Sample records for aws truewind aws

  1. AWS Truewind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S.ratios inAS 42.05,

  2. AWS Truewind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40 -Solar GmbHASPAVGAWTruewind

  3. aws truewind llc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    could increaseSeneca Creek Associates, LLC Wood Resources International, LLC "Illegal" Logging and Global Wood Markets: The Competitive Impacts on the U.S. Wood Products...

  4. AW-101 entrained solids - Solubility versus temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GJ Lumetta; RC Lettau; GF Piepel

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids entrained in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. BNFL requested Battelle to dilute the AW-1-1 sample using de-ionized water to mimic expected plant operating conditions. BNFL further requested Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids present in the diluted AW-101 sample versus temperature conditions of 30, 40, and 50 C. BNFL requested these tests to assess the composition of the LAW supernatant and solids versus expected plant-operating conditions. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-7, Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of LAW Entrained Solids. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan.

  5. American Way Solar AWS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmerenSamoa: EnergyAWS Jump to:

  6. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  7. aws technical activities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A.W. Roscoe June 22, 2004 Abstract A long-standing complaint about the theory of CSP has been that all theories which encompass divergence are divergence-strict, meaning...

  8. On the expressiveness of CSP A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    On the expressiveness of CSP A.W. Roscoe February 16, 2011 Abstract We define "CSP express every operator of Hoare's CSP. Furthermore we show that every op- erator with CSP-like operational semantics can be simulated in CSP with the addition of an exception-throwing operator P A Q in which any

  9. CSP is expressive enough for A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    CSP is expressive enough for A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Computing Laboratory {Bill.Roscoe@comlab.ox.ac.uk} Abstract. Recent results show that Hoare's CSP, augmented by one additional operator, can express every operator whose operational semantics are expressible in a new notation and are therefore "CSP

  10. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  11. Acceptance test report, 241-AW air inlet filter station pressure decay test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuck, J.A.

    1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the acceptance test report for pressure decay tests performed on newly-installed 241-AW Tank Farm primary ventilation system air inlet filter stations.

  12. Charged Higgs Search via $AW^\\pm/HW^\\pm$ Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baradhwaj Coleppa; Felix Kling; Shufang Su

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on models with a low energy spectrum containing a pair of charged scalars $H^\\pm$, as well as a light scalar H and/or a pseudoscalar A. We study the $H^\\pm tb$ associated production with $H^\\pm \\to AW/HW$, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. With detailed collider analysis, we obtain the exclusion bounds as well as discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC for the process $pp \\to H^\\pm tb \\to AWtb/HWtb \\to \\tau\\tau bbWW, bbbbWW$. We find that for a daughter particle mass of 50 GeV, the 95% C.L. exclusion reach in $\\sigma$xBR varies from about 70 fb to 25 fb, for $m_{H^\\pm}$ ranging from 150 GeV to 500 GeV with 300 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity in the $\\tau\\tau$ mode. We further interpret these bounds in the context of Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model. We find that large regions of parameter space in $\\tan\\beta$ versus $\\sin(\\beta-\\alpha)$ can be covered when the daughter Higgs mass is relatively light, in particular, for small and large $\\tan\\beta$. The exclusion region in the $m_{H^\\pm}-\\tan\\beta$ plane can be extended to $m_{H^\\pm}=$ 600 GeV, while discovery is possible for $m_{H^\\pm}\\lesssim$ 280 GeV with 300 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity. The exotic decay mode $H^\\pm \\to AW/HW$ offers a complementary channel to the conventional mode $H^\\pm \\to \\tau\

  13. LEGUS Discovery of a Light Echo Around Supernova 2012aw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Anderson, Jay; Andrews, Jennifer E; Calzetti, Daniela; Bright, Stacey N; Ubeda, Leonardo; Smith, Linda J; Sabbi, Elena; Grebel, Eva K; Herrero, Artemio; de Mink, Selma E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have discovered a luminous light echo around the normal Type II-Plateau Supernova (SN) 2012aw in Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351), detected in images obtained approximately two years after explosion with the Wide Field Channel 3 on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS). The multi-band observations span from the near-ultraviolet through the optical (F275W, F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W). The apparent brightness of the echo at the time was ~21--22 mag in all of these bands. The echo appears circular, although less obviously as a ring, with an inhomogeneous surface brightness, in particular, a prominent enhanced brightness to the southeast. The SN itself was still detectable, particularly in the redder bands. We are able to model the light echo as the time-integrated SN light scattered off of diffuse interstellar dust in the SN environment. We have assumed that this dust is analogous to that in the Milky Way with R_V=3.1. The SN light curves that we consider ...

  14. Electron cooling in a young radio supernova: SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Chakraborti, Sayan [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stockdale, Christopher [Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Chandra, Poonam [National Center for Radio Astronomy-TIFR, Pune 411007 (India); Smith, Randall [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Roy, Rupak; Bose, Subhash [Aryabhhata Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Nainital 263129 (India); Dwarkadas, Vikram [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sutaria, Firoza [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Pooley, David, E-mail: nyadav@tifr.res.in, E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of 10 Mpc. The spectral index values calculated using C, X, and K bands are smaller than the expected values for the optically thin regime. During this time, the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral-index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between the Compton cooling timescale and the synchrotron cooling timescale, we find that the inverse Compton cooling process dominates over the synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling timescale, t {sub cool}, and the acceleration timescale, t-tilde {sub acc}. We constrain the mass-loss rate in the wind ( M-dot ?1.9×10{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field ( ?-tilde =?{sub e}/?{sub B}?1.12×10{sup 2}) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about two days, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.

  15. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Frye, G.C.; Schneider, T.W.

    1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO{sub 2}. In another embodiment, the SiO{sub 2} is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system. 8 figs.

  16. Internalising agents in CSP protocol models P.J. Broadfoot and A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    . . An essential part of our CSP models is knowing what a given agent believes about the progress of its protocolInternalising agents in CSP protocol models P.J. Broadfoot and A.W. Roscoe Oxford University of cryptographic protocols using CSP [11] and FDR [5], often via extensions to Casper [6]. Since FDR can only check

  17. Generating short-output digest functions L.H. Nguyen and A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeavons, Peter

    Generating short-output digest functions L.H. Nguyen and A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Computing and secure digest functions". This paper has also been submitted to AFRICACRYPT 2010 in January 2010 digest which has similarities to -balanced and almost universal hash func- tions. Digest functions

  18. Solar Energy Research at the Australian National University A.W. Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the cost. Some groups and companies are developing non-silicon solar cells based on materialsSolar Energy Research at the Australian National University A.W. Blakers Centre for Sustainable in the areas of photovoltaics and solar thermal energy. 1. INTRODUCTION The Centre for Sustainable Energy

  19. The expressiveness of CSP extended by priority A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    The expressiveness of CSP extended by priority (draft) A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Department of Computer Science October 17, 2014 Abstract In previous work [27, 26] the author defined a notion of CSP with such an operational semantics can be translated into CSP and therefore has a semantics in every model of CSP

  20. Revivals, stuckness and the hierarchy of CSP models A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    Revivals, stuckness and the hierarchy of CSP models A.W. Roscoe December 9, 2007 Abstract We give details of a new model for CSP introduced in response to work by Fournet et al [8]. This is the stable revivals model R alluded to in [22]. We provide the full semantics for CSP in this model, indicate why

  1. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  2. The disappearance of the progenitor of SN 2012aw in late-time imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new late-time near-infrared imaging of the site of the nearby core-collapse supernova SN 2012aw, confirming the disappearance of the point source identified by Fraser et al. (2012) and Van Dyk et al. (2012) as a candidate progenitor in both J and Ks filters. We re-measure the progenitor photometry, and find that both the J and Ks magnitudes of the source are consistent with those quoted in the literature. We also recover a marginal detection of the progenitor in H-band, for which we measure H=19.67+/-0.40 mag. SN 2012aw appears to have resulted from the explosion of a 12.5+/-1.5 Msun red supergiant.

  3. Photometry of the dwarf nova AW Sagittae during the 2006 November superoutburst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Shears; Roger Pickard; Tom Krajci; Gary Poyner

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2006 November an outburst of the dwarf nova AW Sge was observed using CCD photometry. This revealed 0.25 magnitude superhumps confirming it to be a superoutburst, possibly only the second confirmed such outburst of this star. The superhumps were observed for 4 days and had a stable period Psh = 0.0745(2)d, a value which is consistent with Psh measured during the 2000 superoutburst.

  4. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of a boildown study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-106 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27 °C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C.

  5. Final Report for the Erosion-Corrosion Anaysis of Tank 241-AW-02E Feed Pump Pit Jumpers B-2 and 1-4 Removed from Service in 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S.

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report summarizing the results in the examination of two pipe sections (jumpers) from the tank 241-AW-02E feed pump pit in the 241-AW tank farm. These pipe section samples consisted of jumper AW02E-WT-J-[B – 2] and jumper AW02E-WT-J-[1 – 4]. For the remainder of this report, these jumpers will be referred to as B – 2 and 1 – 4.

  6. MODELLING OF THE PERC STRUCTURE WITH STRIPE AND DOT BACK K.R. Catchpole and A.W. Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELLING OF THE PERC STRUCTURE WITH STRIPE AND DOT BACK CONTACTS K.R. Catchpole and A.W. Blakers Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering Department, FEIT, The Australian National University commercial cell designs with only a small increase in process complexity. Optimisation of the PERC structure

  7. Shifting the Focus of Survivability: Back to the Basics \\Lambda A.W. Krings, W.S. Harrison M. McQueen, S. Matthews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Shifting the Focus of Survivability: Back to the Basics \\Lambda A.W. Krings, W.S. Harrison M. Mc possible level and incorporate the basic survivability model described in [8]. #12; 2 Motivation

  8. On the Paths of the Soul: Stanis?aw Przybyszewski and the Russian Stage. The Cases of Vera Komissarzhevskaia and Vsevolod Meierkhol'd (1900-1910)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael Duane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation inquires into the impact of the controversial Polish dramatist, essayist, and novelist Stanis?aw Przybyszewski on the theatrical innovations of two great Russian actor-directors of the early 20th century, ...

  9. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Pignata, G.; Bufano, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Bayless, A. J. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Science, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Pritchard, T. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Elias-Rosa, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Campus UAB, Torre C5, Za plata, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Haislip, J. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Harutyunyan, A. [Fundación Galileo Galilei - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja, TF - Spain (Spain); and others

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ? 20 M {sub ?}, progenitor radius R ? 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (?430 R {sub ?}), explosion energy E ? 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ?0.06 M {sub ?}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ?} of the Type IIP events.

  10. THE RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR OF SUPERNOVA 2012aw (PTF12bvh) IN MESSIER 95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mailcode 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V., E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: cenko@berkeley.edu, E-mail: afilippenko@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); and others

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the direct detection and characterization of the probable red supergiant (RSG) progenitor of the intermediate-luminosity Type II-Plateau (II-P) supernova (SN) 2012aw in the nearby (10.0 Mpc) spiral galaxy Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351). We have identified the star in both Hubble Space Telescope images of the host galaxy, obtained 17-18 yr prior to the explosion, and near-infrared ground-based images, obtained 6-12 yr prior to the SN. The luminous supergiant showed evidence for substantial circumstellar dust, manifested as excess line-of-sight extinction. The effective total-to-selective ratio of extinction to the star was R'{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 4.35, which is significantly different from that of diffuse interstellar dust (i.e., R{sub V} = 3.1), and the total extinction to the star was therefore, on average, A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 3.1 mag. We find that the observed spectral energy distribution for the progenitor star is consistent with an effective temperature of 3600 K (spectral type M3), and that the star therefore had a bolometric magnitude of -8.29. Through comparison with recent theoretical massive-star evolutionary tracks we can infer that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass 15 {approx}< M{sub ini}(M{sub Sun }) < 20. Interpolating by eye between the available tracks, we surmise that the star had initial mass {approx}17-18 M{sub Sun }. The circumstellar dust around the progenitor must have been destroyed in the explosion, as the visual extinction to the SN is found to be low (A{sub V} = 0.24 mag with R{sub V} = 3.1).

  11. L AW R E N C E N A T I O N A L LABORATORY LIVERMORE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015JustKateKent5 B KristinAnalysisv/---=AW

  12. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of a boil down study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-I06 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27°C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C. The boiling temperature of the composite was measured at three different pressures (40, 60, and 80 Torr) throughout the volume reduction, and the results show steadily increasing boiling temperatures with increasing volume reduction and no significant discontinuities. Moderate foaming was observed at the onset of the boildown. The foaming disappeared during the first reduction step, and minimal foaming was observed throughout the rest of the study. The bulk densities at 18.0 °C (D{sub Bulk}{sup 18 °C}) and quantities of settled and centrifuged solids were measured on samples of the boildown concentrates. Estimated values of the bulk densities at the 60-Torr boiling temperatures (D{sub Bulk}{sup 60 Torr}) were also calculated. Solids were first observed at boildown temperatures when the % VWR reached 39.3%. The quantity of solids in the composite quickly increased after this initial formation; the amount of centrifuged solids increased by 22% as the %WVR increased from 39.3 to 44.1 %. A small amount of solids did appear in the samples collected prior to the initial formation during the boildown. These solids precipitated while they sat at hot cell ambient temperature and in the 18. 0 °C water bath. Analysis of boil down test samples indicated that natrophosphate (Na7{sub 3}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{centerdot} 19 H{sub 2}O) and kogarkoite (Na3FS04) accounted for a majority of the initial solids (~80% of the dissolved sulfate and phosphate precipitated from the composite by 44.1 % WVR). The large increase in solids at 44.1 % WVR was dominated by sodium nitrate and sodium carbonate.

  13. Thomas, J.R. and Clem, A.W, 1991, PWR moderator temperature coefficient via noise analysis: time series methods, Proceedings of SMORNVI, Gatlinburg, 34.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    and Testing Symposium, Knoxville, Tennes­ see 52.01 Uhrig, R.E., 1990, Use of artificial intelligence/Computer Interactions: Nuclear and Beyond, Nash­ ville, Tennessee, 210 Uhrig R.E., 1991, Potential application of neural­ 36 ­ Thomas, J.R. and Clem, A.W, 1991, PWR moderator temperature coefficient via noise analysis

  14. Please Do Not Cite Hefer, A.W., D.N. Little, and B.E. Herbert. 2005. Bitumen Surface Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Please Do Not Cite Hefer, A.W., D.N. Little, and B.E. Herbert. 2005. Bitumen Surface Energy. Herbert,3 Bitumen Surface Energy Characterization by Inverse Gas Chromatography ABSTRACT : Modern surface bitumen-aggregate combinations. In addition, this approach offers the potential to quantitatively assess

  15. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  16. PBi3aws

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ c3ppY-.I ' Y{OoEr'P-2' '

  17. Disruption Characterization and Database Activities for ITER J.C. Wesley 1), A.W. Hyatt 1), E.J. Strait 1), D.P. Schissel 1), S.M. Flanagan 1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 IT/P1-21 Disruption Characterization and Database Activities for ITER J.C. Wesley 1), A.W. Hyatt, New Jersey, USA 5) Plasma Science Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts, USA 6) Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Naka, Ibaraki

  18. AW Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40 -Solar GmbHASPAVGAW Energy

  19. Austrian Wirtschaftsservice (AWS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformationGuideInformation

  20. AWS Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki HomeASN Power Projects Ltd Jump

  1. Small Ramsey Numbers Stanisl/aw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    , March 25 ElJC revision #3 1997, July 11 ElJC revision #4 1998, July 9 ElJC revision #5 1999, July 5 El of Technology Rochester, NY 14623, spr@cs.rit.edu http://www.cs.rit.edu/~spr Submitted: June 11, 1994; Revision Subject Number 05C55 Revisions 1993, February preliminary version, RIT­TR­93­009 [Ra2] 1994, July 3 first

  2. DENOTAPIONAL SEMANTICS FOR OCCAN A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    of concurrency essential in such a theory, There has been a consid- erable amount of effort expended in recent. Fortunat- ely occam is close in spirit to CSP [6 ], a language which has been one of the main veh- icles, originally developed as a model for a purely parallel version of CSP. It was introduced in [4], and developed

  3. aw-6061 particle reinforced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: strength between a geomembrane and a reinforced geosynthetic clay liner (GeL), and the internal shear reinforcing fiber pull-out andor tearing; and,...

  4. AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40 -Solar GmbHASPAVGAW

  5. MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLowM2E Power

  6. MHK Projects/AWS II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLowM2E

  7. Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgoura Hills, California:AgriFuel Company

  8. Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLUTIONS, LLC (now AWS Truewind LLC) 255 FULLER ROAD, SUITE 274 ALBANY, NEW YORK Michael Brower PrincipalII Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE

  9. Arnold Schwarzenegger California Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albany, New York Contract No. 500-03-006 Prepared For: Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) ProgramArnold Schwarzenegger Governor California Wind Energy Resource Modeling and Measurement Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: AWS Truewind

  10. Melinda Marquis Oct. 21, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melinda Marquis NOAA/ESRL Oct. 21, 2010 Solar farm photo courtesy of Will von Dauster of NOAA/ESRL. Wind farm photo courtesy of AWS TrueWind. #12;How did you spend your summer vacation? 2 #12;Key Message Solar Power Tower. Photo courtesy of DOE NREL. 5 #12;Weather Research and Services Improved forecasts

  11. actual hanford 241-aw-101: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 85 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  12. Strong and uniform equivalence of nonmonotonic theories ---an algebraic Mirosl/aw Truszczy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    Strong and uniform equivalence of nonmonotonic theories --- an algebraic approach # Mirosl mirekcs.uky.edu Abstract We show that the concepts of strong and uniform equivalence of logic programs can characterizations of strong and uniform equivalence for sev­ eral nonmonotonic logics including logic programming

  13. SAfety, heAlth And environMentAl AwAreneSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    OSH F180--Introduction to Industrial Hygiene.................................4 OSH F201--Workplace for Certificate: 37 credits This program develops entry-level skills in industrial safety, health-on experience necessary for students to obtain work in a variety of safety-related industrial fields. Students

  14. [AW] and L. Wang, Mathematical existence of crystal growth with Gibbs Thomson curvature effects, in preparation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jean

    , in preparation. [ATW1] F. J. Almgren, J. E. Taylor, and L. Wang, A variational approach to motion by weighted. Soc. (1992), 9­12. [ATW2] F. J. Almgren, J. E. Taylor, and L. Wang, Curvature Driven Flows

  15. HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? . -. .- *'TH Ii ' HA'

  16. Metric spaces as models for real-time concurrency G.M. Reed and A.W. Roscoe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    Pro- cesses) We shall essentially extend the abstract syntax for untimed CSP from [BHR,BR] (with for real time concurrent systems, based on the fail- ures model for CSP. The fixed point theory is based. We have chosen to base our work on (extensions of) the theoretical version of CSP and to try

  17. Laser ion source for Columbia Universitys microbeam A.W. Bigelow a,*, G. Randers-Pehrson a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Engineering (HVE) Singletron particle accelerator that will replace the Van de Graaff particle acceler- ator Research Accelerator Facility (RAR- AF) is a focused ion microbeam dedicated for single-particle single Graaff particle accelerator equipped with a duoplasmatron ion source. With the interest to increase

  18. A new bound for l-wise almost universal hash functions L.H. Nguyen and A.W. Roscoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    universal family of hash functions AU with parameters (K, M, b) was introduced by Carter and Wegman [3

  19. Shedding Light on Dark Matter in Hot, Massive, and Awfully Complicated Cluster of Galaxies 1E0657-56

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradac, Marusa

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The cluster of galaxies 1E0657-56 has been the subject of intense ongoing research in the last few years. This system is remarkably well-suited to addressing outstanding issues in both cosmology and fundamental physics. It is one of the hottest and most luminous X-ray clusters known and is unique in being a major supersonic cluster merger occurring nearly in the plane of the sky, earning it the nickname 'the Bullet Cluster'. In this talk I will present our measurements of the composition of this system, show the evidence for existence of dark matter, and describe limits that can be placed on the intrinsic properties of dark matter particles. In addition, I will explain how this cluster offers a serious challenge to MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) theories.

  20. Test procedure for use of the shear vane in tanks 103-SY, 103-AN, and 103-AW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeClair, M.D.; Waters, E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a record copy of a test procedure for application of the full-scale shear vane to underground waste tanks at Hanford. The introduction of the report provides background information on the development and proof-testing of the shear vane, as well as information about its current location. The document was originally prepared in 1988, and the work as shelved temporarily for lack of funds. Activities to utilize the shear vane will be expedited by use of this information.

  1. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, NorthCommunitySouth Jump to:CXD)stAWS Truewind

  2. 80 and 100 Meter Wind Energy Resource Potential for the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Flowers, L.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate information about the wind potential in each state is required for federal and state policy initiatives that will expand the use of wind energy in the United States. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and AWS Truewind have collaborated to produce the first comprehensive new state-level assessment of wind resource potential since 1993. The estimates are based on high-resolution maps of predicted mean annual wind speeds for the contiguous 48 states developed by AWS Truewind. These maps, at spatial resolution of 200 meters and heights of 60 to 100 meters, were created with a mesoscale-microscale modeling technique and adjusted to reduce errors through a bias-correction procedure involving data from more than 1,000 measurement masts. NREL used the capacity factor maps to estimate the wind energy potential capacity in megawatts for each state by capacity factor ranges. The purpose of this presentation is to (1) inform state and federal policy makers, regulators, developers, and other stakeholders on the availability of the new wind potential information that may influence development, (2) inform the audience of how the new information was derived, and (3) educate the audience on how the information should be interpreted in developing state and federal policy initiatives.

  3. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

  4. TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip:Hills JumpTrueWind Solutions

  5. Thermal and Radiolytic Gas Generation Tests on Material from Tanks 241-U-103, 241-AW-101, 241-S-106, and 241-S-102: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Bryan, S.A.

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic flammable gas generation in actual Hanford single-shell tank wastes. The work described was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support DE&S Hanford (DESH) and Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies performed by Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company). This report describes the results of laboratory tests of gas generation from actual convective layer wastes from Tank 241-U-103 under thermal and radiolytic conditions. Accurate measurements of gas generation rates from highly radioactive tank wastes are needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the tanks. The gas generation capacity of the waste in Tank 241-U-103 is a high priority for the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for accumulating gases above the flammability limit (Johnson et al, 1997). The objective of this work was to establish the composition of gaseous degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The gas generation tests on Tank 241-U-103 samples focused first on the effect of temperature on the composition and rate of gas generation Generation rates of nitrogen, nitrous oxide, methane, and hydrogen increased with temperature, and the composition of the product gas mixture varied with temperature.

  6. In-ight annihilation during positron channeling A.W. Hunt a,b,*, D.B. Cassidy a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    , Alexandria 21544, Egypt d Norwegian Defense Research Establishment, 2027 Kjeller, Norway e Department. Ó 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The channeling phenomenon has been- amine the energy distribution of ions backscat- tered from a beam penetrating a material close

  7. !#"%$ &' ()%0213$4&%5 687 9A@CBEDGFIHQPEHQRTSVUXW Y`FbaCDGcedfHhgigp9rqtsAW HuqtP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugeaud, Yann

    . Zhang et al. gave a provably secure optimistic fair exchange protocol based on SOK-IBS [5]. In CIS05 Gu

  8. * Corresponding author. Tel.: #1-803-777-6584; fax: #1-803-777-3391. E-mail address: adecho@sph.sc.edu (A.W. Decho).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decho, Alan

    during the frequent physical stresses (e.g., changes in salinity and temperature, UV irradiation, which then act as an e$cient trophic-transfer vehicle for the entry of contaminants into food webs

  9. Bridging the Missing Link of Cloud Data Storage Security in AWS Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, SUNY -Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    . The prosperity of Cloud Computing requires the moving from server-attached storage to distributed storage. Along and discussed technical approaches towards potential effective solutions. Keywords: Cloud Computing, Data Storage, Information Security. 1. Introduction Cloud Computing has gained great attention from both

  10. A.W. Blakers, 'Solar and Wind Electricity in Australia', Australian Journal of Environmental Management, Vol 7, pp 223-236, 2000 SOLAR AND WIND ELECTRICITY IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental impact associated with the construction of what amounts to a coastal hydro scheme. Solar energy.blakers@anu.edu.au Abstract This paper examines the renewable generation of electricity in Australia from photovoltaics (PV environmental impacts even when deployed on very large scales. They are the only fully sustainable technologies

  11. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, L.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashbrook, A.W. , Process Metallurgy I , Solvent Extraction,and Applications to Process Metallurgy, Elsevier ScienceAshbrook, A.W. , Process Metallurgy 1, Solvent Extraction:

  12. AgriculturAl And resource economics Anthropology child development communicAtion community development culturAl studies ecology economics geogrAphy history humAn development internAtionAl commerciAl lAw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , and energy in both developed and less-developed countries. To address these issues, the program emphasizes in understanding and improving government policy, market performance, environmental quality, the efficiency ethnography, politics, cultures of history, identity, sexuality, film, media and visual anthropology

  13. Daily Reporting Rainfall Station DIAMANTINA & GEORGINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Constantine Lands End Stn Viola Canobie Wondoola Cowan Downs Esmeralda Trepell AP AWS Flinders R Toorak Etta

  14. Science Record 6 Keeping up with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    and an awful lot of room for future oceanographers--many of whom Wright hopes will be women. Treasure Island

  15. Bounded Nondeterminism and Alternation in Parameterized Complexity Theory Yijia Chen # Jorg Flum + Martin Grohe #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yijia

    , there is a version of each of the complexity classes for each of the six forms of reduction. 1 #12; FPT#W[1] = A[1] #W[2]#W[3]# · · · # W[SAT] # W[P] # # # # A[2] # A[3] # · · · #AW[#]#AW[SAT]#AW[P] Figur

  16. Comments on: Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program: 30 Years of Polar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Lazzara et al. (2012) presented a review of the technical and scientific progress in deployment, data collection and analysis of the Automated Weather Stations (AWS) in the Antarctic. In the subsection entitled Science Applications using AWS Observations, the authors briefly account for several scientific occurrences of meteorological data collected by AWS.

  17. Command Line Tools Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Command Line Tools Cloud Computing #12;Everybody (or nearly everybody) loves GUI. AWS Command Line of advanced features. After surviving the cloud computing class till now, Your are almost a command line guru! You need AWS command line tools, ec2-api-tools, to maximize the power of AWS cloud computing. Plugging

  18. alerta sobre um: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superfcie slida Chemistry Websites Summary: .R., "Crude Oil - Waxes, Emulsion and Asphaltenes", PennWell Books, Tulsa, 1997. Adamson, A.W., "Physical Organic Components in...

  19. Daily Reporting Rainfall Station HAUGHTON & ROSS RIVERS Manual Heavy Rainfall Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .r:/pub/maps/map10/map119_2.wor Upper Black Rv AL Keelbottom TM Upper Bluewater AL Woolshed AWS Bluewater AL/TM Mt

  20. Gcfsrlce Sotvice 3'w.t-ore-_._-------Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as a means o f driving aw3y storms. certain feudal tenures the vass;%lswere bound. t o ring the church b e l

  1. MA 220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dec 10, 2007 ... m'er aisle of every fourth row. ev. 7-7-99. 0 PM aw. ' 4. Exam. LAMBERT FIELDHQUSE EINALEXAMINATIDNQ QFATING ARRANGEMENT.

  2. Lubrication Behavior of Biolubricants and Antiwear Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biolubricants. Developing a new class of more effective anti-wear (AW) lubricant additives is of great interest from both fundamental and practical perspectives in energy...

  3. 10 Questions for a Scientist: Dr. Adam Weber of Lawrence Berkeley...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    your research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory? AW: Throughout my career at LBNL, my group has focused on thermal and water management, especially in relation to...

  4. La rcupration de l'nergie de la houle, La Revue 3EI n59, Dc embre 2009, p : 17 La rcupration de l'nergie de la houle, Partie 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    systèmes à corps mus par la houle. Ainsi, les plus récents (Pelamis, AWS, CETO, SEAREV, Wavebob...) font

  5. association st-segment elevation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: ) at an elevation of 1,100 m. Here, an additional AWS on a 10-meter tower operated seasonally through three summers flawlessly. Excellent overall...

  6. {.} t ? At\\" t t M tiN" t o t.} I \\' r \\.J 13 t T:. \\i t\\$ w:,t Aylr,k1r..:aw t y, I rrt"r r:gr:t; t:t' \\-! tt A1..i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    dati nel portale AD900; collaborazione alla cura dell'inventario dell'Archivio di Enrico Falqui per la900; collaborazione alla cura dell'inventario dell'Archivio di Enrico Falqui per la stampa. Art.2 L

  7. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical sensor (1) includes two or more pairs of interdigital electrodes (10) having different periodicities. Each pair is comprised of a first electrode (10a) and a second electrode (10b). The electrodes are patterned on a surface of a piezoelectric substrate (12). Each pair of electrodes may launch and receive various acoustic waves (AW), including a surface acoustic wave (SAW), and may also launch and receive several acoustic plate modes (APMs). The frequencies associated with each are functions of the transducer periodicity as well as the velocity of the particular AW in the chosen substrate material. An AW interaction region (13) exists between each pair of electrodes. Circuitry (20, 40) is used to launch, receive, and monitor the propagation characteristics of the AWs and may be configured in an intermittent measurement fashion or in a continuous measurement fashion. Perturbations to the AW velocity and attenuation are recorded at several frequencies and provide the sensor response.

  8. acilities QuarterlyE R N E S T O R L A N D O L AW R E N C E B E R K E L E Y N AT I O N A L L A B O R ATO RY FAC I L I T I E S D I V I S I O N N E W S L E T T E RF From the Division Director 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on page 2 BIG C SUB SCRAPPED A small but important piece of Berkeley Lab history will soon disappear from a metal door ajar and one of the heavy steel bars, meant to hold the door shut, bent at a 90-degree angle and to network with some 2600 attendees from a broad range of industries as well as from government and academia

  9. IAGScienticAssembly2013,Potsdam Comparison of seasonal hydrological loading information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    with colatitude and longitude can be expressed as: (P,P) = aw l=0 l m=0 ~Plm(cosP) · ( C lm cos(mP) + S lm sin(mP)) (1) where w is the density of water and a stands for the radius of the Earth and ~Pl,m is the normalised associated Legendre functions, and C lm = 1 4aw (Q,Q)~Plm(cosQ)cos(mQ)d S lm = 1 4aw (Q,Q)~Plm

  10. Dermoscopy of black-spot poison ivy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rader, Ryan K; Mu, Ruipu; Shi, Honglan; Stoecker, William V; Hinton, Kristen A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CT, Bean AS. Black-spot poison ivy: A rare phenomenon. J AmJG, Lucky AW. Black spot poison ivy: A report of 5 cases andis unique for black-spot poison ivy. The UFLC-MS/MS urushiol

  11. Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    southward fluxes over the Pacific Ocean were maintained in a°W 43°N) and over the Pacific Ocean (lower left corner: 126Arizona, Nevada, the Pacific Ocean, or Mexico is important

  12. Klamath Falls: High-Power Acoustic Well Stimulation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Brian

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic well stimulation (AWS) technology uses high-power sonic waves from specific frequency spectra in an attempt to stimulate production in a damaged or low-production wellbore. AWS technology is one of the most promising technologies in the oil and gas industry, but it has proven difficult for the industry to develop an effective downhole prototype. This collaboration between Klamath Falls Inc. and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) included a series of tests using high-power ultrasonic tools to stimulate oil and gas production. Phase I testing was designed and implemented to verify tool functionality, power requirements, and capacity of high-power AWS tools. The purpose of Phase II testing was to validate the production response of wells with marginal production rates to AWS stimulation and to capture and identify any changes in the downhole environment after tool deployment. This final report presents methodology and results.

  13. The Physiological Impact of Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Arranged to Excert High Melanopic Stimulation * LED Spectrum with coolwhite and blue * 12000 K with Ra80 13 WojtysiakDoEPhysiological Impact.pptx | CT RI APP LQ | AW...

  14. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AB, Elson LM. The human brain coloring book. 1st ed. New21. Toga AW, Mazziotta JC. Brain mapping : the systems. SanSR, Phelps ME. Imaging Brain Function with Positron Emission

  15. What Police Learn From Lawsuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Joanna C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an “effective early warning system about claims. ” Id. atRisk Management Early Warning Systems, 54 L AW & C ONTEMP .studying medical early warning systems with a database that

  16. Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and India Insights. Paris: IEA. 34. Wyckoff AW, Roop JM.and India Insights. Paris: IEA. 3. US Energy Inf. Adm. 2007.Organization Year of Forecast IEA (WEO) EIA (IEO) (after

  17. LES INSECTES POLLINISATEURS DE QUELQUES OMBELLIFRES D'INTRT AGRICOLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ARCHANGELICA L., CARUM CARVI L., PETROSELINUM CRISPUM A.W. HILL., APIUM GRAVEOLENS L., PIMPINELLA ANISUM L Pirnpinella ani.sum des propriétés semblables aux précédentes (POMINI, 1973), Petroselinum, Apium, Daucus et

  18. air flow due: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VI 2KSTISO ISCEfIQUF" AW' P". -l CKKU% VIX AIR... Holleman, Theo Rufus 1951-01-01 35 Overheat Instability in an Ascending Moist Air Flow as a Mechanism of Hurricane Formation...

  19. Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bainbridge, Stephen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of American Corporate Governance, 1 V A . L. & B US . R EV .Access is Harmful to Corporate Governance, 37 J. C ORP . L.Dooley, Two Models of Corporate Governance, 47 B US . L AW .

  20. Dead Hand and No Hand Pills: Precommitment Strategies in Corporate Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bainbridge, Stephen M

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decisionmaking in Corporate Governance, 55 V AND . L. R EV .Dooley, Two Models of Corporate Governance, 47 B US . L AW .resurgence of the corporate governance issues that dominated

  1. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    A.W. , “Likely Near-Term Solar-Thermal Water SplittingFundamentals of s Solar-thermal Mn 2 O 3 /MnO ThermochemicalPower-Photovaltaics or Solar Thermal Power? ” Proceedings of

  2. Street, Suite 210, Petaluma, CA 94952 | 707-769-2289 | www.awsciences.com February 4, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and asbestos. AWS will collect air samples for lead and asbestos and/or mercury in selected areas of high to hazardous materials concern: Basement ­ All Rooms 169 ­ Belfor personnel may enter with proper PPE

  3. A delayed effect of ozone fumigation on photosynthesis of Norway spruce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A delayed effect of ozone fumigation on photosynthesis of Norway spruce D. Eamus1 A.W. Davis J into the long-lastincl effects of ozone fumiga- tion upon photosynthesis of Norway spruce. Measurements were

  4. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 774776 "Leonard Pairs" in Classical Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    ]). Terwilliger showed [5, 10] that a Leonard pair X, Y satisfies a certain algebraic relations with respect to commutators. In turn, the Terwilliger relations follow from to the so-called relations of the AW

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - autonomous reactor sstar Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aw* ngaMrmkom ) SRE... -7-78 16 0 tabtes + 2 fflvstrMnas Abstract A nuclear reactor for district heating is proposed Source: Ris National Laboratory Collection:...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - athene reactor Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aw* ngaMrmkom ) SRE... -7-78 16 0 tabtes + 2 fflvstrMnas Abstract A nuclear reactor for district heating is proposed Source: Ris National Laboratory Collection:...

  7. Bill Wilcox ? The transformation and second birth of Oak Ridge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prize winner. "The year was scarred by two awful events. Oak Ridge's first (so far only) nuclear criticality accident occurred at Y-12 on June 16, 1958, that exposed eight...

  8. Use of Spatial Archetypes for Optimized Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primikiri, E.; Kokkolaras, M.; Papalambros, P. Y.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the geometri relations: Aw Af AfArArAwA AzxAh AfAfAfA yxAh =: 2 (12) The U values taken from ASHRAE are shown below. Table 4. U values for the wall and window materials Aw U Transmittance value of the wall (0.082 btu/ft 2 F*h or 0.014 W/m 2... K) Af U Transmittance value of the windows (0.49 btu/ft 2 F*h or 0.086 W/m 2 K) Therefore equation 11 can be rewritten as 026.0)49.0082.0(: 11 ??+ ArArAfAwA zxAAg (13) Furniture Requirements 1. Total floor area: For a floor...

  9. Planning for a brighter future: A review of sun protection and barriers to behavioral change in children and adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dadlani, Chicky; Orlow, Seth J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AW, Sylvester JA, et al. Summer sun exposure: knowledge,364-372. PubMed 35. Robins P. Sun sense. New York, NY. 1990children and parents about sun protection. Dermatology

  10. Participant satisfaction with appearance-based versus health-based educational videos promoting sunscreen use: a randomized controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuong, William; Armstrong, April W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Larsen ER, Armstrong AW. Videos to influence: a systematicof effectiveness of video-based education in modifyingNZ, Kim RH. Effects of video-based, online education on

  11. 1. Lagrangefunktion eines elastisch gebetteten Balkens (Winklersche Bettung) lautet: L w x t dx w x t dx w x t dx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1. Lagrangefunktion eines elastisch gebetteten Balkens (Winklersche Bettung) lautet: 2 2 0 0 0 Balkens (Winklersche Bettung) lautet: 0IV Aw EIw w + + = . A. Eine unendlich lange Schiene wird an einem

  12. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D. Fredrickson, W.W. Heidbrink, C.Z. Cheng, N.N. Gorelenkov, E. Belova, A.W. Hyatt, G.J. Kramer, J. Manickam, J.D. Fredrickson,a W.W. Heidbrink,b C.Z. Cheng,a N.N. Gorelenkov,a E. Belova,a A.W. Hyatt,c G.J. Kramer,a J

  13. Viscous flow prediction within a centrifugal impeller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlschlegel, David Hale

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) By combining equations (A-7a), (A-7b) and (A-9) in order to eliminate the pressure terms and utilizing equations (A-10a), (A-10b) and (A-10c), the following is obtained: ~baW 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 + a + b + c an an am am ae 2 2 2 2 2 + e aW + f W aW + E W a...

  14. Space Sci Rev (2008) 136: 391435 DOI 10.1007/s11214-007-9300-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    .A. Wortman · R.A. Mewaldt · A.C. Cummings · W.R. Cook · A.W. Labrador · R.A. Leske · M.E. Wiedenbeck Received+Business Media B.V. 2008 Abstract The IMPACT investigation for the STEREO Mission includes a complement of Solar.R. Cook · A.W. Labrador · R.A. Leske California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA M

  15. Final Detailed Measurement Program Plan Detailed Measurement Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by TrueWind Solutions, LLC Albany, New York for California Energy Commission Sacramento, California was developed by TrueWind Solutions, hereon referred to as TrueWind, to guide Task 4 of the Wind Energy Resource Modeling and Measurement Project, contact number 500-03-006, with the California Energy Commission

  16. Approximation Results for Parameter Estimation in Nonlinear Elastomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Hookean elastomer rod is given by aeAw tt +A 1 w +A 2 w t +D \\Lambda ~ g(Dw) = F in V \\Lambda : (1.6) If this model; `). Then equation (1.4) with the specified boundary conditions can be written in the variational form: aeAw tt +A 1 w +D \\Lambda ~ g(Dw) = F in V \\Lambda ; (1.5) where A 1 2 L(V; V \\Lambda ) is given by hA 1 '; /i V

  17. Characterization of the coherent structure in a high speed subsonic jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattanachayakul, Montri

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    number Reynolds number PUD Re 0 local hot-wire Reynolds number, P"~w U hot-wire resistance Symbol Description R reference hot-wire resistance St S aw Strouhal number, fD/U hot-wire overheat ratio, lV r %V r T R r 1 T aw adiabatic hot... the structure of the jet. Compressed air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor to a 30 cm. diameter stilling chamber by way of a storage tank, water after cooler, two water separator/filters and a pressure regulator. The water after cooler was used...

  18. Accurate Measurement of 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Human Cerebellum DNA by Oxidative Bisulfite on an Array (OxBS-Array)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Sarah F.; Beraldi, Dario; Bachman, Martin; Stewart, Sabrina K.; Beck, Stephan; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    , Whiteside C, Coleman PD, et al. (2010) Epigenetic changes in Alz- heimer’s disease: Decrements in DNAmethylation. Neurobiol Aging 31: 2025–2037. doi: 10.1016/j. neurobiolaging.2008.12.005 PMID: 19117641 15. Rudenko A, Dawlaty MM, Seo J, Cheng AW, Meng J, et... , Whiteside C, Coleman PD, et al. (2010) Epigenetic changes in Alz- heimer’s disease: Decrements in DNAmethylation. Neurobiol Aging 31: 2025–2037. doi: 10.1016/j. neurobiolaging.2008.12.005 PMID: 19117641 15. Rudenko A, Dawlaty MM, Seo J, Cheng AW, Meng J, et...

  19. Cem Kaner, Ph.D., J.D. Law Office of Cem Kaner 408-244-7000 (v)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anyway. After all, how often do contractors get sued, even ones who do awful work? Y2K service contracts are different. Y2K service contracts carry more risks. You should therefore be more careful when you sign a Y2K

  20. Requestor's Name: Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paid 1) California Electric Transmission Lines Calif. Electric Transmission Grid showing 33 to 500 k). Data Source: AWS Truepower, 2006 A. Statewide Map - California Electric Transmission Lines and Substations: B. 2-Part Map Set (Upper & Lower) - California Electric Transmission Lines and Substations: C. 3

  1. OTTE EXPORT M cies of the B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    UNC CHARLO I. Introd The Polic th th fa But over protectin could ham Export la technolog such cas foreign s work is demonstr "Researc that any must be reported agreemen scholarsh OTTE EXPORT M their r the past fe ng informatio mper U.S. e aws and regu gy and these In particu ns) exists w n export

  2. The Queen's College: The Rev'd Dr George Westhaver 4 Before Lent, 9 Feb 2014, Amos 2.6-3end Eph 4.17-end

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    , but also a time when great wealth and luxury existed alongside grinding poverty and perverted forms of the place ...3 there is not a stick of furniture, save the crazy-looking table and one broken chair with the intolerable smell. At a glance we take in the awful poverty, for literally 4 well, I have seen them 5 Perhaps

  3. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC8, supplbmentau Journal de Physique I, Volume 3,dicembre1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Telechelic Polymers (HTP) has been prepared. Prelerninary SAXS results on a,w - carboxy poly (tert. butyl acrylate patterns. A new class of model ionomers has been developed in Liege: the Halato-Telechelic Polymers. HTP and discussion All the experimentsperformed until now confirm the multi-peak structure of the new HTP's at low

  4. The Provincial Cemeteries of Naga ed-Deir: A Comprehensive Study of Tomb Models Dating from the Late Old Kingdom to the Late Middle Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenke, Karin Roberta

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institut Kairo im MnTw- Htp-Tempel und in El-TârifC.J.C. 1941. ?Growth of the Htp-di-nsw formula in the Middle11 th Dynasty tomb of MnTw-Htp/BwAw at Deir el-Bahri (pit

  5. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  6. News / Events Home > News / Events : News > Business > SGS to Showcase Its Wind Energy Servic...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    > Business > SGS to Showcase Its Wind Energy Servic... FOCUS ON MORE NEWS SGS to Conduct AWS Certified/07/10 SGS to Showcase Its Wind Energy Services at the Husum Wind Energy Trade Fair 2010 in Husum, Germany of the exhibitors at the Husum Wind Energy 2010 Trade Fair in Husum, Germany. The services offered by SGS Global

  7. August 8, 2008 -Issue 19Purdue Cooperative Extension Service http://extension.entm.purdue.edu/pestcrop/index.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    = Corn Earworm, FAW = Fall Armyworm, AW = Armyworm Bryan Overstreet, Jasper County CES, sent pictures. 19 August 8, 2008 · Page 2 Black Light Trap Catch Report - (John Obermeyer) County/Cooperator 7 in Missouri. During my field visits yesterday, some larvae were found in late-whorl corn. Actually the early

  8. OOM tutorial 1 An OOM Tutorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...an On Definition (m ,(a )a,w0) 1an a1 w0 0 Note. A formally more general, but equivalent =1 a1...an On an a1 w0 0 #12;OOM tutorial 7 Theorem An OOM defines a stochastic process

  9. One Hourly Rainfall Bulletin for Mandurah to Ludlow Bureau of Meteorology, Perth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dwellingup AWS* 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Pinjarra South AL* 0.0 0.0 0

  10. Three Hourly Rainfall Bulletin for Mandurah to Ludlow Bureau of Meteorology, Perth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .6 Saddleback Rd Bridge* 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 9.6 11 0.6 Dwellingup AWS* 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.4 20 15 0.2 Pinjarra

  11. Daily Rainfall Bulletin for Mandurah to Ludlow Bureau of Meteorology, Perth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .0 1.2 4.4 1.8 0.4 0.0 0.2 0.2 Dwellingup AWS* 0.0 1.2 15 1.8 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.2 Pinjarra Pinjarra South

  12. Modelling unbounded parallel sessions of security protocols in CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    Modelling unbounded parallel sessions of security protocols in CSP E. Kleiner and A.W. Roscoe that a simplification to earlier CSP models designed to prove protocols correct on the FDR model checker is valid of injective authentication. Essentially for historical reasons, that paper created a model with both

  13. Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD of Technology, 2Meteodyn Objectives Conclusions References [1] TopoWind software, User Manual [2] Wind Resource Assessment Handbook: Fundamentals for Conducting a Successful Wind Monitoring Program, AWS Scientific, Inc

  14. Digestive efficiency and dry-matter digestibility in Steller sea lions fed herring, pollock, squid, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digestive efficiency and dry-matter digestibility in Steller sea lions fed herring, pollock, squid, and salmon D.A.S. Rosen and A.W. Trites Abstract: Dry-matter digestibility and energy digestive efficiency-matter digestibility (DMD) and digestive efficiency (DE) were measured using the energy and manganese concentration

  15. Inside this Issue Exploring the Ocean Depths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , organizing volunteers to serve on subcommittees for social and academic events, history, marketing, finance energy radiating from this place." I concur. Dan Oliver President In Review Editor MCCS (AW, a multination exercise 9 Hunt for `Red Octobers' Aim-able undersea directional soundbeams detect sound

  16. ISO and US Standards for Thermal Cutting and Joint Preparation (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hochanadel, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The summary of this presentation is: (1) There is a lot of shared space between AWS and ISO documents; (2) Several areas use the same specifications and standards, especially true in process materials; and (3) Equipment is one area with very little overlap.

  17. Contstraint effects of shallow cracks in structures containing fillet weld toe cracks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neligon, Melinda T

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for structures containing a/W--O.l and a/W--O.5 fillet weld toe cracks. The Anderson-Dodds scaling model is applied to quantify the effects of finite size on J contour integral values for structures containing a/W=O.l and a/W=0.5 fillet weld toe cracks loaded...

  18. Integrated Materials and Construction Practices (IMCP) for Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Materials and Construction Practices (IMCP) for Concrete Pavement Workshop Participant Handbook Prepared for Prepared by Federal Highway Administration National Concrete Pavement Technology Center Office of Pavement Technology at Iowa State University 400 7th Street AW 2711 South Loop Drive

  19. Analysis of the SSL 3.0 protocol David Wagner Bruce Schneier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneier, Bruce

    Analysis of the SSL 3.0 protocol David Wagner Bruce Schneier University of California, Berkeley Counterpane Systems daw@cs.berkeley.edu schneier@counterpane.com Abstract The SSL protocol is intended of the cryptographic strength of the SSL 3.0 protocol. A number of minor aws in the protocol and several new active

  20. Analysis of the SSL 3.0 protocol David Wagner Bruce Schneier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneier, Bruce

    Analysis of the SSL 3.0 protocol David Wagner Bruce Schneier University of California, Berkeley Counterpane Systems daw@cs.berkeley.edu schneier@counterpane.com Revised April 15, 1997 Abstract The SSL analysis of the cryptographic strength of the SSL 3.0 protocol. A number of minor aws in the protocol

  1. Magnetic Detection of Microstructure Change in Power Plant Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yardley, Victoria Anne

    2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    for 180? wall Pinning enrgy for wall at arbitrary angle ? Correlation length Modelling: new model Ai Total number pinning points of ith type per unit volume Aw Wall surface area C Constant E Fitting error E0 Electric field amplitude lw Wall...

  2. The Big Questions For Biodiversity Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Knapp, Sandra; Guralnick, Robert P.; Soberó n, Jorge; Holder, Mark T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .H., FERRIER, S., HUETTMAN, F., MORITZ, C. & PETERSON, A.T. 2004. New developments in museum-based informatics and applications in biodiversity analysis. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 19, 497–503. GRAYMAN, W.M., MALES, R.M., GATES, W.E. & HADDER, A.W. 1975...

  3. tea:ro,+\\`.a,.:a,.;a.;\\.. .,`:'.\\....\\.,.:..:....+'..i..`:Ya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    ....... Los Angeles. Hill,CharlesC..........Pasadena. Holmes , Anna L... San Bernardino. Irvine , Agnes M.\\a:.cs·'.'+Aw·:a>..a,.e:.,\\'je.:akZ\\.,n::a\\A>xa.:'.,aa,_.'::atdiaa+aa-·.a M #12;Y #12 .................. Superintendent Public Instruction. Ex officio. STEPHEN M. WHITE .................................. Los Angeles. A

  4. Home Articles Directions Contact Green Resources & Links The Green Building Gallery Gill Holland, green developer / film producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Articles Directions Contact Green Resources & Links The Green Building Gallery Gill Holland to try to follow the US Green Building Council's (USGBC) guidelines for both green building building and try to bring aw areness of green building to Louisville and its developers. After making tw o

  5. The immunology of Human cytomegalovirus latency: could latent infection be cleared by novel immunotherapeutic strategies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wills, M. R.; Poole, Emma; Lau, Betty; Krishna, Ben; Sinclair, John

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    by targeting different epitopes on the gH/gL/UL128-131A complex. J Virol. 2010; 84: 1005-13. Epub 2009/11/06. 14. Sylwester AW, Mitchell BL, Edgar JB, Taormina C, Pelte C, Ruchti F, et al. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells...

  6. Going Digital: Building eHealth and mHealth Interventions Society of Behavioral Medicine Conference 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    . Use of qualitative methods across the software development lifecycle in health informatics. Student(6): 2067-2077 Iterative Development and Qualitative Methods Larman C, Basili VR. Iterative and incremental development: a brief history. IEEE Computer 2003;36:47­56. Borycki EM, Househ M, Kushniruk AW, Kuziemsky C

  7. Support.Strategies.Resources. learningcommons.sfu.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Support.Strategies.Resources. learningcommons.sfu.ca Demystifying Academic Writing What is academic writing? Academic writing (AW) is the general term for several distinct forms of professional writing practiced at the university level: essays, critical articles or reviews, and scientific reports are among

  8. Contstraint effects of shallow cracks in structures containing fillet weld toe cracks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neligon, Melinda T

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for structures containing a/W--O.l and a/W--O.5 fillet weld toe cracks. The Anderson-Dodds scaling model is applied to quantify the effects of finite size on J contour integral values for structures containing a/W=O.l and a/W=0.5 fillet weld toe cracks loaded...

  9. Methodological Publications Purushottam (Prakash) Laud, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linear Models. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 97:859-871, 2002. 8. Johnson-Masotti, A.W.: A Predictive Approach to the Analysis of Designed Experiments. Journal of the American Statistical Association Models Using Jeffrey's Prior. Journal of the American Statistical Association 86:981-986, 1991. 21. Laud

  10. 7th Int. Conference on Business Process Management (BPM`09) 7-10 September 2009, Ulm, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    7th Int. Conference on Business Process Management (BPM`09) 7-10 September 2009, Ulm, Germany www.bpm2009.org Keynote Speaker A.-W. Scheer BPM 3.0 Founder of IDS Scheer, President of Bitkom, Vice on Reference Modelling ER-BPM'09 - 1st International Workshop on Empirical Research in Business Process BPD'09

  11. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF WIND RESOURCES IN SELECTED FOCUS AREAS OF CALIFORNIA Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: AWS-06-024 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Mike Kane Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

  12. MI FARM TO SCHOOL GRANTEES 2014-2015 PROGRAM YEAR AND PREVIOUS GRANTEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MI FARM TO SCHOOL GRANTEES 2014-2015 PROGRAM YEAR AND PREVIOUS GRANTEES FOODSYSTEMS.MSU.EDU 2014-2015 GRANTEES School/ district/ program County Current Grant Years as a grantee A&W Daycare Wayne Planning 1 TO SCHOOL GRANTEES (2011/12 ­ 2013/14) School/ district/ program County Grant Type(s) Grant Years All Aboard

  13. Verifying Statemate Statecharts Using CSP and FDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscoe, Bill

    Verifying Statemate Statecharts Using CSP and FDR A.W. Roscoe and Z. Wu Oxford University Computing of statecharts. We use the CSP/FDR framework to model complex systems designed in statecharts, and check translation from statecharts into CSP and exploited it in both theoretical and prac- tical senses. 1

  14. Model checking Timed CSP Philip Armstrong Gavin Lowe Joel Ouaknine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    Model checking Timed CSP Philip Armstrong Gavin Lowe Jo¨el Ouaknine A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Department of Computer Science Abstract Though Timed CSP was developed 25 years ago and the CSP for Timed CSP. In this paper we report on the creation of such a version, based on the digitisation results

  15. Doppler Sodar Report, 2001/2002 Season Ian Renfrew and Russ Ladkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrew, Ian

    , ten solar panels and ten wind generators. A Tattletale logger monitors the APS along with a standard damage ranging from minor repairs to complete write-off. Several of the solar panels also suffered BAS FpAWS and controls the Sodar Processing Unit (SPU). Operators communicate with the logger via

  16. One Way Mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenk, Barbara

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled. "So fake it!" she said fiercely. "You'd better." She began a cautious exploration of the cabin, walking around slowly, her hands clasped behind her back. There were two spacious rooms, plus bathroom and closet areas. It seemed like an awfully...

  17. he theory of nuclear winter has provoked argu-ments since it was first proposed in 1982. While the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    T he theory of nuclear winter has provoked argu- ments since it was first proposed in 1982. While of nuclear winter. The U. N. report, whose authors include eleven scientists from six continents, en- dorsed and supported nuclear winter theory, stating: "It appears evident that none would escape the awful conse

  18. JULY/AUGUST 2013 periscopeperiscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    -5 performAnCe pLAnninG 3 SUSTAinABiLiTY 3 QUArTer CenTUrY AwArdS 5 reCYCLinG TipS 6 meeT CAThY CArneY 7 stands out, Ellen, is your caring and open heart. Your keen interpersonal intelligence has led to your

  19. de recherche ISSN0249-6399ISRNINRIA/RR--7153--FR+ENG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by carefully studying the technology they use? This paper analyzes the security aws of the typical technology blocks used in state-of-the-art CBIRS and shows it is possible to delude systems, making them useless détails des technologies qu'ils emploient? Cet article analyse les failles de sécurité des briques

  20. A New Way to Resolve Cepheid Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Remage Evans; Derck Massa

    2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the centroid shift of low resolution HST FOC spectra as the dominant star changes from the Cepheid to the hot companion. With this approach we have resolved the AW Per system and marginally resolved the U Aql system.

  1. Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network Recommendations for Prospective Multi-Center Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V, Preda A, Keator D, O'Leary DS, Lim KO, Glover G, PotkinHJ, Clark VP, Lauriello J, O'Leary D, Mueller BA, Lim KO,DH, Gollub R, Lauriello J, O'Leary D, van Erp TG, Toga AW,

  2. Understanding Social Media: Accelerating Social Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    , with one exception #12;Market mixed, February 8, 2008 Energy & Technology up, Financial & Health Care down & Visualization www.aw.com/DTUI Fifth Edition: March 2009 #12;U.S. Library of Congress ·Scholars, Journalists.cs.vt.edu/gigapixel #12;www.smartmoney.com/marketmap Treemap: Smartmoney MarketMap #12;Market falls steeply Feb 27, 2007

  3. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  4. Check Aid Status & Loans on ISIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    Check Aid Status & Loans on ISIS As a University of Florida (UF) financial aid applicant, you can business using ISIS (the UF Integrated Student Information System): www.isis.ufl.edu 1.CheCk Aid StAtuS/AwArdS on iSiS You are responsible for keeping track of your financial aid file and awards, including

  5. Lipase hydration state in the gas phase: Sorption isotherm measurements and inverse gas chromatography.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lipase hydration state in the gas phase: Sorption isotherm measurements and inverse gas Rochelle, Cedex 01, France. Keywords: Water, Lipase, Adsorption, Inverse Gas Chromatography, Solid/Gas@univ-lr.fr Fax : +33 5 46 45 82 65 Abbreviations: IGC, Inverse Gas Chromatography aW, water thermodynamic

  6. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Facilities. ” American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns onthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWind

  7. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, III, James Edward (Newton, MA); Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  8. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA); Carey, III, James E. (Newton, MA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  9. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA); Carey, III, James E. (Newton, MA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  10. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, James Edward

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity great than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelenths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  11. Regmi Research Series ,Year 14, December 1, 1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmi, Mahesh C

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;) Sh akn ~ra . Hc h~d CC(,i0 to NGpf'.l ;.lon,5 with the 1dol s of Nlm ,,,: ju :md ot;h;... r gods , nod (~ rot1nu o conSisting of sc ') r os o f c ~stes including N.aw:crs w o livJd in th ,;) N.:'.ir r ciSO c ;llLd Nnynr, sons o f Br... ;) Sh akn ~ra . Hc h~d CC(,i0 to NGpf'.l ;.lon,5 with the 1dol s of Nlm ,,,: ju :md ot;h;... r gods , nod (~ rot1nu o conSisting of sc ') r os o f c ~stes including N.aw:crs w o livJd in th ,;) N.:'.ir r ciSO c ;llLd Nnynr, sons o f Br...

  12. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  13. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric (Concord, MA); Carey, III, James Edward (Newton, MA)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  14. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|<0.0092 GeV?².

  15. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore »limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|« less

  16. This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ;=>130(23) BackgroundY!9#K%(4!G&=%8K'+#$!&O#&+!#+I(6'+T&![9DQb]!9E@,!O#76A!#A!'+=7'+$%'3!#+!G86(=74!#+!QA#&!&+3! QI7@,! #+I'$=#8+! #+! %6H&+AW! M%'A'! &7'! G8(&7#T'3!$'((A!&+3!=%'!G8(&7#=4!8I!#+I(6'+T&!

  17. Feasibility and electromagnetic compatibility study of the ClearPEM front-end electronics for simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    for simultaneous PET-MR imaging J.A. Neves a,b,c,n , R. Bugalho a,b , R. Gruetter c,d,e , A.W. Magill c,d , C Keywords: PET ClearPEM 7 Tesla MR Simultaneous PET-MRI EMI and EMC a b s t r a c t In this work we present a first feasibility study of the ClearPEM technology for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. The mutual

  18. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  19. EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition Turbine Wake Model for Wind Resource Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 1 Turbine Wake Model for Wind Resource Software Ole) AT: #12;EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 2 21 2 0TT C U= (1) 0 0(1 )wU a U= - (2); 1.5 0.75 AR Aw0 U0 Uw0 T #12;EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 3 ( )2 0 1 ( , ) 1

  20. A pocket formula for fusion barriers using proximity-type potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutt, Ishwar, E-mail: idsharma.pu@gmail.com [Panjab University, Department of Physics (India)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using three potentials parameterized within the proximity concept, namely, Bass 80, AW 95, and Denisov DP, a pocket formula for fusion barriers is presented. This formula was obtained by analyzing as many as 400 reactions with mass between 15 and 296 units. Further, this pocket formula can reproduce the exact barriers within an accuracy of {+-}2%. A comparison with experimental data yields close agreement.

  1. OSP WEEKLY FUNDING BULLETIN Volume 5, Issue 04 January 24, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    ) Solicitation No. RFA-ES-11-002 CFDA No. 93.113 Due Date: Letter of Intent: 21 March 2011 Application: 21 April-NR-11-006 CFDA No. 93.361 Due Date: Letter of Intent: 2 April 2011 Application: 2 May 2011 http-11-AW-031-MENA-012111 CFDA No. 19.500 Due Date: 7 March 2011 http://mepi.state.gov/mepi/english

  2. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  3. Assessment of Research Needs for Oil Recovery from Heavy-Oil Sources and Tar Sands (FERWG-IIIA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of J.W. Mares (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and A.W. Trivelpiece (Director, Office of Energy Research), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on oil recovery from heavy oil sources and tar sands. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of research areas that affect the prospects for oil recovery from these sources. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  4. Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

  5. JD/LLM in International and Comparative Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    (919) 613-7020 admissions@law.duke.edu www.law.duke.edu/admis l a u n c h y o u r g l o b a l l aw p r a c t i c e h e r e APPLY NOW law.duke.edu/admis/degreeprograms/jd-llm/ Early Application Deadlines 11@ JD/LLM in International and Comparative Law Duke Law Admissions Duke University School of Law

  6. Developing a Framework for a New Visual-Based Interface Design in Autodesk Maya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Timothy Clayton

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    was the fact they did not have a consistent user interface. Luckily, the PARC researchers realized this aw and developed a new visual code development environment called Smalltalk, shown in Fig. 2, the rst modern GUI. What was amazing about Smalltalk wasn..., Leventhal, Wills, and Manaris (2002) noted the importance of Human-computer in- teraction (HCI) suggesting at least 50% of programming code is devoted to the user interface [28]. The most widely used interface type in computer applications is the (W...

  7. 1 Week 02: 27 January 2009 2 Systems in one dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ,1 0 = {w # L 1 | w # # L 1 , Aw(a) +Bw(b) = 0}. The dual viewpoint says that the di#erential equation spaces of data f and solutions u) i# for every f # L 1 there is a unique solution u # W , and a stability spaces: #u#W := (b - a)#u # # L 1 + #u# L 1 # C#f# L 1 for some constant C independent of u and f

  8. that are specific to the tension and occupancy branches of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    ., and Taylor, S.S. (2003). Aurora B couples chromosome alignment with anaphase by targeting BubR1, Mad2­393. 2. Tang, Z., Bharadwaj, R., Li, B., and Yu, H. (2001). Mad2-Independent inhibition of APCCdc20 by the mitotic checkpoint protein BubR1. Dev. Cell 1, 227­237. 3. Stern, B.M., and Murray, A.W. (2001). Lack

  9. Warm-VM Reboot Warm-VM Reboot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourai, Kenichi

    Tos Warm-VM Reboot VMM OS Warm-VM Reboot VMM OS OS 1 Tvmm > Tos Tvmm Tos Warm-VM Reboot Tvmm Dw(n) Warm-VM Reboot VM n Dos OS OS rejuvenation VMM rejuvenation time (a) Tvmm > Tos VMM rejuvenation OS rejuvenation time (b) Tvmm Tos 1 Warm-VM Reboot Nw Tvmm OS Nw Tvmm-Dw(n) Tos Dw(n) + NwDos Aw = 1 - Dw(n) + Nw

  10. 3D pattern of brain changes in deaf subjects using Tensor-Based Morphometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    , Patrick Vachon2 , Franco Lepore2 , Yi-Yu Chou1 , Patrice Voss2 , Caroline Brun1 , Agatha D. Lee1 , Arthur W. Toga1 , and Paul M. Thompson1 1 Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department of Neurology, David. N. Lepore, Y-Y. Chou, O.L. Lopez, H.J. Aizenstein, J.T. Becker, A.W. Toga, P.M. Thompson, Fast 3D

  11. Respiratory effects of two-hour exposure with intermittent exercise to ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide alone and in combination in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagawa, J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven adult male healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.15 ppm each of O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination, with intermittent light exercise for two hours. Three of the 7 subjects developed cough during deep inspiration and one subject had chest pain during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. Among the various indices of pulmonary function tests, specific airway conductane (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was the most sensitive index to examine the changes produced by the exposure to O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. Significant decrease of G/sub aw//V/sub tg/ in comparison with control measurements was observed in 6 of 7 subjects during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone, and in all subjects during exposures to the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. However, no significant enhancement of effect was observed in the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants, although a slightly greater decrease of airway resistance/volume of thoracic gas (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was observed for the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants than for O/sub 3/ alone.

  12. Virtual Photon Emission from Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Suryanarayana

    2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently proposed an empirical approach for the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects in photon emission from the quark gluon plasma as a function of photon mass. This approach was based on Generalized Emission Functions (GEF) for photon emission, derived at a fixed temperature and strong coupling constant. In the present work, we have extended the LPM calculations for several temperatures and strong coupling strengths. The integral equations for (${\\bf \\tilde{f}(\\tilde{p}_\\perp)}$) and ($\\tilde{g}({\\bf \\tilde{p}_\\perp})$) are solved by the iterations method for the variable set \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2,T,\\alpha_s$\\}, considering bremsstrahlung and $\\bf aws$ processes. We generalize the dynamical scaling variables, $x_T$, $x_L$, for bremsstrahlung and {\\bf aws} processes which are now functions of variables $p_0,q_0,Q^2,T,\\alpha_s$. The GEF introduced earlier, $g^b_T$, $g^a_T$, $g^b_L$, $g^a_L$, are also generalized for any temperatures and coupling strengths. From this, the imaginary part of the photon polarization tensor as a function of photon mass and energy can be calculated as a one dimensional integral over these GEF and parton distribution functions in the plasma. However, for phenomenological studies of experimental data, one needs a simple empirical formula without involving parton momentum integrations. Therefore, we present a phenomenological formula for imaginary photon polarization tensor as a function of \\{$q_0,Q^2,T,\\alpha_s$\\} that includes bremsstrahlung and $\\bf aws$ mechanisms along with LPM effects.

  13. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  14. TWRS privatization support project waste characterization database development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory requested support from ICF Kaiser Hanford Company in assembling radionuclide and chemical analyte sample data and inventory estimates for fourteen Hanford underground storage tanks: 241-AN-102, -104, -105, -106, and -107, 241-AP-102, -104, and -105, 241-AW-101, -103, and -105, 241 AZ-101 and -102; and 241-C-109. Sample data were assembled for sixteen radionuclides and thirty-five chemical analytes. The characterization data were provided to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the Tank Waste Remediation Services Privatization Support Project. The purpose of this report is to present the results and document the methodology used in preparing the waste characterization information data set to support the Tank Waste Remediation Services Privatization Support Project. This report describes the methodology used in assembling the waste characterization information and how that information was validated by a panel of independent technical reviewers. Also, contained in this report are the various data sets created: the master data set, a subset, and an unreviewed data set. The master data set contains waste composition information for Tanks 241-AN-102 and -107, 241-AP-102 and -105, 241-AW-101; and 241-AZ-101 and -102. The subset contains only the validated analytical sample data from the master data set. The unreviewed data set contains all collected but unreviewed sample data for Tanks 241-AN-104, -105, and -106; 241-AP-104; 241-AW-103 and-105; and 241-C-109. The methodology used to review the waste characterization information was found to be an accurate, useful way to separate the invalid or questionable data from the more reliable data. In the future, this methodology should be considered when validating waste characterization information.

  15. Visiting hours: the second-person address in critical theory and creative practice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Scott David

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) but also for postmodern readers, to snap them out of the fog created by the changes in language and society. Kitch, the unseen (except in one brief scene) narrator is my vehicle--my metafictionist and fabulator. The Russian Formalist term "scar... in the castle, don't you'!" "A king2" "No, " she shakes her head, long raven tresses waving "A wizard? A knight7 A dragon2" "No, honey. Why, it's the home of the girl who will be your own true love. " "Aw, mom. I love you!" "You' re so sweet! I'm sure you...

  16. Work simplification in the drafting room: an investigation of reference table improvement and the place of templates in the drafting room.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Joel

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atea' tooled' Nenes, tc this ee4v it ie the ympooe af this ewyort W ~"~M 4nefting efficiency ehsaegh inyrove4 referacee tehle 4eeign eng fvL1 ntilieetiae af ~toe + 3 Na0aega, Zchb, "IWIIIIWAfsss, :-:=- i&aielI': IhebsaLL:J, Aws 1903 1854 QLY~W'&'de ', GCVX...Le& eseXugiog the fieet ~& ~4 10 y Coat Stagy' Ccagerkeoa of eating buXb ~ bf Lnstreaeate va. ueiag a t~late Caet foa' aabiag fiwat bulb a ha'. 'f ada, 8 +' ~. . = y . eg~/~ hx'. Sip'flk t "~~-" br. xy ~x" ws/:";, ~QQ ~ht hr. l, $ teey...

  17. Semidefinite geometry of the numerical range Didier Henrion1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrion, Didier

    . Lemma 1 W(A) = F(A) = {( A0, W , A1, W , A2, W ) P2 + : W CnÃ?n , W 0}. Proof: The dual to F(A) is F of the semidefinite cone. On the other hand, since w Aw = w A1w + i w A2w, the numerical range can be expressed as W(A) = {x = (w A0w, w A1w, w A2w)} = {x : xk = Ak, W , W 0, rank W = 1}, the same affine projection as above

  18. Semidefinite geometry of the numerical range Didier Henrion1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Lemma 1 W(A) = F(A) = {( A0, W , A1, W , A2, W ) P2 + : W CnÃ?n , W 0}. Proof: The dual to F(A) is F #12;an affine projection of the semidefinite cone. On the other hand, since w Aw = w A1w + i w A2w, the numerical range can be expressed as W(A) = {x = (w A0w, w A1w, w A2w)} = {x : xk = Ak, W , W 0, rank W = 1

  19. J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .A. Schuler, K. Sridhar, and R. Vogt, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 10, 3043 ~1995!. @49# K. Tsushima, D.H. Lu, A.W. Thomas, K. Saito, and R.H. Lan- dau, Phys. Rev. C 59, 2824 ~1999!. @50# A. Hayashigaki, Phys. Lett. B 487, 96 ~2000!. @51# W. Weise, Proceedings....M. Xu, D. Kharzeev, H. Satz, and X.N. Wang, Phys. Rev. C 53, 3051 ~1996!. @11# S. Gavin and R. Vogt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1006 ~1997!. 054909- fragmentation model @21,22# indicates that the feeddown should be small for central collisions. We thus...

  20. Functional design criteria, Project W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval Systems. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, C.A.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical baseline for retrieval of waste from ten double-shell tanks in the SY, AN, AP, AW, AY, and AZ tank farms. In order to retrieve waste from these tanks, systems are needed to mix the sludge with the supernate and pump the waste mixture from the tank. For 101-SY, the existing mitigation pump will be used to mix the waste and Project W-211 will provide for waste removal. The retrieval scope for the other nine tanks includes both the waste mixing and removal functions.

  1. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  2. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirnivas, S.; Musial, W.; Bailey, B.; Filippelli, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a deliverable for a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entitled National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign -- Analysis and Collaboration (contract number DE-EE0005372; prime contractor -- AWS Truepower). The project objective is to supplement, facilitate, and enhance ongoing multiagency efforts to develop an integrated national offshore wind energy data network. The results of this initiative are intended to 1) produce a comprehensive definition of relevant met-ocean resource assets and needs and design standards, and 2) provide a basis for recommendations for meeting offshore wind energy industry data and design certification requirements.

  3. Mode I transverse cracking in an epoxy and a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, David Robert

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    release rate can be derived from Equation (2) and shown to be: P dc where C = D/P is the compliance (m/N), D being displacement (m) and P being load (N) . Given an algebraic expression for the compliance as a function of crack length, it is possible... lengths to a compliance function suggested by Slepetz and Carlson [11]: C = A *A + A *A + A *(2+A)l(1-A) 3 2 1 2 3 24 where the A. are the coefficients, A is the relative crack length a/w (crack length measured from load line divided by specimen...

  4. Complementizer Agreement in Najdi Arabic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Perfective PL Plural PST Past Tense Q Quantifier REF Referential SG Singular SUBJ Subject TOP Topic ix TABLES Table 1. The Consonants of Najdi Arabic Table 2. The Vowels of Najdi Arabic Table 3. Strong Pronouns Table 4. Weak Pronouns...-?atiqid inna-ha sawwa-t al-akil 2SG-think that-3SG.FEM make.PERF-3SG.FEM the-food ‘You think that she made the food.’ b. ta-?atiqid inna-hum saww-aw al-akil 2SG-think that-3PL.MASC make.PERF-3PL...

  5. Near-infrared photoactive Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} thin films by co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banavoth, Murali; Dias, Sandra; Krupanidhi, S. B. [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore- 560012 (India)] [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore- 560012 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thin films of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) were grown by co-sputtering further the structural, optical and electrical properties were analyzed and confirmed the CZTS phase formation. The photo response of CZTS in near IR photodectection has been demonstrated. The detector response was measured employing both the IR lamp and IR laser illuminations. The calculated growth and decay constants were 130 m sec and 700 m sec followed by the slower components upon lamp illumination. The external quantum efficiency of 15%, responsivity of 13 AW{sup ?1} makes CZTS a suitable candidate for the IR photodectection.

  6. A comparison of theoretical and experimental rotordynamic coefficients for helically grooved annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gansle, Anthony Joseph

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for aW' and C, &. 229 mm . Fig. 12 Direct stiffness, K, as a function of inlet circumferential velocity ratio for aE) and C, &. 305 mm Fig. 13 Direct stiffness, K, as a function of inlet circumferential velocity ratio for a=15 and C, E). 229 mm Fig.... 14 Direct stiffness, K, as a function of inlet circumferential velocity ratio for a=15' and C, &. 305 mm Fig. 15 Direct stiffness, K, as a function of inlet circumferential velocity ratio for et=30 and C, E). 229 mm Fig. 16 Direct stiffness, K...

  7. Work simplification in the drafting room: an investigation of reference table improvement and the place of templates in the drafting room. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Joel

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atea' tooled' Nenes, tc this ee4v it ie the ympooe af this ewyort W ~"~M 4nefting efficiency ehsaegh inyrove4 referacee tehle 4eeign eng fvL1 ntilieetiae af ~toe + 3 Na0aega, Zchb, "IWIIIIWAfsss, :-:=- i&aielI': IhebsaLL:J, Aws 1903 1854 QLY~W'&'de ', GCVX...Le& eseXugiog the fieet ~& ~4 10 y Coat Stagy' Ccagerkeoa of eating buXb ~ bf Lnstreaeate va. ueiag a t~late Caet foa' aabiag fiwat bulb a ha'. 'f ada, 8 +' ~. . = y . eg~/~ hx'. Sip'flk t "~~-" br. xy ~x" ws/:";, ~QQ ~ht hr. l, $ teey...

  8. Detection and Plant Monitoring Programs: Lessons from an Intensive Survey of Asclepias meadii with Five Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Helen M.; Reed, Aaron W.; Kettle, W. Dean; Slade, Norman A.; Bodbyl-Roels, Sarah Ann; Collins, Cathy Diane; Salisbury,Vaughn

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    information about probabilities of detection and what factors cause plants to be missed. This information can guide development of monitoring programs. Citation: Alexander HM, Reed AW, Kettle WD, Slade NA, Bodbyl Roels SA, et al. (2012) Detection and Plant... of observers. This value was calculated as: 1{ 1{pAð Þ 1{pBð Þ 1{pCð Þ 1{pDð Þ 1{pEð Þ½ #2; ð1Þ where pA, pB, pC, pD, and pE refer to observer-specific detection probabilities. We calculated a common variance using the delta method [34]. Each observer...

  9. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  10. Case Study of Two MBCx Projects: Using M&V to Track Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jump, D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ’s claimed savings do not stand up to third party review #0;? Savings lifetimes are short #0;? Negative impact on program realization rates 6 Need for Robust M&V in RCx Projects Needs: • Demonstrate actual, verified energy savings benefits of RCx • Provide a...W and steam meters • Electric and steam trended at 15 minute intervals • Data stored indefinitely #0;? Web-based points mapped from BAS • Chiller kW • BAS points trended at 1 minute intervals • Data stored for 6 months 11 Soda Hall • UC Berkeley’s Computer...

  11. Las Cruces MPO 2040 Metropolitan Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    circumstance, wes not determined, LITERAT %E CITS' Esm, Katherine, Plant Anatosy, John k'iley and Sons& p 115~ 1953. 2. Johansen~ D. A. , Plsnt Eicrotechnique~ HcOx'aw Hill~ p 87 ~ 19h0. 'Oosssrd, A. C?Rooting of pecan stea tissue by layering~ Aaerioan..., Page 24 TJL'ELK XQ Nuaher of roots per tree in 'Ireataents 1 and 2 on the two dates of inspections Ju+ la 1957~ and Narch 9a 1958 Date of Inspection ". reataent 1 Treataent 2 July la 1957 10 Naroh 9a 1958 Averais 2d 12 ho m ...

  12. Soil weight (lbf/ft{sup 3}) at Hanford waste storage locations (2 volumes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pianka, E.W.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Reservation waste storage tanks are fabricated in accordance with approved construction specifications. After an underground tank has been constructed in the excavation prepared for it, soil is place around the tank and compacted by an approved compaction procedure. To ensure compliance with the construction specifications, measurements of the soil compaction are taken by QA inspectors using test methods based on American Society for the Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Soil compaction tests data taken for the 241AP, 241AN, and 241AW tank farms constructed between 1978 and 1986 are included. The individual data values have been numerically processed to obtain average soil density values for each of these tank farms.

  13. Interview of Julian Hunt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    landing craft, through the waves; thought it most frightening and ran away from this most awful apparition I could imagine 7:14:03 When we came back to England in 1947 we lived in Oxford, close to my mother's parents; my grandfather was Maxwell Garnett, a... of their contributions and experiences 37:03:14 Called masters by nicknames which was supposed to make them like older brother; I felt an awkwardness in this as they still had to maintain discipline; in general the masters were kind; in my last year and a half at Dragons...

  14. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4??m, with a peak responsivity of up to ?100??A/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140?K.

  15. Quantification and propagation of errors when converting vertebrate biomineral oxygen isotope data to temperature for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Alexander J. E.; Stevens, Rhiannon E.; O’Connell, Tamsin C.; Lister, John R.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    interglacial-glacial cycle contexts at the Hallera Avenue site, Wroc?aw (Poland) (3 measurements ranging between 13.4‰ and 14.1‰; Skrzypek et al., 2011, Supplementary Data). The isotopic data were interpreted as indicating temperatures 2–4ºC higher than... using ?18Oprecipitation data from local or regional International Atomic Energy Agency monitoring stations that may not include (or be restricted to) data from the years when the analysed fauna were alive, rather than being estimated from water sources...

  16. NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released new estimates of the U.S. potential for wind-generated electricity, using advanced wind mapping and validation techniques to triple previous estimates of the size of the nation's wind resources. The new study, conducted by NREL and AWS TruePower, finds that the contiguous 48 states have the potential to generate up to 37 million gigawatt-hours annually. In comparison, the total U.S. electricity generation from all sources was roughly 4 million gigawatt-hours in 2009.

  17. The Honorable Sacrifice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuk, Beverly C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Anticipation of a lance through his body faded with its fading toll. Silence again, though not as complete as before. Kirk let out the brGath tiG'd'.'bGen holding and reluctantly drew in another. He was once more "aw~'re of the stGnch of his concealment. He... with a rotting piece of cloth, but the silence remained unbroken, the space bet;:een them empty, ''rhe eyes',.if\\hirfOrmer ::medical ofUcGr' s rawboned face were a murderous blue. Hovering dangerously above his exposed chest I

  18. US5804965.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank Casella US40081A UmtedCeeehi et a].W00lley

  19. Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced MaterialsEnergy,Envelope SHARE Building Envelopes101-HV Feb2-AW Feb

  20. Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced MaterialsEnergy,Envelope SHARE Building Envelopes101-HV Feb2-AW

  1. American Wind Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmerenSamoa: EnergyAWS Jump to:American

  2. Americans for Solar Power ASPv | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmerenSamoa: EnergyAWS Jump

  3. Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmerenSamoa: EnergyAWS

  4. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, NorthCommunitySouth Jump to:CXD)stAWS

  5. Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Danielson; MR Elmore; SG Pitman

    2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 {und M} HNO{sub 3} could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test.

  6. Upper-hybrid wave-driven Alfvenic turbulence in magnetized dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, A. P. [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden); Banerjee, S. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear dynamics of coupled electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH) and Alfven waves (AWs) is revisited in a magnetized electron-ion plasma with charged dust impurities. A pair of nonlinear equations that describe the interaction of UH wave envelopes (including the relativistic electron mass increase) and the density as well as the compressional magnetic field perturbations associated with the AWs are solved numerically to show that many coherent solitary patterns can be excited and saturated due to modulational instability of unstable UH waves. The evolution of these solitary patterns is also shown to appear in the states of spatiotemporal coherence, temporal as well as spatiotemporal chaos, due to collision and fusion among the patterns in stochastic motion. Furthermore, these spatiotemporal features are demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. It is found that a redistribution of wave energy takes place to higher harmonic modes with small wavelengths, which, in turn, results in the onset of Alfvenic turbulence in dusty magnetoplasmas. Such a scenario can occur in the vicinity of Saturn's magnetosphere as many electrostatic solitary structures have been observed there by the Cassini spacecraft.

  7. Analytical and characterization studies of organic and inorganic species in brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Domazetis; M. Raoarun; B.D. James; J. Liesegang; P.; J. Pigram; N. Brack [La Trobe University, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemistry

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies have been carried out on the distribution of organic functional groups and inorganic species in as-received (ar) and acid-washed (aw) brown coals using elemental analysis, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Surface concentrations of the various carbon groups, organic oxygen, and inorganic hydroxide were obtained using XPS, but oxygen from clay and quartz, if present, interfered with organic oxygen determinations for the coals. A comparison of ar and aw coals using XPS and SEM-EDX is provided in terms of inorganic and organic sulfur groups. Chloride in these coals is present mainly as acid extractable forms, but small amounts of chloride in the organic matrix were indicated by the elemental analysis of ultra low-ash coals. TOF-SIMS fragments from brown coals were indicative of polymers consisting mainly of single aromatic groups linked by hydrocarbons with carboxyl and phenol functional groups. Sulfur fragments were from inorganic sulfur, thiols, organo-sulfates, and S-N-organic species. Numerous fragments containing organically bound chloride were observed. Fragments of the inorganic species Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Ga were also observed. Environmentally undesirable species, particularly from organo-sulfur and organo-chloride groups in brown coal, are likely to emerge from processes that heat coal-water mixture. 54 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Highly Responsive Ultrathin GaS Nanosheet Photodetectors on Rigid and Flexible Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Prof Pingan [Harbin Institute of Technology; Wang, Lifeng [Harbin Institute of Technology; Yoon, Mina [ORNL; Zhang, Jia [Harbin Institute of Technology; Feng, Wei [Harbin Institute of Technology; Wang, Xiaona [Harbin Institute of Technology; Wen, Zhenzhong [Harbin Institute of Technology; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first GaS nanosheet-based photodetectors are demonstrated on both mechanically rigid and flexible substrates. Highly-crystalline, exfoliated GaS nanosheets are promising for optoelectronics due to strong absorption in the UV-visible wavelength region. Photocurrent measurements of GaS nanosheet photodetectors made on SiO2/Si substrates and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates exhibit a photo-responsivity at 254nm up to 4.2 AW-1 and 19.2 AW-1, respectively, which exceeds that of graphene, MoS2, or other 2D materials-based devices. Additionally, the linear dynamic range of the devices on SiO2/Si and PET substrates are 97.7dB and 78.73 dB, respectively. Both surpass that of currently-exploited InGaAs photodetectors (66 dB). Theoretical modeling of the electronic structures indicates that the reduction of the effective mass at the valence band maximum (VBM) with decreasing sheet thickness enhances the carrier mobility of the GaS nanosheets, contributing to the high photocurrents. Double-peak VBMs are theoretically predicted for ultrathin GaS nanosheets (thickness less than 5 monolayers), which is found to promote photon absorption. These theoretical and experimental results show that GaS nanosheets are promising materials for high performance photodetectors on both conventional silicon and flexible substrates.

  9. High performance photodiodes based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for very long wavelength infrared detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang, A. M.; Chen, G.; Chevallier, R.; Haddadi, A.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Very long wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices are demonstrated on GaSb substrate. A heterostructure photodiode was grown with 50% cut-off wavelength of 14.6??m. At 77?K, the photodiode exhibited a peak responsivity of 4.8?A/W, corresponding to a quantum efficiency of 46% at ?300?mV bias voltage from front side illumination without antireflective coating. With the dark current density of 0.7?A/cm{sup 2}, it provided a specific detectivity of 1.4?×?10{sup 10} Jones. The device performance was investigated as a function of operating temperature, revealing a very stable optical response and a background limited performance below 50?K.

  10. Effects of a nonrigid, impermeable bottom on plane surface waves in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gade, Herman Gerhard

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~oq ~o Woqoe i~g qsoqg oq c~ soqgea sqf, N&l 3 5i4 gflE L&bl EPSOM Gv A RQIRIOIB) Xl6'RWHRARLS' SPVIQL' GF FAkllS SURFACE INES W? 8EAL$4I 1A%lk kWStktK The forewing yayer ie a disenssioa of tbo aatwgL effesta ef yeadressive ~ socisa ef esall...~oode ops. 'aog ~~goq @we ~ s 41' OOOQ CIY$$0'$Jg 0$ O~ $~Q pQll l$0$$~ ~OS 'ill ~ %N~'5++~ ~+ og en' Casey esca ge yoa~a ye~CEg seaag~ oyea ~ eo~aw4see y SSNDXk XXQSMBV $2QHXRiUBU NOXQMQgGQ 3q&eR e4~4 e&ttHS ttq3 hat tttt73ttttXAQ? teo334R FP78 tt...

  11. The osteology of Bufo woodhousi, with comparison to Bufo terrestris 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldauf, Richard John

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fo~ nagn@n) ~ T&s; ~or ~ oan hs deteru4ned in yreserwxk spseinsnn, 1I@ aDcnchng tho point of the ukernmstsr to pierce ~ space hat%eon ths ~pital and the ~ ~hrao The )aw ~ is ~sentsd lhgr that distanos fro@ ths nrt9, snLation of the n~ ~ l~ )nMs te... creat aiong tho ckor~orior cxkgo of its ~~ A stxeight sn~ ak. cmg the cx~ ~ ~ the ~ing of tho ~ ma~, a ~ght transsxme satnre exists post~kg ~e oaoh naaxLk ~ its fekkcw fr@nto~etaXi The ~o~QI is not visible onternaXlp as ~ of ~ ~cxn ckorsims ~ fronts...

  12. Jordan algebras and orthogonal polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Tsujimoto; Luc Vinet; Alexei Zhedanov

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We illustrate how Jordan algebras can provide a framework for the interpretation of certain classes of orthogonal polynomials. The big -1 Jacobi polynomials are eigenfunctions of a first order operator of Dunkl type. We consider an algebra that has this operator (up to constants) as one of its three generators and whose defining relations are given in terms of anticommutators. It is a special case of the Askey-Wilson algebra AW(3). We show how the structure and recurrence relations of the big -1 Jacobi polynomials are obtained from the representations of this algebra. We also present ladder operators for these polynomials and point out that the big -1 Jacobi polynomials satisfy the Hahn property with respect to a generalized Dunkl operator.

  13. Jordan algebras and orthogonal polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We illustrate how Jordan algebras can provide a framework for the interpretation of certain classes of orthogonal polynomials. The big -1 Jacobi polynomials are eigenfunctions of a first order operator of Dunkl type. We consider an algebra that has this operator (up to constants) as one of its three generators and whose defining relations are given in terms of anticommutators. It is a special case of the Askey-Wilson algebra AW(3). We show how the structure and recurrence relations of the big -1 Jacobi polynomials are obtained from the representations of this algebra. We also present ladder operators for these polynomials and point out that the big -1 Jacobi polynomials satisfy the Hahn property with respect to a generalized Dunkl operator.

  14. Fast wave dispersion, damping, and electron current drive in the Irvine torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, R.C.; McWilliams, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast waves with frequencies near the mean gyrofrequency were excited in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Experimental measurements of wave dispersion were found to be in good agreement with predictions from cold plasma theory. Experimental measurements of wave damping lengths have been made. Measured damping lengths were found to be anomalously short when compared to predictions for electron Landau-damping, transit-time magnetic pumping and collisional damping. Unidirectional fast waves drove steady-state electron currents. Peak efficiencies up to eta = InR/P = 6 x 10/sup -2/ A/W(10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/)m were observed with up to 14% of the wave energy converted to poloidal magnetic field energy.

  15. Formulation of an efficient triangular plate element for laminate analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Ricky Dale

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aY ( W + ~) By 3y 2 (5) 3 u Bv Bu~ 3v4 Y ? + + xy 3y Bx By 3x aw Yx 2 3 3 z(2 ? + ? + ~) Bx3y 3y 3x Bu Bw Y = + = Y xz Bz Bx x 3v Bw Y + Y yz Bz By y The stresses in a typical lamina 'i' are written in terms of the midplane strains... and curvatures as 1 a x Xy 11 12 16 12 22 26 16 26 66 0 X E xy + z x 'Y (6) r 1 xz Q44 Q4& T yz Q4S Q65 Yx Yy where au Bv au 3v E = ? g E = ? s = ? + x ax ' y 3y ' xy' ay 3x 3 w 2 = ? (? 'x 2 3x xxy = X + ? ) 3x 2 a2 aY xy =-( ? +~) 3...

  16. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  17. Adequacy of milk manufacturing plants in the North Texas marketing area to handle surplus milk, 1953-54

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Mabern David

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    toceiwrs ~ asken to ?ivc one copy to eaob gaffe sbo lived on a farm regardless cf ~ther or not the farm ba ' nairg cattle. xhe list of farmers need fox ths dirsc? mailing was a list of g~ farmers& nct a list of %Uk groctncsrs ~ uEormation fran...~' tali!4' Goose sbo c~ 4o liuke 4'o&~ 'ikhhh dlk~c 4' ~ c~, hi QOi@f~, CA'MX4' Qh 4iKf;~f 0*m. i AW I&M D) fui4~UAM I953 ~uzi z'@ & ~ I mv. c ra& . At ia i' ia s i, farces ~ eoaatcaaxea as having s dairy herc only if hs ze- p01't06 kNLViah fiss 0...

  18. STORAGE, NUTRITIONAL AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF HIGH-FAT FISH AND RICE FLOUR COEXTRUDATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Sukumar Bandyopadhyay; Amarender Singh Bawa

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research is on understanding the storage, nutritional and sensory characteristics of high-fat fish (khoira) and rice flour coextrudates at storage temperature of 30C. The extruder processing conditions used are barrel temperature (200C), screw speed (109 rpm), fish content of feed (44%) and feed moisture content (39%). Sorption isotherm data indicated that the safe aw level was about 0.4–0.7. Guggenheim -Anderson -de Boer model described the sorption data adequately with an r2 value of 0.99. During the initial 15 days of storage, there was a loss of vitamin A and total tocopherols by 64.4 and 20.6%, and an increase in peroxides and free fatty acid content by about 116 mg/kg and 21.7%. The nonlinear mathematical model developed has adequately described the changes in nutritional and storage properties. Sensory attributes indicated that the product fried for 15 s was most acceptable.

  19. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  20. Pharmacology of DB844, an Orally Active aza Analogue of Pafuramidine, in a Monkey Model of Second Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thutia, John K.; Wang, Michael Z.; Kagira, John M.; Denton, Cathrine L.; Paine, Mary F.; Mdachi, Raymond E.; Murilla, Grace A.; Ching, Shelley; Boykin, David W.; Tidwell, Richard R.; Hall, James E.; Brun, Reto

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ;N eg = N eg at iv e; Po s= po si tiv e; W D = w ith dr aw n fr om th e ex pe rim en t af te r1 0t h dr ug do se du e to to xi ci ty ;N um be rs in sq ua re br ac ke ts = m ax im um nu m be ro fw hi te ce ll co un ts ob se rv ed du rin g an y of th e...- cytes (red blood cells, RBC) and associated parameters. Average haemoglobin concentration declined by 32.1% in group II monkeys, from 13.460.6 [95% CI= 12.4–15.1] g/dl at baseline (day 0) to 9.160.6 [95% CI= 7.9–10.3] g/dl (p,0.0001] at 27 DPI (Table 3...

  1. CdS/PbSe heterojunction for high temperature mid-infrared photovoltaic detector applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Binbin, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Zhao, Lihua; Chang, Caleb [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Shi, Zhisheng, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Nanolight, Inc., Norman, Oklahoma 73069 (United States)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    n-CdS/p-PbSe heterojunction is investigated. A thin CdS film is deposited by chemical bath deposition on top of epitaxial PbSe film by molecular beam epitaxy on Silicon. Current-voltage measurements demonstrate very good junction characteristics with rectifying ratio of ?178 and ideality factor of 1.79 at 300?K. Detectors made with such structure exhibit mid-infrared spectral photoresponse at room temperature. The peak responsivity R{sub ?} and specific detectivity D{sup *} are 0.055?A/W and 5.482?×?10{sup 8}?cm·Hz{sup 1/2}/W at ??=?4.7??m under zero-bias photovoltaic mode. Temperature-dependent photoresponse measurements show abnormal intensity variation below ?200?K. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are also discussed.

  2. Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, K.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

  3. Use of the TRUEX process for the pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge: Results of a design basis experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, J L

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experiment designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a sludge dissolution/solvent extraction process to separate transuranic elements from the bulk components of Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. Such a separation would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as low-level waste, which is much less costly than geologic disposal as would be required for the waste in its current form. The results indicate that the proposed process is well suited to meet the desired objectives. A composite sample of NCRW sludge taken from Tank 103-AW in 1986 was dissolved in nitric acid at room temperature. Dissolution of bulk components and all radionuclides was {ge}95% complete; thus, {le}5% of the bulk components will require geologic disposal. The TRUEX (TRansUranium EXtraction) solvent extraction process gave very good separation of the transuranic from the bulk components of the waste.

  4. Ultraviolet band-pass Schottky barrier photodetectors formed by Al-doped ZnO contacts to n-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheu, J.K.; Lee, M.L.; Tun, C.J.; Lin, S.W. [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Technology, No.1, Nantai St, Yung-Kang City, Tainan 710, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optical Science, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This work prepared Al-doped ZnO(AZO) films using dc sputtering to form Schottky contacts onto GaN films with low-temperature-grown GaN cap layer. Application of ultraviolet photodetector showed that spectral responsivity exhibits a narrow bandpass characteristic ranging from 345 to 375 nm. Moreover, unbiased peak responsivity was estimated to be around 0.12 A/W at 365 nm, which corresponds to a quantum efficiency of around 40%. In our study, relatively low responsivity can be explained by the marked absorption of the AZO contact layer. When the reverse biases were below 5 V, the study revealed that dark currents were well below 5x10{sup -12} A even though the samples were annealed at increased temperatures.

  5. A numerical study of steady fluid flow in the entry region of a straight circular tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crain, John Kee

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region. The Basic Equations The flow under i nves ti gati on is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations p ? = F - . + uv Du Dt x ax p ? = F - @uv v, Dv a A 2 Dt y ay (2) Dw= F ma+ Dt w as and the continuity equation "u av aw + ? = p ay... + w D a a a a Ut = at ax ay as and 2 a2 a2 a2 ax2 ay2 as2 Expressed in cylindrical form, the previous equations become 2 P = Fr M + & v V r e D Ve 2aV Dt r " ar r2ae DVe V Ve 2aV V p + ? = Fe - ~a + u & Ve + r - e Dt r rae (2a) F -22+ pv V...

  6. Growth of selected plants under Trans-Pecos conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemph, Gary Stephen

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions. Russian wildrye 0 I I I LU I CL Eo LU 0 20 ia ~oi V g) O~ og oz EQ ) Poi I I I I I I I I I gl ICQ RO pK ~l I 1 0 Cd c-c 'cd 0 0 aw '4 8 Q W 8 c ccd cD 5 Q 8 0 Cd 8 cd W Cd plants with elongated internodes showed... 27 4 27 7 29 9 May 30 9 33 14 July 32 16 32 16 31 16 33 12 June 33 14 33 13 Y! cr '0 ~ r 0 W cd 0 a S 'tl 0 0 4 C3 N ~ cd N cc) 4 2N c 0, 4-' Q N cd 0 'OS&4 0 E 4S OS S4 4N 0, dO C-c S 0 S. r g. r cd 4 cd '0 c ccc C Q ccc...

  7. Generalized Emission Functions for Photon Emission from Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Suryanarayana

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effects on photon emission from the quark gluon plasma have been studied as a function of photon mass, at a fixed temperature of the plasma. The integral equations for the transverse vector function (${\\bf \\tilde{f}(\\tilde{p}_\\perp)}$) and the longitudinal function ($\\tilde{g}({\\bf \\tilde{p}_\\perp})$) consisting of multiple scattering effects are solved by the self consistent iterations method and also by the variational method for the variable set \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2$\\}, considering the bremsstrahlung and the $\\bf aws$ processes. We define four new dynamical scaling variables, $x^b_T$,$x^a_T$,$x^b_L$,$x^a_L$ for bremsstrahlung and {\\bf aws} processes and analyse the transverse and longitudinal components as a function of \\{$p_0,q_0,Q^2$\\}. We generalize the concept of photon emission function and we define four new emission functions for massive photon emission represented by $g^b_T$, $g^a_T$, $g^b_L$, $g^a_L$. These have been constructed using the exact numerical solutions of the integral equations. These four emission functions have been parameterized by suitable simple empirical fits. In terms of these empirical emission functions, the virtual photon emission from quark gluon plasma reduces to one dimensional integrals that involve folding over the empirical $g^{b,a}_{T,L}$ functions with appropriate quark distribution functions and the kinematic factors. Using this empirical emission functions, we calculated the imaginary part of the photon polarization tensor as a function of photon mass and energy.

  8. Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

  9. K Basins sludge removal temporary sludge storage tank system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mclean, M.A.

    1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipment of sludge from the K Basins to a disposal site is now targeted for August 2000. The current path forward for sludge disposal is shipment to Tank AW-105 in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). Significant issues of the feasibility of this path exist primarily due to criticality concerns and the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in the sludge at levels that trigger regulation under the Toxic Substance Control Act. Introduction of PCBs into the TWRS processes could potentially involve significant design and operational impacts to both the Spent Nuclear Fuel and TWRS projects if technical and regulatory issues related to PCB treatment cannot be satisfactorily resolved. Concerns of meeting the TWRS acceptance criteria have evolved such that new storage tanks for the K Basins sludge may be the best option for storage prior to vitrification of the sludge. A reconunendation for the final disposition of the sludge is scheduled for June 30, 1997. To support this decision process, this project was developed. This project provides a preconceptual design package including preconceptual designs and cost estimates for the temporary sludge storage tanks. Development of cost estimates for the design and construction of sludge storage systems is required to help evaluate a recommendation for the final disposition of the K Basin sludge.

  10. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  11. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dimitri; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cut-off at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photorespo...

  12. Dunkl shift operators and Bannai-Ito polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the most general Dunkl shift operator $L$ with the following properties: (i) $L$ is of first order in the shift operator and involves reflections; (ii) $L$ preserves the space of polynomials of a given degree; (iii) $L$ is potentially self-adjoint. We show that under these conditions, the operator $L$ has eigenfunctions which coincide with the Bannai-Ito polynomials. We construct a polynomial basis which is lower-triangular and two-diagonal with respect to the action of the operator $L$. This allows to express the BI polynomials explicitly. We also present an anti-commutator AW(3) algebra corresponding to this operator. From the representations of this algebra, we derive the structure and recurrence relations of the BI polynomials. We introduce new orthogonal polynomials - referred to as the complementary BI polynomials - as an alternative $q \\to -1$ limit of the Askey-Wilson polynomials. These complementary BI polynomials lead to a new explicit expression for the BI polynomials in terms of the or...

  13. Photo-modulated thin film transistor based on dynamic charge transfer within quantum-dots-InGaZnO interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang [Electronic Science and Engineering School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing (China); Yang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Mingju [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing (China); Tao, Zhi; Wei, Lei, E-mail: lw@seu.edu.cn; Li, Chi, E-mail: lichi@seu.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Baoping [Electronic Science and Engineering School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Dai, Qing, E-mail: daiq@nanoctr.cn [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing (China); London Center for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Nathan, Arokia [Electronic Science and Engineering School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); London Center for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal development of next-generation photo-induced transistor across semiconductor quantum dots and Zn-related oxide thin film is reported in this paper. Through the dynamic charge transfer in the interface between these two key components, the responsibility of photocurrent can be amplified for scales of times (?10{sup 4}?A/W 450?nm) by the electron injection from excited quantum dots to InGaZnO thin film. And this photo-transistor has a broader waveband (from ultraviolet to visible light) optical sensitivity compared with other Zn-related oxide photoelectric device. Moreover, persistent photoconductivity effect can be diminished in visible waveband which lead to a significant improvement in the device's relaxation time from visible illuminated to dark state due to the ultrafast quenching of quantum dots. With other inherent properties such as integrated circuit compatible, low off-state current and high external quantum efficiency resolution, it has a great potential in the photoelectric device application, such as photodetector, phototransistor, and sensor array.

  14. Appendix I1-2 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Zack; Deborah Hanley; Dora Nakafuji

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to dev elop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET field campaign deployment experiences and challenges. As part of the WindNET project on the Big Island of Hawaii, AWS Truepower (AWST) conducted a field campaign to assess the viability of deploying a network of monitoring systems to aid in local wind energy forecasting. The data provided at these monitoring locations, which were strategically placed around the Big Island of Hawaii based upon results from the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) observational targeting study (Figure 1), provided predictive indicators for improving wind forecasts and developing responsive strategies for managing real-time, wind-related system events. The goal of the field campaign was to make measurements from a network of remote monitoring devices to improve 1- to 3-hour look ahead forecasts for wind facilities.

  15. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  16. Surfatron plasma-loaded as surfaprobe: A theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicconi, G.; Rosatelli, C. [Univ. of Genova (Italy)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma columns generated and substained, within dielectric tubes, by travelling or standing, slow surface waves (Gould-Trivelpiece electromechanical modes) can be used as diagnostic probes, that we call SWP {open_quotes}surfaprobes{close_quotes}, when these are embedded in a suitable plasma. These surface wave generated plasmas are practically nonradiating in electrodeless devices and can be regarded as dielectric plasmaguides, operating also in the presence of an axial confining dc magnetic field. These plasmaguides, described in slow wave operation, were firstly presented and discussed by A.W. Trivelpiece. In this paper a quasistatic theoretical description, together with a surfaguide equivalent circuit is presented and in a first approximation discussed. We consider a SWP operating in two typical conditions, as: (1) conductivity probe in a collisional SW plasma, (2) reactivity probe in a collisionless SW plasma. In a SWP, for instance, either the matching network of the wave launcher circuitry (LC network in HF operation or reentrant cavity in UHF) or the fluctuation of eigenmodes (detected, for instance, by the light emitted by the SWP) as a diagnostic sensor may be used. We may consider, as an example, the Ro-box launcher for a SWP, claimed for over 1 MHz-10 GHz frequency range.

  17. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  18. SN 2013ab : A normal type IIP supernova in NGC 5669

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zampieri, Luca; Sand, David; Kumar, Brijesh; Pastorello, Andrea; Sutaria, Firoza; Maccarone, Thomas J; Kumar, Brajesh; Graham, M L; Howell, D Andy; Ochner, Paolo; Chandola, H C; Pandey, Shashi B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present densely-sampled ultraviolet/optical photometric and low-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of the type IIP supernova 2013ab in the nearby ($\\sim$24 Mpc) galaxy NGC 5669, from 2 to 190d after explosion. Continuous photometric observations, with the cadence of typically a day to one week, were acquired with the 1-2m class telescopes in the LCOGT network, ARIES telescopes in India and various other telescopes around the globe. The light curve and spectra suggest that the SN is a normal type IIP event with a plateau duration of $ \\sim80 $ days with mid plateau absolute visual magnitude of -16.7, although with a steeper decline during the plateau (0.92 mag 100 d$ ^{-1} $ in $ V $ band) relative to other archetypal SNe of similar brightness. The velocity profile of SN 2013ab shows striking resemblance with those of SNe 1999em and 2012aw. Following the Rabinak & Waxman (2011) prescription, the initial temperature evolution of the SN emission allows us to estimate the progenitor radius to be...

  19. Microstructural analysis of a single pass 2.25% Cr-1.0% Mo steel weld metal with different manganese contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimares de Souza, Luis Felipe [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET-RJ), Av. Maracana, 229, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20271-110 (Brazil); Souza Bott, Ivani de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-RIO), R. Marques de SaoVicente, 225, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22453-900 (Brazil); Ferreira Jorge, Jorge Carlos [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET-RJ), Av. Maracana, 229, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20271-110 (Brazil); Sauer Guimaraes, Ari [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), Caixa Postal 68.505, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, RJ, 21945-970 (Brazil); Pinheiro Rocha Paranhos, Ronaldo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Av. Alberto Lamego, 2000, Campos, RJ, 28013-602 (Brazil)]. E-mail: paranhos@uenf.br

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Weld metals of the 2.25% Cr-1.0% Mo type with 0.84%, 1.21% and 2.3% Mn produced by submerged-arc welding were analyzed in the as-welded (AW), post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and PWHT followed by step-cooling (SC) heat treatment conditions. Fracture surface analysis revealed an evolution in the mode of fracture due to Mn content variations and heat treatment conditions, the occurrence of intergranular fracture being observed in welds with 2.30% Mn that were step-cooled. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the microstructure was predominantly composed of bainite, although martensite was also observed for high Mn contents. A marked carbide precipitation was observed, preferentially at grain boundaries. This could be attributed to the SC heat treatment and associated with the embrittlement. However, the application of a de-embrittlement heat treatment to this step cooled weld metal has proved efficient, because the impact energy levels after this heat treatment surpassed those obtained in the stress relieved condition. This indicates that segregation of impurities to grain boundaries was responsible for the low impact energy levels observed after SC of weld metal containing > 0.84% Mn.

  20. Statement of work for services provided by the waste sampling and characterization facility for the effluent and environmental monitoring program during calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greager, E.M.

    1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the services the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program (EEM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The purpose of the EEM Program is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents, and the environment immediately around the facilities which may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine their degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits. The Appendix identifies the samples EEM plans to submit for analysis in CY-1998. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements cited in Quality Assurance Program Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Monitoring (especially Appendix G) (WHC 1995a), Effluent Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Data (WHC 1995b), Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan (WMNW 1997), and Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (DOE 1996). Should changes to this document be necessary, WSCF or the Waste Management Federal Services, Inc. (WMH) Air and Water Services (AWS) Organization may amend it at any time with a jointly approved internal memo.

  1. High-performance solar-blind ultraviolet photodetector based on mixed-phase ZnMgO thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, M. M. [Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 3888 Dongnanhu Road, 130033 Changchun (China); Liu, K. W., E-mail: liukw@ciomp.ac.cn, E-mail: shendz@ciomp.ac.cn; Zhang, Z. Z.; Li, B. H.; Chen, X.; Zhao, D. X.; Shan, C. X.; Shen, D. Z., E-mail: liukw@ciomp.ac.cn, E-mail: shendz@ciomp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 3888 Dongnanhu Road, 130033 Changchun (China)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High Mg content mixed-phase Zn{sub 0.38}Mg{sub 0.62}O was deposited on a-face sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, based on which a metal-semiconductor-metal solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetector was fabricated. The dark current is only 0.25?pA at 5?V, which is much lower than that of the reported mixed-phase ZnMgO photodetectors. More interestingly, different from the other mixed-phase ZnMgO photodetectors containing two photoresponse bands, this device shows only one response peak and its ?3?dB cut-off wavelength is around 275?nm. At 10?V, the peak responsivity is as high as 1.664?A/W at 260?nm, corresponding to an internal gain of ?8. The internal gain is mainly ascribed to the interface states at the grain boundaries acting as trapping centers of photogenerated holes. In view of the advantages of mixed-phase ZnMgO photodetectors over single-phase ZnMgO photodetectors, including easy fabrication, high responsivity, and low dark current, our findings are anticipated to pave a new way for the development of ZnMgO solar-blind UV photodetectors.

  2. Statement of work for services provided by the waste sampling and characterization facility for the effluent and environmental monitoring program during calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the services the Waste Sampling & Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program (EEM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The purpose of the EEM Program is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents, and the environment immediately around the facilities which may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine their degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits. The Appendix identifies the samples EEM plans to submit for analysis in CY-1997. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements cited in Quality Assurance Program Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Monitoring (especially Appendix G) (VTHC 1995a), Effluent Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Data (WHC 1995b), Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (WHC 1994b), and Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (DOE 1996). Should changes to this document be necessary, WSCF or the Air & Water Services (A&WS) Organization may amend it at any time with a jointly approved internal memo.

  3. Growth and response of whitebrush to 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid as conditioned by available soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCully, Wayne Gunter

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS A&MCOL EGF &?*/MG*? MH CLeO?a&d*L OM - of?OLDp- b orLpM&M/L?GMtDEr?Oer EreF E* rMGFeOeMG?F aD EmEepEap? *Mep fMe*Od&? E Fnyy19585nKN aW C8WN1 AT fSrhuuW ? ? * *hscn551i 5K 5l1 A98ih851 *SlKKu Kv 5l1 Eb9nShu5h...98u 8Ni f1Sl8NnS8u rKuu1b1 Kv O1,8y nN B895n8u vhuvnuuc1N5 Kv 5l1 91.hn91c1N5y vK9 5l1 i1b911 Kv FMrOM& MH /LepM*M/LD f8W P>xg fE?M& *da??rOJ /pEGO /LD*eMpMAD A&MCOL EGF &?*/MG*? MH CLeO?a&d*L OM - of?OLDpow orLpM&M/L?GMteEr?Oer EMeF E* r...

  4. Tridiagonal pairs of $q$-Racah type and the $\\mu$-conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $\\K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $\\K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  5. The Drinfel'd polynomial of a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  6. Tridiagonal pairs of $q$-Racah type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote an algebraically closed field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  7. How to sharpen a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $\\F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $\\F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  8. A classification of sharp tridiagonal pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro; Terwilliger, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  9. Sharp tridiagonal pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of $K$-linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfies the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering ${V_i}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering ${V^*_i}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  10. On the shape of a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  11. The structure of a tridiagonal pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_i + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_i + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv)there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  12. Tridiagonal pairs and the $\\mu$-conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  13. Towards a classification of the tridiagonal pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. Let $End(V)$ denote the $K$-algebra consisting of all $K$-linear transformations from $V$ to $V$. We consider a pair $A,A^* \\in End(V)$ that satisfy (i)--(iv) below: (i) Each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable. (ii) There exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$. (iii) There exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$. (iv) There is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  14. Ferrite determination in stainless steel welds -- Advances since 1974

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotecki, D.J. [Lincoln Electric Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of MagneGage Number 3 Magnet strengths led to a concept for extending, by extrapolation, the calibration range of AWS A4.2-7.4 to ferrite levels above 28 FN. Ferrite Numbers could then be assigned to thinner coating thickness standards for primary calibration of MagneGages over the extended range. Calibration using primary standards is limited to a very few instruments, due to the difference in distribution of ferromagnetic material in coating thickness standards vs that in stainless steel weld metal. secondary standards, covering the range from near zero to about 100 FN, became available for calibrating additional instruments at the beginning of 1995. A round robin of tests established that the interlaboratory reproducibility of measurement after calibration by the secondary standards is similar to that observed with MagneGages calibrated by use of primary standards. Excessive ferrite in duplex stainless steel weld metals has adverse effects on weld properties. The utility of the Ferrite Number measurement system for duplex stainless steels is thus established. Development of a solid link between Ferrite Number and ferrite percent, determination of ferrite in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of duplex stainless steel weldments, and further development of predicting diagrams remain for the future.

  15. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

  16. MOSE: zooming on the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances at the surface layer at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lascaux, Franck; di Arcetri, INAF / Osservatorio Astrofisico; 10.1117/12.925934

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of the MOSE project, in this contribution we present a detailed analysis of the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances and their dependency on the model and orography horizontal resolutions in proximity of the ground. The investigated sites are Cerro Paranal (site of the ESO Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the ESO European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), in Chile. At both sites, data from a rich statistical sample of different nights are available - from AWS (Automated Weather Stations) and masts - giving access to wind speed, wind direction and temperature at different levels near the ground (from 2 m to 30 m above the ground). In this study we discuss the use of a very high horizontal resolution (dX=0.1 km) numerical configuration that overcomes some specific limitations put in evidence with a standard configuration with dX=0.5 km. In both sites results are very promising. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF.

  17. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  18. SN 2013ej - A type IIL supernova with weak signs of interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh; Duggal, Chetna; Misra, Kuntal; Brown, Peter J; Singh, Mridweeka; Dwarkadas, Vikram; York, Donald G; Chakraborti, Sayan; Chandola, H C; Dahlstrom, Julie; Ray, Alak; Safonova, Margarita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova 2013ej. It is one of the brightest type II supernovae exploded in a nearby ($\\sim 10$ Mpc) galaxy NGC 628. The light curve characteristics are similar to type II SNe, but with a relatively shorter ($ \\sim85 $ day) and steeper ($ \\sim1.7 $ mag (100 d)$^{-1} $ in V) plateau phase. The SN shows a large drop of 2.4 mag in V band brightness during plateau to nebular transition. The absolute ultraviolet (UV) light curves are identical to SN 2012aw, showing a similar UV plateau trend extending up to 85 days. The radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass estimated from the tail luminosity is $ 0.02 $M$_{\\odot}$ which is significantly lower than typical type IIP SNe. The characteristics of spectral features and evolution of line velocities indicate that SN 2013ej is a type II event. However, light curve characteristics and some spectroscopic features provide strong support in classifying it as a type IIL event. A detailed SYNOW modelling of spectra indicates ...

  19. TREKiSM Issue 34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drive Lewisville, Texas 75067 · CRYPTOGRA~I ANSWERS: ' 1I"j.LasAw aSJnOJ uO~S~LLOJ ~ JO 6u~4:).awos uo wlI 'w~rll IIi'" UeJ~a 4:).~'" aSJnOJ uO~S~LLOJ E uo d~4SaJeds e 5.:).1 isauog ':).aUELd e :).,US~ s~4:)' lng ll "~# lIi:).~ paJn:> I l:)'~ d...ND SOURCE . AL.L UflOiEO 1 TEO ,. ..H 'lfR1TING "NO ART IS THE WORI( OF THE EDITOR . ....... StJ8S[['IU IQN RATES; FO~Il"HU~RS CF r:NSA IN US, {t {t ~~::~"~ !+O~_~~!:~=~s~~g'1JA I~~~.: !AT~~~FA~~N~~: {t {t ' !~~U...

  20. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Engineering Div.]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science and Mineral Engineering Dept.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm{sup {minus}1} with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  1. Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penik, M.A. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

  2. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  3. DISCOVERY AND EARLY MULTI-WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF THE ENERGETIC TYPE IC SUPERNOVA PTF12GZK: A MASSIVE-STAR EXPLOSION IN A DWARF HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Mazzali, Paolo A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Modjaz, Maryam [New York University, Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L.; Sand, David J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Horst, J. Chuck; Leonard, Douglas C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Im, Myunshin; Jeon, Yiseul [CEOU/Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pian, Elena [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Sullivan, Mark, E-mail: sagi.ben-ami@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery and extensive early-time observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN) PTF12gzk. Our light curves show a rise of 0.8 mag within 2.5 hr. Power-law fits (f(t){proportional_to}(t - t{sub 0}) {sup n}) to these data constrain the explosion date to within one day. We cannot rule out a quadratic fireball model, but higher values of n are possible as well for larger areas in the fit parameter space. Our bolometric light curve and a dense spectral sequence are used to estimate the physical parameters of the exploding star and of the explosion. We show that the photometric evolution of PTF12gzk is slower than that of most SNe Ic. The high ejecta expansion velocities we measure ({approx}30, 000 km s{sup -1} derived from line minima four days after explosion) are similar to the observed velocities of broad-lined SNe Ic associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) rather than to normal SN Ic velocities. Yet, this SN does not show the persistent broad lines that are typical of broad-lined SNe Ic. The host-galaxy characteristics are also consistent with GRB-SN hosts, and not with normal SN Ic hosts. By comparison with the spectroscopically similar SN 2004aw, we suggest that the observed properties of PTF12gzk indicate an initial progenitor mass of 25-35 M{sub Sun} and a large ((5-10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg) kinetic energy, the later being close to the regime of GRB-SN properties.

  4. Determination of Dark Energy and Dark Matter from the values of Redshift for the present time, Planck and Trans-Planck epochs of the Big-Bang model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asger G. Gasanalizade; Ramin A. Hasanalizade

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As an alternative to the Standard cosmology model we have developed a new modified Freundlich's (quantum relativity) redshift (MFRS) mechanisms, which provide a precise solutions of the Dark Energy and Dark Matter problems. We apply the joint solution of three MFRS equations for concordances quantize bounce Planck hierarchy steps. Simultaneous scaling solutions of MFRS equations in logarithmic scale appropriate to three cosmological epoch's, yields a currently testable predictions regarding the Dark Matter {\\Omega}_{DM} = 0.25, and Dark Energy {\\Omega}_{DE} = 0.75. These predictions coincides with the recent observational data from WMAP and other a key supernovae SNe Ia findings. Thus, the presence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy had already been not only detected observationally, but also confirmed theoretically with the very compelling accuracy. From the WMAP7 and our predicted ages we find a value of the Hubble constant H_0 = 65.6 km * s^{-1} Mpc^{-1} which is excellent agreement with the Planck 2013 results XVI. Compared with the "holographic scenario" results, we find an important coincidence between our new and "holographic" parameters. We discuss the connection hierarchy between the multiverse masses and examine the status of the cosmic acceleration. The product of the age of the Universe into the cosmic acceleration in each cosmological epochs --including present day are constant and precisely corresponds to an possible observable-geophysical parameter g_U = 9.50005264_{265} (exact) * (m/s^2). For the derived by WMAP7 age of the Universe t_{W7} = 13.75(13) * 10^9 yr, we find the relevant acceleration a_{W7} = 6.91(65) * 10^{-10} m/s^2. The predicted value of t_0 = 9.0264_9(51) * 10^2 Gyr is consistent with the background acceleration. a_0 = 1.05246_4(61) * 10^{-11} m/s^2.

  5. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations – the Southern Study Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Manobianco, John; Schroeder, John; Ancell, Brian; Brewster, Keith; Basu, Sukanta; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Flores, Isabel

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report presents a comprehensive description, findings, and conclusions for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)--Southern Study Area (SSA) work led by AWS Truepower (AWST). This multi-year effort, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), focused on improving short-term (15-minute – 6 hour) wind power production forecasts through the deployment of an enhanced observation network of surface and remote sensing instrumentation and the use of a state-of-the-art forecast modeling system. Key findings from the SSA modeling and forecast effort include: 1. The AWST WFIP modeling system produced an overall 10 – 20% improvement in wind power production forecasts over the existing Baseline system, especially during the first three forecast hours; 2. Improvements in ramp forecast skill, particularly for larger up and down ramps; 3. The AWST WFIP data denial experiments showed mixed results in the forecasts incorporating the experimental network instrumentation; however, ramp forecasts showed significant benefit from the additional observations, indicating that the enhanced observations were key to the model systems’ ability to capture phenomena responsible for producing large short-term excursions in power production; 4. The OU CAPS ARPS simulations showed that the additional WFIP instrument data had a small impact on their 3-km forecasts that lasted for the first 5-6 hours, and increasing the vertical model resolution in the boundary layer had a greater impact, also in the first 5 hours; and 5. The TTU simulations were inconclusive as to which assimilation scheme (3DVAR versus EnKF) provided better forecasts, and the additional observations resulted in some improvement to the forecasts in the first 1 – 3 hours.

  6. The Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey II: Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies - Strong Luminosity Dependent Bias at z=4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Allen; Leonidas A. Moustakas; Gavin Dalton; Emily MacDonald; Chris Blake; Lee Clewley; Catherine Heymans; Gary Wegner

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the clustering properties of bright ($L>L_{*}$) z$\\sim$4 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey (ODT). We describe techniques used to select and evaluate our candidates and calculate the angular correlation function which we find best fitted by a power law, $\\omega(\\theta)=A_{w}\\theta^{-\\beta}$ with $A_{w}=15.4$ (with $\\theta$ in arcseconds), using a constrained slope of $\\beta=0.8$. Using a redshift distribution consistent with photometric models, we deproject this correlation function and find a comoving $r_{0}=11.4_{-1.9}^{+1.7}$ h$_{100}^{-1}$ Mpc in a $\\Omega_m=0.3$ flat $\\Lambda$ cosmology for $i_{AB}\\leq24.5$. This corresponds to a linear bias value of $b=8.1_{-2.6}^{+2.0}$ (assuming $\\sigma_{8}=0.9$). These data show a significantly larger $r_{0}$ and $b$ than previous studies at $z\\sim4$. We interpret this as evidence that the brightest LBGs have a larger bias than fainter ones, indicating a strong luminosity dependence for the measured bias of an LBG sample. Comparing this against recent results in the literature at fainter (sub-$L_{*}$) limiting magnitudes, and with simple models describing the relationship between LBGs and dark matter haloes, we discuss the implications on the implied environments and nature of LBGs. It seems that the brightest LBGs (in contrast with the majority sub-$L_{*}$ population), have clustering properties, and host dark matter halo masses, that are consistent with them being progenitors of the most massive galaxies today.

  7. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  8. Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. 1. Intermediates and mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeff, I. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem, Israel); Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

    1983-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The photochemistry of aqueous 9,10-anthranquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) was investigated by using four different approaches: (1) laser photolysis of AWS in water as a function of concentration and pH; (2) laser photolysis of AQS in CH/sub 3/CN and CH/sub 3/CN/H/sub 2/O mixtures, combined with emission spectroscopy; (3) steady-state photolytic study of the effect of AQS concentration and pH on the yield of photohydroxylation in water; (4) quenching of intermediates in inhibition of photohydroxylation by inorganic anions. Our results lead to identification of triplet AQS (tau approx. 100 ns in water) and two other intermediates (B and C) which are formed by two parallel reactions of triplet AQS with H/sub 2/O. The nature of these intermediates is still uncertain, but evidence is presented to rule out H abstraction or net electron transfer (even in the case of OH/sup -/) leading to formation of free OH radicals. The possibility that B and C are two different water adducts is discussed. The role of referential solvation of AQS in CH/sub 3/CH/H/sub 2/O mixures in determining its photochemistry is also examined. Species C (lambda/sub max/ approx. 600 nm) is the only transient observed which appears to react with ground-state AQS, and this reaction is considered to be responsible for photohydroxylation. Our results provide direct evidence for the validity of the ''/sup 3/AQS/H/sub 2/O'' mechanism proposed by Clark and Stonehill (CS), in which the primary step is reaction of /sup 3/AQS with water (and not with ground-state AQS) to produce the hydoxylation agent. However, this mechanism is modified for pHgreater than or equal to11 by proposing another hydroxylating agent which may be AQS/sup -/.OH exciplex (or radical pair) produced by charge-transfer (CT) quenching of /sup 3/AQS by OH/sup -/. Evidence is presented to establish the charge-transfer nature of quenching of triplet AQS by various anions including OH/sup -/.

  9. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fangwei Fu

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the transient eddy currents in a conductive plate. The crack response is found using the reciprocity theorem. Good agreement is observed between the predictions of the magnetic field due to the crack and experimental measurements.

  10. Underlying event studies at ATLAS and CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, D.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding and modeling of the underlying event in high energy collider environment is important for more precise measurements at the LHC. CDF Run II data for the underlying event associated with Drell-Yan lepton pair production and early ATLAS data measuring underlying event activity with respect to the leading transverse momentum track are presented. The data are compared with several QCD Monte Carlo models. It is seen that no current standard Monte Carlo tune adequately describes all the early ATLAS data and CDF data simultaneously. The underlying event observables presented here are particularly important for constraining the energy evolution of multiple parton interaction models. One of the goals of these analyses is to provide data that can be used to test and improve MC models for current and future physics studies at the LHC. The underlying event observables presented here are particularly important for constraining the energy evolution of multiple partonic interaction models, since the plateau heights of the underlying event profiles are highly correlated to multiple parton interaction activity. The data at 7 TeV are crucial for MC tuning, since measurements are needed with at least two energies to constrain the energy evolution of MPI activity. PYTHIA tune A and tune AW do a good job in describing the CDF data on the underlying-event observables for leading jet and Drell-Yan events, respectively, although the agreement between predictions and data is not perfect. The leading-jet data show slightly more activity in the underlying event than PYTHIA Tune A, although they are very similar - which may indicate the universality of underlying event modeling. However, all pre-LHC MC models predict less activity in the transverse region (i.e in the underlying event) than is actually observed in ATLAS leading track data, for both center-of-mass energies. There is therefore no current standard MC tune which adequately describes all the early ATLAS data. However, using diffraction-limited minimum bias distributions and the plateau of the underlying event distributions presented here, ATLAS has developed a new PYTHIA tune AMBT1 (ATLAS Minimum Bias Tune 1) and a new HERWIG+ JIMMY tune AUET1 (ATLAS Underlying Event Tune 1) which model the p{sub T} and charged multiplicity spectra significantly better than the pre-LHC tunes of those generators. It is critical to have sensible underlying event models containing our best physical knowledge and intuition, tuned to all relevant available data.

  11. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.

  12. Experimental Study of W Z Intermediate Bosons Associated Production with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pozzobon, Nicola; /Pisa U.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying WZ associated production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is of great importance for two main reasons. On the one hand, this process would be sensitive to anomalies in the triple gauge couplings such that any deviation from the value predicted by the Standard Model would be indicative of new physics. In addition, by choosing to focus on the final state where the Z boson decays to b{bar b} pairs, the event topology would be the same as expected for associated production of a W and a Standard Model light Higgs boson (m{sub H} {approx}< 135 GeV) which decays into b{bar b} pairs most of times. The process WH {yields} W b{bar b} has an expected {sigma} {center_dot} B about five times lower than WZ {yields} Wb{bar b} for m{sub H} {approx_equal} 120 GeV. Therefore, observing this process would be a benchmark for an even more difficult search aiming at discovering the light Higgs in the WH {yields} Wb{bar b} process. After so many years of Tevatron operation only a weak WZ signal was recently observed in the full leptonic decay channel, which suffers from much less competition from background. Searching for the Z in the b{bar b} decay channel in this process is clearly a very challenging endeavour. In the work described in this thesis, WZ production is searched for in a final state where the W decays leptonically to an electron-neutrino pair or a muon-neutrino pair, with associated production of a jet pair consistent with Z decays. A set of candidate events is obtained by applying appropriate cuts to the parameters of events collected by wide acceptance leptonic triggers. To improve the signal fraction of the selected events, an algorithm was used to tag b-flavored jets by means of their content of long lived b-hadrons and corrections were developed to the jet algorithm to improve the b-jet energy resolution for a better reconstruction of the Z mass. In order to sense the presence of a signal one needs to estimate the amount of background. The relative content of heavy flavor jets in the dominant W+multijet background is assumed as predicted by theory. This technique was originally developed in CDF to measure the t{bar t} production cross section in the final state with W + 3 or more jets. This thesis was conceived as the first attempt within CDF to apply a customized version of it to look for evidence of diboson production in the final state with aW and two jets. Extracting the signal in this channel is very hard since with such a small number of jets the background is two orders of magnitude greater than the signal. Moreover, since the signal to background ratio is very small, the expected sensitivity depends critically on the theoretical uncertainties on the amount of background. While work is in progress to understand this background more reliably, this analysis provides an estimate of the achievable upper limit on the WZ production cross section.

  13. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-GeneratedElectricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this paper, we use wind speed data from three different sources to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwestern United States. By ''value'', we refer to either the contribution of wind power to meeting the electric system's peak loads, or the financial value of wind power in electricity markets. Sites for wind power projects are often screened or compared based on the annual average power production that would be expected from wind turbines at each site (Baban and Parry 2001; Brower et al. 2004; Jangamshetti and Rau 2001; Nielsen et al. 2002; Roy 2002; Schwartz 1999). However, at many locations, variations in wind speeds during the day and year are correlated with variations in the electric power system's load and wholesale market prices (Burton et al. 2001; Carlin 1983; Kennedy and Rogers 2003; Man Bae and Devine 1978; Sezgen et al. 1998); this correlation may raise or lower the value of wind power generated at each location. A number of previous reports address this issue somewhat indirectly by studying the contribution of individual wind power sites to the reliability or economic operation of the electric grid, using hourly wind speed data (Fleten et al.; Kahn 1991; Kirby et al. 2003; Milligan 2002; van Wijk et al. 1992). However, we have not identified any previous study that examines the effect of variations in wind timing across a broad geographical area on wholesale market value or capacity contribution of those different wind power sites. We have done so, to determine whether it is important to consider wind-timing when planning wind power development, and to try to identify locations where timing would have a more positive or negative effect. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in California and the Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming) with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. We also assess whether modeled wind data from TrueWind Solutions, LLC, can help answer such questions, by comparing results found using the TrueWind data to those found using anemometers or wind farm power production data. This paper summarizes results that are presented in more detail in a recent report from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Fripp and Wiser 2006). The full report is available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/re-pubs.html.