation and decomposition of the hydride, respectively. This expansion and contraction causes large localized stresses within the packing material, which if these stresses can not be accommodated within the packing will cause the material to crack and degrade. The purpose of this report is to document the results of the absorption/desorption cycling of 1,100{degree}C heated Pd/k and compare these results to the results obtained from the absorption/desorption cycling of Pd/k which had not been heated at 1, 100{degree}C.

  2. New p( rvec. gamma. ,. pi. degrees ) results from LEGS and the quadrupole excitation of the. Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Results from three independent measurements of the p({yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup {degrees}}) reaction are presented for incident photon energies between 243 and 314 MeV. The ratio of cross sections measured with orthogonal states of linear polarization is sensitive to the E2 excitation of the {Delta} resonance. Comparisons are made to the predictions of various models, all of which fail to reproduce these data.

  3. Containing A Star On Earth: Understanding Turbulence At 100 Million Degrees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 1, 2014, 9:00am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium Containing A Star On Earth: Understanding Turbulence At 100 Million Degrees Dr. Walter Guttenfelder, Research Physicist Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Presentation: PDF icon Guttenfelder_Science_on_Saturday_2014_1.pdf One of the principal challenges remaining for realizing magnetic fusion energy is to understand and mitigate the chaotic flows of ionized gas, or plasma, that lead to unacceptable

  4. Realizing thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles from commercially available planar circuit materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Brian B; Whites, Kieth W; Radway, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, recent work on engineering R-card surface resistivity with printed metallic patterns is extended to the design of thin electromagnetic absorbers. Thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles and both polarizations have recently been computationally verified by Luukkonen et al.. These absorbers are analytically modeled high-impedance surfaces with capacitive arrays of square patches implemented with relatively high dielectric constant and high loss substrate. However, the advantages provided by the accurate analytical model are largely negated by the need to obtain high dielectric constant material with accurately engineered loss. Fig. I(c) illustrates full-wave computational results for an absorber without vias engineered as proposed by Luukkonen et al.. Unique values for the dielectric loss are required for different center frequencies. Parameters for the capacitive grid are D=5.0 mm and w=O.l mm for a center frequency of 3.36 GHz. The relative permittivity and thickness is 9.20(1-j0.234) and 1=3.048 mm. Consider a center frequency of5.81 GHz and again 1=3.048 mm, the required parameters for the capacitive grid are D=2.0 mm and w=0.2 mm where the required relative permittivity is now 9.20(1-j0.371) Admittedly, engineered dielectrics are themselves a historically interesting and fruitful research area which benefits today from advances in monolithic fabrication using direct-write of dielectrics with nanometer scale inclusions. However, our objective in the present study is to realize the advantages of the absorber proposed by Luukkonen et al. without resort to engineered lossy dielectrics. Specifically we are restricted to commercially available planer circuit materials without use of in-house direct-write technology or materials engineering capability. The materials considered here are TMM 10 laminate with (35 {mu}lm copper cladding with a complex permittivity 9.20-j0.0022) and Ohmegaply resistor conductor material (maximum 250 {Omega}/sq.). A thin electromagnetic absorber for incidence angles greater than 30deg. but less than 60deg. and both polarizations is computationally demonstrated. This absorber utilizes high-permittivity, low-loss microwave substrate in conjunction with an engineered lossy sheet impedance. The lossy sheet impedance is easily engineered with simple analytical approximations and can be manufactured from commercially available laminate materials on microwave substrate.

  5. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using Hig Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-11-21

    The Yowlumne field is a giant field in the southern San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. It is a deep (13,000 ft) waterflood operation that produces from the Miocene- aged Stevens Sand. The reservoir is interpreted as a layered, fan-shaped, prograding turbidite complex containing several lobe-shaped sand bodies that represent distinct flow units. A high ultimate recovery factor is expected, yet significant quantities of undrained oil remain at the fan margins. The fan margins are not economic to develop using vertical wells because of thinning pay, deteriorating rock quality, and depth. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the northeast distal fan margin through the use of a high- angle well completed with multiple hydraulic- fracture treatments. A high-angle well offers greater pay exposure than can be achieved with a vertical well. Hydraulic-fracture treatments will establish vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at a cost of approximately two vertical wells. The near-horizontal well penetrated the Yowlumne sand; a Stevens sand equivalent, in the distal fan margin in the northeast area of the field. The well was drilled in a predominately westerly direction towards the interior of the field, in the direction of improving rock quality. Drilling and completion operations proved to be very challenging, leading to a number of adjustments to original plans. Hole conditions resulted in obtaining less core material than desired and setting intermediate casing 1200 ft too high. The 7 in. production liner stuck 1000 ft off bottom, requiring a 5 in. liner to be run the rest of the way. The cement job on the 5 in. liner resulted in a very poor bond, which precluded one of three hydraulic fracture treatments originally planned for the well. Openhole logs confirmed most expectations going into the project about basic rock properties: the formation was shaly with low porosities, and water saturations were in line with expectations, including the presence of some intervals swept out by the waterflood. High water saturations at the bottom of the well eliminated one of the originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. Although porosities proved to be low, they were more uniform across the formation than expected. Permeabilities of the various intervals continue to be evaluated, but appear to be better than expected from the porosity log model derived in Budget Period One. The well was perforated in all pay sections behind the 5 in. liner. Production rates and phases agree nicely with log calculations, fractional flow calculations, and an analytical technique used to predict the rate performance of the well.

  6. Temperature threshold for nanorod structuring of metal and oxide films grown by glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deniz, Derya; Lad, Robert J.

    2011-01-15

    Thin films of tin (Sn), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W), ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2}), tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}), and tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) were grown by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to determine the nanostructuring temperature threshold, {Theta}{sub T}, above which adatom surface diffusion becomes large enough such that nanorod morphology is no longer formed during growth. The threshold was found to be lower in metals compared to oxides. Films were grown using both dc and pulsed dc magnetron sputtering with continuous substrate rotation over the temperature range from 291 to 866 K. Film morphologies, structures, and compositions were characterized by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Films were also grown in a conventional configuration for comparison. For elemental metals, nanorod structuring occurs for films with melting points higher than that of Al (933 K) when grown at room temperature with a rotation rate of {approx}5 rpm, corresponding to a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.33{+-}0.01. For the oxide films, a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.5 was found, above which GLAD nanorod structuring does not occur. The existence of a nanostructuring temperature threshold in both metal and oxide GLAD films can be attributed to greater adatom mobilities as temperature is increased resulting in nonkinetically limited film nucleation and growth processes.

  7. Investigation of the tripoli porous structure by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avdeev, M. V.; Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Garamus, V. M.; Novikov, A. G. Puchkov, A. V.

    2011-12-15

    The characteristics of the tripoli porous structure have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Tripoli is a finely porous sedimentary rock formed by small spherical opal particles. Its main component is aqueous silica SiO{sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O (80-90%). Tripoli is widely used in practice as a working medium for sorption filters and in some other commercial and construction technologies. The shape of the experimental SANS curves indicates the presence of small and large pores in tripoli. The small-pore size was estimated to be {approx}100 Angstrom-Sign . The size of large pores turned out to be beyond the range of neutron wave vector transfers Q that are available for the instrument used; however, their size was indirectly estimated to be {approx}(2000-2500) Angstrom-Sign . The pores of both groups behave as surfacetype fractal scatterers with the fractal dimension D {approx} 2.2-2.6. The densities of pores of these two groups differ by approximately three orders of magnitude ({approx}10{sup 16} and {approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for small and large pores, respectively); the fraction of large pores amounts to 70-80% of the total pore volume. The found pore characteristics (their densities, sizes, and relative volumes) are in satisfactory agreement (when a comparison is possible) with the absorption data.

  8. The accurate assessment of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Carter, Lester G.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Martel, Anne; Snell, Edward H.

    2015-01-23

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has grown in popularity in recent times with the advent of bright synchrotron X-ray sources, powerful computational resources and algorithms enabling the calculation of increasingly complex models. However, the lack of standardized data-quality metrics presents difficulties for the growing user community in accurately assessing the quality of experimental SAXS data. Here, a series of metrics to quantitatively describe SAXS data in an objective manner using statistical evaluations are defined. These metrics are applied to identify the effects of radiation damage, concentration dependence and interparticle interactions on SAXS data from a set of 27 previously described targetsmore » for which high-resolution structures have been determined via X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Studies show that these metrics are sufficient to characterize SAXS data quality on a small sample set with statistical rigor and sensitivity similar to or better than manual analysis. The development of data-quality analysis strategies such as these initial efforts is needed to enable the accurate and unbiased assessment of SAXS data quality.« less

  9. Identifying ferroelectric phase and domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2014-03-24

    We used angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM), vertical PFM (VPFM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide a systematic interpretation of domain patterns in polycrystalline, near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate. This material was used to illustrate the power of AR-PFM methods in resolving complex domain patterns where multiple phases may be present. AR-PFM was carried out with a 30° rotation interval, and the resulting data were analysed to identify the orientation of the underlying axis of piezoelectricity. The additional information provided by AR-PFM was studied, comparing its capabilities to those of 3-dimensional PFM, consisting of one VPFM image and two orthogonal lateral PFM (LPFM) images. We show that, in certain conditions, using AR-PFM can identify the phases present at the sub-grain scale. This was confirmed using VPFM and EBSD data. Furthermore, the method can discriminate laminated domain patterns that appear similar in VPFM and can reliably expose domain patterns that may not be seen in LPFM data from a single orientation, or even in 3D PFM data.

  10. The accurate assessment of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, Thomas D. [HauptmanWoodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Luft, Joseph R. [HauptmanWoodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); SUNY Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Carter, Lester G.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Martel, Anne [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS69, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Snell, Edward H., E-mail: esnell@hwi.buffalo.edu [HauptmanWoodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); SUNY Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A set of quantitative techniques is suggested for assessing SAXS data quality. These are applied in the form of a script, SAXStats, to a test set of 27 proteins, showing that these techniques are more sensitive than manual assessment of data quality. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has grown in popularity in recent times with the advent of bright synchrotron X-ray sources, powerful computational resources and algorithms enabling the calculation of increasingly complex models. However, the lack of standardized data-quality metrics presents difficulties for the growing user community in accurately assessing the quality of experimental SAXS data. Here, a series of metrics to quantitatively describe SAXS data in an objective manner using statistical evaluations are defined. These metrics are applied to identify the effects of radiation damage, concentration dependence and interparticle interactions on SAXS data from a set of 27 previously described targets for which high-resolution structures have been determined via X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The studies show that these metrics are sufficient to characterize SAXS data quality on a small sample set with statistical rigor and sensitivity similar to or better than manual analysis. The development of data-quality analysis strategies such as these initial efforts is needed to enable the accurate and unbiased assessment of SAXS data quality.

  11. Experimental determination of the complex stiffness tensor and Euler angles in anisotropic media using ultrasonic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alaoui-Ismaili, N.; Guy, P.; Chassignole, B.

    2014-02-18

    The aim of this work is to measure the complex elastic tensor and Euler angles in very complex anisotropic media like austenitic steel welds, by inverse problem resolution from experimental data. The obtained experimental characteristics of the anisotropic material will be injected in a FE code developed by EDF enabling the simulation of an actual ultrasonic NDE of welds. The present work aims to provide reliable input data to the 3D future development of the code. In particular, this complex elastic tensor will allow to predict by modeling beam skewing ant attenuation in an austenitic weld. The investigation of such anisotropic media is very complex because of the directional dependency of the elastic stiffness tensor. Then we will discuss the use of a hybrid genetic algorithm to overcome this difficulty. The identification method is based on waveforms spectra reconstruction associated to a physical model describing wave propagation in plates, during underwater measurements. The entire procedure is qualified and validated using simulated data. Moreover, a comparison of the estimated elastic coefficients with literature values and ultrasonic measurements obtained in transmission is also given, at the end of the paper.

  12. Wide-angle ITER-prototype tangential infrared and visible viewing system for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C. J. Allen, S. L.; Ellis, R. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Morris, K.; Seppala, L. G.; Crabtree, K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2014-11-15

    An imaging system with a wide-angle tangential view of the full poloidal cross-section of the tokamak in simultaneous infrared and visible light has been installed on DIII-D. The optical train includes three polished stainless steel mirrors in vacuum, which view the tokamak through an aperture in the first mirror, similar to the design concept proposed for ITER. A dichroic beam splitter outside the vacuum separates visible and infrared (IR) light. Spatial calibration is accomplished by warping a CAD-rendered image to align with landmarks in a data image. The IR camera provides scrape-off layer heat flux profile deposition features in diverted and inner-wall-limited plasmas, such as heat flux reduction in pumped radiative divertor shots. Demonstration of the system to date includes observation of fast-ion losses to the outer wall during neutral beam injection, and shows reduced peak wall heat loading with disruption mitigation by injection of a massive gas puff.

  13. A unified heteronuclear decoupling strategy for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk; Madhu, P. K. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk

    2015-05-14

    A unified strategy of two-pulse based heteronuclear decoupling for solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is presented. The analysis presented here shows that different decoupling sequences like two-pulse phase-modulation (TPPM), X-inverse-X (XiX), and finite pulse refocused continuous wave (rCW{sup A}) are basically specific solutions of a more generalized decoupling scheme which incorporates the concept of time-modulation along with phase-modulation. A plethora of other good decoupling conditions apart from the standard, TPPM, XiX, and rCW{sup A} decoupling conditions are available from the unified decoupling approach. The importance of combined time- and phase-modulation in order to achieve the best decoupling conditions is delineated. The consequences of different indirect dipolar interactions arising from cross terms comprising of heteronuclear and homonuclear dipolar coupling terms and also those between heteronuclear dipolar coupling and chemical-shift anisotropy terms are presented in order to unfold the effects of anisotropic interactions under different decoupling conditions. Extensive numerical simulation results are corroborated with experiments on standard amino acids.

  14. The accurate assessment of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Carter, Lester G.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Martel, Anne; Snell, Edward H.

    2015-01-23

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has grown in popularity in recent times with the advent of bright synchrotron X-ray sources, powerful computational resources and algorithms enabling the calculation of increasingly complex models. However, the lack of standardized data-quality metrics presents difficulties for the growing user community in accurately assessing the quality of experimental SAXS data. Here, a series of metrics to quantitatively describe SAXS data in an objective manner using statistical evaluations are defined. These metrics are applied to identify the effects of radiation damage, concentration dependence and interparticle interactions on SAXS data from a set of 27 previously described targets for which high-resolution structures have been determined via X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Studies show that these metrics are sufficient to characterize SAXS data quality on a small sample set with statistical rigor and sensitivity similar to or better than manual analysis. The development of data-quality analysis strategies such as these initial efforts is needed to enable the accurate and unbiased assessment of SAXS data quality.

  15. Design of a Thermal Imaging Diagnostic Using 90-Degree, Off-Axis, Parabolic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Robert M.; Becker, Steven A.; Dolan, Daniel H.; Hacking, Richard G.; Hickman, Randy J.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Stevens, Gerald D.; Turley, William D.

    2006-09-01

    Thermal imaging is an important, though challenging, diagnostic for shockwave experiments. Shock-compressed materials undergo transient temperature changes that cannot be recorded with standard (greater than ms response time) infrared detectors. A further complication arises when optical elements near the experiment are destroyed. We have designed a thermal-imaging system for studying shock temperatures produced inside a gas gun at Sandia National Laboratories. Inexpensive, diamond-turned, parabolic mirrors relay an image of the shocked target to the exterior of the gas gun chamber through a sapphire vacuum port. The 30005000-nm portion of this image is directed to an infrared camera which acquires a snapshot of the target with a minimum exposure time of 150 ns. A special mask is inserted at the last intermediate image plane, to provide dynamic thermal background recording during the event. Other wavelength bands of this image are split into high-speed detectors operating at 9001700 nm, and at 17003000 nm for timeresolved pyrometry measurements. This system incorporates 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors, which can collect low f/# light over a broad spectral range, for high-speed imaging. Matched mirror pairs must be used so that aberrations cancel. To eliminate image plane tilt, proper tip-to-tip orientation of the parabolic mirrors is required. If one parabolic mirror is rotated 180 degrees about the optical axis connecting the pair of parabolic mirrors, the resulting image is tilted by 60 degrees. Different focal-length mirrors cannot be used to magnify the image without substantially sacrificing image quality. This paper analyzes performance and aberrations of this imaging diagnostic.

  16. Exotic equilibria of Harary graphs and a new minimum degree lower bound for synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canale, Eduardo A.; Monzn, Pablo

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stability of equilibria in the homogeneous (equal frequencies) Kuramoto model of weakly coupled oscillators. In 2012 [R. Taylor, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 115 (2012)], a sufficient condition for almost global synchronization was found in terms of the minimum degreeorder ratio of the graph. In this work, a new lower bound for this ratio is given. The improvement is achieved by a concrete infinite sequence of regular graphs. Besides, non standard unstable equilibria of the graphs studied in Wiley et al. [Chaos 16, 015103 (2006)] are shown to exist as conjectured in that work.

  17. Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40% of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, the Energy Information Administration has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The Annual Energy Outlook 2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

  18. Developments in the Nuclear Safeguards and Security Engineering Degree Program at Tomsk Polytechnic University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boiko, Vladimir I.; Demyanyuk, Dmitry G.; Silaev, Maxim E.; Duncan, Cristen L.; Heinberg, Cynthia L.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.

    2009-10-06

    Over the last six years, Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) has developed a 5 year engineering degree program in the field of Material Protection Control and Accounting (MPC&A). In 2009 the first students graduated with this new degree. There were 25 job offers from nuclear fuel cycle enterprises of Russia and Kazakhstan for 17 graduates of the program. Due to the rather wide selection of workplaces, all graduates have obtained positions at nuclear enterprises. The program was developed within the Applied Physics and Engineering Department (APED). The laboratory and methodological base has been created taking into consideration the experience of the similar program at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). However, the TPU program has some distinguishing features such as the inclusion of special courses pertaining to fuel enrichment and reprocessing. During the last two years, three MPC&A laboratories have been established at APED. This was made possible due to several factors such as establishment of the State innovative educational program at TPU, assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the financial support of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority and some Russian private companies. All three of the MPC&A laboratories are part of the Innovative Educational Center Nuclear Technologies and Non-Proliferation, which deals with many topics including research activities, development of new curricula for experts training and retraining, and training of masters students. In 2008, TPU developed a relationship with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which was familiarized with APEDs current resources and activities. The IAEA has shown interest in creation of a masters degree educational program in the field of nuclear security at TPU. A future objective is to acquaint nuclear fuel cycle enterprises with new APED capabilities and involve the enterprises in the scientific and educational projects implemented through the Nuclear Technologies and Non-Proliferation Center. This paper describes the development of the MPC&A engineering degree program and future goals of TPU in the field of nonproliferation education.

  19. On linear groups of degree 2 over a finite commutative ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashkirov, Evgenii L.; Eser, Hasan

    2014-08-20

    Let p > 3 be a prime number and F{sub p} be a field of p elements. Let K be a commutative and associative ring obtained by adjoining to F{sub p} an element ? such that ? satisfies a polynomial over F{sub p} and a polynomial of the least degree whose root is ? can be written as a product of distinct polynomials irreducible over F{sub p}. We prove that the special linear group SL{sub 2}(K) is generated by two elementary transvections ( (table) ), ( (table) )

  20. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2013 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Mike Mehlman 2012 Design of TAMUTRAP and Testing of RFQ Pressure Control System D. Melconian Continue to Ph. D. degree John Goodwin 2012 Can Environmental Factors affect Half-Life in Beta Decay? An Analysis J. C. Hardy N.A. Martin Cordrington 2012 Lon- Range Rapidity at High pT in sqrt(s) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collision with STAR S. Mioduszewski N.A. James Lucus Drachenberg 2012 Forward Di-Hadron Asymmetries from p + p at

  1. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Jonathan Button 2013 Decay Detector for the Study of Gant Monopole Resonance in Unstable Nuclei D. H. Youngblood Continue to Ph. D. degree Guangyao Chen 2013 Initial Conditions from Color Glass Condensate R. J. Fries Post. Doc. at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Ellen Nicole Simmons 2013 The β-Delayed Proton and Gamma Decay of 27 P R. E. Tribble Post. Doc. at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Andrew

  2. Glancing angle deposition of SiO{sub 2} thin film microstructures: Investigations of optical and morphological properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokas, R. B. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Jena, S. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Sarkar, P. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Thakur, S. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Sahoo, N. K. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com

    2014-04-24

    In present work, the optical and the morphological properties of micro-structured SiO{sub 2} thin films fabricated by using glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique has been carried out. The results are compared with the normally deposited SiO{sub 2} films for the gained advantages. The influence of the glancing angle on the refractive index of porous SiO{sub 2} film was investigated by the spectral transmission measurement in 400–950 nm wavelength regimes. The refractive index has been found to be 1.14@532 nm for the porous SiO{sub 2} film deposited at a glancing angle of 85°. The density and surface qualities of these samples were primarily investigated by using grazing angle X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) and atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. Results indicate a substantial decrease in film density and refractive index and increase in surface roughness and grain size for GLAD SiO{sub 2} compared to normally deposited SiO{sub 2} films.

  3. An angle-dependent estimation of CT x-ray spectrum from rotational transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuan Samei, Ehsan; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Stierstorfer, Karl

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) performance as well as dose and image quality is directly affected by the x-ray spectrum. However, the current assessment approaches of the CT x-ray spectrum require costly measurement equipment and complicated operational procedures, and are often limited to the spectrum corresponding to the center of rotation. In order to address these limitations, the authors propose an angle-dependent estimation technique, where the incident spectra across a wide range of angular trajectories can be estimated accurately with only a single phantom and a single axial scan in the absence of the knowledge of the bowtie filter. Methods: The proposed technique uses a uniform cylindrical phantom, made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene and positioned in an off-centered geometry. The projection data acquired with an axial scan have a twofold purpose. First, they serve as a reflection of the transmission measurements across different angular trajectories. Second, they are used to reconstruct the cross sectional image of the phantom, which is then utilized to compute the intersection length of each transmission measurement. With each CT detector element recording a range of transmission measurements for a single angular trajectory, the spectrum is estimated for that trajectory. A data conditioning procedure is used to combine information from hundreds of collected transmission measurements to accelerate the estimation speed, to reduce noise, and to improve estimation stability. The proposed spectral estimation technique was validated experimentally using a clinical scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Germany) with spectra provided by the manufacturer serving as the comparison standard. Results obtained with the proposed technique were compared against those obtained from a second conventional transmission measurement technique with two materials (i.e., Cu and Al). After validation, the proposed technique was applied to measure spectra from the clinical system across a range of angular trajectories [−15°, 15°] and spectrum settings (80, 100, 120, 140 kVp). Results: At 140 kVp, the proposed technique was comparable to the conventional technique in terms of the mean energy difference (MED, −0.29 keV) and the normalized root mean square difference (NRMSD, 0.84%) from the comparison standard compared to 0.64 keV and 1.56%, respectively, with the conventional technique. The average absolute MEDs and NRMSDs across kVp settings and angular trajectories were less than 0.61 keV and 3.41%, respectively, which indicates a high level of estimation accuracy and stability. Conclusions: An angle-dependent estimation technique of CT x-ray spectra from rotational transmission measurements was proposed. Compared with the conventional technique, the proposed method simplifies the measurement procedures and enables incident spectral estimation for a wide range of angular trajectories. The proposed technique is suitable for rigorous research objectives as well as routine clinical quality control procedures.

  4. Small-angle neutron scattering measurement of deuterium trapping at dislocations and grain boundaries in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuser, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been performed on deformed single and polycrystalline palladium with and without deuterium dissolved in the solution phase at room temperature. The purpose of these experiments was to directly measure the spatial distribution of trapped deuterium at dislocations in the deformed metal. The net scattering cross section for the same smaple with and without deuterium shows a behavior expected from deuterium correlation with dislocations froming rod-like scattering structures. The measured cross sections indicate the trapped deuterium is within 2 to 3 Burgers vectors of the dislocation core. On average 1 to 3 deuterons per {angstrom} are trapped at the dislocations in the deformed samples. The measurements also indicate the straight, rod-like correlation geometry extends on average 50 to 100 {angstrom} along the dislocations. Dislocation densities on the order of 5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm/cm{sup 3} were found for all samples investigated. Net scattering from a well annealed polycrystalline palladium sample exhibiting a behavior expected from spherical shells has been observed. This net scattering is attributed to deuterium trapping at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline sample. net scattering in excess of that expected from deuterium correlated at dislocations was also observed in a deformed polycrystalline measurement. This too is attributed to deuterium trapping at grain boundaries. The dislocation substructure of the deformed palladium samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This analysis illustrated the cellular arrangement that evolved in palladium during cold working. The presence of MnO particles also was confirmed by TEM analysis.

  5. Structural Design Considerations for Tubular Power Tower Receivers Operating at 650 Degrees C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neises, T. W.; Wagner, M. J.; Gray, A. K.

    2014-04-01

    Research of advanced power cycles has shown supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles may have thermal efficiency benefits relative to steam cycles at temperatures around 500 - 700 degrees C. To realize these benefits for CSP, it is necessary to increase the maximum outlet temperature of current tower designs. Research at NREL is investigating a concept that uses high-pressure supercritical carbon dioxide as the heat transfer fluid to achieve a 650 degrees C receiver outlet temperature. At these operating conditions, creep becomes an important factor in the design of a tubular receiver and contemporary design assumptions for both solar and traditional boiler applications must be revisited and revised. This paper discusses lessons learned for high-pressure, high-temperature tubular receiver design. An analysis of a simplified receiver tube is discussed, and the results show the limiting stress mechanisms in the tube and the impact on the maximum allowable flux as design parameters vary. Results of this preliminary analysis indicate an underlying trade-off between tube thickness and the maximum allowable flux on the tube. Future work will expand the scope of design variables considered and attempt to optimize the design based on cost and performance metrics.

  6. Image system for three dimensional, 360{degree}, time sequence surface mapping of moving objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, S.Y.

    1998-12-22

    A three-dimensional motion camera system comprises a light projector placed between two synchronous video cameras all focused on an object-of-interest. The light projector shines a sharp pattern of vertical lines (Ronchi ruling) on the object-of-interest that appear to be bent differently to each camera by virtue of the surface shape of the object-of-interest and the relative geometry of the cameras, light projector and object-of-interest. Each video frame is captured in a computer memory and analyzed. Since the relative geometry is known and the system pre-calibrated, the unknown three-dimensional shape of the object-of-interest can be solved for by matching the intersections of the projected light lines with orthogonal epipolar lines corresponding to horizontal rows in the video camera frames. A surface reconstruction is made and displayed on a monitor screen. For 360{degree} all around coverage of the object-of-interest, two additional sets of light projectors and corresponding cameras are distributed about 120{degree} apart from one another. 20 figs.

  7. Image system for three dimensional, 360 DEGREE, time sequence surface mapping of moving objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Shin-Yee (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional motion camera system comprises a light projector placed between two synchronous video cameras all focused on an object-of-interest. The light projector shines a sharp pattern of vertical lines (Ronchi ruling) on the object-of-interest that appear to be bent differently to each camera by virtue of the surface shape of the object-of-interest and the relative geometry of the cameras, light projector and object-of-interest Each video frame is captured in a computer memory and analyzed. Since the relative geometry is known and the system pre-calibrated, the unknown three-dimensional shape of the object-of-interest can be solved for by matching the intersections of the projected light lines with orthogonal epipolar lines corresponding to horizontal rows in the video camera frames. A surface reconstruction is made and displayed on a monitor screen. For 360.degree. all around coverage of theobject-of-interest, two additional sets of light projectors and corresponding cameras are distributed about 120.degree. apart from one another.

  8. Determining the slag fraction, water/binder ratio and degree of hydration in hardened cement pastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yio, M.H.N. Phelan, J.C.; Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2014-02-15

    A method for determining the original mix composition of hardened slag-blended cement-based materials based on analysis of backscattered electron images combined with loss on ignition measurements is presented. The method does not require comparison to reference standards or prior knowledge of the composition of the binders used. Therefore, it is well-suited for application to real structures. The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. Results obtained from an experimental study involving sixty samples with a wide range of water/binder (w/b) ratios (0.30 to 0.50), slag/binder ratios (0 to 0.6) and curing ages (3 days to 1 year) show that the method is very promising. The mean absolute errors for the estimated slag, water and cement contents (kg/m{sup 3}), w/b and s/b ratios were 9.1%, 1.5%, 2.5%, 4.7% and 8.7%, respectively. 91% of the estimated w/b ratios were within 0.036 of the actual values. -- Highlights: A new method for estimating w/b ratio and slag content in cement pastes is proposed. The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. Reference standards or prior knowledge of the binder composition are not required. The method was tested on samples with varying w/b ratios and slag content.

  9. Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCray, John; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Mouzakis, Katherine; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot

    2010-11-01

    Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from <0.3% to 4% by weight. Expandable clay contents range from 10% to {approx}40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. Results from this study, combined with high-resolution TEM imaging, provide insight into the differences in volume and geometry of porosity between these various mudstones.

  10. Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    96 Created on: 4/26/2016 6:14:01 PM Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days Month/Year/Type of data New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT NJ, NY, PA IL, IN, MI, OH, WI IA, KS, MN, MO, ND, NE, SD DE, FL, GA, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA, WV November Normal 702 665 757 841 443 2014 749 742 909 1,002 562 2015 583 509 596 653 325 % Diff (normal to 2015) -17.0 -23.5 -21.3 -22.4 -26.6 % Diff (2014 to 2015) -22.2 -31.4

  11. Sublimation rate of molecular crystals - role of internal degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L A; Gee, R H; Burnham, A

    2007-01-19

    It is a common practice to estimate site desorption rate from crystal surfaces with an Arrhenius expression of the form v{sub eff} exp(-{Delta}E/k{sub B}T), where {Delta}E is an activation barrier to desorb and v{sub eff} is an effective vibrational frequency {approx} 10{sup 12} sec{sup -1}. However, such a formula can lead to several to many orders of magnitude underestimation of sublimation rates in molecular crystals due to internal degrees of freedom. We carry out a quantitative comparison of two energetic molecular crystals with crystals of smaller entities like ice and Argon (solid) and uncover the errors involved as a function of molecule size. In the process, we also develop a formal definition of v{sub eff} and an accurate working expression for equilibrium vapor pressure.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the 110{degree}C thermal aging of PETN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosser, L.R.; Seliskar, C.J.

    1992-07-30

    The 110{degrees}C thermal aging parameters, including initial rates of decomposition, of four types of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) over a period of ten months are presented. Both decomposition products nitric oxide, NO, and nitrogen dioxide, N0{sub 2} were monitored from multiple, hermetically-sealed, in vacuo samples. Nitric oxide appears to be the first nitrogen oxide product evolved. Nitrogen dioxide produced by abrupt thermal aging is more slowly converted to nitric oxide by a 1:1 process. The behavior of samples of RR5K PETN was significantly different from that of other powders studied. Further work is in progress to better define the thermal aging of RR5K PETN.

  13. Strongly coupled electronic, magnetic, and lattice degrees of freedom in LaCo5 under pressure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stillwell, Ryan L.; Jeffries, Jason R.; McCall, Scott K.; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-11-25

    In this study, we have performed high-pressure magnetotransport and x-ray diffraction measurements on ferromagnetic LaCo5, confirming the theoretically predicted electronic topological transition driving the magnetoelastic collapse seen in the related compound YCo5. Our x-ray diffraction results show an anisotropic lattice collapse of the c axis near 10 GPa that is also commensurate with a change in the majority charge carriers evident from high-pressure Hall effect measurements. The coupling of the electronic, magnetic, and lattice degrees of freedom is further substantiated by the evolution of the anomalous Hall effect, which couples to the magnetization of the ordered state of LaCo5.

  14. NEUTRON-INDUCED SWELLING OF Fe-Cr BINARY ALLOYS IN FFTF AT ~400 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Okita, Taira; Sekimura, Naoto; Wolfer, W. G.

    2002-12-31

    The purpose of this effort is to determine the influence of dpa rate, He/dpa ratio and composition on the void swelling of simple binary Fe-Cr alloys. Contrary to the behavior of swelling of model fcc Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated in the same FFTF-MOTA experiment, model bcc Fe-Cr alloys do not exhibit a dependence of swelling on dpa rate at approximately 400 degrees C. This is surprising in that an apparent flux-sensitivity was observed in an earlier comparative irradiation of Fe-Cr binaries conducted in EBR-II and FFTF. The difference in behavior is ascribed to the higher helium generation rates of Fe-Cr alloys in EBR-II compared to that of FFTF, and also the fact that lower dpa rates in FFTF are accompanied by progressively lower helium generation rates.

  15. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 1: A model for subsonic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. In the first part of this paper two proved and well-established profile loss correlations for subsonic flows are extended to quasi-two-dimensional conditions and to custom-tailored blade designs. Instead of a deviation angle correlation, a simple method based on singularities is utilized. The comparison between the new model and a recently published model demonstrates the improved accuracy in prediction of cascade performance achieved by the new model.

  16. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle inpp¯→Z/γ*→e+e-Events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.  M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.  S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.  P.; Alexeev, G.  D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2θℓeff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp¯→Z/γ*→e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2θℓeff=0.23147±0.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precisionmore »close to the best LEP and SLD results.« less

  17. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle inpp¯→Z/γ*→e+e-Events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.  M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.  S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.  P.; Alexeev, G.  D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2θℓeff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp¯→Z/γ*→e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2θℓeff=0.23147±0.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precisionmore » close to the best LEP and SLD results.« less

  18. Design of a High Resolution and High Flux Beam line for VUV Angle-Resolved Photoemission at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2007-01-19

    A high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been designed for a 750 MeV synchrotron light source UVSOR-II. The beamline equips an APPLE-II-type undulator with the horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a modified Wadsworth-type monochromator and a high-resolution photoelectron analyzer. The monochromator covers the photon energy range of 6 - 40 eV. The energy resolution (hv/{delta}hv) and the photon flux on samples are expected to be 2 x 104 and 1012 photons/sec at 10 eV, 4 x 104 and 5 x 1011 photons/sec at 20 eV, and 6 x 104 and 1011 photons/sec at 40 eV, respectively. The beamline provides the high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy less than 1 meV in the whole VUV energy range.

  19. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  20. The spin Hall angle and spin diffusion length of Pd measured by spin pumping and microwave photoresistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, X. D.; Feng, Z.; Miao, B. F.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Wu, D.; Du, J.; Zhang, W.; Ding, H. F., E-mail: hfding@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-05-07

    We present the experimental study of the spin Hall angle (SHA) and spin diffusion length of Pd with the spin pumping and microwave photoresistance effects. The Py/Pd bilayer stripes are excited with an out-of-plane microwave magnetic field. The pure spin current is thus pumped and transforms into charge current via the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in Pd layer, yielding an ISHE voltage. The ISHE voltage can be distinguished from the unwanted signal caused by the anisotropic magnetoresistance according to their different symmetries. Together with Pd thickness dependent measurements of in and out-of-plane precessing angles and effective spin mixing conductance, the SHA and spin-diffusion length of Pd are quantified as 0.0056??0.0007 and 7.3??0.7?nm, respectively.

  1. Measurement of the weak mixing angle with the Drell-Yan process in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2011-12-01

    A multivariate likelihood method to measure electroweak couplings with the Drell-Yan process at the LHC is presented. The process is described by the dilepton rapidity, invariant mass, and decay angle distributions. The decay angle ambiguity due to the unknown assignment of the scattered constituent quark and antiquark to the two protons in a collision is resolved statistically using correlations between the observables. The method is applied to a sample of dimuon events from proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.1 inverse femtobarns. From the dominant u-ubar, d-dbar to gamma*/Z to opposite sign dimuons process, the effective weak mixing angle parameter is measured to be sin^2(theta[eff]) = 0.2287 +/- 0.0020 (stat.) +/- 0.0025 (syst.). This result is consistent with measurements from other processes, as expected within the standard model.

  2. Ligand Bridging-Angle-Driven Assembly of Molecular Architectures Based on Quadruply Bonded Mo-Mo Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jian-Rong; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Lu, Weigang; Timmons, Daren J; Zhuang, Wenjuan; Yuan, Daqiang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-12-15

    A systematic exploration of the assembly of Mo?(O?C-)?-based metalorganic molecular architectures structurally controlled by the bridging angles of rigid organic linkers has been performed. Twelve bridging dicarboxylate ligands were designed to be of different sizes with bridging angles of 0, 60, 90, and 120 while incorporating a variety of nonbridging functional groups, and these ligands were used as linkers. These dicarboxylate linkers assemble with quadruply bonded MoMo clusters acting as nodes to give 13 molecular architectures, termed metalorganic polygons/polyhedra with metal cluster node arrangements of a linear shape, triangle, octahedron, and cuboctahedron/anti-cuboctahedron. The syntheses of these complexes have been optimized and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results have shown that the shape and size of the resulting molecular architecture can be controlled by tuning the bridging angle and size of the linker, respectively. Functionalization of the linker can adjust the solubility of the ensuing molecular assembly but has little or no effect on the geometry of the product. Preliminary gas adsorption, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties of selected members were also studied. The present work is trying to enrich metal-containing supramolecular chemistry through the inclusion of well-characterized quadruply bonded MoMo units into the structures, which can widen the prospect of additional electronic functionality, thereby leading to novel properties.

  3. SAMRAI: A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-15

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a {+-}18 deg. acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (h{nu}/{Delta}h{nu}) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1x10{sup 4} and 10{sup 12} photons/s, respectively, with a 100 {mu}m exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... azimuthal angles have been studied. The enhancement of energy loss, potential electron emission yields, intensity of KLsup 1 satellite lines, or x-ray yields for the Arsup ...

  5. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Gu, X.; Haldenman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C. G.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  6. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Gu, X.; Haldeman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S.; Wang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  7. Application of conical 90-degree reflectors for solving the problem of mirror alignment in terahertz-range lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radionov, V P; Kiselev, V K

    2014-10-29

    We report a study of the conical mirrors with an apex angle of 90 in the resonator of the gas-discharge HCN laser with the radiation wavelength of 337 ?m (0.89 THz). Experimental results have shown that such mirrors do not require precise alignment. This makes it possible to improve the radiation stability, significantly simplify the construction of laser and reduce the complexity of its maintenance. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Rotation-Enabled 7-Degree of Freedom Seismometer for Geothermal Resource Development. Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, Bob; Laughlin, Darren

    2013-10-29

    Under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant, A-Tech Corporation d.b.a. Applied Technology Associates (ATA), seeks to develop a seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) seismic measurement tool for high-temperature geothermal applications. The Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer includes a conventional tri-axial accelerometer, a conventional pressure sensor or hydrophone, and a tri-axial rotational sensor. The rotational sensing capability is novel, based upon ATA's innovative research in rotational sensing technologies. The geothermal industry requires tools for high-precision seismic monitoring of crack formation associated with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) stimulation activity. Currently, microseismic monitoring is conducted by deploying many seismic tools at different depth levels along a 'string' within drilled observation wells. Costs per string can be hundreds of thousands of dollars. Processing data from the spatial arrays of linear seismometers allows back-projection of seismic wave states. In contrast, a Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer would simultaneously measure p-wave velocity, s-wave velocity, and incident seismic wave direction all from a single point measurement. In addition, the Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer will, by its nature, separate p- and s-waves into different data streams, simplifying signal processing and facilitating analysis of seismic source signatures and geological characterization. By adding measurements of three additional degrees-of-freedom at each level and leveraging the information from this new seismic observable, it is likely that an equally accurate picture of subsurface seismic activity could be garnered with fewer levels per hole. The key cost savings would come from better siting of the well due to increased information content and a decrease in the number of confirmation wells drilled, also due to the increase in information per well. Improved seismic tools may also increase knowledge, understanding, and confidence, thus removing some current blocks to feasibility and significantly increasing access to potential geothermal sites. During the Phase 1 effort summarized in this final report, the ATA Team modeled and built two TRL 3 proof-of-concept test units for two competing rotational sensor technologies. The two competing technologies were based on ATA's angular rate and angular displacement measurement technologies; Angular rate: ATA's Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor (Seismic MHD); and Angular displacement: ATA's Low Frequency Improved Torsional Seismometer (LFITS). In order to down-select between these two technologies and formulate a go / no go decision, the ATA Team analyzed and traded scientific performance requirements and market constraints against sensor characteristics and components, acquiring field data where possible to validate the approach and publishing results from these studies of rotational technology capability. Based on the results of Phase 1, the ATA Team finds that the Seismic MHD (SMHD) technology is the best choice for enabling rotational seismometry and significant technical potential exists for micro-seismic monitoring using a downhole 7-DOF device based on the SMHD. Recent technical papers and field data confirm the potential of rotational sensing for seismic mapping, increasing confidence that cost-reduction benefits are achievable for EGS. However, the market for geothermal rotational sensing is small and undeveloped. As a result, this report recommends modifying the Phase 2 plan to focus on prototype development aimed at partnering with early adopters within the geothermal industry and the scientific research community. The highest public benefit will come from development and deployment of a science-grade SMHD rotational seismometer engineered for geothermal downhole conditions and an integrated test tool for downhole measurements at active geothermal test sites.

  9. A new method to estimate local pitch angles in spiral galaxies: Application to spiral arms and feathers in M81 and M51

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puerari, Ivnio; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Block, David L.

    2014-12-01

    We examine 8 ?m IRAC images of the grand design two-arm spiral galaxies M81 and M51 using a new method whereby pitch angles are locally determined as a function of scale and position, in contrast to traditional Fourier transform spectral analyses which fit to average pitch angles for whole galaxies. The new analysis is based on a correlation between pieces of a galaxy in circular windows of (lnR,?) space and logarithmic spirals with various pitch angles. The diameter of the windows is varied to study different scales. The result is a best-fit pitch angle to the spiral structure as a function of position and scale, or a distribution function of pitch angles as a function of scale for a given galactic region or area. We apply the method to determine the distribution of pitch angles in the arm and interarm regions of these two galaxies. In the arms, the method reproduces the known pitch angles for the main spirals on a large scale, but also shows higher pitch angles on smaller scales resulting from dust feathers. For the interarms, there is a broad distribution of pitch angles representing the continuation and evolution of the spiral arm feathers as the flow moves into the interarm regions. Our method shows a multiplicity of spiral structures on different scales, as expected from gas flow processes in a gravitating, turbulent and shearing interstellar medium. We also present results for M81 using classical 1D and 2D Fourier transforms, together with a new correlation method, which shows good agreement with conventional 2D Fourier transforms.

  10. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Simon

    2013-09-30

    The Electric-drive Vehicle Engineering (EVE) MS degree and graduate certificate programs have been continuing to make good progress, thanks to the funding and the guidance from DOE grant management group, the support from our University and College administrations, and to valuable inputs and feedback from our Industrial Advisory Board as well as our project partners Macomb Community College and NextEnergy. Table 1 below lists originally proposed Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO), which have all been completed successfully. Our program and course enrollments continue to be good and increasing, as shown in later sections. Our graduating students continue to get good job offers from local EV-related companies. Following the top recommendation from our Industrial Advisory Board, we were fortunate enough to be accepted into the prestigious EcoCAR2 (http://www.ecocar2.org/) North America university design competition, and have been having some modest success with the competition. But most importantly, EcoCAR2 offers the most holistic educational environment for integrating real-world engineering and design with our EVE graduate curriculum. Such integrations include true real-world hands-on course projects based on EcoCAR2 related tasks for the students, and faculty curricular and course improvements based on lessons and best practices learned from EcoCAR2. We are in the third and last year of EcoCAR2, and we have already formed a core group of students in pursuit of EcoCAR”3”, for which the proposal is due in early December.

  11. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  12. Investigation of coercivity mechanism in hot deformed Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, M., E-mail: masao-yano-aa@mail.toyota.co.jp; Manabe, A.; Shoji, T.; Kato, A. [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Ono, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Harada, M. [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-05-07

    The magnetic reversal behaviors of single domain sized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, with and without isolation between the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, was clarified using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS patterns obtained arose from changes in the magnetic domains and were analyzed using the TeubnerStray model, a phenomenological correlation length model, to quantify the periodicity and morphology of the magnetic domains. The results indicated that the magnetic reversal evolved with the magnetic domains that had similar sized grains. The grain isolation enabled us to realize the reversals of single domains.

  13. Structure of spontaneously formed solid-electrolyte interphase on lithiated graphite determined using small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Banuelos, Jose Leo [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Cheng, Yongqiang [ORNL; Wildgruber, Christoph U [ORNL; Jones, Lacy L [ORNL; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We report the first small-angle neutron scattering of a chemically formed solid-electrolyte interphase from LixC6 reacting with ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbon solvent. This provides a different and perhaps simpler view of SEI formation than the usual electrochemically-driven reaction. We show that an organic layer coats the graphite particles filling in micro-pores and is polymeric in nature being 1-3 nm thick. We used inelastic neutron scattering to probe the chemistry, and we found that the SEI showed similar inelastic scattering to polyethylene oxide.

  14. Structure of spontaneously formed solid-electrolyte interphase on lithiated graphite determined using small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Banuelos, Jose Leobardo; Veith, Gabriel M.; Littrell, Ken C.; Cheng, Yongqiang Q.; Wildgruber, Christoph U.; Jones, Lacy L.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Rother, Gernot; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-03-25

    We report the first small-angle neutron scattering of a chemically formed solid-electrolyte interphase from LixC6 reacting with ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbon solvent. This provides a different and perhaps simpler view of SEI formation than the usual electrochemically-driven reaction. We show that an organic layer coats the graphite particles filling in micro-pores and is polymeric in nature being 1-3 nm thick. We used inelastic neutron scattering to probe the chemistry, and we found that the SEI showed similar inelastic scattering to polyethylene oxide.

  15. Structure of Spontaneously Formed Solid-Electrolyte Interphase on Lithiated Graphite Determined Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Veith, Gabriel M.; Littrell, Ken C.; Cheng, Yongqiang Q.; Wildgruber, Christoph U.; Jones, Lacy L.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Rother, Gernot; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-05-07

    We report the first small-angle neutron scattering of a chemically formed solid-electrolyte interphase from LixC6 reacting with ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbon solvent. This provides a different and perhaps simpler view of SEI formation than the usual electrochemically-driven reaction. We show that an organic layer coats the graphite particles filling in micro-pores and is polymeric in nature being 1-3 nm thick. We used inelastic neutron scattering to probe the chemistry, and we found that the SEI showed similar inelastic scattering to polyethylene oxide.

  16. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 742; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Volume: 742; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands Language: English Word...

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Li; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    2015-03-01

    Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the spatial anisotropy of the initial density profile. A long-standing problem in the interpretation of flow data is that uncertainties in the initial anisotropy are mingled with uncertainties in the response. We argue that the non-Gaussianity of flow fluctuations in small systems with large fluctuations can be used to disentangle the initial state from the response. We apply this method to recent measurements of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC, assuming linear response to the initial anisotropy. The response coefficient is found to decreasemoreas the system becomes smaller and is consistent with a low value of the ratio of viscosity over entropy of ?/s 0.19. Deviations from linear response are studied. While they significantly change the value of the response coefficient they do not change the rate of decrease with centrality. Thus, we argue that the estimate of ?/s is robust against non-linear effects.less

  19. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  20. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  1. Spectral behavior of the optical constants in the visible/near infrared of GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films grown at glancing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Palma, R. J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Pantano, C. G.

    2007-04-23

    GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films were deposited using glancing angle deposition onto transparent glass substrates for the determination of the spectral behavior of the optical constants (index of refraction n and extinction coefficient k) in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-2500 nm) as a function of the deposition angle. Computational simulations based on the matrix method were employed to determine the values of the optical constants of the different films from the experimental reflectance and transmittance spectra. A significant dependence of the overall optical behavior on the deposition angle is found. Furthermore, the band gap of the GeSbSe thin films was calculated. The accurate determination of the optical constants of films grown at glancing angle will enable the development of sculptured thin film fiber-optic chemical sensors and biosensors.

  2. Predicting primary crystalline phase and liquidus temperature above or below 1050{degrees}C as functions of glass composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redgate, P.E.; Piepel, G.F.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results of applying statistical empirical modeling techniques to primary crystalline phase at the liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) and (ii) whether liquidus temperature is above or below 1050{degree}C (1OO{degree}C below a melting temperature of 1150{degree}C). Data used in modeling primary crystalline phase and liquidus temperate are from the Composition Variability Study (CVS) of Hanford waste glass compositions and properties. The majority of the 123 CVS glasses are categorized into one of 13 primary crystalline phases (at the liquidus temperature). They are also classified as to having T{sub L} Above or Below 1050{degree}C. Two common statistical methods used to model such categorical data are the multinomial logit and classification tree models. The classification tree models provided an overall better modeling approach than did the multinomial logit models. The performance of models in this report should be compared to the performance of the revised ``Development of Models and Software for Liquidus Temperature of Glasses of HWVP Products`` models from Ecole Polytechnique. If the Ecole Polytechnique models perform better than the models discussed in this report, no additional effort on these models would be needed. However, if the converse is true, it may be worthwhile to invest additional effort on statistical empirical modeling methods.

  3. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 2: A model for supersonic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. The second part of the present report focuses on the extension of a well-known correlation for cascade losses at supersonic inlet flows. It was originally established for DCA bladings and is now modified to reflect the flow situation in blade rows having low-cambered, arbitrarily designed blades including precompression blades. Finally, the steady loss increase from subsonic to supersonic inlet-flow velocities demonstrates the matched performance of the different correlations of the new model.

  4. Measurement of B⁰→J/ψη(') and constraint on the η-η' mixing angle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, M.-C.; Duh, Y.-C.; Lin, J.-Y.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; et al

    2012-05-04

    We measure the branching fractions of B⁰→J/ψη(') decays with the complete Belle data sample of 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. The results for the branching fractions are: B(B⁰→J/ψη)=(12.3±1.811.7±0.7)×10⁻⁶ and B(B⁰→J/ψη')<7.4×10⁻⁶ at 90% confidence level. The η-η' mixing angle is constrained to be less than 42.2° at 90% confidence level.

  5. Highly efficient inverted top emitting organic light emitting diodes using a transparent top electrode with color stability on viewing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Bum; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Jang-Joo, E-mail: jjkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-17

    We report a highly efficient phosphorescent green inverted top emitting organic light emitting diode with excellent color stability by using the 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile/indium zinc oxide top electrode and bis(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) acetylacetonate as the emitter in an exciplex forming co-host system. The device shows a high external quantum efficiency of 23.4% at 1000?cd/m{sup 2} corresponding to a current efficiency of 110?cd/A, low efficiency roll-off with 21% at 10?000?cd/m{sup 2} and low turn on voltage of 2.4?V. Especially, the device showed very small color change with the variation of ?x?=?0.02, ?y?=?0.02 in the CIE 1931 coordinates as the viewing angle changes from 0 to 60. The performance of the device is superior to that of the metal/metal cavity structured device.

  6. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  7. Small-angle x-ray scattering measurements of the microstructure of liquid helium mixtures adsorbed in aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lurio, L. B.; Mulders, N.; Paetkau, M.; Chan, M. H. W.; Mochrie, S. G. J. [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Okanagan College, British Columbia V1Y4X8 (Canada); Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to measure the microstructure of isotopic mixtures of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He adsorbed into silica aerogels as a function of temperature and {sup 3}He concentration. The SAXS measurements could be well described by the formation of a nearly pure film of {sup 4}He which separates from the bulk mixture onto the aerogel strands and which thickens with decreasing temperature. Previous observations of a superfluid {sup 3}He-rich phase are consistent with superfluidity existing within this film phase. Observed differences between different density aerogels are explained in terms of the depletion of {sup 4}He from the bulk mixture due to film formation.

  8. Numerical simulations of the bending of narrow-angle-tail radio jets by ram pressure or pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soker, N.; Sarazin, C.L.; O'Dea, C.P.

    1988-04-01

    Three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations are used to study the bending of radio jets. The simulations are compared with observations of jets in narrow-angle-tail radio sources. Two mechanisms for the observed bending are considered: direct bending of quasi-continuous jets by ram pressure from intergalactic gas and bending by pressure gradients in the interstellar gas of the host galaxy, the pressure gradients themselves being the result of ram pressure by intergalactic gas. It is shown that the pressure gradients are much less effective in bending jets, implying that the jets have roughly 30 times lower momentum fluxes if they are bent by this mechanism. Ram-pressure bending produces jets with kidney-shaped cross sections; when observed from the side, these jets appear to have diffuse extensions on the downstream side. On the other hand, pressure-gradient bending causes the jets to be densest near their upstream side. 31 references.

  9. B2 0800+24 - a narrow-angle tail radio galaxy in a small group of galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocke, J.T.; Burns, J.O.

    1987-08-01

    The environments of three asymmetric sources (B2 0800+24, NGC 4410a/b, and B2 1553+24) are studied in detail. Because the morphology of B2 0800+24 most clearly resembles the narrow-angle tails (NATs) found in clusters, this source is used to study the apparent conflict between the head-tail morphology and the low ram pressure present in a small group environment. If the jets in the NATs are ram-pressure confined, then lateral expansion of the jets in poor groups makes them easier to bend (this was observed for B2 0800+24). It is concluded that NAT morphology may be common both in rich clusters and in poor groups. 56 references.

  10. Measurement of carbon condensation using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L. M.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; van Buuren, T.; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Graber, T.; Jensen, B. J.; Ilavsky, J.; Willey, T. M.

    2015-06-24

    The dynamics of carboncondensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. As a result, the power-law slope is about –3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  11. Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-01

    Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

  12. Correlation of Oil-Water and Air-Water Contact Angles of Diverse Silanized Surfaces and Relationship to Fluid Interfacial Tensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2012-02-24

    The use of air-water, {Theta}{sub wa}, or air-liquid contact angles is customary in surface science, while oil-water contact angles {Theta}{sub ow}, are of paramount importance in subsurface multiphase flow phenomena including petroleum reocovery, nonaqueous phase liquid fate and transport, and geological carbon sequestration. In this paper we determine both the air-water and oil-water contact angles of silica surfaces modified with a diverse selection of silanes, using hexadecane as the oil. The silanes included alkylsilanes, alkylarylsilanes, and silanes with alkyl or aryl groups that are functionalized with heteroatoms such as N, O, and S. These silanes yielded surfaces with wettabilities from water-wet to oil wet, including specific silanized surfaces functionalized with heteroatoms that yield intermediate wet surfaces. The oil-water contact angles for clean and silanized surfaces, excluding one partially fluorinated surface, correlate linearly with air-water contact angles with a slope of 1.41 (R = 0.981, n = 13). These data were used to examine a previously untested theoretical treatment relating air-water and oil-water contact angles in terms of fluid interfacial energies. Plotting the cosines of these contact angles against one another, we obtain a linear relationship in excellent agreement with the theoretical treatment; the data fit cos {Theta}{sub ow} = 0.667 cos {Theta}{sub ow} + 0.384 (R = 0.981, n = 13), intercepting cos {Theta}{sub ow} = -1 at -0.284. The theoretical slope, based on the fluid interfacial tensions {Theta}{sub wa}, {Theta}{sub ow}, and {Theta}{sub oa}, is 0.67. We also demonstrate how silanes can be used to alter the wettability of the interior of a pore network micromodel device constructed in silicon/silica with a glass cover plate. Such micromodels are used to study multiphase flow phenomena. The contact angle of the resulting interior was determined in situ. An intermediate wet micromodel gave a contact angle in excellent agreement with that obtained on an open planar silica surface using the same silane.

  13. Rare-earth elements in hot brines (165 to 190 degree C) from the Salton Sea geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rare-earth element (REE) concentrations are important indicators for revealing various chemical fractionation processes (water/rock interactions) and source region geochemistry. Since the REE patterns are characteristic of geologic materials (basalt, granite, shale, sediments, etc.) and minerals (K-feldspar, calcite, illite, epidote, etc.), their study in geothermal fluids may serve as a geothermometer. The REE study may also enable us to address the issue of groundwater mixing. In addition, the behavior of the REE can serve as analogs of the actinides in radioactive waste (e.g., neodymium is an analog of americium and curium). In this paper, the authors port the REE data for a Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brine (two aliquots: port 4 at 165{degree}C and port 5 at 190{degree}C) and six associated core samples.

  14. {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100>, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100> oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  15. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE„4/1/00-3/31/01

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - March 31, 2006 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor First Position Present Position Elizabeth Bell 2005 N /Z Equilibration S.J. Yennello Graduate Research Assistant Chemistry Instructor st Blinn College, Texas Fakhriddin Pirlepesov 2005 Asymptotic scattering wave function for three charged particles and astrophysical capture processes R.E. Tribble/ A.M. Mukhamedzhanov Graduate Teaching Assistant Pursuing degree at Department of Statistics, Texas A&M University Jim Musser 2005 Measurement of

  16. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE„4/1/00-3/31/01

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Zach Kohley 2010 Transverse Collective Flow and Emission Order of Mid- Rapidity Fragments in Fermi Energy Heavy Ion Collisions S. J. Yennello Post Doc., HRIBF, ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Xingbo Zhao 2010 Charmonium in Hot Medium Ralf Rapp Post Doc., Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa Sarah Nicole

  17. Structural stability of 1100[degree]C heated Pd/k during absorption cycling in protium. [Palladium supported on kieselguhr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.A.

    1993-03-12

    Pd/k is a hydride forming packing material which is used in the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP). Palladium is supported on kieselguhr to create a packing material which will provide adequate void space to prevent excessive pressure drops and flow restrictions. The use of unsupported palladium would result in blockage of columns and clogging of filters due to the small particle size of unsupported palladium hydride powder. During pilot scale demonstrations, it was noted that the Pd/k packing material had degraded causing severe flow restrictions within the TCAP column. A solution to the problem involved the heating of Pd/k at 1,110[degree]C to strengthen the packing material, and render it more resistant to breakdown. The 1, 100[degree]C heated Pd/k has been shown to be more resistant to mechanical breakdown than the Pd/k prior to heat treatment. Two primary modes of Pd/k particle degradation have been identified: mechanical breakdown caused by particle fluidization and degradation caused by absorption/desorption cycling. Absorption/desorption cycling causes the palladium particles within the packing to expanded and contract upon formation and decomposition of the hydride, respectively. This expansion and contraction causes large localized stresses within the packing material, which if these stresses can not be accommodated within the packing will cause the material to crack and degrade. The purpose of this report is to document the results of the absorption/desorption cycling of 1,100[degree]C heated Pd/k and compare these results to the results obtained from the absorption/desorption cycling of Pd/k which had not been heated at 1, 100[degree]C.

  18. Auto-calibrated scanning-angle prism-type total internal reflection microscopy for nanometer-precision axial position determination and optional variable-illumination-depth pseudo total internal reflection microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fang, Ning; Sun, Wei

    2015-04-21

    A method, apparatus, and system for improved VA-TIRFM microscopy. The method comprises automatically controlled calibration of one or more laser sources by precise control of presentation of each laser relative a sample for small incremental changes of incident angle over a range of critical TIR angles. The calibration then allows precise scanning of the sample for any of those calibrated angles for higher and more accurate resolution, and better reconstruction of the scans for super resolution reconstruction of the sample. Optionally the system can be controlled for incident angles of the excitation laser at sub-critical angles for pseudo TIRFM. Optionally both above-critical angle and sub critical angle measurements can be accomplished with the same system.

  19. Solutions for implementing time-of-flight techniques in low-angle neutron scattering, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.

    1992-12-01

    The implementation of small-angle (Low-momentum transfer) neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources, using time of flight methods, has meant the introduction of some new ideas in instrument design, data acquisition, data reduction and computer management of the experiment and the data. Here we recount some of the salient aspects of solutions for implementing time of fight small-angle neutron scattering instruments at pulsed sources, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer, LQD, at Los Alamos. We consider, fortlier, some of the problems that are yet to be solved, and take a short excursion into the future of SANS instrumentation at pulsed sources.

  20. Application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for determining the location of buried polymer interfaces with tens of nanometer precision

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Damin, Craig A.; Nguyen, Vy H. T.; Niyibizi, Auguste S.; Smith, Emily A.

    2015-02-11

    Near-infrared scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy was utilized to determine the interface location in bilayer films (a stack of two polymer layers) of polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC). Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the sum square electric field (SSEF) for films with total bilayer thicknesses of 1200–3600 nm were used to construct models for simultaneously measuring the film thickness and the location of the buried interface between the PS and PC layers. Samples with total thicknesses of 1320, 1890, 2300, and 2750 nm and varying PS/PC interface locations were analyzed using SA Raman spectroscopy. Comparing SA Raman spectroscopy and optical profilometrymore » measurements, the average percent difference in the total bilayer thickness was 2.0% for films less than ~2300 nm thick. The average percent difference in the thickness of the PS layer, which reflects the interface location, was 2.5% when the PS layer was less than ~1800 nm. The SA Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable, non-destructive method capable of determining the total bilayer thickness and buried interface location for bilayer samples consisting of thin polymer films with comparable indices of refraction.« less

  1. Fast, Quantitative, and Nondestructive Evaluation on Hydrided LWR Fuel Cladding by Small Angle Incoherent Neutron Scattering of Hydrogen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Littrell, Ken; Parish, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distributionmore » of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.« less

  2. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the θ13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the θ13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22θ13=0.083±0.018 in the three-flavor oscillationmore » model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22θ13=0.089±0.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.« less

  3. Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using the concept of tidal and ancillary domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finkelstein, T.

    1996-12-31

    In a parallel publication (Finkelstein, 1996), a new analysis of the ideal loss-less Stirling Cycle Machine was presented based upon the concept of overlapping Tidal and Ancillary domains. This has led to the definition of the following two dimensionless parameters: (1) the specific performance {Pi} for the unified measure of output for engines, refrigerators and heat pumps, and (2) the Tidal Compression Ratio {Kappa}, which is akin to the Compression Ratio in internal combustion machines and uniquely defines the operational characteristics of any Stirling Cycle Machine. An analysis to replace the alternative traditional Schmidt equation was presented and a new expression for the general performance of practical Stirling engines was derived from the first principles. An analytical optimization of the volumes of the three internal heat exchangers was also included. In this present paper, which is an extension of the above analysis, these new equations for the performance are utilized for an analytical optimization of the phase angles. It is shown that the optimum phase lead of the expansion space and the optimum phase lag of the compression space for an ideal isothermal machine is precisely {pi}/4 for all possible machines. This is independent of the previous conclusion that the pressure vector should have a zero phase lag or lead.

  4. Recent results in the study of heavy-ion elastic scattering at large angles. [180/sup 0/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrette, J.; Kahana, S.

    1983-01-01

    The observation, a few years ago, of unexpected large cross sections at backward angles in the elastic scattering of mass-asymmetric heavy ion systems gave us hope that we could learn something new and more precise on the properties of the average ion-ion potential. The subsequent observation of broad regular structures in the elastic and inelastic excitation functions near theta/sub cm/ = 180/sup 0/ were also very promising. Numerous models were proposed to explain some or all the observed features. These models can be divided mainly in two groups. Some try to modify directly the average optical potential whereas others associate the observed cross sections to a modification of specific partial waves outside the scope of the optical potential. This separation in two groups is not always clear since as demonstrated adding a Regge pole to a strongly absorbing potential is under some conditions perfectly equivalent to changing the shape of this potential. Similarly the resonances added to an S matrix can be understood as the manifestation of the potential resonances of a completely different optical potential. We describe recent calculations which have been carried on to try to understand the behavior of the data near the barrier.

  5. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle ?13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the ?13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the ?13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22?13=0.0830.018 in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22?13=0.0890.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  6. Protein Folding Dynamics Detected By Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Small-Angle Scattering Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Satoshi [RIKEN Harima Institute, SPring-8 Center, Laboratory for Biometal Science, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University Suita Osaka 565-0871/CREST, JST (Japan)

    2007-03-30

    The polypeptide collapse is an essential dynamics in protein folding. To understand the mechanism of the collapse, in situ observation of folding by various probes is necessary. The changes in secondary and tertiary structures in the folding process of globular proteins, whose chain lengths are less than 300 polypeptides, were observed by circular dichrosim and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopies, respectively. On the other hand, those in protein compactness could be only detected by using time-resolved synchrotron x-ray small-angle scattering technique. The observed dynamics for several proteins with different topologies suggested a common folding mechanism termed 'collapse and search' dynamics, in which the polypeptide collapse precedes the formation of the native contact formation. In 'collapse and search' dynamics, the most outstanding feature lied in the compactness of the initial intermediates. The collapsed intermediates demonstrated the scaling relationship between radius of gyration (Rg) and chain length with a scaling exponent of 0.35 {+-} 0.11, which is close to the value (1/3) predicted by mechano-statistical theory for the collapsed globules of polymers in poor solvent. Thus, it was suggested that the initial collapse is caused by the coil-globule transition of polymers. Since the collapse is essential to the folding of larger proteins, further investigations on the collapse likely lead to an important insight into the protein folding phenomena.

  7. Application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for determining the location of buried polymer interfaces with tens of nanometer precision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damin, Craig A.; Nguyen, Vy H. T.; Niyibizi, Auguste S.; Smith, Emily A.

    2015-02-11

    Near-infrared scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy was utilized to determine the interface location in bilayer films (a stack of two polymer layers) of polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC). Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the sum square electric field (SSEF) for films with total bilayer thicknesses of 1200–3600 nm were used to construct models for simultaneously measuring the film thickness and the location of the buried interface between the PS and PC layers. Samples with total thicknesses of 1320, 1890, 2300, and 2750 nm and varying PS/PC interface locations were analyzed using SA Raman spectroscopy. Comparing SA Raman spectroscopy and optical profilometry measurements, the average percent difference in the total bilayer thickness was 2.0% for films less than ~2300 nm thick. The average percent difference in the thickness of the PS layer, which reflects the interface location, was 2.5% when the PS layer was less than ~1800 nm. The SA Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable, non-destructive method capable of determining the total bilayer thickness and buried interface location for bilayer samples consisting of thin polymer films with comparable indices of refraction.

  8. The ITER VIS/IR wide angle viewing system: Challenges and on-going R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travere, J. M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Joanny, M.; Jouve, M.; Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Salasca, S.; Marot, L.; Chabaud, D.; Ferme, J. J.; Bremond, F.; Thonnat, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER tokamak is the next generation fusion device which will allow studying burning plasma obtained by a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction during hundreds of seconds. ITER vacuum vessel real-time protection will be mandatory during plasma operation to avoid water leaks and critical plasma facing components degradation. The protection system will be based on a wide angle viewing system (WAVS) composed with 18 visible (VIS) and 18 infrared (IR) cameras covering 80 % of the vacuum vessel which will be one of the major imaging systems of ITER. Compared to protection systems routinely used on current tokamaks and based on imaging (VIS and/or IR), new constraints must be taken into account because of their influence on the system performance: the harsh environment (high neutron flux) and the metallic plasma facing components (both first wall and divertor). In this new demanding context, we have achieved three mandatory R and D studies starting from the understanding of the source of signals by using realistic photonic simulation up to real-time processing strategy taken into account first order optical design constraints to define what type of performance could be reached for ITER vacuum vessel protection. (authors)

  9. Poisson's ratio of collagen fibrils measured by small angle X-ray scattering of strained bovine pericardium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Hannah C.; Sizeland, Katie H.; Kayed, Hanan R.; Haverkamp, Richard G.; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T.

    2015-01-28

    Type I collagen is the main structural component of skin, tendons, and skin products, such as leather. Understanding the mechanical performance of collagen fibrils is important for understanding the mechanical performance of the tissues that they make up, while the mechanical properties of bulk tissue are well characterized, less is known about the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils. In this study, bovine pericardium is subjected to strain while small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns are recorded using synchrotron radiation. The change in d-spacing, which is a measure of fibril extension, and the change in fibril diameter are determined from SAXS. The tissue is strained 0.25 (25%) with a corresponding strain in the collagen fibrils of 0.045 observed. The ratio of collagen fibril width contraction to length extension, or the Poisson's ratio, is 2.1 ± 0.7 for a tissue strain from 0 to 0.25. This Poisson's ratio indicates that the volume of individual collagen fibrils decreases with increasing strain, which is quite unlike most engineering materials. This high Poisson's ratio of individual fibrils may contribute to high Poisson's ratio observed for tissues, contributing to some of the remarkable properties of collagen-based materials.

  10. Early stages of spinodal decomposition in Fe–Cr resolved by in-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hörnqvist, M. Thuvander, M.; Steuwer, A.; King, S.; Odqvist, J.; Hedström, P.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ, time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigations of the early stages of the spinodal decomposition process in Fe–35Cr were performed at 773 and 798 K. The kinetics of the decomposition, both in terms of characteristic distance and peak intensity, followed a power-law behaviour from the start of the heat treatment (a′{sup  }= 0.10–0.11 and a″ = 0.67–0.86). Furthermore, the method allows tracking of the high–Q slope, which is a sensitive measure of the early stages of decomposition. Ex-situ SANS and atom probe tomography were used to verify the results from the in-situ investigations. Finally, the in-situ measurement of the evolution of the characteristic distance at 773 K was compared with the predictions from the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model, which showed good agreement with the experimental data (a′{sup  }= 0.12–0.20 depending on the assumed mobility)

  11. Fast, Quantitative, and Nondestructive Evaluation on Hydrided LWR Fuel Cladding by Small Angle Incoherent Neutron Scattering of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yong; Qian, Shuo; Littrell, Ken; Parish, Chad M; Plummer, Lee K

    2015-01-01

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.

  12. ARM - Datastreams - xsacrhsrhi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send Datastream : XSACRHSRHI X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals) Active Dates...

  13. A high resolution and large solid angle x-ray Raman spectroscopy end-station at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Mori, R. Alonso; Bergmann, U.; Qian, Q.

    2012-04-15

    We present a new x-ray Raman spectroscopy end-station recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The end-station is located at wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two monochromators-Si(111) and Si(311) as well as collimating and focusing optics. It consists of two multi-crystal Johann type spectrometers arranged on intersecting Rowland circles of 1 m diameter. The first one, positioned at the forward scattering angles (low-q), consists of 40 spherically bent and diced Si(110) crystals with 100 mm diameters providing about 1.9% of 4{pi} sr solid angle of detection. When operated in the (440) order in combination with the Si (311) monochromator, an overall energy resolution of 270 meV is obtained at 6462.20 eV. The second spectrometer, consisting of 14 spherically bent Si(110) crystal analyzers (not diced), is positioned at the backward scattering angles (high-q) enabling the study of non-dipole transitions. The solid angle of this spectrometer is about 0.9% of 4{pi} sr, with a combined energy resolution of 600 meV using the Si (311) monochromator. These features exceed the specifications of currently existing relevant instrumentation, opening new opportunities for the routine application of this photon-in/photon-out hard x-ray technique to emerging research in multidisciplinary scientific fields, such as energy-related sciences, material sciences, physical chemistry, etc.

  14. Structure of low-density nanoporous dielectrics revealed by low-vacuum electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S O; Toth, M; Baumann, T F; Hamza, A V; Ilavsky, J; Knowles, W R; Thiel, B L; Tileli, V; van Buuren, T; Wang, Y M; Willey, T M

    2006-06-05

    We use low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy to image directly the ligament and pore size and shape distributions of representative aerogels over a wide range of length scales ({approx} 10{sup 0}-10{sup 5} nm). The images are used for unambiguous, real-space interpretation of small-angle scattering data for these complex nanoporous systems.

  15. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: Level density, level dynamics, thermal properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strnsk, Pavel; Macek, Michal; Cejnar, Pavel

    2014-06-15

    Quantum systems with a finite number of freedom degrees f develop robust singularities in the energy spectrum of excited states as the systems size increases to infinity. We analyze the general form of these singularities for low f, particularly f=2, clarifying the relation to classical stationary points of the corresponding potential. Signatures in the smoothed energy dependence of the quantum state density and in the flow of energy levels with an arbitrary control parameter are described along with the relevant thermodynamical consequences. The general analysis is illustrated with specific examples of excited-state singularities accompanying the first-order quantum phase transition. -- Highlights: ESQPTs found in infinite-size limit of systems with low numbers of freedom degrees f. ESQPTs related to non-analytical evolutions of classical phasespace properties. ESQPT signatures analyzed for general f, particularly f=2, extending known case f=1. ESQPT signatures identified in smoothened density and flow of energy spectrum. ESQPTs shown to induce a new type of thermodynamic anomalies.

  16. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  17. p-Hydroxyphenyl (H) Units Lower the Degree of Polymerization in Lignin: Chemical Control in Lignin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangha, A. K.; Parks, J. M.; Davis, M. F.; Smith, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin, composed predominantly of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) subunits, is a major component of plant cell walls that imparts resistance toward chemical and microbial deconstruction of plant biomass, rendering its conversion inefficient and costly. Previous studies have shown that alterating lignin composition, i.e., the relative abundance of H, G and S subunits, promises more efficient extraction of sugars from plant biomass. Smaller and less branched lignin chains are more easily extracted during pretreatment, making cellulose more readily degradable. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we show that the incorporation of H subunits into lignin via b-b and b-5 interunit linkages reduces the degree of polymerization in lignin. Frontier molecular orbital analyses of lignin dimers and trimers show that H as a terminal subunit on a growing lignin polymer linked via b-b and b-5 linkage cannot undergo radical formation, preventing further chain growth by endwise polymerization resulting in lignin polymers with lower degree of polymerization. These results indicate that, for endwise polymerization in lignin synthesis, there exists a chemical control that may lay a significant role in determining the structure of lignin.

  18. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard X-ray-producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path ? associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that ? ? (10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}) cm for ?30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  19. Mass fractal characteristics of silica sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donatti, D.A.; Vollet, D.R.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Mesquita, A.; Silva, T.F.P. [Unesp-Universidade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 178 CEP, 13500-970 Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-01-01

    A sample series of silica sonogels was prepared using different water-tetraethoxysilane molar ratio (r{sub w}) in the gelation step of the process in order to obtain aerogels with different bulk densities after the supercritical drying. The samples were analyzed by means of small-angle x-ray-scattering (SAXS) and nitrogen-adsorption techniques. Wet sonogels exhibit mass fractal structure with fractal dimension D increasing from {approx}2.1 to {approx}2.4 and mass-fractal correlation length {xi} diminishing from {approx}13 nm to {approx}2 nm, as r{sub w} is changed in the nominal range from 66 to 6. The process of obtaining aerogels from sonogels and heat treatment at 500 deg. C, in general, increases the mass-fractal dimension D, diminishes the characteristic length {xi} of the fractal structure, and shortens the fractal range at the micropore side for the formation of a secondary structured particle, apparently evolved from the original wet structure at a high resolution level. The overall mass-fractal dimension D of aerogels was evaluated as {approx}2.4 and {approx}2.5, as determined from SAXS and from pore-size distribution by nitrogen adsorption, respectively. The fine structure of the 'secondary particle' developed in the obtaining of aerogels could be described as a surface-mass fractal, with the correlated surface and mass-fractal dimensions decreasing from {approx}2.4 to {approx}2.0 and from {approx}2.7 to {approx}2.5, respectively, as the aerogel bulk density increases from 0.25 (r{sub w}=66) up to 0.91 g/cm{sup 3} (r{sub w}=6)

  20. Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

  1. Exploring the Limits of the Dipole Approximation with Angle-Resolved Electron Time-of-Flight Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laidman, S.; Pangilinan, J.; Guillemin, R.; Yu, S.U.; Ohrwall, G.; Lindle, D.; Hemmers, O.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of atoms and molecules is fundamental in determining their basic properties as well as the interactions that occur with different particles such as light. One such interaction is single photoionization; a process in which a photon collides with an atom or molecule and an electron with a certain kinetic energy is emitted, leaving behind a residual ion. Theoretical models of electronic structures use the dipole approximation to simplify x-ray interactions by assuming that the electromagnetic field of the radiation, expressed as a Taylor-series expansion, can be simplified by using only the first term. It has been known for some time that the dipole approximation becomes inaccurate at high photon energies, but the threshold at which this discrepancy begins is ambiguous. In order to enhance our understanding of these limitations, we measured the electron emissions of nitrogen. Beamline 8.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source was used with an electron Time-of-Flight (TOF) end station, which measures the time required for electrons emitted to travel a fixed distance. Data were collected over a broad range of photon energies (413 - 664 eV) using five analyzers rotated to 15 chamber angles. Preliminary analysis indicates that these results confirm the breakdown of the dipole approximation at photon energies well below 1 keV and that this breakdown is greatly enhanced in molecules just above the core-level ionization threshold. As a result, new theoretical models must be made that use higher order terms that were previously truncated.

  2. Measurement of CP observables in B__ ->D_CPK__ decays and constraints on the CKM angle gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    Using the entire sample of 467 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC, we perform a 'GLW' analysis of B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sup {+-}} decays, using decay modes in which the neutral D meson decays to either CP-eigenstates or non-CP-eigenstates. We measure the partial decay rate charge asymmetries for CP-even and CP-odd D final states to be A{sub CP+} = 0.25 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02 and A{sub CP-} = -0.09 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively, where the first error is the statistical and the second is the systematic uncertainty. The parameter A{sub CP+} is different from zero with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations, constituting evidence for direct CP violation. We also measure the ratios of the charged-averaged B partial decay rates in CP and non-CP decays, R{sub CP+} = 1.18 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.05 and R{sub CP-} = 1.07 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.04. We infer frequentist confidence intervals for the angle {gamma} of the (db) unitarity triangle, for the strong phase difference {delta}{sub B}, and for the amplitude ratio r{sub B}, which are related to the B{sup -} {yields} D{sup -} decay amplitude by r{sub B}e{sup i({delta}{sub b-{gamma}})} = A(B{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}K{sup -})/A(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup 0-}). Including statistical and systematic uncertainties, they obtain 0.24 < r{sub B} < 0.45 (0.06 < r{sub B} < 0.51) and, modulo 180{sup o}, 11.3{sup o} < {gamma} < 22.7{sup o} or 80.9{sup o} < {gamma} < 99.1{sup o} or 157.3{sup o} < {gamma} 168.7{sup o} (7.0{sup o} < {gamma} < 173.0{sup o}) at the 68% (95%) confidence level.

  3. A portable hydro-thermo-mechanical loading cell for in-situ small angle neutron scattering studies of proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Gao, Carrie Y; Heller, William T; Chen, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A portable hydro-thermo-mechanical loading cell has been designed to enable in-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of proton exchange membranes (PEM) under immersed tensile loadings at different temperatures. The cell consists of three main parts as follows: a letter-paper-size motor-driven mechanical load frame, a SANS friendly reservoir that provides stable immersed and thermal sample conditions, and a data acquisition & control system. The ex-situ tensile tests of Nafion 212 membranes demonstrated a satisfactory thermo-mechanical testing performance of the cell for either dry or immersed conditions at elevated temperatures. The in-situ SANS tensile measurements on the Nafion 212 membranes immersed in D2O at 70oC proved the feasibility and capability of the cell for small angle scattering study on deformation behaviors of PEM and other polymer materials under hydro-thermo-mechanical loading.

  4. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Annual report, September 28, 1995--September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemeyer, B.L.

    1997-09-01

    The digital fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economic to develop using verticle wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional verticle wells while maintaining verticle communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three verticle wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  5. Erosion-corrosion of materials in high-temperature environments: Impingement angle effects in alloys 310 and 6B under simulated coal gasification atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, S.C.; Howes, M.A.H.

    1986-03-01

    The present paper provides a brief overview of the existing knowledge of erosion, high-temperature erosion, and high-temperature CGA erosion-corrosion (EC) phenomena. Experimental results and interpretive analysis of impingement angle effects in alloys 310 and 6B exposed to simulated CGA EC atmosphere at 1500/sup 0/F are presented and discussed. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of the interpretive analysis in developing better cause and effect and mechanistic understanding of the CGA EC phenomena.

  6. Microstructure of amorphous-silicon-based solar cell materials by small-angle x-ray scattering. Annual subcontract report, 6 April 1994--5 April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The general objective of this research is to provide detailed microstructural information on the amorphous-silicon-based, thin-film materials under development for improved multijunction solar cells. The experimental technique used is small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) providing microstructural data on microvoid fractions, sizes, shapes, and their preferred orientations. Other microstructural features such as alloy segregation, hydrogen-rich clusters and alloy short-range order are probed.

  7. Outmigration of landlocked Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts and effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small scale hydroelectric facility. [Salmo salar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettles, D.C.; Gloss, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Modes of downstream passage (penstock, spillway, diversion chute) by Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts were monitored using radio telemetry to assess the effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small hydroelectric dam on the Boquet River, New York. Telemetry of 170 Atlantic salmon smolts and visual observations of stocked smolts were used to determine aspects of Atlantic salmon outmigration behavior. Smolts initiated mass migrations after river temperatures reached or exceeded 10/sup 0/C. Many radio-tagged smolts interrupted movements upon reaching ponded waters and/or the dam. River flow did not (P > .05) affect the frequency of migratory movements, passages, or rate of movement. Migrations were of approximately 30 days duration. Passages at the dam occurred primarily at night (61%) with diurnal passages (17%) and crepuscular passages (17%) of secondary importance. Timing of 5% of the passages was undetermined. All passages which occurred when angled trash racks were in place were through the bypass or over the spillway. Six (6) passages occurred when trash racks perpendicular to the penstock were in place: 3 of these were penstock passages. The angled trash rack and bypass structure served to reduce entrainment.

  8. Characteristic on the thermal stresses near apex in dissimilar materials (Relation between the intensity of stress field and the bonded wedge angle)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, T.; Koguchi, H.

    1995-11-01

    The characteristic of thermal stresses near the apex in dissimilar materials under a uniform temperature change is theoretically and numerically investigated. The materials are composed of two isotropic homogeneous wedges with arbitrary angles. The dominant factor of thermal stresses near the apex is represented by Kr{sup p{minus}1}, where p{minus}1 is the order of the stress singularity and K indicates the intensity of the stress field. For the bonded structures of Cu/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, the relationship between the wedge angle {var_phi}{sub 1} of material 1 and the total angle {var_phi}{sub 1} + {var_phi}{sub 2} of the bonded wedge, in which K becomes zero, is clarified theoretically. Also, it is shown that the distribution of the intensity K for each root p is divided into two forms. Finally, a relation between the distribution of the thermal stresses near apex and characteristic length of the bonded structure is examined by FEM.

  9. ARM - Datastreams - rphtilt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basetime North latitude degreeN lat East longitude degreeE lon Surface condition Pitch angle reported by tilt table degrees pitch ( time ) Surface condition Roll angle...

  10. Thermochemical properties of gibbsite, bayerite, boehmite, diaspore, and the aluminate ion between 0 and 350/degree/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apps, J.A.; Neil, J.M.; Jun, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    A requirement for modelling the chemical behavior of groundwater in a nuclear waste repository is accurate thermodynamic data pertaining to the participating minerals and aqueous species. In particular, it is important that the thermodynamic properties of the aluminate ion be accurately determined, because most rock forming minerals in the earth's crust are aluminosilicates, and most groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline, where the aluminate ion is the predominant aluminum species in solution. Without a precise knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of the aluminate ion aluminosilicate mineral solubilities cannot be determined. The thermochemical properties of the aluminate ion have been determined from the solubilities of the aluminum hydroxides and oxyhydroxides in alkaline solutions between 20 and 350/degree/C. An internally consistent set of thermodynamic properties have been determined for gibbsite, boehmite, diaspore and corundum. The thermodynamic properties of bayerite have been provisionally estimated and a preliminary value for ..delta..G/sub f, 298//sup 0/ of nordstrandite has been determined. 205 refs., 17 figs., 25 tabs.

  11. THE MAGNETIZATION DEGREE OF THE OUTFLOW POWERING THE HIGHLY POLARIZED REVERSE-SHOCK EMISSION OF GRB 120308A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming, E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2015-01-01

    GRB 120308A, a long duration ?-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift, was distinguished by a highly polarized early optical afterglow emission that strongly suggests an ordered magnetic field component in the emitting region. In this work, we model the optical and X-ray emission in the reverse and forward shock scenario and show that the strength of the magnetic field in the reverse-shock region is ?10 times stronger than that in the forward shock region. Consequently, the outflow powering the highly polarized reverse-shock optical emission was mildly magnetized at a degree of ? ? a few percent. Considering the plausible magnetic energy dissipation in both the acceleration and prompt emission phases of the GRB outflow, the afterglow data of GRB 120308A provides us with compelling evidence that, at least for some GRBs, a nonignorable fraction of the energy was released in the form of Poynting flux, confirming the finding first made in the reverse-forward shock emission modeling of the optical afterglow of GRB 990123 by Fan etal. in 2002 and Zhang etal. in 2003.

  12. Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raich, J.W.

    2003-09-15

    We used a climate-driven regression model to develop spatially resolved estimates of soil-CO{sub 2} emissions from the terrestrial land surface for each month from January 1980 to December 1994, to evaluate the effects of interannual variations in climate on global soil-to-atmosphere CO{sub 2} fluxes. The mean annual global soil-CO{sub 2} flux over this 15-y period was estimated to be 80.4 (range 79.3-81.8) Pg C. Monthly variations in global soil-CO{sub 2} emissions followed closely the mean temperature cycle of the Northern Hemisphere. Globally, soil-CO{sub 2} emissions reached their minima in February and peaked in July and August. Tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests contributed more soil-derived CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere than did any other vegetation type ({approx}30% of the total) and exhibited a biannual cycle in their emissions. Soil-CO{sub 2} emissions in other biomes exhibited a single annual cycle that paralleled the seasonal temperature cycle. Interannual variability in estimated global soil-CO{sub 2} production is substantially less than is variability in net carbon uptake by plants (i.e., net primary productivity). Thus, soils appear to buffer atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations against far more dramatic seasonal and interannual differences in plant growth. Within seasonally dry biomes (savannas, bushlands, and deserts), interannual variability in soil-CO{sub 2} emissions correlated significantly with interannual differences in precipitation. At the global scale, however, annual soil-CO{sub 2} fluxes correlated with mean annual temperature, with a slope of 3.3 PgCY{sup -1} per degree Celsius. Although the distribution of precipitation influences seasonal and spatial patterns of soil-CO{sub 2} emissions, global warming is likely to stimulate CO{sub 2} emissions from soils.

  13. THIRD COMPONENT SEARCH AND ABUNDANCES OF THE VERY DUSTY SHORT-PERIOD BINARY BD +20 Degree-Sign 307

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Cordero, Maria J.; Galicher, Raphael; Zuckerman, B.; Melis, Carl; Weinberger, Alycia J. E-mail: majocord@indiana.edu E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu

    2012-04-10

    We have obtained near-infrared adaptive optics imaging and collected additional radial velocity observations to search for a third component in the extremely dusty short-period binary system BD +20 Degree-Sign 307. Our image shows no evidence for a third component at separations greater than 19 AU. Our four seasons of radial velocities have a constant center-of-mass velocity and are consistent with the systemic velocities determined at two earlier epochs. Thus, the radial velocities also provide no support for a third component. Unfortunately, the separation domains covered by our imaging and radial velocity results do not overlap. Thus, we examined the parameters for possible orbits of a third component that could have been missed by our current observations. With our velocities we determined improved circular orbital elements for the 3.4 day double-lined binary. We also performed a spectroscopic abundance analysis of the short-period binary components and conclude that the stars are a mid- and a late-F dwarf. We find that the iron abundances of both components, [Fe/H] = 0.15, are somewhat greater than the solar value and comparable to that of stars in the Hyades. Despite the similarity of the binary components, the lithium abundances of the two stars are very unequal. The primary has log {epsilon} (Li) = 2.72, while in the secondary log {epsilon} (Li) {<=}1.46, which corresponds to a difference of at least a factor of 18. The very disparate lithium abundances in very similar stars make it impossible to ascribe a single age to them. While the system is likely at least 1 Gyr old, it may well be as old as the Sun.

  14. Catalytic steam gasification reactivity of HyperCoals produced from different rank of coals at 600-775{degree}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi

    2008-11-15

    HyperCoal is a clean coal with ash content <0.05 wt %. HyperCoals were prepared from a brown coal, a sub-bituminous coal, and a bituminous raw coal by solvent extraction method. Catalytic steam gasification of these HyperCoals was carried out with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 775, 700, 650, and 600 {degree}C, and their rates were compared. HyperCoals produced from low-rank coals were more reactive than those produced from the high-rank coals. XRD measurements were carried out to understand the difference in gasification reactivity of HyperCoals. Arrhenius plot of ln (k) vs 1/T in the temperature range 600-825{degree}C was a curve rather than a straight line. The point of change was observed at 700{degree}C for HyperCoals from low-rank coals and at 775{degree}C for HyperCoals from high-rank coals. Using HyperCoal produced from low-rank coals as feedstock, steam gasification of coal may be possible at temperatures less than 650{degree}C. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Improving the efficiency of configurational-bias Monte Carlo: A density-guided method for generating bending angle trials for linear and branched molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri, Aliasghar; Loeffler, Troy D.; Chen, Bin

    2014-08-21

    A new method has been developed to generate bending angle trials to improve the acceptance rate and the speed of configurational-bias Monte Carlo. Whereas traditionally the trial geometries are generated from a uniform distribution, in this method we attempt to use the exact probability density function so that each geometry generated is likely to be accepted. In actual practice, due to the complexity of this probability density function, a numerical representation of this distribution function would be required. This numerical table can be generated a priori from the distribution function. This method has been tested on a united-atom model of alkanes including propane, 2-methylpropane, and 2,2-dimethylpropane, that are good representatives of both linear and branched molecules. It has been shown from these test cases that reasonable approximations can be made especially for the highly branched molecules to reduce drastically the dimensionality and correspondingly the amount of the tabulated data that is needed to be stored. Despite these approximations, the dependencies between the various geometrical variables can be still well considered, as evident from a nearly perfect acceptance rate achieved. For all cases, the bending angles were shown to be sampled correctly by this method with an acceptance rate of at least 96% for 2,2-dimethylpropane to more than 99% for propane. Since only one trial is required to be generated for each bending angle (instead of thousands of trials required by the conventional algorithm), this method can dramatically reduce the simulation time. The profiling results of our Monte Carlo simulation code show that trial generation, which used to be the most time consuming process, is no longer the time dominating component of the simulation.

  16. Expected accuracy in a measurement of the CKM angle alpha using a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 ---> rho pi decays in the BTeV project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shestermanov, K.E.; Vasiliev, A.N; Butler, J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Kasper, P.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Kutschke, R.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Minaev, N.G.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the angle {alpha} in the CKM triangle is very important for a complete test of Standard Model. A theoretically clean method to extract {alpha} is provided by B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} decays. Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the BTeV reconstruction efficiency and to estimate the signal to background ratio for these decays were performed. Finally the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis, using the isospin amplitude formalism for tre and penguin contributions, was carried out. It was shown that in one year of data taking BTeV could achieve an accuracy on {alpha} better than 5{sup o}.

  17. An engine with means for changing the phase angle between displacer and working pistons: Its thermo dynamic cycle compared to the ideal Stirling cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala V., E.

    1984-08-01

    This paper describes a heat engine comprising a displacer piston actuated by the pressure changes accomplished by the working piston combined with the force exerted by the pressure of a spring against the piston which can be changed to modify the phase angle between the displacer and working pistons. A gas cooler is arranged in an independent closed loop circuit that is put into operation between the end of the expansion stroke and the beginning of the compression stroke. The working cylinder is connected to the cold end of the displacer cylinder through an auxiliary cooler and to the end of the displacer cylinder through the heat regenerator and the heater.

  18. Commissioning of a Soft X-ray Beamline PF-BL-16A with a Variable-Included-Angle Varied-Line-Spacing Grating Monochromator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amemiya, Kenta; Toyoshima, Akio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Kosuge, Takashi; Nigorikawa, Kazuyuki; Sumii, Ryohei; Ito, Kenji

    2010-06-23

    The design and commissioning of a new soft X-ray beamline, BL-16A, at the Photon Factory is presented. The beamline consists of a pre-focusing mirror, an entrance slit, a variable-included-angle varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator, and a post-focusing system as usual, and provides circularly and linearly polarized soft X rays in the energy range 200-1500 eV with an APPLE-II type undulator. The commissioning procedure for the beamline optics is described in detail, especially the check of the focal position for the zero-th order and diffracted X rays.

  19. Strong spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman spin splitting in angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Rik Pramanik, Tanmoy; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Movva, Hema C. P.; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-06-02

    We have studied angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film with field up to 9 T over 2–20 K temperatures. The perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory alone in a system with strong spin-orbit coupling, from which we have estimated the mean free path, the phase coherence length, and the spin-orbit relaxation time. We have obtained the out-of-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be small and the in-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be comparable to the momentum relaxation time. The estimation of these charge and spin transport parameters are useful for spintronics applications. For parallel field magnetoresistance, we have confirmed the presence of Zeeman effect which is otherwise suppressed in perpendicular field magnetoresistance due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The parallel field data have been explained using both the contributions from the Maekawa-Fukuyama localization theory for non-interacting electrons and Lee-Ramakrishnan theory of electron-electron interactions. The estimated Zeeman g-factor and the strength of Coulomb screening parameter agree well with the theory. Finally, the anisotropy in magnetoresistance with respect to angle has been described by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. This anisotropy can be used in anisotropic magnetic sensor applications.

  20. Magnetization reversal of a Nd-Cu-infiltrated Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet observed with small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Kotaro Ono, Kanta; Ueno, Tetsuro; Yano, Masao; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Manabe, Akira; Kato, Akira; Harada, Masashi; Keiderling, Uwe

    2015-05-07

    The magnetization reversal process of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnets infiltrated with Nd-Cu alloy was examined using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The magnetic-field dependence of SANS intensity revealed a qualitative difference between Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples and as-deformed samples. Insufficient magnetic isolation along the direction perpendicular to the nominal c-axis is expected from comparable SANS intensities for different ranges of q values along this direction. For small q values near the coercivity field, Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples show a noticeable reduction in SANS intensity along the nominal c-axis, which is parallel to the external magnetic field. This indicates less spatial fluctuation of magnetic moments in Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples, owing to magnetically isolated Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains.

  1. Enhanced photoresponse of conformal TiO{sub 2}/Ag nanorod array-based Schottky photodiodes fabricated via successive glancing angle and atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Cansizoglu, Mehmet Fatih; Karabacak, Tansel; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors demonstrate a proof of concept nanostructured photodiode fabrication method via successive glancing angle deposition (GLAD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The fabricated metal-semiconductor nanorod (NR) arrays offer enhanced photoresponse compared to conventional planar thin-film counterparts. Silver (Ag) metallic NR arrays were deposited on Ag-film/Si templates by utilizing GLAD. Subsequently, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) was deposited conformally on Ag NRs via ALD. Scanning electron microscopy studies confirmed the successful formation of vertically aligned Ag NRs deposited via GLAD and conformal deposition of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs via ALD. Following the growth of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs, aluminum metallic top contacts were formed to complete the fabrication of NR-based Schottky photodiodes. Nanostructured devices exhibited a photo response enhancement factor of 1.49??10{sup 2} under a reverse bias of 3 V.

  2. Electronic structure of Ce?RhIn?: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Petrovic, C.; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce?RhIn?. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) ?/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimoresheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.less

  3. Simulations of Microchannel Plate Sensitivity to <20 keV X-rays as a Function of Energy and Incident Angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruschwitz, Craig; Wu, M.; Rochau, G. A.

    2013-06-13

    We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP) response to x-rays in the 250 eV to 20 keV energy range as a function of both x-ray energy and impact angle. The model is based on the model presented in Rochau et al. (2006). However, while the Rochau et al. (2006) model was two-dimensional, and their results only went to 5 keV, our results have been expanded to 20 keV, and our model has been incorporated into a three-dimensional Monte Carlo MCP model that we have developed over the past several years (Kruschwitz et al. 2011). X-ray penetration through multiple MCP pore walls is increasingly important above 5 keV. The effect of x-ray penetration through multiple pores on MCP performance was studied and is presented.

  4. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7 GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ∼8.9 GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0} = 132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24 GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  5. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah, Wa'el; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Hoorani, H.

    2009-09-15

    The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

  6. Small angle neutron scattering analyses and high temperature mechanical properties of nano-structured oxide dispersion strengthened steels produced via cryomilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeoung Han; Byun, Thak Sang; Shin, Eunjoo; Seol, Jae-Bok; Young, Sung; Reddy, N. S.

    2015-08-17

    Three oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are produced in order to investigate the effect of the mechanical alloying (MA) temperature on the microstructural evolution and high temperature mechanical properties. The microstructural evolution with different MA conditions is examined using small angle neutron scattering. As the MA temperature decreases, the density of the nanoclusters below 10 nm increases and their mean diameter decreases. A low temperature during MA leads to a high strength in the compression tests performed at 500 *C; however, this effect disappears in testing at 900 *C. The milling process at *70 *C exhibits excellent high fracture toughness, which is better than the benchmark material 14YWT-SM10. However, the *150 *C milling process results in significantly worse fracture toughness properties. The reasons for this strong temperature dependency are discussed.

  7. Arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pidcoe, Stephen V.; Zink, Roger A.; Boroski, William N.; McCaw, William R.

    1993-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube of a magnet such as is used with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The arrangement includes a magnetic field alignment gauge that is carried through the magnet bore tube by a positioning shuttle in predetermined increments. The positioning shuttle includes an extensible body assembly which is actuated by an internal piston arrangement. A pair of spaced inflatable cuffs are carried by the body assembly and are selectively actuated in cooperation with pressurizing of the piston to selectively drive the positioning shuttle in an axial direction. Control of the shuttle is provided by programmed electronic computer means located exteriorly of the bore tube and which controls valves provided pressurized fluid to the inflatable cuss and the piston arrangement.

  8. MAGNETIC HELICITY SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF THE ANGLE WITH RESPECT TO THE LOCAL MEAN MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podesta, J. J.; Gary, S. P., E-mail: jpodesta@solar.stanford.edu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Magnetic field data acquired by the Ulysses spacecraft in high-speed streams over the poles of the Sun are used to investigate the normalized magnetic helicity spectrum {sigma}{sub m} as a function of the angle {theta} between the local mean magnetic field and the flow direction of the solar wind. This spectrum provides important information about the constituent modes at the transition to kinetic scales that occurs near the spectral break separating the inertial range from the dissipation range. The energetically dominant signal at scales near the thermal proton gyroradius k{sub perpendicular{rho}i} {approx} 1 often covers a wide band of propagation angles centered about the perpendicular direction, {theta} {approx_equal} 90{sup 0} {+-} 30{sup 0}. This signal is consistent with a spectrum of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfven waves with k{sub perpendicular} >> k{sub ||} in which there is more energy in waves propagating away from the Sun and along the direction of the local mean magnetic field than toward the Sun. Moreover, this signal is principally responsible for the reduced magnetic helicity spectrum measured using Fourier transform techniques. The observations also reveal a subdominant population of nearly parallel propagating electromagnetic waves near the proton inertial scale k{sub ||} c/{omega}{sub pi} {approx} 1 that often exhibit high magnetic helicity |{sigma}{sub m}| {approx_equal} 1. These waves are believed to be caused by proton pressure anisotropy instabilities that regulate distribution functions in the collisionless solar wind. Because of the existence of a drift of alpha particles with respect to the protons, the proton temperature anisotropy instability that operates when T{sub pperpendicular}/T{sub p||} > 1 preferentially generates outward propagating ion-cyclotron waves and the fire-hose instability that operates when T{sub pperpendicular}/T{sub p||} < 1 preferentially generates inward propagating whistler waves. These kinetic processes provide a natural explanation for the magnetic field observations.

  9. Renewable Energy, Right in Your Back Yard | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    select from "solar" or "wind" energy. Under solar, the application lets you draw your own solar panel square on the roof, input a few values (size, derating, tilt angle, Azimuth...

  10. Measurement of porosity in a composite high explosive as a function of pressing conditions by ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mang, Joseph Thomas; Hjelm, Rex P; Francois, Elizabeth G

    2009-01-01

    We have used ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) with contrast variation to measure the porosity (voids and binder-filled regions) in a composite high explosive, PBX 9501, formulated with a deuterated binder. Little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 10,000 and 29,000 psi at 90 C. Five samples were prepared at each pressure that differed in the fraction of deuterated binder, facilitating variation of the neutron scattering length density contrast ({Delta}{rho}) and thus, the resolution of microstructural details. The sample composition was determined by calculation of the Porod Invariant as a function of {Delta}{rho} and compared with compositional estimates obtained from the bulk sample density. Structural modeling of the USANS data, at different levels of contrast, assuming both spherical and cylindrical morphologies, allowed the mean size and size distribution of voids and binder-filled regions to be determined. A decrease in the mean diameter of binder-filled regions was found with increasing pressing intensity, while the mean void diameter showed no significant change.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Clusters the Cell Adhesion Molecule CD44 and Assembles a Specific CD44-Ezrin Heterocomplex, as Revealed by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Ju, Jeong Ho; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Stanley, Christopher B.; Do, Changwoo; Heller, William T.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2015-01-08

    The cell adhesion molecule CD44 regulates diverse cellular functions, including cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction, cell motility, migration, differentiation, and growth. In cells, CD44 co-localizes with the membrane-cytoskeleton adapter protein Ezrin, which links the CD44 assembled receptor signaling complexes to the cytoskeletal actin and organizes the spatial and temporal localization of signaling events. Here we report that the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 (CD44ct) is largely disordered and adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which prevents CD44ct from binding directly to activated Ezrin in solution. Binding to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphlate (PIP2) disrupts autoinhibition in CD44ct, and activates CD44ct to associate with Ezrin.more » Further, using contrast variation small angle neutron scattering, we show that PIP2 mediates the assembly of a specific hetero-tetramer complex of CD44ct with Ezrin. This study reveals a novel autoregulation mechanism in the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 and the role of PIP2 in mediating the assembly of multimeric CD44ct-Ezrin complexes. We hypothesize that polyvalent electrostatic interactions are responsible for the assembly of multimeric PIP2-CD44-Ezrin complexes.« less

  12. Morphological transformations in the magnetite biomineralizing protein Mms6 in iron solutions: A small-angle x-ray scattering study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Honghu; Liu, Xunpei; Feng, Shuren; Wang, Wenjie; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Akinc, Mufit; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Vaknin, David; Mallapragada, Surya

    2015-02-10

    In this study, magnetotactic bacteria that produce magnetic nanocrystals of uniform size and well-defined morphologies have inspired the use of biomineralization protein Mms6 to promote formation of uniform magnetic nanocrystals in vitro. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies in physiological solutions reveal that Mms6 forms compact globular three-dimensional (3D) micelles (approximately 10 nm in diameter) that are, to a large extent, independent of concentration. In the presence of iron ions in the solutions, the general micellar morphology is preserved, however, with associations among micelles that are induced by iron ions. Compared with Mms6, the m2Mms6 mutant (with the sequence ofmore » hydroxyl/carboxyl containing residues in the C-terminal domain shuffled) exhibits subtle morphological changes in the presence of iron ions in solutions. The analysis of the SAXS data is consistent with a hierarchical core–corona micellar structure similar to that found in amphiphilic polymers. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron ions to the protein solution induces morphological changes in the micellar structure by transforming the 3D micelles into objects of reduced dimensionality of 2, with fractal-like characteristics (including Gaussian-chain-like) or, alternatively, platelet-like structures.« less

  13. Influences of wide-angle and multi-beam interference on the chromaticity and efficiency of top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Lingling; Zhou, Hongwei; Chen, Shufen Liu, Bin; Wang, Lianhui; Shi, Hongying

    2015-02-28

    Wide-angle interference (WI) and multi-beam interference (MI) in microcavity are analyzed separately to improve chromaticity and efficiency of the top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes (TWOLEDs). A classic electromagnetic theory is used to calculate the resonance intensities of WI and MI in top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TOLEDs) with influence factors (e.g., electrodes and exciton locations) being considered. The role of WI on the performances of TOLEDs is revealed through using ?-doping technology and comparing blue and red EML positions in top-emitting and bottom-emitting devices. The blue light intensity significantly increases and the chromaticity of TWOLEDs is further improved with the use of enhanced WI (the blue emitting layer moving towards the reflective electrode) in the case of a weak MI. In addition, the effect of the thicknesses of light output layer and carrier transport layers on WI and MI are also investigated. Apart from the microcavity effect, other factors, e.g., carrier balance and carrier recombination regions are considered to obtain TWOLEDs with high efficiency and improved chromaticity near white light equal-energy point.

  14. Extracting magnetic cluster size and its distributions in advanced perpendicular recording media with shrinking grain size using small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Virat; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Takano, Ken; Terris, Bruce D.; Hellwig, Olav; Wang, Tianhan; Wu, Benny; Graves, Catherine; Dürr, Hermann A.; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Jo

    2015-05-18

    We analyze the magnetic cluster size (MCS) and magnetic cluster size distribution (MCSD) in a variety of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media designs using resonant small angle x-ray scattering at the Co L{sub 3} absorption edge. The different PMR media flavors considered here vary in grain size between 7.5 and 9.5 nm as well as in lateral inter-granular exchange strength, which is controlled via the segregant amount. While for high inter-granular exchange, the MCS increases rapidly for grain sizes below 8.5 nm, we show that for increased amount of segregant with less exchange the MCS remains relatively small, even for grain sizes of 7.5 and 8 nm. However, the MCSD still increases sharply when shrinking grains from 8 to 7.5 nm. We show evidence that recording performance such as signal-to-noise-ratio on the spin stand correlates well with the product of magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution.

  15. Electronic structure of Ce2 RhIn8: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the two-dimensional (2D) heavy-fermion superconductor, Ce2 RhIn8. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q vector of (0.32, 0.32) π/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band-structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersionmore » and location of the Fermi sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band-structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  16. Electronic structure of Ce2RhIn8: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce₂RhIn₈. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) π/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimore » sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. As a result, our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  17. Characterization of nanostructured zirconia prepared by hydrolysis and reverse micelle synthesis by small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Li, X.; Littrell, K.; Seifert, S.; Csencsits, R.; Loong, C.

    1999-12-07

    Low temperature techniques such as hydrolysis and reverse micelle syntheses provide the opportunity to determine the relationship between the structural properties and preparation conditions of zirconia powders as well as to tailor their physicochemical properties. The authors have performed small-angle neutron and synchrotron X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) experiments to study the nucleation and organization of zirconia nanoparticles via different preparation routes. First, the formation of reverse micelles in individual and mixed solutions of (ZrOCl{sub 2}+D{sub 2}O)/AOT/C{sub 6}D{sub 5}CD{sub 3}, and (NH{sub 4}OH+H{sub 2}O)/AOT/C{sub 6}D{sub 5}CD{sub 3} systems at water/AOT molar ratio of 20 was characterized. Second, the aggregation of zirconia gels obtained from the reaction of the reverse micelle solutions after heat treatments was studied. Third, the nanostructure of zirconia powders prepared by the reverse micelle method is compared with the corresponding powders prepared by hydrolysis after different heat treatments.

  18. Structural and phase transition changes of sodium dodecyl sulfate micellar solution in alcohols probed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman; Patriati, Arum

    2015-04-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements on 0.3M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solutions have been performed in the presence of n-alcohols, from ethanol to decanol at different alcohol concentrations, 2–10 wt%. The ellipsoid micellar structure which occurred in the 0.3M SDS in aqueous solution with the size range of 30–50 Å has different behavior at various hydrocarbon chain length and concentration of alcohols. At low concentration and short chain-length of alcohols, such as ethanol, propanol, and butanol, the size of micelles reduced and had a spherical-like structure. The opposite effect occurred as medium to long chain alcohols, such as hexanol, octanol and decanol was added into the 0.3M SDS micellar solutions. The micelles structure changed to be more elongated in major axis and then crossed the critical phase transition from micellar solution into liquid crystal phase as lamellar structure emerged by further addition of alcohols. The inter-lamellar distances were also depending on the hydrocarbon chain length and concentration of alcohols. In the meantime, the persistent micellar structures occurred in addition of medium chain of n-alcohol, pentanol at all concentrations.

  19. Repeated compressive stress increase with 400 [degree]C thermal cycling in tantalum thin films due to increases in the oxygen content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, C. Jr.; Clevenger, L.A.; Schad, R.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Stresses which build up in thin films such as tantalum, during thermal processing, can cause major reliability problems in electronic and x-ray optics applications. We demonstrate that 50--200 nm thick sputtered [beta]-Ta thin films undergo repeated compressive stress increases when thermally cycled to 400 [degree]C (at a rate of 10 [degree]C/min) and back in a purified He ambient because of small amounts of oxygen gettered by the tantalum. The oxygen contamination results from the poor quality of the atmospheric seal on the quartz annealing chamber. As-deposited Ta thin films have a compressive stress ranging from [minus]1 to [minus]4 GPa. The compressive stress buildup was monitored [ital in] [ital situ] and was shown to increase [minus]0.5 GPa on average after each thermal cycle for a final value from [minus]6 to [minus]7 GPa after seven cycles. After being cycled thermally seven times any perturbation of the film such as a four-point probe resistivity measurement can cause the film to instantaneously crack in a serpentine pattern, relieving the large compressive stress. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis was used to determine that the as-deposited film contained 1 at. % oxygen which increased to 8%--12% after seven thermal cycles with an approximate doubling in resistivity. The [minus]0.5 GPa average compressive stress increase in Ta thin films when cycled to 400 [degree]C is attributed to a 1.3% increase in oxygen concentration leading to a Ta unit cell expansion of 0.6%.

  20. High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1996-01-01

    As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

  1. Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

    1980-10-01

    Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

  2. INFLUENCE OF CARBON AND DPA RATE ON NEUTRON-INDUCED SWELLING OF Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti IN FFTF AT ~400 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okita, Taira; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Wolfer, W. G.

    2002-12-31

    The purpose of this effort is to determine the influence of dpa rate and composition on the void swelling of simple austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Contrary to the swelling behavior of fcc Fe-15Cr-16Ni and Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti alloys irradiated in the same FFTF-MOTA experiment, Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti-0.04C does not exhibit a dependence of swelling on dpa rate at approximately 400 degrees C. The transient regime of swelling is prolonged by carbon addition, however.

  3. Fifty Degrees North, Four Degrees West - Microbial Bebop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Larsen

    2012-10-01

    This musical composition was created from data of microbes (bacteria, algae and other microorganisms) sampled in the English Channel. Argonne National Laboratory biologist Peter Larsen created the songs as a unique way to present and comprehend large datasets. More details: All of the data in this composition derives from twelve observed time points collected at monthly intervals at the L4 Station during 2007. The composition is composed of seven choruses. Each chorus has the same chord progression of 12 measures each in which chords are derived from monthly measures of temperature and chlorophyll A concentrations. The first and last chorus melodies are environmental parameter data as in 'Blues for Elle'. The melody in each of the second through sixth chorus is generated from the relative abundances of one of the five most common microbial taxa: Rickettsiales, Rhodobacteriales, Flavobacteriales, Cyanobactera, and Pseudomondales. A different 'instrument' is used to represent each microbial taxon. Melodies for microbial taxa were generated as in 'Far and Wide'. More information at http://www.anl.gov/articles/songs-key... Image: Cyanobacteria, probably genus Gloeotrichia, taken in darkfield. Credit Specious Reasons via Flickr Creative Commons (http://www.flickr.com/photos/28594931...)

  4. Process for forming unusually strong joints between metals and ceramics by brazing at temperatures that do no exceed 750 degree C.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Joseph P.; David, Stan A.; Woodhouse, John J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a process for joining metals to ceramics to form very strong bonds using low brazing temperature, i.e., less than 750.degree. C., and particularly for joining nodular cast iron to partially stabilized zirconia. The process provides that the ceramic be coated with an active metal, such as titanium, that can form an intermetallic with a low melting point brazing alloy such as 60Ag-30Cu-10Sn. The nodular cast iron is coated with a noncarbon containing metal, such as copper, to prevent carbon in the nodular cast iron from dissolving in the brazing alloy. These coated surfaces can be brazed together with the brazing alloy between at less than 750.degree. C. to form a very strong joint. An even stronger bond can be formed if a transition piece is used between the metal and ceramic. It is preferred for the transition piece to have a coefficient of thermal compatible with the coefficient of thermal expansion of the ceramic, such as titanium.

  5. 3Degrees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    helps organizations buy, sell and market environmental commodities, such as Renewable Energy Certificates(RECs) and verified carbon offsets. Its mission, as stated on its website,...

  6. 2degrees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: OX2 7HT Product: Oxford-based collaborative network provider for sustainability professionals. Coordinates: 43.781517, -89.571699 Show Map Loading map......

  7. In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Hoffman, D M; van Buuren, T; Lauderbach, L; Ilavsky, J; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Overturf, G; Fried, L

    2008-02-06

    TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for much of the volume expansion caused by temperature cycling. These voids are in the predicted size regime for hot-spot formation during ignition and detonation, and thus an experimental measure of these voids is important feedback for hot-spot theory and for determining the relationship between void size distributions and detonation properties. Also, understanding the mechanism of ratchet growth allows future choice of explosive/binder mixtures to minimize these types of changes to explosives, further extending PBX shelf life. This paper presents the void size distributions of LX-17, UFTATB, and PBXs using commercially available Cytop M, Cytop A, and Hyflon AD60 binders during temperature cycling between -55 C and 70 C. These void size distributions are derived from ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), a technique sensitive to structures from about 10 nm to about 2 mm. Structures with these sizes do not appreciably change in UFTATB, indicating voids or cracks larger than a few microns appear in UFTATB during temperature cycling. Compared to Kel-F 800 binders, Cytop M and Cytop A show relatively small increases in void volume from 0.9% to 1.3% and 0.6% to 1.1%, respectively, while Hyflon fails to prevent irreversible volume expansion (1.2% to 4.6%). Computational mesoscale models of ratchet growth and binder wetting and adhesion properties point to mechanisms of ratchet growth, and are discussed in combination with the experimental results.

  8. Adsorption of Supercritical CO2 in Aeroglass Studied by Small--Angle Neutron Scattering and Neutron Transmission Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Wignall, George D [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Frielinghaus, H. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany

    2006-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the adsorption behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in porous Vycor glass and silica aerogels. Measurements were performed along two isotherms (T = 35 and 80 C) as a function of pressure (P) ranging from atmospheric up to 25 MPa, which corresponds to the bulk fluid densities ranging from {rho}CO{sub 2} - 0 to 0.9 g/cm{sup 3}. The intensity of scattering from CO{sub 2}-saturated Vycor porous glass can be described by a two-phase model which suggests that CO{sub 2} does not adsorb on the pore walls and fills the pore space uniformly. In CO{sub 2}-saturated aerogels an adsorbed phase is formed with a density substantially higher that of the bulk fluid, and neutron transmission data were used to monitor the excess adsorption at different pressures. The results indicate that adsorption of CO{sub 2} is significantly stronger in aerogels than in activated carbons, zeolites, and xerogels due to the extremely high porosity and optimum pore size of these materials. SANS data revealed the existence of a compressed adsorbed phase with the average density - 1.07 g/cm{sup 3}, close to the density corresponding to closely packed van der Waals volume of CO{sub 2}. A three-phase model [W. L. Wu, Polymer 23, 1907 (1982)] was used to estimate the volume fraction {phi}{sub 3} of the adsorbed phase as a function of the fluid density, and gave {phi}{sub 3} - 0.78 in the maximum adsorption regime around {rho}CO{sub 2} - 0.374 g/cm{sup 3}. The results presented in this work demonstrate the utility of SANS combined with the transmission measurements to study the adsorption of supercritical fluids in porous materials.

  9. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering study of magnetic ordering and inhomogeneity across the martensitic phase transformation in Ni50–xCoxMn₄₀Sn₁₀ alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhatti, Kanwal Preet; El-Khatib, S.; Srivastava, Vijay; James, R. D.; Leighton, C.

    2012-04-27

    The Heusler-derived multiferroic alloy Ni50–xCoxMn₄₀Sn₁₀ has recently been shown to exhibit, at just above room temperature, a highly reversible martensitic phase transformation with an unusually large magnetization change. In this work the nature of the magnetic ordering above and below this transformation has been studied in detail in the critical composition range x = 6–8 via temperature-dependent (5–600 K) magnetometry and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We observe fairly typical paramagnetic to long-range-ordered ferromagnetic phase transitions on cooling to 420–430 K, with the expected critical spin fluctuations, followed by first-order martensitic phase transformations to a nonferromagnetic state below 360–390 K. Themore » static magnetization reveals complex magnetism in this low-temperature nonferromagnetic phase, including a Langevin-like field dependence, distinct spin freezing near 60 K, and significant exchange bias effects, consistent with superparamagnetic blocking of ferromagnetic clusters of nanoscopic dimensions. We demonstrate that these spin clusters, whose existence has been hypothesized in a variety of martensitic alloys exhibiting competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, can be directly observed by SANS. The scattering data are consistent with a liquidlike spatial distribution of interacting magnetic clusters with a mean center-to-center spacing of 12 nm. Considering the behavior of the superparmagnetism, cooling-field and temperature-dependent exchange bias, and magnetic SANS, we discuss in detail the physical form and origin of these spin clusters, their intercluster interactions, the nature of the ground-state magnetic ordering in the martensitic phase, and the implications for our understanding of such alloy systems.« less

  11. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at the octahedral sites provides the charge carriers that, by a hopping mechanism between Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} adjacent sites, leads to a significant conductivity, up to 0.85 S cm{sup −1} at 800 °C in air.

  12. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized Drell-Yan processes and the Boer-Mulders distributions of antiquarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Barone,S. Melis,A. Prokudin

    2010-12-01

    Using a previous extraction of the quark Boer-Mulders distributions from semiinclusive deep inelastic scattering data, we fit the unpolarized Drell-Yan data on the $\\cos 2 \\phi$ asymmetry, determining the antiquark Boer-Mulders distributions. A good agreement with the data is found in the region of low $q_T$, where the transverse-momentum factorization approach applies.

  13. Study of the azimuthal magnetic fields and scaling laws at the KPF-4-Phoenix facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz@nfi.kiae.ru; Mitrofanov, K. N. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Voitenko, D. A.; Matveev, Yu. V.; Astapenko, G. I. [Sukhum Institute of Physics and Technology, Abkhazia (Country Unknown)] [Sukhum Institute of Physics and Technology, Abkhazia (Country Unknown)

    2013-11-15

    Results are presented from magnetic probe measurements in the pinching region formed during the compression of the plasma current sheath (PCS) in a discharge in deuterium at the KPF-4-Phoenix plasma focus facility. The fine structure (shock front-magnetic piston) of the PCS and its time evolution in the course of plasma compression toward the facility axis was studied by means of magnetic probes. It is shown that the fraction of the current transported into the axial region by the PCS does not exceed 65% of the total discharge current. The integral neutron yield Y{sub n} is well described by the formula Y{sub n} ? (1.53) 10{sup 10}I{sub p}{sup 4}, where I{sub p} (in MA) is the pinch current flowing in the region r ? 22 mm.

  14. CASL-U-2015-0178-000 An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-based Transverse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Michigan Benjamin Collins, Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 19, 2015 CASL-U-2015-0178-000 ANS MC2015 - Joint International Conference on Mathematics and ...

  15. An Azimuthal, Fourier Moment-Based Axial SN Solver for the 2D...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... . . . . . . . . . . 119 6.2.2 Spherical Harmonic Expansions for Angular Flux and Leakages ... Next, a spherical harmonic expansion for the angular flux term (Eq. 2.12) in the ...

  16. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged jet production in sNN=2.76 TeV...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2016-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1234182 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 753; Journal Issue: C;...

  17. Observation of Spin Correlation in tt¯ Events from pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-05-24

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is reported using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb⁻¹. Candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse energy and at least two jets. The difference in azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame is used to extract the correlation between the top and antitop quark spins. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.40+0.09-0.08, in agreement with the next-to-leading-order standard model prediction. The hypothesis of zero spin correlation ismore » excluded at 5.1 standard deviations.« less

  18. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of the Mott Insulator to Superconductor Evolution in Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Kyle Michael; ,

    2005-09-02

    It is widely believed that many of the exotic physical properties of the high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors arise from the proximity of these materials to the strongly correlated, antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state. Therefore, one of the fundamental questions in the field of high-temperature superconductivity is to understand the insulator-to-superconductor transition and precisely how the electronic structure of Mott insulator evolves as the first holes are doped into the system. This dissertation presents high-resolution, doping dependent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies of the cuprate superconductor Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, spanning from the undoped parent Mott insulator to a high-temperature superconductor with a T{sub c} of 22 K. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain how the spectral lineshape, the quasiparticle band dispersion, and the chemical potential all progress with doping in a logical and self-consistent framework. This model is based on Franck-Condon broadening observed in polaronic systems where strong electron-boson interactions cause the quasiparticle residue, Z, to be vanishingly small. Comparisons of the low-lying states to different electronic states in the valence band strongly suggest that the coupling of the photohole to the lattice (i.e. lattice polaron formation) is the dominant broadening mechanism for the lower Hubbard band states. Combining this polaronic framework with high-resolution ARPES measurements finally provides a resolution to the long-standing controversy over the behavior of the chemical potential in the high-T{sub c} cuprates. This scenario arises from replacing the conventional Fermi liquid quasiparticle interpretation of the features in the Mott insulator by a Franck-Condon model, allowing the reassignment of the position of the quasiparticle pole. As a function of hole doping, the chemical potential shifts smoothly into the valence band while spectral weight is transferred from incoherent weight at high energies to a coherent quasiparticle peak near E{sub F}. The combined shift in the chemical potential and Fermi wavevector, k{sub F}, closely corresponds to a rigid band shift into the faint excitation branch defined by the low-energy quasiparticles. In addition, the detailed doping evolution of the low-energy excitations has been studied throughout k-space. A large, hole-like contour emerges with doping, although well-defined quasiparticle peaks are only observed along a small arc around the (0, 0)-({pi},{pi}) nodal line. Near the ({pi}, 0) antinodes, faint parallel segments are found with a nesting wavevector and energy dependence very similar to the 4a{sub 0} x 4a{sub 0} checkerboard pattern observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. However, these measurements reveal a striking dichotomy between the real and momentum-space probes, where antinodal charge ordering is emphasized in the tunnelling measurements, while ARPES is most sensitive to excitations near the d-wave nodal line. These results emphasize the importance of momentum anisotropy in determining the complex electronic properties of the cuprates and places strong constraints on theoretical models of the charge ordered state.

  19. Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200.degree. C and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Havens, John; Jones, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100.degree. C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired.

  20. Effectiveness of 700{degrees}C thermal treatment on primary water stress corrosion sensitivity of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes: Laboratory tests and in field experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cattant, F.; Keroulas, F. de; Garriga-Majo, D.; Todeschini, P.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    In France, the steam generators of some 900 MWe reactors, and of all the 1 300 MWe reactors in service are equipped with heat treated Alloy 600 tubes. The purpose of the heat treatment, performed at 700{degrees}C, is to relieve the residual stresses. Generally, it also increases the SCC resistance of the alloy. A laboratory study has been carried out in order to gain a better understanding of the metallurgical factors influencing the PWSCC resistance of Alloy 600 after heat treatment. It has been shown that there are two kinds of tubes for which the heat treatment does not produce a microstructure having a potentially high resistance to SCC: tubes with a high carbon content (over 0.032%) or tubes mill-annealed at high temperatures and heavily cold-worked by the straightening. The analysis of the behaviour of french steam generators reveals that the heat treatment generally had the expected beneficial effect. However, the early cracking in service of some treated tubes led EDF (national power company) to proceed with removals. The majority of the cracked pulled-out tubes exhibit microstructures having a potentially high PWSCC sensibility in laboratory tests. It has been shown that these microstructures can be correlated to a high carbon content.

  1. A new tectonic model for the development of the Eastern Cordillera, Altiplano, and Subandean zones, Bolivian Central Andes, 20[degrees]S latitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubbels, T.L.; Isacks, B.L. ); Koch, R.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Construction of a regional transect across the central Andes at 20[degrees]S sheds new light on the relationship between the Altiplano, Eastern Cordillera (EC), and Subandean zones and allows us to refine the two-stage model of Isacks (1988) for the growth of the Central Andes. This new model is based on examination of the regional geology and geophysics, coupled with field investigations, satellite image analysis, and new Ar-Ar geochronology. In this model, widespread Oligocene to mid-Miocene compressional deformation in the Altiplano and EC was followed in the late-Miocene and Pliocene by thrusting localized east of the EC within the Subandean fold-thrust belt. During the first stage of deformation, the Altiplano basin underwent important subsidence and internal deformation. The EC was both deformed internally and thrust westwards over the Altiplano basin, while the present Subandean zone was the site of an early, broad foreland basin which received material eroded from the EC. During the second stage, beginning at [approximately]10 ma, deformation terminated within the EC and became concentrated within the fold-thrust belt in response to large scale overthrusting of the EC above the Brazilian shield; this resulted in major thrusting along the Cabalgamiento Frontal Principal (CFP), which soles into the master Subandean decollement, and [approximately]100 km of telescoping within the early, broad foreland basin. In the EC, this second stage is marked by the elaboration of a regionally extensive erosion surface, ponding of gravels in shallow basins, and the emplacement of giant ignimbrite sheets. The Eastern Cordillera can thus be thought of as a crustal-scale wedge which has been extruded upward and outward on alternate sides during successive stages of late Cenozoic deformation. This motion has served to drive subsidence in both the Altiplano and Subandean foreland basins, as well as shortening in the fold-thrust belt.

  2. Constraints on the Z-Z Prime mixing angle from data measured for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} at the LEP2 collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, Vas. V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2012-01-15

    An analysis of effects induced by new neutral gauge Z Prime bosons was performed on the basis of data from the OPAL, DELPHI, ALEPH, and L3 experiments devoted to measuring differential cross sections for the process of the annihilation production of pairs of charged gauge W{sup {+-}} bosons at the LEP2 collider. By using these experimental data, constraints on the Z Prime -boson mass and on the angle of Z-Z Prime mixing were obtained for a number of extended gauge models.

  3. Results of U-xMo (x=7, 10, 12 wt.%) Alloy versus Al-6061 Cladding Diffusion Couple Experiments Performed at 500, 550 and 600 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Yongho Sohn

    2013-04-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been developing low enrichment fuel systems encased in Al 6061 for use in research and test reactors. U–Mo alloys in contact with Al and Al alloys can undergo diffusional interactions that can result in the development of interdiffusion zones with complex fine-grained microstructures composed of multiple phases. A monolithic fuel currently being developed by the RERTR program has local regions where the U–Mo fuel plate is in contact with the Al 6061 cladding and, as a result, the program finds information about interdiffusion zone development at high temperatures of interest. In this study, the microstructural development of diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo, and U-12wt.%Mo vs. Al 6061 (or 6061 aluminum) cladding, annealed at 500, 550, 600 degrees C for 1, 5, 20, 24, or 132 hours, was analyzed by backscatter electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy on a scanning electron microscope. Concentration profiles were determined by standardized wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and standardless x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results of this work shows that the presence of surface layers at the U–Mo/Al 6061 interface can dramatically impact the overall interdiffusion behavior in terms of rate of interaction and uniformity of the developed interdiffusion zones. It further reveals that relatively uniform interaction layers with higher Si concentrations can develop in U–Mo/Al 6061 couples annealed at shorter times and that longer times at temperature result in the development of more non-uniform interaction layers with more areas that are enriched in Al. At longer annealing times and relatively high temperatures, U–Mo/Al 6061 couples can exhibit more interaction compared to U–Mo/pure Al couples. The minor alloying constituents in Al 6061 cladding can result in the development of many complex phases in the interaction layer of U–Mo/Al–6061 cladding couples, and some phases in the interdiffusion zones of U–Mo/Al–6061 cladding couples are likely similar to those observed for U–Mo/pure Al couples.

  4. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-08-11

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme ismore » much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.« less

  5. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC05-84ER40150 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 2002 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, Norfolk, VA (US), ...

  6. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... DOE Contract Number: AC05-84ER40150 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 2002 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, Norfolk, VA (US), ...

  7. HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Brian Arthur; Skoug, Ruth M.

    2015-12-04

    This report describes how the HOPE instrument is used to measure subatomic particles in the Van Allen belts.

  8. SMB, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ligula metus convallis tellus, sit amet consequat ante neque iaculis augue. Cras ut erat id diam aliquam volutpat quis ac tellus. Ut eget vulputate sem, nec lobortis...

  9. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  10. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) Lumeras LLC, 207 McPherson St, Santa Cruz, California 95060 (United States) Publication Date: 2016-01-15 OSTI Identifier: ...

  11. Large-Angle Anomalies in the CMB

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2010-01-01

    We review the recently found large-scale anomalies in the maps of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. These include alignments of the largest modes of CMB anisotropy with each other and with geometry and direction of motion of the solar ssystem, and the unusually low power at these largest scales. We discuss these findings in relation to expectation from standard inflationary cosmology, their statistical significance, the tools to study them, and the various attempts to explain them.

  12. Interrogation of Surface, Skin, and Core Orientation in Thermotropic Liquid-Crystalline Copolyester Moldings by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rendon,S.; Bubeck, R.; Thomas, L.; Burghardt, W.; Hexemer, A.; Fischer, D.

    2007-01-01

    Injection molding thermotropic liquid-crystalline polymers (TLCPs) usually results in the fabrication of molded articles that possess complex states of orientation that vary greatly as a function of thickness. 'Skin-core' morphologies are often observed in TLCP moldings. Given that both 'core' and 'skin' orientation states may often differ both in magnitude and direction, deconvolution of these complex orientation states requires a method to separately characterize molecular orientation in the surface region. A combination of two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) in transmission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to probe the molecular orientation in injection molded plaques fabricated from a 4,4'-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene (DH{alpha}MS)-based thermotropic liquid crystalline copolyester. Partial electron yield (PEY) mode NEXAFS is a noninvasive ex situ characterization tool with exquisite surface sensitivity that samples to a depth of 2 nm. The effects of plaque geometry and injection molding processing conditions on surface orientation in the regions on- and off- axis to the centerline of injection molded plaques are presented and discussed. Quantitative comparisons are made between orientation parameters obtained by NEXAFS and those from 2D WAXS in transmission, which are dominated by the microstructure in the skin and core regions. Some qualitative comparisons are also made with 2D WAXS results from the literature.

  13. THE ROTATION OF THE WHITE LIGHT SOLAR CORONA AT HEIGHT 4 R{sub sun} FROM 1996 TO 2010: A TOMOGRAPHICAL STUDY OF LARGE ANGLE AND SPECTROMETRIC CORONAGRAPH C2 OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Huw

    2011-09-10

    Solar rotational tomography is applied to Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) observations covering the period 1996-2010, resulting in a set of electron density maps at a height of 4 R{sub sun} from which rotation rates can be calculated. Large variation of rotation rates is measured. Rates are dominated by the Carrington rotation rate (14.18 deg d{sup -1} sidereal), but at times over the solar cycle, rates are measured between -3 and 3 deg d{sup -1} relative to the Carrington rotation rate. Rotation rates can vary considerably between latitudes, even between neighboring latitudes. They can remain relatively stable or change smoothly over long periods of times, or can change rather abruptly. There are periods for certain latitudes (for example, the equator at solar maximum) when the movement is dominated by rapid structural reconfiguration, not a coherent rotation. These results raise new questions regarding the link between the Sun and the corona, and provide fresh challenges to interpretations of the coronal structural evolution and the development of large-scale coronal models. In particular, can interchange reconnection provide an explanation of the considerable latitudinal differences in rotation rates, and what mechanism can explain abrupt changes in rotation rates?

  14. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore » nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  15. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Moinuddin Ilev, Ilko

    2014-10-15

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 ?g/cm{sup 2}. The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time.

  16. Structural dynamics and ssDNA binding activity of the three N-terminal domains of the large subunit of Replication Protein A from small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Tsutakawa, Susan; Brosey, Chris A.; Castillo, Amalchi; Chagot, Marie-Eve; Smith, Jarrod A.; Tainer, John A.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-03-11

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein utilized in diverse DNA transactions in the cell. RPA is a heterotrimeric protein with seven globular domains connected by flexible linkers, which enable substantial inter-domain motion that is essential to its function. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments on two multi-domain constructs from the N-terminus of the large subunit (RPA70) were used to examine the structural dynamics of these domains and their response to the binding of ssDNA. The SAXS data combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal substantial interdomain flexibility for both RPA70AB (the tandem high affinity ssDNA binding domains A and B connected by a 10-residue linker) and RPA70NAB (RPA70AB extended by a 70-residue linker to the RPA70N protein interaction domain). Binding of ssDNA to RPA70NAB reduces the interdomain flexibility between the A and B domains, but has no effect on RPA70N. These studies provide the first direct measurements of changes in orientation of these three RPA domains upon binding ssDNA. The results support a model in which RPA70N remains structurally independent of RPA70AB in the DNA bound state and therefore freely available to serve as a protein recruitment module.

  17. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore »nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  18. Mineralogical textural and compositional data on the alteration of basaltic glass from Kilauea, Hawaii to 300 degrees C: Insights to the corrosion of a borosilicate glass waste-form. [Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Mineralogical, textural and compositional data accompanying greenschist facies metamorphism (to 300{degrees}C) of basalts of the East Rift Zone (ERZ), Kilauea, Hawaii may be evaluated relative to published and experimental results for the surface corrosion of borosilicate glass. The ERZ alteration sequence is dominated by intermittent palagonite, interlayered smectite-chlorite, chlorite, and actinolite-epidote-anhydrite. Alteration is best developed in fractures and vesicles where surface reaction layers root on the glass matrix forming rinds in excess of 100 microns thick. Fractures control fluid circulation and the alteration sequence. Proximal to the glass surface, palagonite, Fe-Ti oxides and clays replace fresh glass as the surface reaction layer migrates inwards; away from the surface, amphibole, anhydrite, quartz and calcite crystallize from hydrothermal fluids in contact with the glass. The texture and composition of basaltic glass surfaces are similar to those of a SRL-165 glass leached statically for sixty days at 150 {degrees}C. While the ERZ reservoir is a complex open system, conservative comparisons between the alteration of ERZ and synthetic borosilicate glass are warranted. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  20. edward_teller_awards_degrees.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  1. Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystalsmirrors or between 0.degree. and 45.degree. on the first crystalmirror and between ...

  2. Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The arrangements encompass the two cases, where the Bragg angle--the complement to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystalsmirrors ...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The arrangements encompass the two cases, where the Bragg angle--the complement to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystalsmirrors ...

  4. Data acquisition and processing system and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2015-01-27

    A system and a method includes generating a first signal at a first frequency; and a second signal at a second frequency. Respective sources are positioned within the borehole and controllable such that the signals intersect in an intersection volume outside the borehole. A receiver detects a difference signal returning to the borehole generated by a non-linear mixing process within the intersection volume, and records the detected signal and stores the detected signal in a storage device and records measurement parameters including a position of the first acoustic source, a position of the second acoustic source, a position of the receiver, elevation angle and azimuth angle of the first acoustic signal and elevation angle and azimuth angle of the second acoustic signal.

  5. Apparatus and method for mapping an area of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staab, Torsten A. Cohen, Daniel L.; Feller, Samuel

    2009-12-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for mapping an area of interest using polar coordinates or Cartesian coordinates. The apparatus includes a range finder, an azimuth angle measuring device to provide a heading and an inclinometer to provide an angle of inclination of the range finder as it relates to primary reference points and points of interest. A computer is provided to receive signals from the range finder, inclinometer and azimuth angle measurer to record location data and calculate relative locations between one or more points of interest and one or more primary reference points. The method includes mapping of an area of interest to locate points of interest relative to one or more primary reference points and to store the information in the desired manner. The device may optionally also include an illuminator which can be utilized to paint the area of interest to indicate both points of interest and primary points of reference during and/or after data acquisition.

  6. ARM - Datastreams - rphcontrol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basetime North latitude degreeN lat East longitude degreeE lon Surface condition Pitch angle of the ship, positive is bow up degree pitch ( time ) Surface condition Pitch...

  7. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in pp Collisions at s=8  TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-08

    We present a measurement of spin correlation in t¯t production using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb₋1. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton t¯t events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity = 0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair productionmore » of top squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Lastly, top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  8. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-08

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is presented using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton tt¯ events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair production of topmore » squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  9. Technique for enhancing the power output of an electrostatic generator employing parametric resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2016-02-23

    A circuit-based technique enhances the power output of electrostatic generators employing an array of axially oriented rods or tubes or azimuthal corrugated metal surfaces for their electrodes. During generator operation, the peak voltage across the electrodes occurs at an azimuthal position that is intermediate between the position of minimum gap and maximum gap. If this position is also close to the azimuthal angle where the rate of change of capacity is a maximum, then the highest rf power output possible for a given maximum allowable voltage at the minimum gap can be attained. This rf power output is then coupled to the generator load through a coupling condenser that prevents suppression of the dc charging potential by conduction through the load. Optimized circuit values produce phase shifts in the rf output voltage that allow higher power output to occur at the same voltage limit at the minimum gap position.

  10. Method for preparing high temperature superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Chudzik, Michael P. (Beacon, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A method of depositing a biaxially textured metal oxide on a substrate defining a plane in which metal oxide atoms are vaporized from a source to form a plume of metal oxide atoms. Atoms in the plume disposed at a selected angle in a predetermined range of angles to the plane of the substrate are allowed to contact the substrate while preventing atoms outside a selected angle from reaching the substrate. The preferred range of angles is 40.degree.-70.degree. and the preferred angle is 60.degree..+-.5.degree.. A moving substrate is disclosed.

  11. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  12. Nondispersive neutron focusing method beyond the critical angle of mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ice, Gene E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2008-10-21

    This invention extends the Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror focusing geometry to allow nondispersive focusing of neutrons with a convergence on a sample much larger than is possible with existing KB optical schemes by establishing an array of at least three mirrors and focusing neutrons by appropriate multiple deflections via the array. The method may be utilized with supermirrors, multilayer mirrors, or total external reflection mirrors. Because high-energy x-rays behave like neutrons in their absorption and reflectivity rates, this method may be used with x-rays as well as neutrons.

  13. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostruct...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1185666 GrantContract Number: AC05-00OR22725 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Optics Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 40; Journal ...

  14. Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 2: Conversion technologies, electro-chemical technologies, stirling engines, thermal management; Chetty, P.R.K.; Jackson, W.D.; Dicks, E.B. eds.; PB: 867 p. Publisher: ...

  15. Angle-Insensitive Structural Colours based on metallic nanocavities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Proposed for publication in Nature Scientific Reports. Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories Sponsoring Org: ...

  16. Accessing Phonon Polaritons in Hyperbolic Crystals by Angle-Resolved...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: FG02-05ER46203; desc0001088 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 115; ...

  17. Status And Prospects for the Measurement of Angle Gamma (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  18. Precise orientation of single crystals by a simple x-ray diffraction rocking curve method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucette, L.D.; Pereira da Cunha, M.; Lad, R.J.

    2005-03-01

    A simple method has been developed for accurately measuring the crystallographic orientation of a single crystal boule, employing a conventional four-circle x-ray diffraction arrangement in the rocking curve mode which relaxes the need for precise instrument and/or reference alignment. By acquiring a total of eight rocking curve measurements at specific orientations about the specimen azimuth, the absolute miscut angle between a crystal surface and the desired crystallographic plane can be resolved to within {+-}0.01 deg.

  19. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of itsmore » high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.« less

  20. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of its high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.

  1. Electromagnetic variable degrees of freedom actuator systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Trumper, David L.; Kirtley, Jr., James L.

    2009-02-17

    The present invention provides a variable reluctance actuator system and method that can be adapted for simultaneous rotation and translation of a moving element by applying a normal-direction magnetic flux on the moving element. In a beneficial example arrangement, the moving element includes a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from an axis of rotation so as to produce a rotary fast tool servo that provides a tool motion in a direction substantially parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. An actuator rotates a swing arm such that a cutting tool moves toward and away from a mounted rotating workpiece in a controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. Position sensors provide rotation and displacement information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in feed slide of a precision lathe.

  2. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2003 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor First Position Present Position Tiegang Di 2002 Charm Meson Interactions with Hadrons Che-Ming Ko Graduate Research Assistant...

  3. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONDUCTED AT THE CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2001 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor First Position Present Position Douglas Rowland 2000 A Study of the Projectile...

  4. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2005 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor First Position Present Position Wei Liu 2004 Charmonium absorption and charmed hadron production in hadronic reaction Che-Ming Ko...

  5. Using 360 degree photography as a decommissioning tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEBARON, G.J.

    2003-05-06

    Digital cameras, in conjunction with computer software, make possible 360{sup o} photos allowing a person to look all around, up and down, and zoom in or out. Multiple 360{sup o} photos can be linked creating a virtual tour. Other information, such as sound files, flat photos and text can also be attached to the photos. A virtual tour of a building or room can be used for facility documentation, informing management and others, work planning and orientation, training and historical documentation, thus minimizing the need to re-enter hazardous areas. Reducing entries decreases exposure, increases safety and efficiency, and minimizes waste.

  6. ORISE: Nuclear engineering degrees at highest ranges since 1980s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates for nuclear engineering candidates are still at highest ranges reported since 1980s Report also shows shifts in career opportunities beyond graduation in nuclear utilities ...

  7. 360 Degree Photography to Decrease Exposure, Increase Safety & Minimize Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEBARON, G.J.

    2002-01-31

    High-resolution digital cameras, in conjunction with software techniques. make possible 360{sup o} photos that allow a person to look all around, up and dawn, and zoom in or out. The software provides the opportunity to attach other information to a 360{sup o} photo such as sound tiles, flat photos (providing additional detail about what is behind a panel or around a corner) and text (Information which can be used to show radiological conditions or identify other hazards not readily visible). The software also allows other 360{sup o} photos to be attached creating a virtual tour where the user can move from area to area, and stop, study and zoom in on areas of interest. A virtual tour of a building or room can be used for facility documentation, informing management and others, work planning and orientation, and training, thus minimizing the need to re-enter hazardous radioactive areas. Reducing entries decreases exposure, increases safety and minimizes waste.

  8. Quantification of the degree of reaction of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Haha, M.; De Weerdt, K.; Lothenbach, B.

    2010-11-15

    The quantification of the fly ash (FA) in FA blended cements is an important parameter to understand the effect of the fly ash on the hydration of OPC and on the microstructural development. The FA reaction in two different blended OPC-FA systems was studied using a selective dissolution technique based on EDTA/NaOH, diluted NaOH solution, the portlandite content and by backscattered electron image analysis. The amount of FA determined by selective dissolution using EDTA/NaOH is found to be associated with a significant possible error as different assumptions lead to large differences in the estimate of FA reacted. In addition, at longer hydration times, the reaction of the FA is underestimated by this method due to the presence of non-dissolved hydrates and MgO rich particles. The dissolution of FA in diluted NaOH solution agreed during the first days well with the dissolution as observed by image analysis. At 28 days and longer, the formation of hydrates in the diluted solutions leads to an underestimation. Image analysis appears to give consistent results and to be most reliable technique studied.

  9. System and technique for ultrasonic determination of degree of cooking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Leonard J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Judd, Kayte M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Cliff, William C.; Pfund, David M.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-03-20

    A method and apparatus are described for determining the doneness of food during a cooking process. Ultrasonic signal are passed through the food during cooking. The change in transmission characteristics of the ultrasonic signal during the cooking process is measured to determine the point at which the food has been cooked to the proper level. In one aspect, a heated fluid cooks the food, and the transmission characteristics along a fluid-only ultrasonic path provides a reference for comparison with the transmission characteristics for a food-fluid ultrasonic path.

  10. Aging of Alloy 617 at 650 and 750 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julian Benz; Thomas Lillo; Richard Wright

    2013-01-01

    Alloy 617 has been selected as the primary candidate for heat exchanger applications in advanced reactors. For the VHTR this application could require extended service up to a reactor outlet temperature of 950°C. A key hurdle to using this alloy in the VHTR heat exchanger application is qualifying the alloy for Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In order to Code qualify the material it is necessary to characterize the influence of long term aging on the mechanical behavior. Alloy 617 has been aged at 650 and 750°C for times up to 5300 hours. The microstructure after aging has been characterized using optical and transmission electron microscopies. It has been determined that in addition to carbides, a significant volume fraction of ?’ phase (Ni3Al) is formed at these temperatures. The ?’ does not contribute significantly to changing the tensile or impact properties of the aged material. It does, however, appear to increase creep resistance and impede creep crack growth.

  11. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009 Temperature and Scaling Studies from Projectile Fragmentation of 86,78 Kr + 64,58 Ni at 35MeVA S. J. Yennello Post Doc., Department of Radiation Oncology, School of...

  12. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the Isoscaling Properties of the Fragments in Multifragmentation of 40 Ca + 58 Ni, 40 Ar+ 58 Ni and 40 Ar+ 58 Fe Reactions S. J. Yennello Graduate Research Assistant...

  13. ORISE: Report shows number of health physics degrees for 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seen what impact the March 11 Fukushima Daiichi accident may have on the nuclear industry. ... Conversely, the Fukushima incident has also led to a reassessment of the safety ...

  14. STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assistant Research Associate, University of Washington, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology Xiaodong Tang 2002 Determination of the S Factor for 11 C (p,) 12 N Tribble...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    proper access to sunlight. Easements must be executed in writing and must include: The vertical and horizontal angles, expressed in degrees, at which the solar easement extends...

  16. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

  17. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle inpp¯Z/γ*e+e-Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.  M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.  S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.  P.; Alexeev, G.  D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.  V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.  F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.  B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.  C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.  E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.  B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.  P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.  C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.  M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.  W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.  E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.  J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.  P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.  T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.  F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.  V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.  D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.  N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.  E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.  H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.  A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.  E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.  D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.  W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.  M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.  P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.  D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.  D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.  L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.  S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.  S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.  W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.  N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.  M.; Kozelov, A.  V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V.  A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.  S.; Lee, S.  W.; Lee, W.  M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.  Z.; Lim, J.  K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.  V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.  L.; Maciel, A.  K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.  L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.  L.; Meijer, M.  M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.  G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.  K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.  A.; Negret, J.  P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.  T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.  K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V.  M.; Popov, A.  V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.  N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M.  P.; Santos, A.  S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.  D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.  A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.  R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.  A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.  V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.  M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.  W.; Vasilyev, I.  A.; Verkheev, A.  Y.; Vertogradov, L.  S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H.  D.; Wang, M.  H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M.  R. J.; Wilson, G.  W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D.  R.; Wyatt, T.  R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.  A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S.  W.; Yu, J.  M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.  G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2θeff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp¯→Z/γ*→e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2θeff=0.23147±0.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  18. Improved multi-directional eddy current inspection test apparatus for detecting flaws in metal articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Roy A.; Hartley, William H.; Caffarel, Alfred J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus is described for detecting flaws in a tubular workpiece in a single scan. The coils of a dual coil bobbin eddy current inspection probe are wound at a 45.degree. angle to the transverse axis of the probe, one coil having an angular position about the axis about 90.degree. relative to the angular position of the other coil, and the angle of intersection of the planes containing the coils being about 60.degree..

  19. Raciometry W. J:. Shaw and C. D. Whiteman Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. J:. Shaw and C. D. Whiteman Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a) Richland, WA 99352 Field measurements to evaluate the parameterizations used in this model were carried out in May 1992 under clear skies using short- and long-wave radiometers mounted on a computer-driven platform. The platform repeatedly stepped through 360 degrees of azimuth and 20 degrees of elevation about the horizontal over a 24-h period. Radiosondes were released to account for the dependence of downwelling long-wave radiance

  20. New experimental possibility to search for the ratio of a possible T-violating amplitude to the weak-interaction amplitude in polarized neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukashevich, V. V.; Aldushchenkov, A. V.; Dallman, D. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina 188350 (Russian Federation); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-03-15

    This paper considers a spin-dependent neutron interaction with optical potentials (fields) from the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and an assumed T-violating interaction. The vector sum of these fields and their interferences determines an effective field of the target with an angular position in space due to polar and azimuthal angles. The phase of the azimuthal component is found to be the sum of two angles. The tangent of the first angle is equal to the ratio of the T-violating forward-scattering amplitude D to the weak-interaction amplitude C. The quantity is of interest. The tangent of the second angle depends on the spin rotation in the residual pseudomagnetic field of the target, and it can be treated as a background effect. This paper shows that the second angle has different signs in measurements with polarized and unpolarized neutrons; thus, two measurements allow it to be compensated for. In addition, the use of the Ramsey method of separated oscillatory fields for measurement of the neutron spin rotation angle, depending on the phase of the rf field in the Ramsey cell, allows a cosine-like spectrum to be measured. This spectrum is called a phase spectrum. The phase spectra measured with polarized and unpolarized targets have a phase shift. The measurements of this phase shift with polarized and nonpolarized neutrons at a p-wave resonance enable the ratio D/C to be isolated. We also describe the algorithm for separating the ratio D/C, taking into account the influence of the fringing fields of the Ramsey coil magnet and the target magnet.