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Sample records for aws truewind aws

  1. AWS Truewind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9)ATS Lighting Inc Jump to:AVTEC Jump

  2. AWS Truewind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformationEnergyAG Jump to:ATAVG KoelnAWLLC

  3. AW Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformationEnergyAG Jump to:ATAVG KoelnAW Energy

  4. AW-101 entrained solids - Solubility versus temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GJ Lumetta; RC Lettau; GF Piepel

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids entrained in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. BNFL requested Battelle to dilute the AW-1-1 sample using de-ionized water to mimic expected plant operating conditions. BNFL further requested Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids present in the diluted AW-101 sample versus temperature conditions of 30, 40, and 50 C. BNFL requested these tests to assess the composition of the LAW supernatant and solids versus expected plant-operating conditions. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-7, Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of LAW Entrained Solids. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan.

  5. AWS breaks new ground with soldering specification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Joining technologies continue to advance with new materials, process innovations, and inspection techniques. An increasing number of high-valued, high-reliability applications -- from boilers and ship hulls to rocket motors and medical devices -- have required the development of industry standards and specifications in order to ensure that the best design and manufacturing practices are being used to produce safe, durable products and assemblies. Standards writing has always had an important role at the American Welding Society (AWS). The AWS standards and specifications cover such topics as filler materials, joining processes, inspection techniques, and qualification methods that are used in welding and brazing technologies. These AWS standards and specifications, all of which are approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), have also provided the basis for many similar documents used in Europe and in Pacific Rim countries.

  6. American Way Solar AWS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5AllEnergyAmeriPower LLCAmericanTechnologyWay Solar AWS

  7. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  8. Small Ramsey Numbers Stanisl/aw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    Small Ramsey Numbers Stanisl/aw P. Radziszowski Department of Computer Science Rochester Institute Ramsey numbers, where the avoided graphs are complete or complete without one edge. Many results per behavior of Ramsey numbers, but rather we concentrate on their specific values. Mathematical Reviews

  9. Exploring the Cloud from Passive Measurements: the Amazon AWS Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring the Cloud from Passive Measurements: the Amazon AWS Case Ignacio Bermudez, Stefano provider that offers computing, storage, and content delivery platforms. Leveraging passive measurements are represented by companies aiming at offering their services without carrying on costs and risks of building

  10. Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  11. On the expressiveness of CSP A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    On the expressiveness of CSP A.W. Roscoe February 16, 2011 Abstract We define "CSP express every operator of Hoare's CSP. Furthermore we show that every op- erator with CSP-like operational semantics can be simulated in CSP with the addition of an exception-throwing operator P A Q in which any

  12. CSP is expressive enough for A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    CSP is expressive enough for A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Computing Laboratory {Bill.Roscoe@comlab.ox.ac.uk} Abstract. Recent results show that Hoare's CSP, augmented by one additional operator, can express every operator whose operational semantics are expressible in a new notation and are therefore "CSP

  13. AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformationEnergyAG Jump to:ATAVG KoelnAW

  14. MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation,Lyons,International Jump to:4AW

  15. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  16. New & Noteworthy -Amazon Web Services (AWS) will present at the April 8 IT Forum. They will discuss why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 March 2015 New & Noteworthy - Amazon Web Services (AWS) will present at the April 8 IT Forum. They will discuss why universities use AWS, what services they are using and demo the AWS Console. - Instructional Technology Services has hired Texas A&M IT (IT Solutions and Support) to provide project management support

  17. Electron cooling in a young radio supernova: SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Chakraborti, Sayan [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stockdale, Christopher [Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Chandra, Poonam [National Center for Radio Astronomy-TIFR, Pune 411007 (India); Smith, Randall [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Roy, Rupak; Bose, Subhash [Aryabhhata Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Nainital 263129 (India); Dwarkadas, Vikram [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sutaria, Firoza [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Pooley, David, E-mail: nyadav@tifr.res.in, E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of 10 Mpc. The spectral index values calculated using C, X, and K bands are smaller than the expected values for the optically thin regime. During this time, the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral-index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between the Compton cooling timescale and the synchrotron cooling timescale, we find that the inverse Compton cooling process dominates over the synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling timescale, t {sub cool}, and the acceleration timescale, t-tilde {sub acc}. We constrain the mass-loss rate in the wind ( M-dot ?1.9×10{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field ( ?-tilde =?{sub e}/?{sub B}?1.12×10{sup 2}) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about two days, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.

  18. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Schneider, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO.sub.2. In another embodiment, the SiO.sub.2 is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system.

  19. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Frye, G.C.; Schneider, T.W.

    1996-11-05

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO{sub 2}. In another embodiment, the SiO{sub 2} is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system. 8 figs.

  20. The Ramsey Multiplicity of K 4 Konrad Piwakowski # Stanisl/aw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    The Ramsey Multiplicity of K 4 Konrad Piwakowski # Stanisl/aw P. Radziszowski Department With the help of computer algorithms, we improve the lower bound on the Ramsey multiplicity of K4 , and thus show that the exact value of it is equal to 9. The Ramsey multiplicity M(G) of a graph G is defined

  1. Solar Energy Research at the Australian National University A.W. Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Australian Greenhouse Office (RECP6) towards the cost of building a pilot plant. #12;Solar Energy ResearchSolar Energy Research at the Australian National University A.W. Blakers Centre for Sustainable in the areas of photovoltaics and solar thermal energy. 1. INTRODUCTION The Centre for Sustainable Energy

  2. AWS Lecture 2 Tucson, Saturday, March 15, 2008 Historical introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldschmidt, Michel

    , auxiliary functions. 2 / 40 #12;Simultaneous approximation and transcendence Irrationality proofs involve rational approximation to a single real number . We wish to prove transcendence results. A complex numberAWS Lecture 2 Tucson, Saturday, March 15, 2008 Historical introduction to transcendence Michel

  3. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AW-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, K.E.

    1997-05-29

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AW-102. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05.

  4. The expressiveness of CSP extended by priority A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    The expressiveness of CSP extended by priority (draft) A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Department of Computer Science October 17, 2014 Abstract In previous work [27, 26] the author defined a notion of CSP with such an operational semantics can be translated into CSP and therefore has a semantics in every model of CSP

  5. Revivals, stuckness and the hierarchy of CSP models A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    Revivals, stuckness and the hierarchy of CSP models A.W. Roscoe December 9, 2007 Abstract We give details of a new model for CSP introduced in response to work by Fournet et al [8]. This is the stable revivals model R alluded to in [22]. We provide the full semantics for CSP in this model, indicate why

  6. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  7. The disappearance of the progenitor of SN 2012aw in late-time imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, M

    2015-01-01

    We present new late-time near-infrared imaging of the site of the nearby core-collapse supernova SN 2012aw, confirming the disappearance of the point source identified by Fraser et al. (2012) and Van Dyk et al. (2012) as a candidate progenitor in both J and Ks filters. We re-measure the progenitor photometry, and find that both the J and Ks magnitudes of the source are consistent with those quoted in the literature. We also recover a marginal detection of the progenitor in H-band, for which we measure H=19.67+/-0.40 mag. SN 2012aw appears to have resulted from the explosion of a 12.5+/-1.5 Msun red supergiant.

  8. Criticality safety evaluation of disposing of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank AW-105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGERS, C.A.

    1999-06-04

    A criticality safety evaluation is made of the disposal of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank (DST) AW-105 located in the 200 east area of Hanford Site. The technical basis is provided for limits and controls to be used in the development of a criticality prevention specification (CPS). A model of K Basin sludge is developed to account for fuel burnup. The iron/uranium mass ration required to ensure an acceptable magrin of subcriticality is determined.

  9. Photometry of the dwarf nova AW Sagittae during the 2006 November superoutburst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Shears; Roger Pickard; Tom Krajci; Gary Poyner

    2007-05-31

    During 2006 November an outburst of the dwarf nova AW Sge was observed using CCD photometry. This revealed 0.25 magnitude superhumps confirming it to be a superoutburst, possibly only the second confirmed such outburst of this star. The superhumps were observed for 4 days and had a stable period Psh = 0.0745(2)d, a value which is consistent with Psh measured during the 2000 superoutburst.

  10. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Automatic Weather Station AWS 2700 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon:LowellMHKInformation Automatic Weather Station AWS 2700

  11. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04

    This document reports the results of a boildown study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-106 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27 °C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C.

  12. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AW-105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1997-06-05

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for double-shell tank 241-AW-105. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-AW-105 waste; and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone Characterization. information presented in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. While only the results of a recent sampling event will be used to fulfill the requirements of the data quality objectives (DQOs), other information can be used to support or question conclusions derived from these results. Historical information for tank 241-AW-105 is provided in Appendix A, including surveillance information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and expected tank contents derived from a process knowledge model. The recent sampling event listed, as well as pertinent sample data obtained before 1996, are summarized in Appendix B along with the sampling results. The results of the 1996 grab sampling event satisfied the data requirements specified in the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for this tank. In addition, the tank headspace flammability was measured, which addresses one of the requirements specified in the safety screening DQO. The statistical analysis and numerical manipulation of data used in issue resolution are reported in Appendix C. Appendix D contains the evaluation to establish the best basis for the inventory estimate and the statistical analysis performed for this evaluation. A bibliography that resulted from an in-depth literature search of all known information sources applicable to tank 241-AW-105 and its respective waste types is contained in Appendix E. A majority of the documents listed in Appendix E may be found in the Tank Characterization and Safety Resource Center.

  13. Laser ion source for Columbia Universitys microbeam A.W. Bigelow a,*, G. Randers-Pehrson a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Laser ion source for Columbia UniversityÕs microbeam A.W. Bigelow a,*, G. Randers-Pehrson a , R High School, NY, USA Available online 29 August 2005 Abstract A laser ion source that will be installed for irradiation experiments with mammalian cells. Through laser ablation the laser ion source can produce heavy

  14. Final Report for the Erosion-Corrosion Anaysis of Tank 241-AW-02E Feed Pump Pit Jumpers B-2 and 1-4 Removed from Service in 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S.

    2014-04-07

    This document is the final report summarizing the results in the examination of two pipe sections (jumpers) from the tank 241-AW-02E feed pump pit in the 241-AW tank farm. These pipe section samples consisted of jumper AW02E-WT-J-[B – 2] and jumper AW02E-WT-J-[1 – 4]. For the remainder of this report, these jumpers will be referred to as B – 2 and 1 – 4.

  15. Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the finalreport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-02-20

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document.

  16. Shifting the Focus of Survivability: Back to the Basics \\Lambda A.W. Krings, W.S. Harrison M. McQueen, S. Matthews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Shifting the Focus of Survivability: Back to the Basics \\Lambda A.W. Krings, W.S. Harrison M. Mc possible level and incorporate the basic survivability model described in [8]. #12; 2 Motivation

  17. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Pignata, G.; Bufano, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Bayless, A. J. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Science, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Pritchard, T. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Elias-Rosa, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Campus UAB, Torre C5, Za plata, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Haislip, J. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Harutyunyan, A. [Fundación Galileo Galilei - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja, TF - Spain (Spain); and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ? 20 M {sub ?}, progenitor radius R ? 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (?430 R {sub ?}), explosion energy E ? 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ?0.06 M {sub ?}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ?} of the Type IIP events.

  18. THE RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR OF SUPERNOVA 2012aw (PTF12bvh) IN MESSIER 95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mailcode 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V., E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: cenko@berkeley.edu, E-mail: afilippenko@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); and others

    2012-09-10

    We report on the direct detection and characterization of the probable red supergiant (RSG) progenitor of the intermediate-luminosity Type II-Plateau (II-P) supernova (SN) 2012aw in the nearby (10.0 Mpc) spiral galaxy Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351). We have identified the star in both Hubble Space Telescope images of the host galaxy, obtained 17-18 yr prior to the explosion, and near-infrared ground-based images, obtained 6-12 yr prior to the SN. The luminous supergiant showed evidence for substantial circumstellar dust, manifested as excess line-of-sight extinction. The effective total-to-selective ratio of extinction to the star was R'{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 4.35, which is significantly different from that of diffuse interstellar dust (i.e., R{sub V} = 3.1), and the total extinction to the star was therefore, on average, A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 3.1 mag. We find that the observed spectral energy distribution for the progenitor star is consistent with an effective temperature of 3600 K (spectral type M3), and that the star therefore had a bolometric magnitude of -8.29. Through comparison with recent theoretical massive-star evolutionary tracks we can infer that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass 15 {approx}< M{sub ini}(M{sub Sun }) < 20. Interpolating by eye between the available tracks, we surmise that the star had initial mass {approx}17-18 M{sub Sun }. The circumstellar dust around the progenitor must have been destroyed in the explosion, as the visual extinction to the SN is found to be low (A{sub V} = 0.24 mag with R{sub V} = 3.1).

  19. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04

    This document reports the results of a boil down study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-I06 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27°C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C. The boiling temperature of the composite was measured at three different pressures (40, 60, and 80 Torr) throughout the volume reduction, and the results show steadily increasing boiling temperatures with increasing volume reduction and no significant discontinuities. Moderate foaming was observed at the onset of the boildown. The foaming disappeared during the first reduction step, and minimal foaming was observed throughout the rest of the study. The bulk densities at 18.0 °C (D{sub Bulk}{sup 18 °C}) and quantities of settled and centrifuged solids were measured on samples of the boildown concentrates. Estimated values of the bulk densities at the 60-Torr boiling temperatures (D{sub Bulk}{sup 60 Torr}) were also calculated. Solids were first observed at boildown temperatures when the % VWR reached 39.3%. The quantity of solids in the composite quickly increased after this initial formation; the amount of centrifuged solids increased by 22% as the %WVR increased from 39.3 to 44.1 %. A small amount of solids did appear in the samples collected prior to the initial formation during the boildown. These solids precipitated while they sat at hot cell ambient temperature and in the 18. 0 °C water bath. Analysis of boil down test samples indicated that natrophosphate (Na7{sub 3}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{centerdot} 19 H{sub 2}O) and kogarkoite (Na3FS04) accounted for a majority of the initial solids (~80% of the dissolved sulfate and phosphate precipitated from the composite by 44.1 % WVR). The large increase in solids at 44.1 % WVR was dominated by sodium nitrate and sodium carbonate.

  20. L AW R E N C E N A T I O N A L LABORATORY LIVERMORE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet)Multimaterial MultiphysicsKwok Ko SLACv/---= 9AW

  1. Creating Metabolic and Regulatory Network Models using Fuzzy Cognitive J.A. Dickerson and Z. Cox E. S. Wurtele A.W. Fulmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    weighting networks [3], differential equations [4], and Petri nets [5]. Circuit simulations and differentialCreating Metabolic and Regulatory Network Models using Fuzzy Cognitive Maps J.A. Dickerson and Z Cincinnati, OH, USA fulmer.aw@pg.com Abstract This paper describes a model of metabolic networks that uses

  2. Bridging the Missing Link of Cloud Data Storage Security in AWS Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, SUNY -Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    1 Bridging the Missing Link of Cloud Data Storage Security in AWS Jun Feng, Yu Chen*, Pu Liu Storage, Information Security. 1. Introduction Cloud Computing has gained great attention from both is the security of data storage in the cloud. As shown in Figure 1, cloud computing services can fundamentally

  3. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  4. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Truewind AWS Truewind New Karner Road Albany New York Wind energy Energy assessment resource mapping project engineering due diligence performance evaluation and forecasting http...

  5. PBi3aws

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN~$7-K 1 l 5P-2 7~' '

  6. Pastuszak, A.W. SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CGAACAG -5.581 222 -4.3369 7275 GUCUUGA -4.5811 208 -3.109 5299 UGAGUAG -3.5811 193 -3.3012 5575 High

  7. AWS Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo NewYanbu,Information onADALLAPIASEANASiT Inc

  8. Austrian Wirtschaftsservice (AWS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump|LineMaine: Energy ResourcesWirtschaftsservice

  9. Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendoMassachusetts:Renewable EnergyLLC Jump to:SourceWaste

  10. MHK Projects/AWS II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation,Lyons,International Jump

  11. 8.1 MICROSYSTEMSTECHNOLOGYLABORATORIESANNUALRESEARCHREPORT 2009 Theses AwArded, 2008-2009 Theses AwArded, 20082009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Temperature sensing Hill,T. (C. Livermore) energy storage in Carbon Nanotube supersprings Hu,X. (K. K for detecting dNA damage Moss,B. (V. M. Stojanovic) Charge-Injection Circuits for Monolithic silicon- Photonic,W. (C. V. Thompson) Commercialization of Gallium Nitride Nanorod Arrays on silicon for solid

  12. Vitrification and Product Testing of AW-101 and AN-107 Pretreated Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Gary L.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary objective for vitrifying the LAW samples is to generate glass products for subsequent product testing. The work presented in this report is divided into 6 work elements: 1) Glass Fabrication, 2) Chemical Composition, 3) Radiochemical Composition, 4) Crystalline and Non-crystalline Phase Determination, and 5) Release Rate (Modified PCT). These work elements will help demonstrate the RPP-WTP projects ability to satisfy the product requirements concerning, chemical and radionuclide reporting, waste loading, identification and quantification of crystalline and non-crystalline phases, and waste form leachability. VOA, SVOA, dioxins, furans, PCBs, and total cyanide analyses will be reported in as separate document (WTP-RPT-005).

  13. AWS Lecture 1 Tucson, Saturday, March 15, 2008 Historical introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldschmidt, Michel

    with irrationality, as an introduction to transcendence results. After a short historical survey of this topic, we to a proof that e2 is not a quadratic number. Such irrationality proofs rest on a criterion for irrationality to a common denominator and scale). Hence 1 + 2 is an irrational number, and 2 also. Michel Waldschmidt http

  14. The correlation of microchemical properties to antiwear (AW) performance in ashless thiophosphate oil additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    May 2004 X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at macro-scale (mm2 ) and X oil additives M.N. Najmana, , M. Kasraia, *, G. M. Bancrofta , B.H. Frazerb and G. De Stasiob and spatial distributions of chemical species in tribochemical films generated from ashless thiophosphate oil

  15. HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadisonAMOCOELIkNATION ;.7,? ._TH Ii '

  16. 1IWF/AW GRAZ LOFAR Carpathian Mountain (CM) stationLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan. 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    1IWF/ÖAW GRAZ LOFAR Carpathian Mountain (CM) stationLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan. 2008 Roger Investigations, Kosivska Poliana, Ukraine #12;2IWF/ÖAW GRAZ Ukrainian Carpathian mountainsLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan. 2008 .Rakhiv #12;3IWF/ÖAW GRAZ Ukrainian Carpathian mountainsLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan

  17. The merger of the phonemes (aw) and (a) in Texas: a study of sociological and phonetic constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Janevlyn

    1989-01-01

    of The Linguistic Atlas of the Gulf States (LAGS) and the initiation of The Phonological Survey of Texas (PST), a multi-faceted survey and multi-purposed study of Texas speech devised and implemented by Dr. Guy Bailey of Texas A A M University, now makes... like to thank the National Science Foundation for providing the grant for The Phonological Survey of Texas, as part of a larger project on urbanization and language. Also, thanks to Jim Dyer and the Texas Poll workers for providing a wealth of data...

  18. [AW] S. Al-Homidan and H. Wolkowicz, Approximate and Exact Completion Problems for Euclidean Distance Matrices using Semidefinite Programming,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Homidan, Suliman

    .S. Nemirovski. Stuctural design. In H. Wolkowicz, R. Saigal, and L. Vandenberghe, editors, Handbook

  19. Test procedure for use of the shear vane in tanks 103-SY, 103-AN, and 103-AW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeClair, M.D.; Waters, E.

    1995-01-01

    This is a record copy of a test procedure for application of the full-scale shear vane to underground waste tanks at Hanford. The introduction of the report provides background information on the development and proof-testing of the shear vane, as well as information about its current location. The document was originally prepared in 1988, and the work as shelved temporarily for lack of funds. Activities to utilize the shear vane will be expedited by use of this information.

  20. Thermal and Radiolytic Gas Generation Tests on Material from Tanks 241-U-103, 241-AW-101, 241-S-106, and 241-S-102: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Bryan, S.A.

    1999-06-17

    This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic flammable gas generation in actual Hanford single-shell tank wastes. The work described was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support DE&S Hanford (DESH) and Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies performed by Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company). This report describes the results of laboratory tests of gas generation from actual convective layer wastes from Tank 241-U-103 under thermal and radiolytic conditions. Accurate measurements of gas generation rates from highly radioactive tank wastes are needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the tanks. The gas generation capacity of the waste in Tank 241-U-103 is a high priority for the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for accumulating gases above the flammability limit (Johnson et al, 1997). The objective of this work was to establish the composition of gaseous degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The gas generation tests on Tank 241-U-103 samples focused first on the effect of temperature on the composition and rate of gas generation Generation rates of nitrogen, nitrous oxide, methane, and hydrogen increased with temperature, and the composition of the product gas mixture varied with temperature.

  1. In-ight annihilation during positron channeling A.W. Hunt a,b,*, D.B. Cassidy a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    , Alexandria 21544, Egypt d Norwegian Defense Research Establishment, 2027 Kjeller, Norway e Department-free electron gas [14,15]. It has also been suggested th

  2. Thomas, J.R. and Clem, A.W, 1991, PWR moderator temperature coefficient via noise analysis: time series methods, Proceedings of SMORNVI, Gatlinburg, 34.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    .M.R., 1974, Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors, Pergamon Press, Oxford #12; ­ 35 ­ Ku, C.C., Lee K.Y., and Edwards R.M., 1991, Neural network for adapting nuclear power plant control for wide­range operation, Noise Analysis Method for Monitoring the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Pressurized Water Reactors

  3. An Introduction The UnIversITy of hAwAI`I AT MAnoA is one of only 32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Nancy E.

    every fall and spring semesters with ICS, and recently expanding to math, physics and chemistry, in CNS-60 percent of gradu- ating engineers finding jobs in Hawai`i.The remaining graduates find jobs on the U with several large U.S. mainland companies, especially to pro- vide mainland job opportunities for its

  4. A.W. Blakers, 'Solar and Wind Electricity in Australia', Australian Journal of Environmental Management, Vol 7, pp 223-236, 2000 SOLAR AND WIND ELECTRICITY IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 ph 02 6249 5905; email andrew utilisation. Fossil fuels are the principal cause of the enhanced greenhouse effect and are subject. In addition to these three large sources of energy there is tidal and geothermal energy. These are available

  5. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION REPORT FOR TANKS 241-AW-103 & 241-AZ-102 & 241-AN-106 & 241-AN-107 & 241-AY-101 & 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-08-22

    Corrosion rates using supernatant samples retrieved from near the top of the liquid layer were determined for the tanks. Corrosion rates using settled solids (saltcake) were determined. The supernatant samples were tested as received without argon sparging. The settled solid sample segments were extruded under anaerobic condition and kept under a sweep of humidified argon gas during 'the electrochemical corrosion testing. The class of steel used to construct the tank in question was used, and test coupons were allowed to equilibrate for a minimum of 18 hours before a Tafel scan was initiated. The coupons were scanned from -250 mV to +250 mV from the rest or open circuit potential. The corrosion rate is reported along with the corrosion current measurement, open circuit potential, and a chi-square statistic generated by the instrument controlling and analysis algorithm.

  6. !#"%$ &' ()%0213$4&%5 687 9A@CBEDGFIHQPEHQRTSVUXW Y`FbaCDGcedfHhgigp9rqtsAW HuqtP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugeaud, Yann

    . Zhang et al. gave a provably secure optimistic fair exchange protocol based on SOK-IBS [5]. In CIS05 Gu

  7. TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP) | Open EnergyTrueWind Solutions Jump to:

  8. Rainfall leaching is critical for long-term use of recycled water in the Salinas Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platts, Belinda E; Grismer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    sites 1–8 * AW = applied water. † DP = deep percolation. ‡parameters associated with soil water balance modeling andSpring AW* Total AW Recycled water fraction EC w Na w inches

  9. Cloud scalability: building the Millennium Falcon 1. CLOUD SCALABILITY PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    automated shipyard created by the Rakata 1 Available: http://aws.amazon.com/autoscaling/. Last visited

  10. Video analytics for retail A.W. Senior, L. Brown, A. Hampapur, C.-F.Shu, Y. Zhai, R.S. Feris, Y.-L. Tian, S.Borger, C.Carlson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Andrew

    .3.3). Cameras Video Management Video storage Object Tracking Face Tracking XML Metadata MILS DatabaseWeb browser- resolution IR sensors for through-store tracking. Haritaoglu and Flickner [5] have also examined the use

  11. The Active Wave-front Sampling based 3D endoscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Hemanth

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of Active Wave-front Sampling (AWS) for real time quantified 3D endoscopy. AWS is a technique by which phase information from an aperture area of a lens is obtained by sampling ...

  12. A UNIFIED NUMERICAL MODEL FOR SATURATED-UNSATURATED GROUNDWATER FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2011-01-01

    A.W. , 11 The measurement of pore pressure in the triaxialtest 11 9 in Pore Pressure and Suction in Soils,9 1973 A.W. , 11 The pore pressure coefficients, A and B

  13. Orientation After Dark SUMMER ORIENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    's Wild Wings AW Shucks Charleston Crab House .East Bay Street: South End Brewery and Smokehouse #12;

  14. An indoorâ??outdoor building energy simulator to study urban modification effects on building energy use â?? Model description and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    55] A.W.  Pratt, Heat Transmission in Buildings, John Wiley through radiative transmission, conductive heat transfer (

  15. 661PI?(SJV!I`l"d)03'8qlJOA'J~ll"%.398610OO'EOS61-66tOPo/98/f886-OPIO q3!q~u!`surs!u~q~aw`%up!Jdlods,uorCpua3aJauop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    supply and demand (see Schweppe, Tabor and Kirtley C131). Incentive-based load management Differential of such pricing policies. Direct load management options. which allow an electric utility to curtail selectively capital cost. It is, therefore, beneficial to differentiate electric power service based on load

  16. Gcfsrlce Sotvice 3'w.t-ore-_._-------Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as a means o f driving aw3y storms. certain feudal tenures the vass;%lswere bound. t o ring the church b e l

  17. A national survey to determine an optimal fourth year curriculum for dermatology candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alikhan, Ali; Ledo, Lynda; Armstrong, April W

    2009-01-01

    students' selection of fourth-year courses. J Med Educ. 1988Chessman AW. A suggested fourth-year curriculum for medicaldetermine an optimal fourth year curriculum for dermatology

  18. Should Good Patents Come in Small Packages? A Welfare Analysis of Intellectual Property Bundling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard J; Katz, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Studies, 69 (3): 513-531. Beggs, A.W. (1992), “The LicensingGallini and Wright (1990), Beggs (1992), and Anton and Yao (

  19. UM"d Sial Do",,,,,,",,.) of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    """ ",,, ''''!' '"". on "" ",",""""d pIoc '" ,1o~'1y doll, ......."". a_')."',,,I,,,",,.!I,..,""'''.....ion. Aw-.h ",i, ,wdy. '" h

  20. MA 220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dec 10, 2007 ... m'er aisle of every fourth row. ev. 7-7-99. 0 PM aw. ' 4. Exam. LAMBERT FIELDHQUSE EINALEXAMINATIDNQ QFATING ARRANGEMENT.

  1. Table 3a. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs from...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a","W","-","-","-","-","-" "Uinta Basin","Alabama","W","-","-","-","-","-" "Uinta Basin","California","-","W","-","-","-","-" "Uinta Basin","Colorado","W","W","W","W","-","-"...

  2. Kheshbn No. 11-12 - September 1957 - Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1957-01-01

    >^ ¿aw'nga /pntrpnnywogmtp inox ? ognyayi ,0x^0x1 ? rmm» pyapx ian IST«? xaax man ia#a»i inox ÎÎX amax aaxip ,x man ÎÎX

  3. CAR-FOLLOWING AND THE MACROSCOPIC AWRASCLE TRAFFIC FLOW MARTE GODVIK AND HARALD HANCHE-OLSEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAR-FOLLOWING AND THE MACROSCOPIC AW­RASCLE TRAFFIC FLOW MODEL MARTE GODVIK AND HARALD HANCHE-OLSEN Abstract. We consider a semi-discrete car-following model and the macroscopic Aw­Rascle model for traffic flow given in Lagrangian form. The solution of the car-following model converges to a weak entropy

  4. Ion Implanted Ge:B Far Infrard Blocked Impurity Band Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beeman, J.W.; Goyal, S.; Reichertz, L.A.; Haller, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    cm -1 . The responsivity and NEP of these devices does nota responsivity of 0.12 A/W and NEP of 5.23 x 10 -15 W/Hz -a responsivity of 0.12 A/W and NEP of 5.23 x 10 -15 W/Hz -

  5. A Vision-based Method for On-Road Truck Height Measurement in Proactive Prevention of 2 Collision with Overpasses and Tunnels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Fei; Park, Man-Woo; Sandidge, Matthew; Brilakis, Ioannis

    2014-11-26

    Television, 2012 490 (http://www.metro.us/philadelphia/news/local/2012/08/14/large-truck-strikes-signs-in-tip-oneill-491 tunnel/). 492 [6] J. Brooks, Stuck truck in Burnley Tunnel cost Victorians $1 million, 3AW, 2013 493 (http://www.3aw.com.au/blogs/neil...

  6. Proc. 16th European CosmicRay Symp., 1998 (Alcala), GR1.3 1 Deciphering diffuse Galactic continuum gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Andrew W.

    , Coulomb scat­ tering, bremsstrahlung, IC and synchrotron are included. A new calculation of the in. The � 0 ­decay gamma rays are calculated explicitly from the propagated proton and Helium spectra http://www.gamma.mpe--garching.mpg.de/¸aws/aws.html #12; Proc. 16th European Cosmic­Ray Symp., 1998

  7. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 7 -Woodgate Schematic Surface and Atlantic Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water WESTERN ARCTIC (PACIFIC) HALOCLINE Halocline Water LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water European Speak: e.g. Manley Circulation Jones, 2001 Typical Arctic profiles Bottom Water "the rest" Western Arctic warmer ATLANTIC WATER T

  8. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A chemical sensor (1) includes two or more pairs of interdigital electrodes (10) having different periodicities. Each pair is comprised of a first electrode (10a) and a second electrode (10b). The electrodes are patterned on a surface of a piezoelectric substrate (12). Each pair of electrodes may launch and receive various acoustic waves (AW), including a surface acoustic wave (SAW), and may also launch and receive several acoustic plate modes (APMs). The frequencies associated with each are functions of the transducer periodicity as well as the velocity of the particular AW in the chosen substrate material. An AW interaction region (13) exists between each pair of electrodes. Circuitry (20, 40) is used to launch, receive, and monitor the propagation characteristics of the AWs and may be configured in an intermittent measurement fashion or in a continuous measurement fashion. Perturbations to the AW velocity and attenuation are recorded at several frequencies and provide the sensor response.

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, David C.

    is a nondestructive evaluation technique to detect aws in metalic specimens. It has found prevalent use in aircraft work, Luong and Santosa, studying the nondestructive problem in corrosion inspection, developed

  10. 3-dimensional surface imaging using Active Wavefront Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frigerio, Federico, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    A novel 3D surface imaging technique using Active Wavefront Sampling (AWS) is presented. In this technique, the optical wavefront traversing a lens is sampled at two or more off-axis locations and the resulting motion of ...

  11. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 774776 "Leonard Pairs" in Classical Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    ]). Terwilliger showed [5, 10] that a Leonard pair X, Y satisfies a certain algebraic relations with respect to commutators. In turn, the Terwilliger relations follow from to the so-called relations of the AW

  12. Planning for a brighter future: A review of sun protection and barriers to behavioral change in children and adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dadlani, Chicky; Orlow, Seth J

    2008-01-01

    AW, Sylvester JA, et al. Summer sun exposure: knowledge,364-372. PubMed 35. Robins P. Sun sense. New York, NY. 1990children and parents about sun protection. Dermatology

  13. Minireview: vitamin D receptor: new assignments for an already busy receptor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Anthony W

    2006-01-01

    of the nuclear receptor for vitamin D bound to its naturalNorman AW 2005 1 ? ,25(OH) 2 -Vitamin D 3 mediated rapid andJW, Glorieux FH, eds. Vitamin D. 2nd ed. San Diego: Elsevier

  14. Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    and India Insights. Paris: IEA. 34. Wyckoff AW, Roop JM.and India Insights. Paris: IEA. 3. US Energy Inf. Adm. 2007.Organization Year of Forecast IEA (WEO) EIA (IEO) (after

  15. Street, Suite 210, Petaluma, CA 94952 | 707-769-2289 | www.awsciences.com February 4, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and asbestos. AWS will collect air samples for lead and asbestos and/or mercury in selected areas of high to hazardous materials concern: Basement ­ All Rooms 169 ­ Belfor personnel may enter with proper PPE

  16. Optimal information transmission in organizations: search and congestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic Press. A.W. Beggs (2001), “Queues and Hierarchies,”all problems (which Beggs (2001) introduces a model that isdi?erences between workers in Beggs (2001) arises because of

  17. Invariance in Human Visual Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandakumar, Chetan

    2011-01-01

    Vision Research, 38, 28172832 Marr, D. (1977). Analysis ofof London, SeriesB, 197,441-475. Marr, D. (1982). Vision: AW.H. Freeman,San Francisco. Marr, D. , and Nishihara, H.

  18. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study N.L. Miller 1 *, A.W. KingCycle Research Strategy, DOE SC-0043, Office of BiologicalLBNL Report LBNL-53826. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study is

  19. A multi-methodological investigation of the processing and interpretation of coordinate sentences involving verb phrase anaphors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callahan, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    46, 229- Inhoff, A.W. , & Rayner, K. (1986). Parafoveal word547). Oxford: Elsevier. Rayner, K. , & Duffy, S.A. (1986).325-345. Schilling, H.E.H. , Rayner, K. , & Chumbley, J.I. (

  20. VolumeVolume 5959, Number 2 August, Number 2 August 20152015 MarinersMariners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and proce- dures, collection of metadata and insuring that standard procedures proposed by WMO are followed and management of Automated Weather Sensors (AWS). This was a great opportunity to emphasize the need for recruit

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chao, A.W. ; Fawley, W.M. ; Frisch, J. ; Huang, Z. ; Nuhn, H.D. ; SLAC ; et al March 2013 Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam...

  2. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    A.W. , “Likely Near-Term Solar-Thermal Water SplittingFundamentals of s Solar-thermal Mn 2 O 3 /MnO ThermochemicalPower-Photovaltaics or Solar Thermal Power? ” Proceedings of

  3. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01

    AB, Elson LM. The human brain coloring book. 1st ed. New21. Toga AW, Mazziotta JC. Brain mapping : the systems. SanSR, Phelps ME. Imaging Brain Function with Positron Emission

  4. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    133. [55] A.W. Pratt, Heat Transmission in Buildings, Johnthrough radiative transmission, conductive heat transfer (heat conduction (large temperature difference between indoors and outdoors) then dominates over light transmission.

  5. A Single Parti cleApproach to Cy clotron Heating in a Non-Unifonn Magneti c Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    to estimate the heating rate. The approach 1 is similar to that of Kuckes in a recent paper. We begin (10) of Kuckes paper (where w c '= aw c ). Now consider a group of non-interacting particles, all

  6. Efficient Spectral-Galerkin Method and Analysis for Elliptic PDEs ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-22

    ... use the coercivity of the bilinear form and polynomial approximation theory to derive ...... Ammari, H., Bao, G., Wood, A.W.: Analysis of the electromagnetic scattering ... Quarteroni, A., Zang, T.A.: Spectral Methods: Fundamentals in Single Do-.

  7. Dermoscopy of black-spot poison ivy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rader, Ryan K; Mu, Ruipu; Shi, Honglan; Stoecker, William V; Hinton, Kristen A

    2012-01-01

    CT, Bean AS. Black-spot poison ivy: A rare phenomenon. J AmJG, Lucky AW. Black spot poison ivy: A report of 5 cases andis unique for black-spot poison ivy. The UFLC-MS/MS urushiol

  8. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W. (1996) 41 Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2 Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C. (1998) 40 CHEETAH: A next generation...

  9. DOE-0336

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by this procedure. "Danger Do Not Operate" tags shall be constructed to include an adhesive laminate to be affixed after tag completion. * 3x5-12 Danger Tag, (AW) 54-6001-955....

  10. Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy DOE Zero Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Words matter...they matter a lot Have you ever heard of the Patagonian Toothfish? The fish industry tried to peddle this awful sounding name for edible food, and surprise, they...

  11. 1. Lagrangefunktion eines elastisch gebetteten Balkens (Winklersche Bettung) lautet: L w x t dx w x t dx w x t dx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1. Lagrangefunktion eines elastisch gebetteten Balkens (Winklersche Bettung) lautet: 2 2 0 0 0 Balkens (Winklersche Bettung) lautet: 0IV Aw EIw w + + = . A. Eine unendlich lange Schiene wird an einem

  12. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, VH

    2014-01-01

    tube Flue Temperature Varies with water heater Air inletnear water heater Air inlet near water heater APT: Automated99 Figure 56. Air intake for water heater AW07. Temperature

  13. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 509 : 212228, 1998 December 10 1998. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Andrew W.

    code for the calculation of Galactic cosmic­ray propagation has been developed, building, Postfach 1603, D­85740 Garching, Germany aws=mpe.mpg.de imos=mpe.mpg.de. 2 Institute for Nuclear Physics, M

  14. Comparative analysis of hospital and forensic laboratory ethanol concentrations: A 15 month investigation of antemortem specimens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitman, A; Estrada, J; Fitzgerald, RL; McIntyre, IM

    2015-01-01

    evident at lower blood ethanol concentrations and provideAW. Interpreting results of ethanol analysis in postmortemA. Fast quanti?cation of ethanol in whole blood specimens by

  15. Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in the scattered Kuiper Belt. Astrophys. J. , 635, L97-L100.al. (2002). The binary Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31. Nature,2005). The high-albedo Kuiper Belt object (55565) 2002 AW

  16. Kheshbn No. 2 - October 1951 - Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1951-01-01

    snjnas yp^iayx ,15WÖ8*ÖW inox ,15**0 *w /D8taami il iiytDDHYX ,p"»aw i^nnswax a:it2; inox :op^^oxa in pgn aang px .

  17. Descriptions and diagrams of the primary and annulus ventilation systems of the double-shell tank farms as of January 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackman, A.E.; Waters, E.D.

    1994-12-28

    This document is a compilation of information describing the ventilation systems of the Double-Shell Tank farms (214-AN, -AP, -AW, -AW, -AY, -AZ, and -SY). A general description of the primary tank and annulus ventilation systems is given along with specific information on the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, condensers, preheaters, exhaust fans, and piping. This information is considered to be current as of January 1988. 38 refs, 20 figs, 30 tabs.

  18. Orthogonal projections Application: search engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geuvers, Herman

    , so v 0 3 if v, w = 0, then: v, aw = aw, v = a w, v = 0 4 We do the proof for n = 2, so assume v w1 = 0 3 v, w = w, v 4 v + v , w = v, w + v , w (similarly in w, by 3) 5 av, w = a v, w (and similarly in w, by 3) Given such inner product, we define length, distance and angle: v = v, v d(v, w) = v - w

  19. Process control plan for 242-A Evaporator Campaign 94-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, E.Q.

    1994-09-01

    242-A Evaporator Campaign 94-2 will process approximately 3.42 million gallons of dilute waste from tanks 101-AP, 107-AP, 108AP, 102-AW, and 106-AW. The process control plant describes activities which will occur during Campaign 94-2. This document also addresses compliance with the tank farm waste compatibility program, the 242-A radiological source term, the criticality prevention specifications, and effluent discharge limits.

  20. Proton Heating in Solar Wind Compressible Turbulence with Collisions between Counter-propagating Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S; Bale, Stuart D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating the laboratorial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. Different from the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfv\\'en waves, anti-sunward Alfv\\'en waves (AWs) are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond respectively to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Els\\"asser variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orth...

  1. Creating A Galactic Plane Atlas With Amazon Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berriman, G Bruce; Good, John; Juve, Gideon; Kinney, Jamie; Merrihew, Ann; Rynge, Mats

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes by example how astronomers can use cloud-computing resources offered by Amazon Web Services (AWS) to create new datasets at scale. We have created from existing surveys an atlas of the Galactic Plane at 16 wavelengths from 1 {\\mu}m to 24 {\\mu}m with pixels co-registered at spatial sampling of 1 arcsec. We explain how open source tools support management and operation of a virtual cluster on AWS platforms to process data at scale, and describe the technical issues that users will need to consider, such as optimization of resources, resource costs, and management of virtual machine instances.

  2. Generation of \\c{hi}2 solitons from the Airy wave through the parametric instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous creation of solitons in quadratic media by the downconversion, i.e., parametric instability against the generation of fundamental-frequency excitations, from the truncated Airy-wave (AW) mode in the second-harmonic component is studied. Parameter regions are identified for the generation of one, two, and three solitons, with additional small-amplitude "jets". Shares of the total power carried by individual solitons are found. Also considered are soliton patterns generated by the downconversion from a pair of AWs bending in opposite directions.

  3. Widmansta?tten Ferrite and Bainite in Ultra High Strength Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Ashraf

    1991-05-07

    with Temperature 8.4 Nucleation of Widmanstatten Ferrite (aw) and Bainite (aB) 8.4.1 The Driving Force for the Nucleation of aw and aB 8.5 Determination of the Energy Function . . . . 8.5.1 Details of the Thermodynamic Calculations 8.6 Results and Discussion 8.6... ]: 1.6.1 Partition-Local Equilibrium (P-LE) For low supersaturations, X partitions between the ferrite (a ) and parent austenite (, ) phase. The flux of carbon is reduced by making the C-concentration gradient very shallow. The precipitate growth rate...

  4. International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foot HS UWB WSN Geo Con Mag 08:30 08:45 WLAN Foot HS UWB WSN Geo Con Mag 09:00 09:15 WLAN Foot HS UWB WSN Geo Con 09:30 WLAN Foot 09:45 Coffee, F-Floor Coffee, F-Floor 10:00 Opening Session, G7 10:15 WLAN Foot Aw UWB WSN Geo Con Inno Demo 10:30 RF IMU Req RFID US Con 10:45 WLAN Foot Aw UWB WSN Geo Con Inno

  5. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Energy Facilities. ” American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns onthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWind

  6. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Electricity Anemometer Data Percentage Change Due to Wind Timing TrueWind Data at Same Locations Load- Weighted Capacity Factor Market

  7. LU TP 9707 Revised September 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    LU TP 97­07 April 1997 Revised September 1997 Bose­Einstein Correlations in the Lund Model Bo. PACS codes: 12.38Aw, 13.85, 13.87Fh Keywords: Bose­Einstein Correlations, Fragmentation, The Lund Model) effect [1], often called the Bose­Einstein effect, originated in astronomy where one uses

  8. LU TP 9728 October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    LU TP 97­28 October 1997 Transverse and Longitudinal Bose­Einstein Correlations Bo Andersson, with respect to the jet axis in e + e \\Gamma annihilation, arises naturally in a model for Bose­Einstein content of the final state. PACS codes: 12.38Aw, 13.85, 13.87Fh Keywords: Bose­Einstein Correlations

  9. Contstraint effects of shallow cracks in structures containing fillet weld toe cracks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neligon, Melinda T

    1995-01-01

    for structures containing a/W--O.l and a/W--O.5 fillet weld toe cracks. The Anderson-Dodds scaling model is applied to quantify the effects of finite size on J contour integral values for structures containing a/W=O.l and a/W=0.5 fillet weld toe cracks loaded...

  10. ISO and US Standards for Thermal Cutting and Joint Preparation (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hochanadel, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-02

    The summary of this presentation is: (1) There is a lot of shared space between AWS and ISO documents; (2) Several areas use the same specifications and standards, especially true in process materials; and (3) Equipment is one area with very little overlap.

  11. Displacement currents in semiconductor quantum dots embedded dielectric media: A method for room temperature photon detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsik, Steven G.

    embedded in paraffin wax is devised to illustrate the principle, giving 0.6 A/W as an upper limitS Qds embedded in paraffin wax Fig. 1 a . PbS Qds embedded paraffin wax films were prepared wax melting point 64 °C, dielec- tric constant=2.4 and a thin layer of wax was spread on the surface

  12. Fatal case of sorafenib-associated idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in the adjuvant treatment of a patient with renal cell carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairfax, B. P.; Pratap, S.; Roberts, I. S. D.; Collier, J.; Kaplan, R.; Meade, A. M.; Ritchie, A. W.; Eisen, T.; Macaulay, V. M.; Protheroe, A.

    2012-12-11

    idiosyncratic vant treatment of a inoma Meade2, AW Ritchie2, T Eisen3, VM Macaulay1 r with activity at Raf, PDGF? and VEGF receptors that is (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current als with localized RCC consists of surveillance-based er treatment...

  13. VBGVBG3/7/2006MODIFIED LEAK DETECTOR BRACKET1 2. WELDING & INSPECTIONS SHALL BE PERFORMED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    VBGVBG3/7/2006MODIFIED LEAK DETECTOR BRACKET1 APPROVED 2. WELDING & INSPECTIONS SHALL BE PERFORMED 4. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED 3. ALL WELDS SHALL BE DYE PENETRANT INSPECTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH AWS D.1.6 1 1. ALL WELDS MUST BE WATERTIGHT NOTES BYDATEDESCRIPTIONREV ITEM NO. QTY. DESCRIPTION

  14. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  15. The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal A.W. England*, Xiaohua Lin climate warming over the past few hundred years are being obtained from profiles of borehole temperature fractions of the geothermal climate signal. One of the long-term objectives of this investigation is to use

  16. Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD of Technology, 2Meteodyn Objectives Conclusions References [1] TopoWind software, User Manual [2] Wind Resource Assessment Handbook: Fundamentals for Conducting a Successful Wind Monitoring Program, AWS Scientific, Inc

  17. Multipath channels Path timing critical (versus amplitude information)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    1 · Multipath channels · Path timing critical (versus amplitude information) ­ Certain modulations: PPM ­ Location/Ranging · Model ­ Delay spread ­ L paths (M choose L possible profiles) ­ Independent path amplitudes ­ Block constant channel ­ AW GN 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 -0.02 0 0.02 The Channel

  18. arXiv:heplat/0610123 Propagators in YangMills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maas, Axel

    : 11.15.Ha 12.38.Aw Green's functions encode completely the non­perturbative properties of a quantum, Caixa Postal 369, 13560­970 São Carlos, SP, Brazil Abstract. Green's functions are gauge minimal Landau gauge. Keywords: Yang­Mills theory; Green's functions; Confinement; Gauge dependence PACS

  19. Regional Climate Downscaling Intercomparison over the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Jian-Hua "Joshua"

    Regional Climate Downscaling Intercomparison over the Philippines J.H. Qian, A.W. Robertson, M: PAGASA, the Philippines #12;#12;#12;#12;Analysis of r a i n f a l l fluctuations in the Philippines 237 Figure 1 Climatological map (after "Philippines Water Resources", 1976). Vigan, Legaspi, Zamboanga

  20. Plasmodium sexual development and the role of Plasmepsin X in Plasmodium falciparum transmission to anopheles gambiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bounkeua, Viengngeun

    2010-01-01

    Parasitol. 86:155-62. van Dijk, M.R. , Waters, A.P. , Janse,A.P. , Thomas, A.W. , van Dijk, M.R. , Janse, C.J. (1997).Immun. 69:4048-54. van Dijk, M.R. , Janse, C.J. , Thompson,

  1. Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Azray D MPA Pallet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    .,. "l ~ : ~~ '" Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Az·ray D MPA Pallet Crew Engineering Model ~TM-1047 PAGI 1 OF DATI 8/11/71 The following ATM presents the results of Crew Engineering evaluation:. Kuechenmeister .... Crew Engineering R. L. Redick Crew Engineering 13 #12;ftU. Kt:V. NO. ' t Cr-aw Eng41(l

  2. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed El Hady; Benjamin B. Machta

    2014-10-05

    Many studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the Action Potential (AP). Despite a large and diverse body of experimental evidence, there is no theoretical consensus either for the physical basis of this mechanical wave nor its interdependence with the electrical signal. In this manuscript we present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model for these AWs allows us to predict, in terms of elastic constants, axon radius and axoplasmic density and viscosity, the shape of the AW that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the AP predicted by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) equations. We show that our model makes predictions that are in agreement with results in experimental systems including the garfish olfactory nerve and the squid giant axon. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology.

  3. Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network Recommendations for Prospective Multi-Center Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    V, Preda A, Keator D, O'Leary DS, Lim KO, Glover G, PotkinHJ, Clark VP, Lauriello J, O'Leary D, Mueller BA, Lim KO,DH, Gollub R, Lauriello J, O'Leary D, van Erp TG, Toga AW,

  4. OTTE EXPORT M cies of the B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Jiancheng

    UNC CHARLO I. Introd The Polic th th fa But over protectin could ham Export la technolog such cas foreign s work is demonstr "Researc that any must be reported agreemen scholarsh OTTE EXPORT M their r the past fe ng informatio mper U.S. e aws and regu gy and these In particu ns) exists w n export

  5. Dear Editor of I was an NCI C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Scholar Aw nvited Profess tegrative Tox rics/Human D uman Medici fety Toxicolo ate University g, Michigan 48 the bio TPA inhibited D It turned out th eld of DNA dam is failed experi cer research at rdle Laboratory y Summary for JAMES E. TROSKO, PH.D. After receiving a Ph.D. in radiation genetics, Dr. Trosko did

  6. Home Articles Directions Contact Green Resources & Links The Green Building Gallery Gill Holland, green developer / film producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , green developer / film producer On March 13, 2006, my w ife Augusta and I bought a 110 year-old w environmental films and being acutely aw are of our being part of the problem in the increase of carbon in our

  7. Infinite Products Associated with Counting Blocks in Binary Strings J.-P. Allouche J. O. Shallit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shallit, Jeffrey O.

    ) occurrences of w in the binary expansion of n. We show that there exists an effectively computable rational we address in this paper. For any finite nonempty block w of 0's and 1's, we define aw(n) as the number of occurrences of w in the binary expansion of n. With this quantity we associate an infinite

  8. Real Time Computational Algorithms for Eddy Current Based Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and improved techniques are constantly being sought to facilitate the detection of hidden corrosion and aws in structures such as airplanes and pipelines. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of detecting technology are components of airplanes, motor vehicles, pipelines, bridges, trains, and power stations

  9. The EMBERS Architecture for Streaming Predictive Analytics Andy Doyle, Graham Katz, Kristen Summers, Chris Ackermann, Ilya Zavorin, Zunsik Lim,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    The EMBERS Architecture for Streaming Predictive Analytics Andy Doyle, Graham Katz, Kristen Summers is built on a streaming, scalable, share-nothing architecture and is deployed on Amazon Web Services (AWS America and the Middle East and North Africa on the basis of publicly available (open-source) data. EMBERS

  10. The Interruption of Alpine Foehn by a Cold Front. Part I: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    in Inn and Wipp Valley Temperature slope profile Doppler wind lidar in Wipp Valley #12;6 of 13 Case study study Wipp Valley: AWS network Pot. Temp. and Wind ­ Hovmoeller diagram Strong and warm foehn in the lower Wipp Valley Western Inn-Valley gust front enters Wipp Valley Cold front propagates southward

  11. MLE IN THE PROPORTIONAL ODDS MODEL BY S.A. MURPHY1, A.J. ROSSINI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Susan A.

    MLE IN THE PROPORTIONAL ODDS MODEL BY S.A. MURPHY1, A.J. ROSSINI AND A.W. VAN DER VAART maximumlikelihood estimation of the parameters in the proportional odds model with right censored data Pettitt 1982 and Bennett 1983ab generalized the proportional odds model to the survival analysis context

  12. A simplified biosphere model for global climate studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Y; Sellers, P; Kinter, J; Shukla, J

    1991-01-01

    is 6T 2 C 8s=Rngx_Hgs_ >‘EgS_ 7r gs Cgs 8t 1' (Tgs —aw, _ 1 1 Tt‘—0sD1 Pl_Ql2—E(Egs+b1Edc) (A11) 6W2 _ 1 1 at *

  13. A Simplified Biosphere Model for Global Climate Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Y; Sellers, PJ; Kinter, JL; Shukla, J

    1991-01-01

    is 6T 2 C 8s=Rngx_Hgs_ >‘EgS_ 7r gs Cgs 8t 1' (Tgs —aw, _ 1 1 Tt‘—0sD1 Pl_Ql2—E(Egs+b1Edc) (A11) 6W2 _ 1 1 at *

  14. In Tutorial 1 the program Macaulay 2 was introduced. In this tutorial we will create functions in Macaulay 2 to implement the algorithms in Lecture 3. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Leah H.

    variables -- return binomial x^(b-) - x^(b+) pos := 1_R; neg := 1_R; scan(#b, i-> if b_i > 0 then pos = pos * R_i^(b_i) else if b_i pos - neg); HSAlg = (A,w) -> ( -- take

  15. Check Aid Status & Loans on ISIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    Check Aid Status & Loans on ISIS As a University of Florida (UF) financial aid applicant, you can business using ISIS (the UF Integrated Student Information System): www.isis.ufl.edu 1.CheCk Aid StAtuS/AwArdS on iSiS You are responsible for keeping track of your financial aid file and awards, including

  16. Processing of high quality mango chips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunez Gallegos, Yolanda

    2010-07-14

    /v), times (45, 60, and 70 min), and temperatures (22, 40, and 57oC). Physical and chemical properties (aw, pH, oBrix, sugar gain, water loss, and shrinkage) after OD were studied. The pre-treated slices were vacuum fried (1.33 kPa) at 120, 130, and 138o...

  17. DNeasy Plant Mini Kit and DNeasy Plant Maxi Kit Handbook 08/2000 15 Protocol for Isolation of DNA from Plant Tissue with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Emily

    /E concentrate may form precipitates upon storage. If necessary, warm to 65°C to redissolve (before adding ethanol to Buffer AP3/E). Do not heat Buffer AP3/E after ethanol has been added · Buffer AP1 may develop a yellow color upon storage. This does not affect the procedure. · Buffers AW and AP3/E

  18. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 493:694707, 1998 February 1 1998. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    1603, 85740 Garching bei Mu nchen, Germany; imos=mpe-garching.mpg.de, aws=mpe-garching.mpg.de Received 1997 June 11; accepted 1997 September 8 ABSTRACT We have made a new calculation of the cosmic decay calculation for positrons. The predicted positron fraction is in good agreement

  19. The Astrophysical Journal, 640:L155L158, 2006 April 1 2006. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    Max-Planck-Institut fu¨r extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching, Germany; aws@mpe.mpg thought of as negligible. However, a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field consistent made a calculation of the attenuation of very high energy g-rays in the Galaxy, using this new

  20. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 565:280296, 2002 January 20 ( 2002. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    , Postfach 1603, D-85740 Garching, Germany;fu r aws=mpe.mpg.de JONATHAN F. ORMES NASA Goddard Space Flight calculation of the secondary antiproton �ux provides a "" background ÏÏ for searches for exotic signals from such tests to be performed. We use our propagation code GALPROP to calculate interstellar cosmic

  1. The Astrophysical Journal, 648: L29L32, 2006 September 1 2006. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    . Strong Max-Planck-Institut fu¨r extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching, Germany; aws@mpe.mpg calculations to the supernova remnants RX J1713.7 3946 and G0.9 0.1, recently observed by HESS. Subject. INTRODUCTION A new calculation (Porter & Strong 2006) of the Galactic interstellar radiation field (ISRF

  2. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 509:212228, 1998 December 10 1998. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    for the calculation of Galactic cosmic-ray propagation has been developed, building on the approach described- 1 Max-Planck-Institut fu r extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1603, D-85740 Garching, Germany; aws=mpe.mpg.de; imos=mpe.mpg.de. 2 Institute for Nuclear Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State Uni- versity, 119 899

  3. DIFFUSE GALACTIC CONTINUUM GAMMA RAYS: A MODEL COMPATIBLE WITH EGRET DATA AND COSMIC-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    Garching, Germany; aws@mpe.mpg.de Igor V. Moskalenko1 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt. In particular, the spectrum of -rays calculated under the assumption that the proton and electron spectra -production in p-p interactions. However, a calculation made using modern Monte Carlo event generators

  4. Seismic evidence for a tilted mantle plume and north^south mantle ow beneath Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    Seismic evidence for a tilted mantle plume and north^south mantle £ow beneath Iceland Yang Shen a.W., Washington, DC 20015, USA c Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland d Department, Grensasvegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland f Meteorological O/ce of Iceland, Bustadavegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland g US

  5. The Columbia University microbeam II endstation for cell imaging and irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    The Columbia University microbeam II endstation for cell imaging and irradiation A.W. Bigelow *, G The Columbia University Microbeam II has been built to provide a focused ion beam for irradiating designated mammalian cells with single particles. With the interest in irradiating non-stained cells and cells in three

  6. Verifying Statemate Statecharts Using CSP and FDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    Verifying Statemate Statecharts Using CSP and FDR A.W. Roscoe and Z. Wu Oxford University Computing of statecharts. We use the CSP/FDR framework to model complex systems designed in statecharts, and check translation from statecharts into CSP and exploited it in both theoretical and prac- tical senses. 1

  7. Model checking Timed CSP Philip Armstrong Gavin Lowe Joel Ouaknine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    Model checking Timed CSP Philip Armstrong Gavin Lowe Jo¨el Ouaknine A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Department of Computer Science Abstract Though Timed CSP was developed 25 years ago and the CSP for Timed CSP. In this paper we report on the creation of such a version, based on the digitisation results

  8. MI FARM TO SCHOOL GRANTEES 2014-2015 PROGRAM YEAR AND PREVIOUS GRANTEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MI FARM TO SCHOOL GRANTEES 2014-2015 PROGRAM YEAR AND PREVIOUS GRANTEES FOODSYSTEMS.MSU.EDU 2014-2015 GRANTEES School/ district/ program County Current Grant Years as a grantee A&W Daycare Wayne Planning 1 TO SCHOOL GRANTEES (2011/12 ­ 2013/14) School/ district/ program County Grant Type(s) Grant Years All Aboard

  9. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  10. Yunge Libe/ Young Love

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Friedman, Yankl Fridman/

    1980-01-01

    px ,yw8a ÎW^ÎI n ; û"n H /inox ,yiyii" H px ,jni8'? p8Btoiyn .payp -18 D*X aiy^a inox /pp OJ$TI$I -px ,"ii .T"aw a*a^aiiayn pn -18 pyayi D*X inox &$n ,oy,ayï8ii axi^o X ,|nn

  11. Journal of Applied Mechanics, Vol. 77, no. 1, 014502 (2010) Page 1 Constitutive Modeling of Electrostrictive Polymers using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odegard, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    of Electrostrictive Polymers using a Hyperelasticity-Based Approach A.W. Richards and G.M. Odegard1 Department-based and polymer-based electroactive materials, a fully-characterized model has not yet been developed to predict the response of transversely-isotropic polymer electrostrictives. A constitutive model is developed within

  12. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 66036622, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/6603/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature-fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for the entire population (single- model suggest to use experimentally derived Jhet as a function of temperature and aw that can be applied

  13. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore »limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|« less

  14. The effect of GnRH on induction of follicular development and ovulation in anovulatory and ovulatory mares 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennington, Debra Louise

    1981-01-01

    pad faq qua!eabeunooua pue aI!oi 'aouaLged unuse gfasEw u! anaL Iaq aw bufqew pue neM aqq. aw 5u!Moqs uo3. noE queqg 'yanqui og 'F, Cfeufg puff . paydwaqge aneq y ge!fg ffe u! qua!eabeunooua pue quoddns 'aoueueaquog ufaqg uog uopbufuuaW I Cassnff... treatment and 70% of the time during GnRH treatment. Control anovulatory mares exhibited estrous behavior 17'K and 15% of the time during the two 25 U1 Q +J Ql Q CL C) c o ) O fO O O Cl col (LUj/6") SN3BOJS3908d 26 courses of sham...

  15. Search for charged Higgs bosons in top quark decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; DØ Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.

    2009-12-07

    . Carrera aw, W. Carvalho c, B.C.K. Casey ax, H. Castilla-Valdez ah, . Chakrabarti bt, D. Chakraborty az, K.M. Chan bc, A. Chandra av, E. Cheu at, D.K. Cho bj, S.W. Cho af, . Choi ag, B. Choudhary ac, T. Christoudias ar, S. Cihangir ax, D. Claes bo, J.... Gadfort br, .F. Galea aj, A. Garcia-Bellido bs, V. Gavrilov al, P. Gaym, W. Geist s, W. Geng o,bm, C.E. Gerber ay, . Gershtein aw,2, D. Gillberg f, G. Ginther ax,bs, B. Gómez h, A. Goussiou cd, P.D. Grannis bt, S. Greder s, . Greenlee ax, Z.D. Greenwood bh...

  16. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA); Carey, III, James E. (Newton, MA)

    2011-02-08

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  17. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA); Carey, III, James E. (Newton, MA)

    2010-08-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  18. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, III, James Edward (Newton, MA); Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA)

    2011-12-20

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  19. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, James Edward

    2013-12-10

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity great than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelenths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  20. Characterization and Correlation of Particle-Level Interactions to the Macroscopic Rheology of Powders, Granular Slurries, and Colloidal Suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P. Poloski; R.C. Daniel; D.R. Rector; P.R. Bredt; E.C. Buck; Berg, J.C.; Saez, A.E.

    2006-09-29

    This project had two primary objectives. The first was to understand the physical properties and behavior of select Hanford tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging, and transportation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The second objective was to develop a fundamental understanding of these sludge suspensions by correlating the macroscopic properties with particle interactions occurring at the colloidal scale. The specific tank wastes considered herein are contained in thirteen Hanford tanks including three double-shell tanks (DSTs) (AW-103, AW-105, and SY-102) and ten single-shell tanks (SSTs) (B-201 through B-204, T-201 through T-204, T-110, and T-111). At the outset of the project, these tanks were designated as potentially containing transuranic (TRU) process wastes that would be treated and disposed of in a manner different from the majority of the tank wastes.

  1. Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G J; Swanson, J L

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).

  2. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2006-06-06

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  3. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA); Carey, III, James Edward (Newton, MA)

    2009-03-17

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  4. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|<0.0092 GeV?².

  5. A two parameter fracture criterion for high strength low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betegon, C. [Univ. of Oviedo, Gijon (Spain). Escuela Tecnica de Ingenieros Industriales] [Univ. of Oviedo, Gijon (Spain). Escuela Tecnica de Ingenieros Industriales; Belzunce, F.J.; Rodriguez, C. [Inst. Tecnologico de Materiales, Asturias (Spain)] [Inst. Tecnologico de Materiales, Asturias (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    The critical J integral and crack tip opening displacement, CTOD, at cleavage instability of a low carbon high strength steel were obtained from three point bending specimens with different crack to width ratios (0.04 < a/W < 0.48). The geometry dependence of the elastoplastic toughness parameters has been correlated with the T stress. The obtained results have been explained by means of a local cleavage fracture criterion applied to the brittle to ductile transition behavior of the steel.

  6. REVIEWS OF GEOPHYSICS AND SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 19, NO. 4, PAGES 687-688, NOVEMBER 1981 Comment on 'Geomagnetic Depth Sounding by Induction Arrow Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    transfer functions given by Ziw) = z~w) . Hn(w) + zo(w) . Dn(w) + g' (2) where Za(W) is the anomalous, as given by Z(w) = A(w) . H(w) + B(w) . D(w) + g'1 (3) where H(w), D(w), and Z(w) are the total fields MAN G. JONES Institutfiir Geophysik tier Westfiilischen Wilhelms-Universitiit, D-4400 Munster, Federal

  7. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  8. A pocket formula for fusion barriers using proximity-type potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutt, Ishwar, E-mail: idsharma.pu@gmail.com [Panjab University, Department of Physics (India)

    2011-07-15

    By using three potentials parameterized within the proximity concept, namely, Bass 80, AW 95, and Denisov DP, a pocket formula for fusion barriers is presented. This formula was obtained by analyzing as many as 400 reactions with mass between 15 and 296 units. Further, this pocket formula can reproduce the exact barriers within an accuracy of {+-}2%. A comparison with experimental data yields close agreement.

  9. Centre Europen de Recherche et de Formation Avance en Calcul Scientifique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Geostrophical Indexes WTs Classifi cation Extraction of point values Selection of 16 grid points p1 , ..., p16 S EW NW NE SESW C.N C.S C.EC.W C.NW C.NE C.SEC.SW A.N A.S A.W A.NW A.NE A.SEA.SW Selection of WTs (26

  10. My Generation--The Who People try to put us d-down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    My Generation--The Who Intro: G F People try to put us d-down G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my generation Just because we get around G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my generation Things they do look awful cold G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my generation I hope I die before I get old G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my

  11. Home Energy Appraisal Form of the Texas Association of Builders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J.

    1986-01-01

    ....................................... 49 Note: lnsulation Material Installed 6. INFILTRATION OF UNCONDITIONED AIR A. Soleplate Area Sealed .............................. 8. Wirmg and Plumbmg Holes Sealed ................... C. Extenor Doors and Windows Weather-stripped ......... D.... Exlenor Doom and Windows Rough Opening Caulked . . E. Attic and Basement Access in Condit~oned Soace Weather-stripped ............................... F. Outside Sheathmg Holes Sealed, and/or Aw Inl~ltralion Barner Installed, Furr downs Sealed...

  12. This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ;=>130(23) BackgroundY!9#K%(4!G&=%8K'+#$!&O#&+!#+I(6'+T&![9DQb]!9E@,!O#76A!#A!'+=7'+$%'3!#+!G86(=74!#+!QA#&!&+3! QI7@,! #+I'$=#8+! #+! %6H&+AW! M%'A'! &7'! G8(&7#T'3!$'((A!&+3!=%'!G8(&7#=4!8I!#+I(6'+T&!

  13. 3D pattern of brain changes in deaf subjects using Tensor-Based Morphometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    , Patrick Vachon2 , Franco Lepore2 , Yi-Yu Chou1 , Patrice Voss2 , Caroline Brun1 , Agatha D. Lee1 , Arthur W. Toga1 , and Paul M. Thompson1 1 Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department of Neurology, David. N. Lepore, Y-Y. Chou, O.L. Lopez, H.J. Aizenstein, J.T. Becker, A.W. Toga, P.M. Thompson, Fast 3D

  14. arXiv:astro-ph/9906229v114Jun1999 Proc. 26th ICRC (Salt Lake City, 1999), OG 2.4.03 The Galactic contribution to high latitude diffuse -ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    and self-consistent calculation of the electron spectrum in 3D. We use our GALPROP model1, which has been, to calculate the Galactic contribution to the high latitude diffuse -ray emission (Strong, Moskalenko, & Reimer For interested users our model and data sets are available in the public domain on the World Wide Web, http://www.gamma.mpe-garching.mpg.de/aws/a

  15. that are specific to the tension and occupancy branches of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    ., and Taylor, S.S. (2003). Aurora B couples chromosome alignment with anaphase by targeting BubR1, Mad2­393. 2. Tang, Z., Bharadwaj, R., Li, B., and Yu, H. (2001). Mad2-Independent inhibition of APCCdc20 by the mitotic checkpoint protein BubR1. Dev. Cell 1, 227­237. 3. Stern, B.M., and Murray, A.W. (2001). Lack

  16. BULLETIN OF "HE UNITED S'f!ATES PISB CO%fAfISSION. 293 medium-sized snake devours 40 young carp per day, for they digest very

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and on opening some houses, I found half-eaten Ash in them, which, I think, were black bass. In one house Ifound the remains of two fish of good size. A few para ago I 8aw 8 musk-rat on the ice before my house.Goodrich in hjs Animal Ring- dom, page 483, says, "In winter, when hard pressed, they sometimes devour each other

  17. Computer systems and software description for gas characterization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vo, C.V.

    1997-04-01

    The Gas Characterization System Project was commissioned by TWRS management with funding from TWRS Safety, on December 1, 1994. The project objective is to establish an instrumentation system to measure flammable gas concentrations in the vapor space of selected watch list tanks, starting with tank AN-105 and AW-101. Data collected by this system is meant to support first tank characterization, then tank safety. System design is premised upon Characterization rather than mitigation, therefore redundancy is not required.

  18. Case-based Teaching Discovery Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Goals Case-based Teaching Discovery Questions Teaching Chips Assessment Web Tools 1 Biology & 2.bio.davidson.edu/people/macampbell/ASCB/2002.html www.aw.com/genomics www.bio.davidson.edu/courses/genomics/studentpages.html www.bio.davidson.edu/courses/genomics/Exams/exams.html www.bio.davidson.edu/projects/GCAT/MAGICTool.html www.bio.davidson.edu/projects/GCAT/teachingchip.html

  19. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Barometric Pressure Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon:LowellMHKInformation Automatic Weather Station AWS

  20. Respiratory effects of two-hour exposure with intermittent exercise to ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide alone and in combination in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagawa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Seven adult male healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.15 ppm each of O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination, with intermittent light exercise for two hours. Three of the 7 subjects developed cough during deep inspiration and one subject had chest pain during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. Among the various indices of pulmonary function tests, specific airway conductane (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was the most sensitive index to examine the changes produced by the exposure to O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. Significant decrease of G/sub aw//V/sub tg/ in comparison with control measurements was observed in 6 of 7 subjects during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone, and in all subjects during exposures to the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. However, no significant enhancement of effect was observed in the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants, although a slightly greater decrease of airway resistance/volume of thoracic gas (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was observed for the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants than for O/sub 3/ alone.

  1. Testing numerical relativity with the shifted gauge wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria C. Babiuc; Bela Szilagyi; Jeffrey Winicour

    2006-02-17

    Computational methods are essential to provide waveforms from coalescing black holes, which are expected to produce strong signals for the gravitational wave observatories being developed. Although partial simulations of the coalescence have been reported, scientifically useful waveforms have so far not been delivered. The goal of the AppleswithApples (AwA) Alliance is to design, coordinate and document standardized code tests for comparing numerical relativity codes. The first round of AwA tests have now being completed and the results are being analyzed. These initial tests are based upon periodic boundary conditions designed to isolate performance of the main evolution code. Here we describe and carry out an additional test with periodic boundary conditions which deals with an essential feature of the black hole excision problem, namely a non-vanishing shift. The test is a shifted version of the existing AwA gauge wave test. We show how a shift introduces an exponentially growing instability which violates the constraints of a standard harmonic formulation of Einstein's equations. We analyze the Cauchy problem in a harmonic gauge and discuss particular options for suppressing instabilities in the gauge wave tests. We implement these techniques in a finite difference evolution algorithm and present test results. Although our application here is limited to a model problem, the techniques should benefit the simulation of black holes using harmonic evolution codes.

  2. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    a) (b) Effect of Wind Timing with Forecast California Pricesa) (b) Effect of Wind Timing with Forecast Northwest Pricesby TrueWind, to develop a forecast of wind speeds. Or, going

  3. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  5. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4??m, with a peak responsivity of up to ?100??A/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140?K.

  6. Work simplification in the drafting room: an investigation of reference table improvement and the place of templates in the drafting room. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Joel

    1954-01-01

    Atea' tooled' Nenes, tc this ee4v it ie the ympooe af this ewyort W ~"~M 4nefting efficiency ehsaegh inyrove4 referacee tehle 4eeign eng fvL1 ntilieetiae af ~toe + 3 Na0aega, Zchb, "IWIIIIWAfsss, :-:=- i&aielI': IhebsaLL:J, Aws 1903 1854 QLY~W'&'de ', GCVX...Le& eseXugiog the fieet ~& ~4 10 y Coat Stagy' Ccagerkeoa of eating buXb ~ bf Lnstreaeate va. ueiag a t~late Caet foa' aabiag fiwat bulb a ha'. 'f ada, 8 +' ~. . = y . eg~/~ hx'. Sip'flk t "~~-" br. xy ~x" ws/:";, ~QQ ~ht hr. l, $ teey...

  7. Deciphering c-MYC-regulated genes in two distinct tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robson, Samuel C.; Ward, Lesley; Brown, Helen; Turner, Heather; Hunter, Ewan; Pelengaris, Stella; Khan, Michael

    2011-09-30

    .71*?0.79?0.72*?1.01?5.28E-03??tro?AF288606?1.06?0.49**?0.97?0.73**??1.1?0.92?1.04?0.91?3.98E-02??ttc4?BC025435?0.85?0.83?1.66**?1.38??0.69*?2.07**?0.68**?1.86**?2.42E-02??txnl4?AW552577?2.10**?1.49**?1.92**?3.24**??0.98?1.43**?1.05?1.72**?1.37E-02??u2af1?NM_024187?0.86?0.67...

  8. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  9. Tank farms essential drawing plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domnoske-Rauch, L.A.

    1998-08-04

    The purpose of this document is to define criteria for selecting Essential Drawings, Support Drawings, and Controlled Print File (CPF) drawings and documents for facilities that are part of East and West Tank Farms. Also, the drawings and documents that meet the criteria are compiled separate listings. The Essential Drawing list and the Support Drawing list establish a priority for updating technical baseline drawings. The CPF drawings, denoted by an asterisk (*), defined the drawings and documents that Operations is required to maintain per the TWRS Administration Manual. The Routing Boards in Buildings 272-WA and 272-AW are not part of the CPF.

  10. ?LED-based Single-Wavelength Bi-directional POF Link with 10 Gb/s Aggregate Data Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Bamiedakis, N.; Wei, J. L.; McKendry, J. J. D.; Xie, E.; Ferreira, R.; Gu, E.; Dawson, M. D.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.

    2015-06-16

    ,” Design and Diagnostics of Electronic Circuits & Systems (DDECS), 2012 IEEE 15th International Symposium on , pp.74,78, 18-20 April 2012 [3] A.M.J. Koonen, H.P.A. van den Boom, E.O. Martinez, P. Guignard, E. Tangdiongga, “Cost optimization of optical... on the datasheet of the APD employed in the experiments (First Sensor AD800-11). The value used is 0.275 A/W for M=1. The receiver noise performance and APD avalanche gain (M) used in the simulation model are based on experimentally- determined values. The beam...

  11. Infinitely many solutions to linearly coupled Schrödinger equations with non-symmetric potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chunhua Wang; Jing Yang

    2015-04-06

    We study a linearly coupled Schr\\"{o}dinger system in $\\R^N(N\\leq3).$ Assume that the potentials in the system are continuous functions satisfying suitable decay assumptions, but without any symmetry properties and the parameters in the system satisfy some suitable restrictions. Using the Liapunov-Schmidt reduction methods two times and combing localized energy method, we prove that the problem has infinitely many positive synchronized solutions, which extends the result Theorem 1.2 about nonlinearly coupled Schr\\"{o}dinger equations in \\cite{aw} to our linearly coupled problem.

  12. Measured Performance of Energy-Efficient Computer Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

    1996-01-01

    , and peripherals 29 W. The average PC workstation was found to have a hat-shaped daily demand curve with a baseload of 18 % and a peak load of 76 %. They also tested a device on 11 workstations which turns off monitors during periods of keyboard inactivity. A...W reduction in peak demand. Unlike other energy saving strategies however, there is no premium for ES compliant equipment. hot and humid climate, the load profiles (~igure 1) of the ES PCs with and without their power saving While savings for both the ES...

  13. Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Shih-Chien

    1978-01-01

    was determined on six me als. Acetic and formic acids were found to be the major corrosive agents. !Vine frac ions of pyrolysis oil obtained by vacuum fractional d still ation were classified on a 0$-1-38/H PO / 3 4 SP1210, 80/100 chromosorb G. C. column. Ph... Naterial s One objective of this work was to determine the corn- position of nine fraction' obtained by vacuum fractiona- tion of whole pyrolysis oil. The nine fractions were ch. omatographed on a 08-1-38/H PO /SP1210/80/100 chromosorb 3 4 W-AW column...

  14. Visiting hours: the second-person address in critical theory and creative practice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Scott David

    1988-01-01

    ) but also for postmodern readers, to snap them out of the fog created by the changes in language and society. Kitch, the unseen (except in one brief scene) narrator is my vehicle--my metafictionist and fabulator. The Russian Formalist term "scar... in the castle, don't you'!" "A king2" "No, " she shakes her head, long raven tresses waving "A wizard? A knight7 A dragon2" "No, honey. Why, it's the home of the girl who will be your own true love. " "Aw, mom. I love you!" "You' re so sweet! I'm sure you...

  15. Coleridge’s Attitude Toward Various Subjects as Shown in His “Biographia Epistolaris”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven, Effie Louise

    1911-01-01

    , through so many generations, the wit and knowledge, being subtle spirits, have evaporated, 91. To Godwin, Kay 21, 1800. Hartley sends his love to Mary. "TTiat, and not to Jfanny?" "Yes, and to Fanny, but I'll have Mary". He often talks about them...©olnd© the awful sublimity ©f Alpine scenery, yet compensate fer the want of it by beauties, of whioh this very l©wn©ss is a n©e©ssary condition. Tester-morning I saw th© lesser lake complet- ly hid by mist; but the moment the Sun po«p©i ©v©r th© Mill, th© mist...

  16. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirnivas, S.; Musial, W.; Bailey, B.; Filippelli, M.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a deliverable for a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entitled National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign -- Analysis and Collaboration (contract number DE-EE0005372; prime contractor -- AWS Truepower). The project objective is to supplement, facilitate, and enhance ongoing multiagency efforts to develop an integrated national offshore wind energy data network. The results of this initiative are intended to 1) produce a comprehensive definition of relevant met-ocean resource assets and needs and design standards, and 2) provide a basis for recommendations for meeting offshore wind energy industry data and design certification requirements.

  17. Soil weight (lbf/ft{sup 3}) at Hanford waste storage locations (2 volumes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pianka, E.W.

    1994-12-01

    Hanford Reservation waste storage tanks are fabricated in accordance with approved construction specifications. After an underground tank has been constructed in the excavation prepared for it, soil is place around the tank and compacted by an approved compaction procedure. To ensure compliance with the construction specifications, measurements of the soil compaction are taken by QA inspectors using test methods based on American Society for the Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Soil compaction tests data taken for the 241AP, 241AN, and 241AW tank farms constructed between 1978 and 1986 are included. The individual data values have been numerically processed to obtain average soil density values for each of these tank farms.

  18. TrekIndex Supplement Issue 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01

    Moonbeam (Moon) #1/2, #3 Ed. Debra Walsh 1030 York Avenue, Lansdale, PA 19446 More Trek Tales (MTT) Ed. M.L. Barnes Pandora Press, P.O. Box 404, Ccranerce City, CO 80037 More Vulcan Reflections (MVR) Ed. Devra Langsam (see Masiform-D) Neural Neutralizer (NN.... Block, P. AC #2 Aircraft Landing. Dodge, M,L, B Sc; DT #3 Aknauhraind, Walske, C, USF Vol 1 Alamo City Con* Owen, D, WXYZine Alien of the Month. Hill, R, GoR Aliens of Star Trek: Andorians* SFH #10 Alkarin Warlord*(music) Marder, F, AW All in a Day...

  19. A detailed assessment of snow accumulation in katabatic wind areas on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braaten, David A.

    1997-12-27

    to activate the aerosol generators and disperse the microspheres. The MDSs at both sites were programmed to activate every 14 days for 10 s, dispersing -75 mL of the inert, colored microspheres from a height of-1.2 m. The microspheres have a terminal... planned for Willie Field and Ferrell, BRAATEN: SNOW ACCUMULATION IN KATABATIC WIND AREAS 30,051 First Field Survey- January 1995 Willie Field MDS site o o o øø o øo 0 o ß AWS 70m Ferrell MDS site ß o ß ø e ß e  õ o co ß ß ß ee ee O ß 0...

  20. Application of the AC Commutator Machine in Wind Energy Conversion Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Jamous, Sami Georges

    1981-01-01

    APPLICATION OF THE AC OOMM3TATOR MACHINE IN WIND ENERGY CONVKGION SYSTB3S A Thesis By SAMI GF33RGES EL-Jhl'3OUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Twas AW University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... Application of the AC Comnutator Nachine in Wind Energy Conversion Systems. (Nay 1981) Semi Georges El-Jasnus, B. A. Nathenatics, Texas ASN University; Chairman of Advisory Comnittee: Dr. A. K. Ayoub The thesis investigates the tectudcal feasibility...

  1. Thermodynamic stability of recoding RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannon, Brian Ray

    2013-02-22

    )ou&(opnasd go sa)I&oJd SU(&&aw p() woJ) sJa)aweJed o(weukpowJaqj g a(qadi 9. o si': iioYcz' "lao3c'0 &czo L'9) (eo) ve) &~)0 OL (&0) c & (o o) c ) &o o& c o- To@9 i. eI, R D Z. L9 (9'9) 9'es &9'07 I 'e9 (so) 8oz (c &)ZZI & &)fez &9. 0T'z. cs (L. O) 9...

  2. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  3. Untitled Mina Fanfiction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-05-16

    at me for a long moment, her expression thoughtful and serious, and I struggled not to fidget under her gaze. Finally, she said, 'Do you know that little café on Chambers Street?' 'The one with all the green decorations and curtains?' I answered... spent the rest of the day debating whether or not meeting them at the café would be a good idea. Well, I mean, I knew it wasn't a particularly good idea, but I wasn't sure if it would rank somewhere around 'not so bad', or 'absolutely awful...

  4. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Volume 25 - 26, Autumn 2003 - Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

    2004-01-01

    of Oriental and African Studies Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square London WC1H 0XG U.K. e-mail: mh8@soas.ac.uk Netherlands: Mark Turin Himalayan Languages Project, Silodam 355 1013 AW Amsterdam Netherlands e-mail: mt272@cornell.edu EBHR 25... 1 Martin Gaenszle Professional writers of history in the Himalayan region have been pre- dominantly concerned with larger social units, dealing with issues such as the formation of states, colonial rule and, above all, nation...

  5. Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen PlasmaEnergy,Recognizing Top101-HV Feb 8 201 WRPS2-AW

  6. Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen PlasmaEnergy,Recognizing Top101-HV Feb 8 201 WRPS2-AWS

  7. AP R

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE. aw wL2--\

  8. ARMY SERVICE FORCES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE. aw

  9. ARMY SERiWE FORCES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE. aw' This

  10. ATOMIC ENERGY CO&lbiISSION ms AlAMos. NEW MMICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE. aw'

  11. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE. aw''

  12. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Refer to File No. AEGR-1 The CommandinS Officer '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE. aw''*>I

  13. Microsoft Word - WA Parish_MAP_Final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In389:UFCAugust 4,For4ViAW.A.

  14. Microsoft Word - WAG7PP-PressRelease_FINAL_ _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In389:UFCAugust 4,For4ViAW.A.News

  15. US5804965.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPPfinal design and fabrication40081A UmtedCeeehi et a].W00lley

  16. Reduced order modeling for transport phenomena based on proper orthogonal decomposition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Tao

    2005-02-17

    (Dm)W )Ap +(?m)E (um)e?(um)p?x AE ?(?m)W (um)p?(um)w?x AW +(?m)N (vm)NE?(vm)NW?x AN ?(?m)S (vm)SE?(vm)SW?x AS: (3:4h) Similarly, the y-momentum equations are discretized as23 (avm)p(vm)p = X nb (avm)nb(vm)nb + (bvm)p ?Ap(?m)p ((pg)N ?(pg)S) + (Fgs(vl ?vm...)op; (3:5e) (avm)op = (?m?m)op?V?t ; (3:5f) (bvm)p = (avm)op(vm)op + Svm ?(?m?m)pg?V; (3:5g) Svm = ((?m)Ntr(Dm)N ?(?m)Str(Dm)S)Ap +(?m)E (um)NE?(um)SE?y AE ?(?m)W (um)NW ?(um)SW?y AW +(?m)N (vm)n?(vm)p?y AN ?(?m)S (vm)p?(vm)s?y AS: (3:5h) Gas pressure...

  17. Analytical and characterization studies of organic and inorganic species in brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Domazetis; M. Raoarun; B.D. James; J. Liesegang; P.; J. Pigram; N. Brack [La Trobe University, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemistry

    2006-08-15

    Detailed studies have been carried out on the distribution of organic functional groups and inorganic species in as-received (ar) and acid-washed (aw) brown coals using elemental analysis, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Surface concentrations of the various carbon groups, organic oxygen, and inorganic hydroxide were obtained using XPS, but oxygen from clay and quartz, if present, interfered with organic oxygen determinations for the coals. A comparison of ar and aw coals using XPS and SEM-EDX is provided in terms of inorganic and organic sulfur groups. Chloride in these coals is present mainly as acid extractable forms, but small amounts of chloride in the organic matrix were indicated by the elemental analysis of ultra low-ash coals. TOF-SIMS fragments from brown coals were indicative of polymers consisting mainly of single aromatic groups linked by hydrocarbons with carboxyl and phenol functional groups. Sulfur fragments were from inorganic sulfur, thiols, organo-sulfates, and S-N-organic species. Numerous fragments containing organically bound chloride were observed. Fragments of the inorganic species Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Ga were also observed. Environmentally undesirable species, particularly from organo-sulfur and organo-chloride groups in brown coal, are likely to emerge from processes that heat coal-water mixture. 54 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Translaminar fracture toughness test methods and results from interlaboratory tests of carbon/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, J.H.; Kortschot, M.T.; Lloyd, W.R.; Eidinoff, H.L.; Wilson, D.A.; Ashbaugh, N.

    1995-12-31

    Fracture tests were performed with carbon/polymer laminates and analyzed for the purpose of developing translaminar fracture toughness test and analysis procedures. Notched specimens were tested of two types of symmetrical layups--quasi-isotropic [0/45/90] and [0/90]; two carbon fiber/epoxy materials--a relatively brittle T300 fiber/976 epoxy and a tougher AS4 fiber/977-2 epoxy; two laminate thicknesses--2 mm and 4 mm; and three specimen configurations--the standard three-point bend and compact configurations, and an extended compact specimen with arm-height to specimen-width ratio of 1.9. Stress and displacement expressions were obtained for the extended compact specimen, including those for stress intensity factor, K, and crack mouth opening displacement, V, in terms of relative notch length, a/W, and for a/W in terms of V. Relationships for the bending stresses that control self-similar and off-axis cracking for the extended compact specimen were derived.

  19. Analysis of geometric phase effects in the quantum-classical Liouville formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Izmaylov, Artur F.; Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 ; Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-02-28

    We analyze two approaches to the quantum-classical Liouville (QCL) formalism that differ in the order of two operations: Wigner transformation and projection onto adiabatic electronic states. The analysis is carried out on a two-dimensional linear vibronic model where geometric phase (GP) effects arising from a conical intersection profoundly affect nuclear dynamics. We find that the Wigner-then-Adiabatic (WA) QCL approach captures GP effects, whereas the Adiabatic-then-Wigner (AW) QCL approach does not. Moreover, the Wigner transform in AW-QCL leads to an ill-defined Fourier transform of double-valued functions. The double-valued character of these functions stems from the nontrivial GP of adiabatic electronic states in the presence of a conical intersection. In contrast, WA-QCL avoids this issue by starting with the Wigner transform of single-valued quantities of the full problem. As a consequence, GP effects in WA-QCL can be associated with a dynamical term in the corresponding equation of motion. Since the WA-QCL approach uses solely the adiabatic potentials and non-adiabatic derivative couplings as an input, our results indicate that WA-QCL can capture GP effects in two-state crossing problems using first-principles electronic structure calculations without prior diabatization or introduction of explicit phase factors.

  20. Estimating Small-area Populations by Age and Sex Using Spatial Interpolation and Statistical Inference Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qai, Qiang [University of Iowa; Rushton, Gerald [University of Iowa; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to compute population estimates by age and sex for small areas whose boundaries are different from those for which the population counts were made. In our approach, population surfaces and age-sex proportion surfaces are separately estimated. Age-sex population estimates for small areas and their confidence intervals are then computed using a binomial model with the two surfaces as inputs. The approach was implemented for Iowa using a 90 m resolution population grid (LandScan USA) and U.S. Census 2000 population. Three spatial interpolation methods, the areal weighting (AW) method, the ordinary kriging (OK) method, and a modification of the pycnophylactic method, were used on Census Tract populations to estimate the age-sex proportion surfaces. To verify the model, age-sex population estimates were computed for paired Block Groups that straddled Census Tracts and therefore were spatially misaligned with them. The pycnophylactic method and the OK method were more accurate than the AW method. The approach is general and can be used to estimate subgroup-count types of variables from information in existing administrative areas for custom-defined areas used as the spatial basis of support in other applications.

  1. Antarctica: Heroic Science at the Botoom of the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Thomas

    2003-04-16

    Antarctic science continues the spirit of the 'Heroic Age of Exploration' of Scott, Amundsen, and Shackleton -- even if participants no longer risk their lives so dramatically. It is the extraordinary logistical support for today's science that deserves to be called heroic. Critical cosmology and earth climate questions drive the research. The South Pole ('Great God! this is an awful place' - Scott 1/17/1912) has become one of the world's great astro/particle physics centers. The McMurdo Dry Valleys, including Beacon Valley, the most like Mars on Earth, and Taylor Valley ('a valley of the dead'), and the great ice sheets, hold crucial keys to understanding the Earth's climate. In December I had the special opportunity to photograph these spectacular places on assignment with Madeleine Nash for Time. The story appeared February 3rd. I will include many photographs of the incredible work and scenery on the highest, driest, coldest continent on Earth.

  2. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3??m. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29??m. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  3. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  4. An evaluation of the crossed box contribution to pion-nucleon scattering, using perturbation theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Gerald Mallory

    1967-01-01

    ) '(W + TVi) 4l2 = (W ? TP)') (l1 ? Tt() 02 = WI AW2/(2 ~ -'iS) WRITE(6p3CO) S 300 FCRt&AT ( lH1//59X p3('S = F12 7) WRITE(6p350) 350 FQR(PAT(IHO//52Xp26HA(L)p B(L L = 1 3 A = O. OCOQQQQO 8 = 0 OCCCOOOQ RZ(20)pGZ(20) (25p5)pF 1(5)iF2... acceptable HI from the free fields of the interacting particles, (c) calculate the matrix elements of S using the model HI, and (d) compare with experiment. Writing a solution of (7) as 10 restricts U(t, t ) to satisfying (1) U(t~to ) ?1? and. (2) i ? U...

  5. Performance enhancement of GaN metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetectors by insertion of ultrathin interfacial HfO{sub 2} layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Manoj E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, Burak; Okyay, Ali Kemal E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-03-15

    The authors demonstrate improved device performance of GaN metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) by ultrathin HfO{sub 2} (UT-HfO{sub 2}) layer on GaN. The UT-HfO{sub 2} interfacial layer is grown by atomic layer deposition. The dark current of the PDs with UT-HfO{sub 2} is significantly reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to those without HfO{sub 2} insertion. The photoresponsivity at 360?nm is as high as 1.42 A/W biased at 5 V. An excellent improvement in the performance of the devices is ascribed to allowed electron injection through UT-HfO{sub 2} on GaN interface under UV illumination, resulting in the photocurrent gain with fast response time.

  6. Ion Implanted Ge:B Far Infrard Blocked Impurity BandDetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeman, J.W.; Goyal, S.; Reichertz, L.A.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-06-12

    Ge Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) photoconductors have the potential to replace stressed Ge:Ga photoconductors for far-infrared astronomical observations. A novel planar BIB device has been fabricated in which ion-implanted boron is used to form the blocking and absorbing layers of necessary purity and compensation. The effect of doping in the infrared active layer on the far-infrared photoconductive response has been studied, and the optimum doping concentration is found to be {approx} 4 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. Devices doped near this concentration show good blocking characteristics with low dark currents. The spectral response extends to {approx} 45 cm{sup -1}, clearly showing the formation of an impurity band. Under low background testing conditions these devices attain a responsivity of 0.12 A/W and NEP of 5.23 x 10{sup -15} W/Hz{sup -1/2}.

  7. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  8. The investigation of the electrodeposition of iron from fluoborate solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosier, Benjamin

    1952-01-01

    gA ~ useeeah@ Ae %ho ~ et yM@ale~ S8a ~ Leal. ~ hag ~ Qsa ot'4he'"~ 4k', eg ~ ylang~~ ms ysdea%4@R ee 4gNg: ~ Scca Oe ecch et Ng&yke @5) e eeeeelee4a4 ~ )eeeahe ~ ?elba' eymrhe4 a4 eh@4 'lf ~~ ~ ~ e ~Acne cg ahe4 SA 8a weeeaeeN~ Ske ea4ahhN yea4...aa ~a %e eyeaeM ~we XX' M ~ IeiaaLe W %aaeloL IMt ge ~easy yei~y ~ Le, Ne oalxNca awk awLIeee yL4Qaag %o e; e~g~ eehek wither ~mvgag vQh. the leAQj+ ot the 4eaa ~W. QIgeeee Re ee4 XI@ TeQe VXXIi R~eeia XP eCLe~ ykttkwg to ~ ~ east deaewesoe ~ oaa...

  9. Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, K.

    2012-10-01

    AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

  10. Alternative generation and analysis for phase I privatization transfer system needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, J.D.

    1996-09-10

    This decision document provides input for the Phase I Privatization waste staging plans for the High-Level Waste (HLW)and Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Programs. This AGA report evaluates what infrastructure upgrades to existing 200 East waste transfer systems are necessary for delivery of HLW and LLW streams to the Phase I Privatization vendor. The AGA identifies the transfer routing alternatives for supernatant waste transfers from the 241-AN, 241-AW, and 241-AP Tank Farms to the 241-AP-102 tank and/or the 241-AP-104 tank. These two tanks have been targeted as the initial LLW feed staging tanks. In addition,this report addresses the transfer of slurry waste from the 241-AY and 241-AZ Tank Farms to the Phase I Privatization vendor`s facilities for HLW immobilization.

  11. Fracture toughness testing of bi-material joints with high strength mis-match

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocak, M.; Hornet, P.; Cornec, A.; Schwalbe, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the influence of strength mis-match on CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) R-curves obtained from homogeneous and electron beam (EB) welded bimaterial CT and SENB specimens of two aluminum alloys. The R-curves of metal-metal bimaterial specimens are compared with the R-curves of each alloy to determine the effect of strength mismatch on the locally measured CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) fracture toughness properties. The homogeneous specimens of two different aluminum alloys, namely 2024-FC and 2024-T351 with yield strengths of 80 and 360 MPa respectively, as well as EB welded bi-material 5 mm thick CT and SENB specimens (a/W = 0.15 and 0.5) have been tested at room temperature. The local CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) fracture toughness measurements on such composite specimen configurations produced generally strength mis-match and geometry independent R-curves.

  12. Fracture of surface cracks loaded in bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Y.J.; Reuter, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    Theoretical background of the constraint effect in brittle fracture of solids is reviewed. Fracture test data from D6-aC, a high strength steel, using three-point-bend (SE(B)) specimens and surface cracked plate (SC(B)) specimens under bending are presented. It is shown that the SE(B) data has an elevated fracture toughness for increasing a/W, i.e., a crack geometry with a larger T/K corresponds to a higher K{sub c} which is consistent with the theoretical prediction. The fundamental fracture properties, i.e., the critical strain and the critical distance, determined from the SE(B) test data are then applied to the interpretation and prediction of the SC(B) test data. Reasonable agreement is achieved for the crack growth initiation site and the load.

  13. The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

    1913-01-01

    as in 0.2 per cent hydro? , s H SN s H OD S UH . NHD 1 V S HF UH 5 5H 1 SEEV Y E A W A 1 V J s E A 5 i O A 1 a chloric acid, and that after extraction with acid the remaining phosphorus was no longer soluble in water, but could be dissolved in 0.2..., and that after extraction with acid the remaining phos? ,936,93IL6 U H . NHD 1 V S HF UH 5 5H 1 SEEV Y E AW A 1 V J s E A 5 i O A 1 hh phorus was no longer Soluble in water, but soluble in 0.2 per cent am? monia. The principal acid-soluble and ammonia...

  14. Imaging SKA-Scale data in three different computing environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Richard; Wu, Chen; Popping, Attila; Meyer, Martin; Wicenec, Andreas; Quinn, Peter; van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations into options for the computing platform for the imaging pipeline in the CHILES project, an ultra-deep HI pathfinder for the era of the Square Kilometre Array. CHILES pushes the current computing infrastructure to its limits and understanding how to deliver the images from this project is clarifying the Science Data Processing requirements for the SKA. We have tested three platforms: a moderately sized cluster, a massive High Performance Computing (HPC) system, and the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud computing platform. We have used well-established tools for data reduction and performance measurement to investigate the behaviour of these platforms for the complicated access patterns of real-life Radio Astronomy data reduction. All of these platforms have strengths and weaknesses and the system tools allow us to identify and evaluate them in a quantitative manner. With the insights from these tests we are able to complete the imaging pipeline processing on both the ...

  15. CdS/PbSe heterojunction for high temperature mid-infrared photovoltaic detector applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Binbin, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Zhao, Lihua; Chang, Caleb [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Shi, Zhisheng, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Nanolight, Inc., Norman, Oklahoma 73069 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    n-CdS/p-PbSe heterojunction is investigated. A thin CdS film is deposited by chemical bath deposition on top of epitaxial PbSe film by molecular beam epitaxy on Silicon. Current-voltage measurements demonstrate very good junction characteristics with rectifying ratio of ?178 and ideality factor of 1.79 at 300?K. Detectors made with such structure exhibit mid-infrared spectral photoresponse at room temperature. The peak responsivity R{sub ?} and specific detectivity D{sup *} are 0.055?A/W and 5.482?×?10{sup 8}?cm·Hz{sup 1/2}/W at ??=?4.7??m under zero-bias photovoltaic mode. Temperature-dependent photoresponse measurements show abnormal intensity variation below ?200?K. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are also discussed.

  16. Jordan algebras and orthogonal polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    We illustrate how Jordan algebras can provide a framework for the interpretation of certain classes of orthogonal polynomials. The big -1 Jacobi polynomials are eigenfunctions of a first order operator of Dunkl type. We consider an algebra that has this operator (up to constants) as one of its three generators and whose defining relations are given in terms of anticommutators. It is a special case of the Askey-Wilson algebra AW(3). We show how the structure and recurrence relations of the big -1 Jacobi polynomials are obtained from the representations of this algebra. We also present ladder operators for these polynomials and point out that the big -1 Jacobi polynomials satisfy the Hahn property with respect to a generalized Dunkl operator.

  17. Jordan algebras and orthogonal polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Tsujimoto; Luc Vinet; Alexei Zhedanov

    2011-08-17

    We illustrate how Jordan algebras can provide a framework for the interpretation of certain classes of orthogonal polynomials. The big -1 Jacobi polynomials are eigenfunctions of a first order operator of Dunkl type. We consider an algebra that has this operator (up to constants) as one of its three generators and whose defining relations are given in terms of anticommutators. It is a special case of the Askey-Wilson algebra AW(3). We show how the structure and recurrence relations of the big -1 Jacobi polynomials are obtained from the representations of this algebra. We also present ladder operators for these polynomials and point out that the big -1 Jacobi polynomials satisfy the Hahn property with respect to a generalized Dunkl operator.

  18. Factors affecting cutability and certain chemical, physical, histological and organoleptic properties of Holstein-Friesian carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rea, Ronald Howard

    1968-01-01

    I Ql 40 4 IQ 0 ICI ICI O 04 Ql O 0 4/l m m C0 Ol M Ol 0 0 0 4J C Ol II C C Ql Ql 4J 0 JO 44 C IO 04 W 44 m m m 44 8 0 00 P m aQO IQ Ql Ql '0 IO 00 0 WI 0 4 0 04 29 O M M CO CD a O O CD m Pc CQ Ch AW C Ql JJ... 0 I4 0 IQ. Ql M c4 04 8 QIMAO O 4 h 4 Ql A Ql JJ g W JJ 0 ctl I4 4 M Am...

  19. A detailed investigation on the impact of post-growth annealing on the materials and device characteristics of 35-layer In{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}As/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector with quaternary In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikary, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Subhananda

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? We investigated the effect of ex situ annealing on InGaAs/GaAs QDIP with InAlGaAs layer. ? As-grown defect was removed by using post-growth annealing treatment. ? Increase in the compressive strain due to annealing is calculated from XRD curve. ? Three-fold enhancement in responsivity is observed in the QDIPs annealed at 650 °C. ? Two-fold enhancement in D* is observed sample annealed at 650 °C compared to as grown. -- Abstract: The effect of post-growth rapid thermal annealing on 35-layer In{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}As/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) with quaternary In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As capping has been investigated. Transmission electron microscopy showed some as-grown defects were removed by post growth annealing treatment. An increase in the compressive strain in the heterostructure due to annealing was identified from X-ray diffraction curve. A two-color photoresponse in the long-wave region (8.5 and 10.2 ?m) was observed in both as-grown device and those annealed at 650 °C temperature. A three-fold enhancement in peak responsivity was observed in the QDIPs annealed at 650 °C (1.19 A/W) compared to that in the as-grown (0.34 A/W). Detectivity also increased by two fold from as-grown to 650 °C annealed device. The changes are attributed to the removal of as-grown defects and dislocations during epitaxial growth. These removals changed the confinement potential profile, which resulted in an improvement in the detectivity and responsivity of the annealed sample.

  20. Generalized Emission Functions for Photon Emission from Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Suryanarayana

    2006-06-06

    The Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effects on photon emission from the quark gluon plasma have been studied as a function of photon mass, at a fixed temperature of the plasma. The integral equations for the transverse vector function (${\\bf \\tilde{f}(\\tilde{p}_\\perp)}$) and the longitudinal function ($\\tilde{g}({\\bf \\tilde{p}_\\perp})$) consisting of multiple scattering effects are solved by the self consistent iterations method and also by the variational method for the variable set \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2$\\}, considering the bremsstrahlung and the $\\bf aws$ processes. We define four new dynamical scaling variables, $x^b_T$,$x^a_T$,$x^b_L$,$x^a_L$ for bremsstrahlung and {\\bf aws} processes and analyse the transverse and longitudinal components as a function of \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2$\\}. We generalize the concept of photon emission function and we define four new emission functions for massive photon emission represented by $g^b_T$, $g^a_T$, $g^b_L$, $g^a_L$. These have been constructed using the exact numerical solutions of the integral equations. These four emission functions have been parameterized by suitable simple empirical fits. In terms of these empirical emission functions, the virtual photon emission from quark gluon plasma reduces to one dimensional integrals that involve folding over the empirical $g^{b,a}_{T,L}$ functions with appropriate quark distribution functions and the kinematic factors. Using this empirical emission functions, we calculated the imaginary part of the photon polarization tensor as a function of photon mass and energy.

  1. Dimer Structure of an Interfacially Impaired Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Pholpholipase C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao,C.; Shi, X.; Wehbi, H.; Zambonelli, C.; Head, J.; Seaton, B.; Roberts, M,.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the W47A/W242A mutant of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been solved to 1.8{angstrom} resolution. The W47A/W242A mutant is an interfacially challenged enzyme, and it has been proposed that one or both tryptophan side chains serve as membrane interfacial anchors (Feng, J., Wehbi, H., and Roberts, M. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 19867-19875). The crystal structure supports this hypothesis. Relative to the crystal structure of the closely related (97% identity) wild-type PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus, significant conformational differences occur at the membrane-binding interfacial region rather than the active site. The Trp {yields} Ala mutations not only remove the membrane-partitioning aromatic side chains but also perturb the conformations of the so-called helix B and rim loop regions, both of which are implicated in interfacial binding. The crystal structure also reveals a homodimer, the first such observation for a bacterial PI-PLC, with pseudo-2-fold symmetry. The symmetric dimer interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, contributed primarily by a central swath of aromatic residues arranged in a quasiherringbone pattern. Evidence that interfacially active wild-type PI-PLC enzymes may dimerize in the presence of phosphatidylcholine vesicles is provided by fluorescence quenching of PI-PLC mutants with pyrene-labeled cysteine residues. The combined data suggest that wild-type PI-PLC can form similar homodimers, anchored to the interface by the tryptophan and neighboring membrane-partitioning residues.

  2. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-29

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists.

  3. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-101. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, J.M.

    1997-06-24

    One major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes m support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for double-shell tank 241-AP-101. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-AP-101 waste; and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 provides the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations about safety status and additional sampling needs. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report supported the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-05. The characterization information in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. Appendix A provides historical information for tank 241-AP-101 including surveillance, information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and expected tank contents derived from a model based upon process knowledge. Appendix B summarizes recent sampling events and historical sampling information. Tank 241-AP-101 was grab sampled in November 1995, when the tank contained 2,790 kL (737 kgal) of waste. An addition1034al 1,438 kL (380 kgal) of waste was received from tank 241-AW-106 in transfers on March 1996 and January 1997. This waste was the product of the 242-A Evaporator Campaign 95-1. Characterization information for the additional 1,438 kL (380 kgal) was obtained using grab sampling data from tank 241-AW-106 and a slurry sample from the evaporator. Appendix C reports on the statistical analysis and numerical manipulation of data used in issue resolution. Appendix D contains the evaluation to establish the best basis for the inventory estimate and the statistical analysis performed for this evaluation. Appendix E is a bibliography that resulted from an in-depth literature search of all known information sources applicable to tank 241-AP-101 and its respective waste types. A majority of the reports listed in Appendix E are available in the Tank Characterization and Safety Resource Center.

  4. High-performance deep ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnO quantum dot assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaoyong; Xu, Chunxiang E-mail: jghu@yzu.edu.cn; Hu, Jingguo E-mail: jghu@yzu.edu.cn

    2014-09-14

    A high-performance ZnO quantum dots (QDs)-based ultraviolet (UV) photodetector has been successfully fabricated via the self-assembly of QDs on the Au interdigital electrode. The broadened band gap in ZnO QDs makes the device has the highly selective response for the deep UV detection. The unique QD-QD junction barriers similar to back-to-back Schottky barriers dominate the conductance of the QD network and the UV light-induced barrier-height modulation plays a crucial role in enhancing the photoresponsivity and the response speed. Typically, the as-fabricated device exhibits the fast response and recovery times of within 1 s, the deep UV selectivity of less than 340 nm, and the stable repeatability with on/off current ratio over 10³, photoresponsivity of 5.04×10²A/W, and photocurrent gain of 1.9×10³, demonstrating that the ZnO QD network is a superior building block for deep UV photodetectors.

  5. Photoresponsive properties of ultrathin silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Duy P.; Macdonald, Thomas J.; Nann, Thomas; Thierry, Benjamin E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Stockmann, Regina; Offenhäusser, Andreas E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au

    2014-12-08

    Functional silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising building blocks in the design of highly sensitive photodetectors and bio-chemical sensors. We systematically investigate the photoresponse properties of ultrathin SiNWs (20?nm) fabricated using a size-reduction method based on e-beam lithography and tetramethylammonium hydroxide wet-etching. The high-quality SiNWs were able to detect light from the UV to the visible range with excellent sensitivity (?1 pW/array), good time response, and high photoresponsivity (R???2.5?×?10{sup 4?}A/W). Improvement of the ultrathin SiNWs' photoresponse has been observed in comparison to 40?nm counter-part nanowires. These properties are attributable to the predominance surface-effect due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of ultrathin SiNWs. Long-term measurements at different temperatures in both the forward and reverse bias directions demonstrated the stability and reliability of the fabricated device. By sensitizing the fabricated SiNW arrays with cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs), hybrid QD SiNW devices displayed an improvement in photocurrent response under UV light, while preserving their performance in the visible light range. The fast, stable, and high photoresponse of these hybrid nanostructures is promising towards the development of optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  6. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  7. Tridiagonal pairs of $q$-Racah type and the $\\mu$-conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01

    Let $\\K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $\\K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  8. The Drinfel'd polynomial of a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  9. Tridiagonal pairs of $q$-Racah type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01

    Let $K$ denote an algebraically closed field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  10. How to sharpen a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01

    Let $\\F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $\\F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  11. A classification of sharp tridiagonal pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro; Terwilliger, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Let $F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  12. Sharp tridiagonal pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2007-01-01

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of $K$-linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfies the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering ${V_i}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering ${V^*_i}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  13. On the shape of a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  14. The structure of a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2008-01-01

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_i + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_i + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv)there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  15. Tridiagonal pairs and the $\\mu$-conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01

    Let $F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  16. Towards a classification of the tridiagonal pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2008-01-01

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. Let $End(V)$ denote the $K$-algebra consisting of all $K$-linear transformations from $V$ to $V$. We consider a pair $A,A^* \\in End(V)$ that satisfy (i)--(iv) below: (i) Each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable. (ii) There exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$. (iii) There exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$. (iv) There is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  17. Low dark current and high speed ZnO metal–semiconductor–metal photodetector on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Çal??kan, Deniz; Bütün, Bayram; Çak?r, M. Cihan; Özcan, ?adan; Özbay, Ekmel

    2014-10-20

    ZnO thin films are deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} on Si substrates. Pt/Au contacts are fabricated by standard photolithography and lift-off in order to form a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector. The dark current of the photodetector is measured as 1?pA at 100?V bias, corresponding to 100?pA/cm{sup 2} current density. Spectral photoresponse measurement showed the usual spectral behavior and 0.35?A/W responsivity at a 100?V bias. The rise and fall times for the photocurrent are measured as 22 ps and 8?ns, respectively, which are the lowest values to date. Scanning electron microscope image shows high aspect ratio and dense grains indicating high surface area. Low dark current density and high speed response are attributed to high number of recombination centers due to film morphology, deducing from photoluminescence measurements. These results show that as deposited ZnO thin film MSM photodetectors can be used for the applications needed for low light level detection and fast operation.

  18. High-responsivity vertical-illumination Si/Ge uni-traveling-carrier photodiodes based on silicon-on-insulator substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chong; Liu, Zhi; Cong, Hui; Cheng, Buwen; Guo, Xia; Liu, Wuming

    2015-01-01

    Si/Ge uni-traveling carrier photodiodes exhibit higher output current when space-charge effects are overcome and thermal effects are suppressed, which is highly beneficial for increasing the dynamic range of various microwave photonic systems and simplifying high-bit-rate digital receivers in different applications. From the point of view of packaging, detectors with vertical-illumination configuration can be easily handled by pick-and-place tools and are a popular choice for making photo-receiver modules. However, vertical-illumination Si/Ge uni-traveling carrier (UTC) devices suffer from inter-constraint between high speed and high responsivity. Here, we report a high responsivity vertical-illumination Si/Ge UTC photodiode based on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. The maximum absorption efficiency of the devices was 2.4 times greater than the silicon substrate owing to constructive interference. The Si/Ge UTC photodiode was successfully fabricated and had a dominant responsivity at 1550 nm of 0.18 A/W, a 5...

  19. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  20. MOSE: zooming on the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances at the surface layer at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lascaux, Franck; di Arcetri, INAF / Osservatorio Astrofisico; 10.1117/12.925934

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the MOSE project, in this contribution we present a detailed analysis of the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances and their dependency on the model and orography horizontal resolutions in proximity of the ground. The investigated sites are Cerro Paranal (site of the ESO Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the ESO European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), in Chile. At both sites, data from a rich statistical sample of different nights are available - from AWS (Automated Weather Stations) and masts - giving access to wind speed, wind direction and temperature at different levels near the ground (from 2 m to 30 m above the ground). In this study we discuss the use of a very high horizontal resolution (dX=0.1 km) numerical configuration that overcomes some specific limitations put in evidence with a standard configuration with dX=0.5 km. In both sites results are very promising. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF.

  1. Photo-modulated thin film transistor based on dynamic charge transfer within quantum-dots-InGaZnO interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang; Yang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Mingju; Tao, Zhi; Wei, Lei Li, Chi Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Baoping; Dai, Qing; Nathan, Arokia

    2014-03-17

    The temporal development of next-generation photo-induced transistor across semiconductor quantum dots and Zn-related oxide thin film is reported in this paper. Through the dynamic charge transfer in the interface between these two key components, the responsibility of photocurrent can be amplified for scales of times (?10{sup 4}?A/W 450?nm) by the electron injection from excited quantum dots to InGaZnO thin film. And this photo-transistor has a broader waveband (from ultraviolet to visible light) optical sensitivity compared with other Zn-related oxide photoelectric device. Moreover, persistent photoconductivity effect can be diminished in visible waveband which lead to a significant improvement in the device's relaxation time from visible illuminated to dark state due to the ultrafast quenching of quantum dots. With other inherent properties such as integrated circuit compatible, low off-state current and high external quantum efficiency resolution, it has a great potential in the photoelectric device application, such as photodetector, phototransistor, and sensor array.

  2. Seed production of crimson clover as affected by fertilizers, boron and honey bees 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Robert Norton

    1952-01-01

    I , gt CR5$tg C~ Ag, ~~ 88, '. SRgg ?:g, ~ ~ . ;, "'";, 'g~~, : 1 ! l k 1 1 t App. =vs+', ~& ev 4o @~2' eel eN~AA & '4c 'I 1 1' "T 'f 1, f t pgj:P;. -p. $?; . (g p"&, g. : - ~y. g, ~ ~i t?, rgb, Bi, F, ' ~!U&'g~D'?9PXC~'i A!9... g~ es a ~a~~ and heQC~@. ere p, fm:c~qg ye~@~:@B. ee@1 . (::&9. - %4M '%~ ~ C~~W QM8 'Wt8 8. 54~'C4. "L f ~ttAS ~~'LL'J C6544a~~. @B , ~ W9, ~. t4. ~, 5A 9p4KL X~. 'tk~t $3% ~l&% ~w-~~~. a@/ ~" ':i"" " fop~) ~~ 'g~ g" ~~ . . +%4'~'44i@AW 4~68. 2...

  3. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  4. Titanium-dioxide nanotube p-n homojunction diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alivov, Yahya E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu; Ding, Yuchen; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu

    2014-12-29

    Application of semiconductors in functional optoelectronic devices requires precise control over their doping and formation of junction between p- and n-doped semiconductors. While doped thin films have led to several semiconductor devices, need for high-surface area nanostructured devices for photovoltaic, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic applications has been hindered by lack of desired doping in nanostructures. Here, we show titanium-dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes doped with nitrogen (N) and niobium (Nb) as acceptors and donors, respectively, and formation of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes p-n homojunction. This TiO{sub 2}:N/TiO{sub 2}:Nb homojunction showed distinct diode-like behaviour with rectification ratio of 1115 at ±5?V and exhibited good photoresponse for ultraviolet light (??=?365?nm) with sensitivity of 0.19?A/W at reverse bias of ?5?V. These results can have important implications for development of nanostructured metal-oxide solar-cells, photodiodes, LED's, photocatalysts, and photoelectrochemical devices.

  5. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  6. TREKisM Issue 52 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1987-01-01

    PIs+no s911 +R4M wI4 6UIM04S '(9:J.11uewnH 0+ snouoslod) 9J94dsow+e le9J ,s04+08 0+ ~JI~ s+JodsueJ+ 9H 'v '4::>e9sMolq + Ol JO:J.+IP9J::>IIn.:l 'O~ Aq SUIM ~JI~ 'AI+::>ex99UIWJ9+9P 0+ PJe4 s,+1 46n04+le '4::>e9Zl p9+uno::>9A,1 .£ (tSJ94+0 AUR) IJI6 9...UI++n::>Aq) ;,'+eoJ4+ Aw +n::>JO ew 9~04::>J94+1311 :eAe4 0+ 9~11 IIe p,9M 9JnS W,I 9UO -- 9::>104::>e ue4~ SJ9:J.:J.OAo~::>W 'L Z1 ·s~el pauJnds 'pa+JafaJ 'Jood pue 60ol~ BJe peBp BJe BJnS A++BJd BJ,BM SBUO AluO B41 'OZ '4JeB Z '(u06UII~) seJ~ pue...

  7. Dunkl shift operators and Bannai-Ito polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    We consider the most general Dunkl shift operator $L$ with the following properties: (i) $L$ is of first order in the shift operator and involves reflections; (ii) $L$ preserves the space of polynomials of a given degree; (iii) $L$ is potentially self-adjoint. We show that under these conditions, the operator $L$ has eigenfunctions which coincide with the Bannai-Ito polynomials. We construct a polynomial basis which is lower-triangular and two-diagonal with respect to the action of the operator $L$. This allows to express the BI polynomials explicitly. We also present an anti-commutator AW(3) algebra corresponding to this operator. From the representations of this algebra, we derive the structure and recurrence relations of the BI polynomials. We introduce new orthogonal polynomials - referred to as the complementary BI polynomials - as an alternative $q \\to -1$ limit of the Askey-Wilson polynomials. These complementary BI polynomials lead to a new explicit expression for the BI polynomials in terms of the or...

  8. The Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey II: Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies - Strong Luminosity Dependent Bias at z=4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, P D; Dalton, G; MacDonald, E; Blake, C; Clewley, L; Heymans, C; Wegner, G; Allen, Paul D.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Dalton, Gavin; Donald, Emily Mac; Blake, Chris; Clewley, Lee; Heymans, Catherine; Wegner, Gary

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of the clustering properties of bright ($L>L_{*}$) z$\\sim$4 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey (ODT). We describe techniques used to select and evaluate our candidates and calculate the angular correlation function which we find best fitted by a power law, $\\omega(\\theta)=A_{w}\\theta^{-\\beta}$ with $A_{w}=15.4$ (with $\\theta$ in arcseconds), using a constrained slope of $\\beta=0.8$. Using a redshift distribution consistent with photometric models, we deproject this correlation function and find a comoving $r_{0}=11.4_{-1.9}^{+1.7}$ h$_{100}^{-1}$ Mpc in a $\\Omega_m=0.3$ flat $\\Lambda$ cosmology for $i_{AB}\\leq24.5$. This corresponds to a linear bias value of $b=8.1_{-2.6}^{+2.0}$ (assuming $\\sigma_{8}=0.9$). These data show a significantly larger $r_{0}$ and $b$ than previous studies at $z\\sim4$. We interpret this as evidence that the brightest LBGs have a larger bias than fainter ones, indicating a strong luminosity dependence for the m...

  9. Iraq challenges sanctions, offers 4.5 million b/d developable capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, T.R. [Stauffer (Thomas R.), Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-04-10

    The prospective oil deals of the century were unveiled last month in Baghdad at the unlikely venue of the first international oil conference in Iraq in decades. In a dramatic twist Iraq detailed 33 oil fields that are now open for joint development with foreign partners. The productive capacity of the listed fields totals some 4.5 million b/d, and the underlying proved reserves exceed 50 billion bbl--equal to more than US and Canadian reserves combined. Reversing its prior compulsive secretiveness concerning oil affairs, the government cleared at the highest level the proposal to publicize the available resources and to offer corroborative detail. ``Four and a half million b/d is an awful lot of oil,`` noted one foreign oilman who was loath to be quoted because his company feared possible reprisals in the US. The economic bait was both clear and enticing. Iraq chose the public forum to signal to the world the gains that could accrue to the first countries that break with the US over continuing the sanctions. The paper discusses the political impacts, the substantial offerings, exploitation costs, and bypassing sanctions.

  10. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dimitri; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cut-off at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photorespo...

  11. Appendix I1-2 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Zack; Deborah Hanley; Dora Nakafuji

    2012-07-15

    This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to dev elop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET field campaign deployment experiences and challenges. As part of the WindNET project on the Big Island of Hawaii, AWS Truepower (AWST) conducted a field campaign to assess the viability of deploying a network of monitoring systems to aid in local wind energy forecasting. The data provided at these monitoring locations, which were strategically placed around the Big Island of Hawaii based upon results from the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) observational targeting study (Figure 1), provided predictive indicators for improving wind forecasts and developing responsive strategies for managing real-time, wind-related system events. The goal of the field campaign was to make measurements from a network of remote monitoring devices to improve 1- to 3-hour look ahead forecasts for wind facilities.

  12. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  13. Ammonia concentration modeling based on retained gas sampler data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrones, G.; Palmer, B.J.; Cuta, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    The vertical ammonia concentration distributions determined by the retained gas sampler (RGS) apparatus were modeled for double-shell tanks (DSTs) AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 and single-shell tanks (SSTs) A-101, S-106, and U-103. One the vertical transport of ammonia in the tanks were used for the modeling. Transport in the non-convective settled solids and floating solids layers is assumed to occur primarily via some type of diffusion process, while transport in the convective liquid layers is incorporated into the model via mass transfer coefficients based on empirical correlations. Mass transfer between the top of the waste and the tank headspace and the effects of ventilation of the headspace are also included in the models. The resulting models contain a large number of parameters, but many of them can be determined from known properties of the waste configuration or can be estimated within reasonable bounds from data on the waste samples themselves. The models are used to extract effective diffusion coefficients for transport in the nonconvective layers based on the measured values of ammonia from the RGS apparatus. The modeling indicates that the higher concentrations of ammonia seen in bubbles trapped inside the waste relative to the ammonia concentrations in the tank headspace can be explained by a combination of slow transport of ammonia via diffusion in the nonconvective layers and ventilation of the tank headspace by either passive or active means. Slow transport by diffusion causes a higher concentration of ammonia to build up deep within the waste until the concentration gradients between the interior and top of the waste are sufficient to allow ammonia to escape at the same rate at which it is being generated in the waste.

  14. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations. The Southern Study Area, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Manobianco, John; Schroeder, John; Ancell, Brian; Brewster, Keith; Basu, Sukanta; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Flores, Isabel

    2014-04-30

    This Final Report presents a comprehensive description, findings, and conclusions for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) -- Southern Study Area (SSA) work led by AWS Truepower (AWST). This multi-year effort, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), focused on improving short-term (15-minute - 6 hour) wind power production forecasts through the deployment of an enhanced observation network of surface and remote sensing instrumentation and the use of a state-of-the-art forecast modeling system. Key findings from the SSA modeling and forecast effort include: 1. The AWST WFIP modeling system produced an overall 10 - 20% improvement in wind power production forecasts over the existing Baseline system, especially during the first three forecast hours; 2. Improvements in ramp forecast skill, particularly for larger up and down ramps; 3. The AWST WFIP data denial experiments showed mixed results in the forecasts incorporating the experimental network instrumentation; however, ramp forecasts showed significant benefit from the additional observations, indicating that the enhanced observations were key to the model systems’ ability to capture phenomena responsible for producing large short-term excursions in power production; 4. The OU CAPS ARPS simulations showed that the additional WFIP instrument data had a small impact on their 3-km forecasts that lasted for the first 5-6 hours, and increasing the vertical model resolution in the boundary layer had a greater impact, also in the first 5 hours; and 5. The TTU simulations were inconclusive as to which assimilation scheme (3DVAR versus EnKF) provided better forecasts, and the additional observations resulted in some improvement to the forecasts in the first 1 - 3 hours.

  15. The relationship between constraint and ductile fracture initiation as defined by micromechanical analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panontin, T.L.; Sheppard, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this study is to provide a proven methodology to allow the transfer of ductile fracture initiation properties measured in standard laboratory specimens to large, complex, flawed structures. A significant part of this work involved specifically addressing the effects of constrain on transferability under large scale yielding conditions. The approach taken was to quantify constrain effects through micromechanical fracture models coupled with finite element generated crack tip stress-strain fields to identify the local condition corresponding to fracture initiation. Detailed finite element models predicted the influence of specimen geometry, loading mode, and material flow properties on the crack tip fields. The ability of two local, ductile fracture models (the Rice and Tracey void growth model (VGM) and the stress-modified, critical strain (SMCS) criterion of Mackenzie et al. and Hancock and Cowling) to predict fracture initiation were investigated. Predictions were made using experimentally verified, two- and three-dimensional, finite strain, large deformation, finite element analyses. Two, high toughness pressure vessel steels were investigated: A516 Gr70, a ferritic, carbon-manganese mild steel demonstrating high hardening behavior, and HY-80, a martensitic, high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel possessing medium hardening ability. Experimental verification of the ductile fracture initiation predictions was performed in a variety of crack geometries possessing a range of a/w ratios from 0.15 to 0.70 and experiencing a range of load conditions from three point bending to nearly pure tension. The predicted constrain dependence of global ductile fracture parameters in the two materials is shown.

  16. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  17. Determination of Dark Energy and Dark Matter from the values of Redshift for the present time, Planck and Trans-Planck epochs of the Big-Bang model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asger G. Gasanalizade; Ramin A. Hasanalizade

    2015-02-20

    As an alternative to the Standard cosmology model we have developed a new modified Freundlich's (quantum relativity) redshift (MFRS) mechanisms, which provide a precise solutions of the Dark Energy and Dark Matter problems. We apply the joint solution of three MFRS equations for concordances quantize bounce Planck hierarchy steps. Simultaneous scaling solutions of MFRS equations in logarithmic scale appropriate to three cosmological epoch's, yields a currently testable predictions regarding the Dark Matter {\\Omega}_{DM} = 0.25, and Dark Energy {\\Omega}_{DE} = 0.75. These predictions coincides with the recent observational data from WMAP and other a key supernovae SNe Ia findings. Thus, the presence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy had already been not only detected observationally, but also confirmed theoretically with the very compelling accuracy. From the WMAP7 and our predicted ages we find a value of the Hubble constant H_0 = 65.6 km * s^{-1} Mpc^{-1} which is excellent agreement with the Planck 2013 results XVI. Compared with the "holographic scenario" results, we find an important coincidence between our new and "holographic" parameters. We discuss the connection hierarchy between the multiverse masses and examine the status of the cosmic acceleration. The product of the age of the Universe into the cosmic acceleration in each cosmological epochs --including present day are constant and precisely corresponds to an possible observable-geophysical parameter g_U = 9.50005264_{265} (exact) * (m/s^2). For the derived by WMAP7 age of the Universe t_{W7} = 13.75(13) * 10^9 yr, we find the relevant acceleration a_{W7} = 6.91(65) * 10^{-10} m/s^2. The predicted value of t_0 = 9.0264_9(51) * 10^2 Gyr is consistent with the background acceleration. a_0 = 1.05246_4(61) * 10^{-11} m/s^2.

  18. The Phoenix Deep Survey: the clustering and the environment of Extremely Red Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Georgakakis; J. Afonso; A. M. Hopkins; M. Sullivan; B. Mobasher; L. E. Cram

    2004-11-22

    In this paper we explore the clustering properties and the environment of the Extremely Red Objects (EROs; I-K>4mag) detected in a ~180arcmin^2 deep (Ks~20mag) Ks-band survey of a region within the Phoenix Deep Survey, an on-going multiwavelength program aiming to investigate the nature and the evolution of faint radio sources. Using our complete sample of 289 EROs brighter than Ks=20mag we estimate a statistically significant (~3.7sigma) angular correlation function signal with amplitude Aw=8.7^{+2.1}_{-1.7}x10^{-3} consistent with earlier work based on smaller samples. This amplitude suggests a clustering length in the range ro=12-17h^{-1}Mpc, implying that EROs trace regions of enhanced density. Using a novel method we further explore the association of EROs with galaxy overdensities by smoothing the K-band galaxy distribution using the matched filter algorithm of Postman et al. (1996) and then cross-correlating the resulting density maps with the ERO positions. Our analysis provides direct evidence that EROs are associated with overdensities at redshifts z>1. We also exploit the deep radio 1.4GHz data (limiting flux 60microJy) available to explore the association of EROs and faint radio sources and whether the two populations trace similar large scale structures. Cross-correlation of the two samples (after excluding 17EROs with radio counterparts) gives a 2sigma signal only for the sub-sample of high-z radio sources (z>0.6). Although the statistics are poor this suggests that it is the high-z radio sub-sample that traces similar structures with EROs.

  19. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fangwei Fu

    2006-08-09

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the transient eddy currents in a conductive plate. The crack response is found using the reciprocity theorem. Good agreement is observed between the predictions of the magnetic field due to the crack and experimental measurements.

  20. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.